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the deli

the magazine about emerging nyc bands

FREE in NYC $2 in the USA

Issue #38 Volume #2 Spring 2014

www.thedelimagazine.com

wyldlife The Can’t Tells EMEFE celestial shore Blank Paper Spirit Animal twintapes NGHBRS NIIA Icewater Late Cambrian weyes blood

Such Hounds Leverage Models Hey Anna wolvves Emily King steel phantoms LODRO

big ups Live at Silent Barn on 6/12/14

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

wet

whiskey bitches


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the deli

the magazine aboutthe emerging nyc scene bands everything about nyc music Issue #38 Volume #2 Spring 2014

Paolo De Gregorio Charles Newman Executive Editor: Quang D. Tran Art Director / Designer: Kaz Yabe (www.kazyabe.com) Cover Photo: Ben Carey Illustrations: Michael Sincavage (of Low Fat Getting High) Web Developers: Mark Lewis Alex Borsody mike levine Staff Writers: Bill Dvorak Dean Van Nguyen Dave Cromwell Mike Levine Brian Chidester BrokeMC Bianca Seidman Kenneth Partridge In-House Contributing Writers: Corinne Bagish Francesca Baker Michael Haskoor Sam Kogon Joe Fish jp basileo ben krieger paul jordan talbot brescia mascheretti The Kitchen: Gus Green Eric Werner Intern: Sammie Spektor Christine Cauthen Publishers: The Deli Magazine LLC / Mother West, NYC Editor In Chief: Founder:

Note from the Editor Deli Readers, Our spring issue is always one of the most “coveted,” since it features all the bands that made it into our Year End Poll, and it also works as a promotional vehicle for our NYC B.E.A.F. (Best of Emerging Artists Fest), which hosts performances by 42 NYC-based artists - almost all of them featured in this issue. Speaking of which, we are happy to announce that our little fest this year will be part of the Northside Festival!

DELI CHARTS RE-HAUL!

Regarding the issue in your hands, it’s the most comprehensive list of talented emerging NYC artists you can get. (They were picked by the jurors on page 10 and by our editors.) If you want a constantly updated, more comprehensive list, you can find it in our online charts, organized by genre and region, which have gone through a complete redesign that is bound to blow your mind. New features include: fame filter (so that you can selectively browse through emerging, unknown or established artists for example), an aggregating player that gathers Soundcloud, Bandcamp and YouTube material from each band and... a star system that lets you highlight the bands you like and - therefore - create lists of them organizable by genre and region! Check them out at: thedelimag.com/charts. -Paolo De Gregorio P.S. Also, big news on the other page on this spread...

The Deli Magazine is a trademark of The Deli Magazine, LLC, Brooklyn & Mother West, NYC. All contents ©2014 The Deli Magazine. All rights reserved.

The Deli’s NYC B.E.A.F 2014 (Best of Emerging Artists Fest)

6/12 - 6/15

@ Northside,

Brooklyn

See p.29 & 30 for schedule !

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014 For artist links: thedelimag.com/nyc2014

1. Big Ups 2. Celestial Shore 3. Wet 4. The Whiskey Bitches 5. The Can’t Tells 6. EMEFE 7. Dough Rollers 8. NGHBRS 9. Wyldlife 10. Spirit Animal 11. Blank Paper 12. Hey Anna 13. Zula 14. Hunters 15. Drowners 16. Dear Georgiana 17. Late Cambrian 17. Pushmethod 19. Tall Tall Trees 20. Twintapes 21. oddlogic 22. Bridget Davis + the Viking Kings 23. Belle Mare 24. Steel Phantoms 25. Poor Remy 26. Butter The Children 27. Half Waif 28. Spires 29. YC the Cynic 30. denitia and sene 30. MisterWives 32. Emily King 32. Nude Beach 34. Weyes Blood

35. Life Size Maps 35. LODRO 35. Mutual Benefit 35. Shark? 35. Tropic of Pisces 35. Zongo Junction 41. Daytona 42. Psychic Twin 43. After the Smoke 44. Dots Will Echo 44. Hess is More 44. PRE WAR 44. Storyman 44. Such Hounds 44. Wilsen 50. Empress Of 50. I/O 52. Active Bird Community 53. Kodacrome 54. The Lovehowl 55. Stargazy 56. Suzanna Choffel 57. WOLVVES 58. Julie Outrage 59. Leverage Models 60. Boytoy 60. Phoebe Novak 62. The Above 63. Piers (ex gondola) 63. Ski Lodge 65. Great Caesar 66. Julia Easterlin 67. Threats 67. Weird Womb 69. Brothertiger

70. Chumped 70. Glass Gang 72. Brazos 72. ICEWATER 72. LIPS 72. Streets of Laredo 72. YVETTE 77. No Shoes 78. Brooms 79. Seasick Mama 80. Haybaby 81. Johanna Warren 82. Golden Animals 82. Graph Rabbit 84. Maginot 85. Lost Boy? 86. BODEGA BAY 87. Christine Hoberg 88. Low Fat Getting High 89. Cannonball Statman 90. Nicholas Nicholas 91. Flagland 92. Astr 93. Cakes da KillA 94. Cassandra Jenkins 94. Empty Chairs 94. King Charles the Martyr 97. Ejecta 97. Greg Banks 97. Motive 97. Rilgood 101. Cardiknox 101. Niia 101. Space Meow


Fresh Buzz

baked

In February, we blogged about mysterious new Brooklyn band, Mother. Their first addictive single ‘Easy,’ a dark, percussive alt-soul midtempo gem, gained over 86k plays on Soundcloud in 10 days, followed in March 2014 by their second, even slower single ‘Victim,’ premiered via Stereogum, shortly after the band played their first ever show to a sold out crowd at Pianos. Mother’s live show exceeded our expectations. Frontman Penn Badgley’s voice shines through their set with a captivating, soulful quality and the polished super-band behind him perfectly captured the distinctive, edgy sound of their first two singles. The set was packed with catchy, experimental, moody songs that bode well for a full-length that should see the light at some point this year. (brescia mascheretti)

mother

the Deli’s

We wonder if - when marijuana will be fully legalized in the US psych rock and its derivatives will be as popular among young NYC musicians as they are now. A band that chooses to name itself Baked must be contributing heavily to this (alleged) record - not only through heavy (alleged) personal consumption, but also through the creation of music that pretty much begs for an audience with altered states of mind. Thing is - the guys are so good at it that (thanks to a spring tour supporting NJ rockers Titus Andronicus) they’ll soon get the opportunity to spread their whiffy vibes through states probably not ready for this, like North Carolina and West Virginia. NJ-based duo Donovan Blanc is the latest addition to Brooklyn label Captured Tracks’ admirable roster. The single ‘Minha Menina,’ which precedes a full-length scheduled for June, showcases chilled thoughtfulness à la Real Estate. A slightly baroque style consisting of a subtle jazz influence in the arrangements (this track at times takes us back to Joni Mitchell’s ‘Hejira’) and sophisticated melodies that - rather than hitting you on the first listen - grow on you over time.

donovan blanc

02

01

rec rds of the m nth 03

PASSENGER PERU Self-Titled

Most artists, who call themselves sound designers, usually go about it in the most serious ways imaginable (think Eno or Peter Gabriel). Not so with Passenger Peru - these Brooklyn-based sound sculptors use everything from train noises and bird tweets (‘Tiger Lily’) to cult preachers talking backwards (at least that’s what it sounds like to us in ‘Heavy Drugs’), and end up with a quality record celebrating planet Earth but without ever forgetting to serve up fun old indie rock while at it. (Mike Levine)

01 - Cloud Becomes Your Hand Rocks or Cakes 02 - Frankie Cosmos Zentropy 03 - Passenger Peru Self-Titled

FRANKIE COSMOS

CLOUD BECOMES YOUR HAND

If you like unassuming, short and charming pop songs about high school, firemen and buses, look no further than 19-year-old singersongwriter Frankie Cosmos. In her just released first full-length “Zentropy” (though she’s put out at least 40 other digital records over the years!), Greta Kline reveals much of her inner child, whether singing about what her dad is up to or how birthdays don’t mean you’re getting older. Songs like ‘Birthday,’ showcase a melodic talent that’s not afraid to experiment with tempo changes and assorted influences, without losing its signature, intimate style. (Mike Levine)

Psychedelia is often associated with big guitar parts, lots of reverb, and a sound that’s at once surreal and epic. But there’s a less grandiose, more playful current of psychedelia, more interested in the bizarrely kaleidoscopic side of dreaming. This is the sonic ground where Brooklyn’s Cloud Becomes Your Hand draws inspiration, adding to the mix their penchant for crooked, almost jazzy melodies, which place them on similar songwriting terrain as other heavily experimental but gentle sounding NYC bands like Dirty Projectors and Celestial Shore.

Zentropy

Rocks or Cakes


state of the scene

Don't Fear the Repeat

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the deli Spring 2014


Why the Rise of Revivalism in the NYC Scene Bodes Well for the Future By The Deli Editors / illustrations by Michael Sincavage

W

hen a person can’t sleep, he or she has plenty of time to think. Sometimes, that leads to epiphanies and revelations: brilliant ideas for a better tomorrow. It’s best to keep a notepad on the bedside table for this very reason.

the Ramones, Afrika Bambaata, The Cramps, Kid Creole, Kid Congo, Grandmaster Flash, Talking Heads, James Chance, Lydia Lunch, the Beastie Boys, Madonna, Sonic Youth, Erik B & Rakim, Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam, A Tribe Called Quest, the Wu-Tang Clan, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, TV on the Radio, De La Soul, Dirty Projectors, and a millionjillion more besides.

Other times, insomnia fosters obsessive recollections of past events - that great Saturday you spent with your dog at the park or the totally bullshit meeting your boss called you into this morning. It’s a crapshoot when you can’t close your eyes.

The list of genre-blurring NYC game-changers is crazy-stupid long, and it’s only going to get longer, but at the moment, it’s not growing as fast as it used to.

The same is true on a macro level here in our beloved City That Never Sleeps - especially when it comes to the underground music scene. In this town, you can’t knock the hustle, and creators never stop creating. Unlike, say, Boston, the trains run all night, and fueled by booze and bodega coffee, we can’t s top and won’t stop. You sleep when you’re dead - or when you get to your day job on Monday morning. Historically, this collective restlessness has spawned some of the greatest rock, pop, soul, disco and hip-hop music ever recorded. Before The Velvet Underground, no one thought to write pop songs about shooting heroin, and until Suicide came along in the early ‘70s, drum machines and synthesizers were for guys in white lab coats, not grimy punks willing to dodge bottles in order to follow their muse. And then there’s Blondie, DJ Kool Herc, Television,

The city is still churning out tremendous singers, songwriters, bands, MCs, beatmakers, producers and instrumentalists of all types, but a quick survey of the local scene suggests there are fewer truly unclassifiable new artists crisscrossing the five boroughs than there were five or 10 years ago. So far, the big story of this decade has been revivalism, or the resurrection of specific genres with set sounds and corresponding looks and aesthetics. Whether we’re talking bluegrass or grunge, NYC musicians have it bad for that which came before. Admittedly, this is a broad assertion, but here at The Deli, we’ve spent the last few years publishing a series of genre-focused articles on topics like the soul resurgence, the new breed of electro artists, and that tidal wave of surf-influenced music that came pouring out of the lo-fi, garage and psych scenes. Exactly one year ago, in our previous “state of the scene” feature, we focused on folk music, and it was then that we first used the word “revival.” Maybe it was because many of

the deli Spring 2014

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state of the scene the artists involved in the neo-folk movement seemed primarily interested in recreating strains of traditional Americana - not in using them as ingredients in fresh new sounds. Up until then, rock and pop in the new millennium had been all about the smushing and smashing of disparate genres - a trend that, in retrospect, may have reached its zenith with bands like Animal Collective and tUnE-yArDs. In that folk article, we argued that artists like Spirit Family Reunion (who graced the cover of that issue) and The Lone Bellows could be seen as reactions to the hyper-busy, super-kaleidoscopic sounds of ‘00s indie rock. In their ’30s-style hats and overalls, the new folkies promised a return to simplicity and purity, and the phenomenon didn’t only apply to folk and country. To wit: Many consider Foxygen, winners of our 2013 NYC Year End Poll, as merely a ’60s/’70s revival band, what with all of those references to Bowie, the Stones, and Roxy Music. Indeed, the NYC scene is experiencing what sports commentators would call a “rebuilding season,” or at the very least - a time of transition and change. If it’s disappointing to some, it’s also pretty exciting. We’re witnessing the planting of the seeds that will grow into the next major trends in rock, pop and electronic music. Right now, we may have a lot of artists that sound like The Smiths or Nirvana or even the Almanac Singers, but it’s likely these influences will shape whatever strange hybrid noises come blasting out of shitty practice spaces in whatever dodgy neighborhoods are next to be gentrified. Also, originality - such that it can even be said to exist - is important, but it isn’t everything. Generally speaking, songs comprise four parts: songwriting (chords structure + melody), arrangement (instrumentation + instrumental parts), performance and lyrics. The characteristics of each component reveal what genre or genres are being referenced, but most mature music listeners agree that great songs are enjoyable regardless of style. What’s more, a talented performer can turn even a mediocre song into something riveting and touching. So while originality is something

The Deli’s latest genre-related Features AVANT-GARDE

The Sporting Life by Valerie Kuehne

http://bit.ly/nyc-avant-garde

AFROBEAT

From Afrobeat to Brooklyn’s Freaks by Mike Levine

http://bit.ly/nyc-afrobeat

DIY

Generation DIY

by Lauren Piper & Paolo De Gregorio

http://bit.ly/nyc-diy

FOLK

Folk Comes Home by Mike Levine

http://bit.ly/nyc-folk

ELECTRO

We’re Still The Robots by Brian Chidester

http://bit.ly/nyc-electro

HIP HOP

Brooklyn Roars by Broke MC

http://bit.ly/nyc-hip-hop

PSYCH

A Psychedelic Apple by Dean Van Nguyen

http://bit.ly/1g3LYbI

SOUL

Bring It on Home to Me by Brian Chidester

http://bit.ly/nyc-soul

SURF ROCK

Surfin’ NYC - a new wave of surf rock by Mike Levine

http://bit.ly/nyc-surf 10

the deli Spring 2014


state of the scene everybody in the music industry professes to value very deeply, it ain’t worth squat unless good songwriting and performance are part of the package. The latter is particularly important, since record sales have dried up, leaving live shows as one of the few remaining avenues for underground musicians to actually make a buck. It’s also worth noting that revivalism is part of any artistic cycle. It’s like classicism in art - a recurrent wave that always returns after periods of wild expressionist experimentation - or the realism and neo-realism movements in literature, which bring back to earth the daydreaming tendencies of romantics. Revivalism is about going back to the basics, and in music, depending on your genre of choice, that can run the gamut from raw punk energy to studied virtuosity. Love it or hate it, revivalism is not wrong. It’s a kind of rebirth. After all, if playing other people’s songs is what makes true artists out of amateurs, it’s both valid and useful. It brings the focus back to songwriting and energy, which are arguably the most important components of any song. When, say, Weird Womb plug in and unleash their post-hardcore fury, their passion is infectious, and their songs work. These are not copycats - they’re dudes who love the music they’re playing, and in time, they may branch off in new directions. Or they might not. As long as they keep making records as rad as that “Ruined by the ’90s” 7-inch, does anyone really care? Ditto neo-grungsters Slothrust and the similarly ’90s-repping Aye Nako - two of the many young bands excavating the ruins of “Alternative

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the deli Spring 2014

Nation.” Were these kids even alive when “120 Minutes” was on the first time around? Probably not, but hey, sultry songstress Emily King wasn’t around when her soul and R&B heroes were making their greatest records, and all of those strumming beardos doing the Americana thing down at Rockwood Music Hall are at least two generations removed from the music they’re so gosh-darn golly-gee smitten for. Also worth mentioning: those Springsteen-loving scruff-rockers in Nude Beach, the straight-up punk chicks behind Whiskey Bitches, and those doo-woppin’ derelict rockabilly cats from Jeremy and the Harlequins. And what about all the vintage thrash bands and old-school hip-hop crews holding it down for their respective genres? The best of today’s revivalists aren’t treating us to tomorrow’s buzzworthy sounds, but on some level, wouldn’t you rather hear Sharon Jones sing her heart out than watch some malnourished kid with a laptop make glitchy chip-step techno-core? No matter how you answered that last question, you’re in luck. The NYC scene will never stop changing, but it will never completely reset itself and start from zero. There’d be too much to lose. In 40 years, when - god willing - The Deli celebrates its 50th anniversary, there will still be bands in biker jackets aping the Ramones, and they’ll share rehearsal rooms with metalheads, coffeehouse folkies, shoegazers, and kids doing things on tablets we’ve yet to imagine. The best stuff will still get heard, and some of it will blow your mind. That’s the promise of New York City - the dream we’d all dream if only we could get some shuteye. d


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

#1

big ups

These jurors helped us pick the bands in this issue:

Photo: ben

carey

RIYL: Fugazi, Fucked Up, Celibate Rifles

Alex Rossiter (Webster Hall), Alice Grandoit, (Red Bull Sound Select), Andy Bodor (Cake Shop), Ben Krieger (Sidewalk Cafe), Billy Jones (Baby’s All Right), Bowery Electric Booking peeps, Samantha Cox (BMI), Derek Evers (Impose Mag), Eric Berrebbi (Arlene’s Booking), Eric Weiner (The Wild Honey Pie), Heath Miller (Excess dB Entertainment), Jacob Moyers (Cameo), Lauren Beck (The L Mag), Lucas Sacks (Brooklyn Bowl), Matt McDonald (CMJ), Matt Ushkow (Bowery Presents), Max Brennan (Lit), Paolo De Gregorio (The Deli), Patrick McNamara (OhMyRockness), Rami Haykal (Pop Gun Presents), Richard Sloven (Knitting Factory), Steve Trimboli (Goodbye Blue Monday), Steven King (The Rock Shop), Steven Matrick (Pianos), The Delancey’s Booking peeps, Todd Abramson (Union Hall), Zack Dinerstein (Spike Hill) and a few more who asked not to be listed.


J

am bands, improvisational music classes and Philip Glass’ five-hour opera “Einstein on the Beach” are just a few of the unexpected influences cited by Brooklyn punk outfit Big Ups. In fact, the band - known for chaotic live performances and a sound that recalls classic ’80s hardcore and ’90s post-hardcore - are not hesitant to admit that some of them used to listen to Phish or that they don’t really consider themselves a punk band. “The ‘punk’ tag probably won’t even apply soon,” frontman Joe Galarraga tells The Deli. “Many of the new songs we’ve been working on are a lot slower.”

bers of the band have also listened to jazz and even jam bands (“We were all in jam bands before this!” - Lal jokes), and it’s the amalgamation of these influences and the band’s interest in experimental music that keeps their songs varied and replete with unexpected turns. It also helps that they all share an appreciation for a good hook. “I guess I’m naturally attracted to aggressive music, but aggressive music that’s accessible,” Galarraga says. When asked if the band would ever move in a jazz-influenced direction, Lal exclaims, “Anything is possible! Our next record could be ‘Big Ups II: A Jazz Odyssey.’”

Despite these admissions, Big Ups are at the forefront of a rising group of Brooklyn bands eschewing lo-fi pop, shoegaze or electro for something heavier and more direct. Like their peers and friends in Low Fat Getting High, Flagland and Vulture Shit, Big Ups’ earnest and aggressive songs stand out in a scene that leans toward irreverent pop music. Since releasing their debut LP, “Eighteen Hours of Static,” on Dead Labour in January, Big Ups have become one of Brooklyn’s most-talked about acts, winning praise from critics, touring with buzzy indie acts like Speedy Ortiz and Pile, and even picking up an international following in the process (they embark on their second UK tour in May).

As a frontman, Galarraga was inspired by bands from his hometown scene of Baltimore. He first began to appreciate simple, melodic songs through indie-pop band SMARTS, and his manic stage presence was influenced by the post-punk antics of Double Dagger and the theatrical moves of Future Islands frontman Sam Herring. “I’m just drawn to front people who give it their all. I don’t want to be a singer just standing there, that’s not entertaining. I want to see someone as exciting as David Yow (of The Jesus Lizard). I really try to be an active front person.”

On “Eighteen Hours of Static,” Big Ups seamlessly transition from the breakneck speed and socially aware bark of Dischord Records bands like Minor Threat and Government Issue to the dissonant, sludgy punk of later-era Black Flag or the groovy, intricate rhythmic exercises of Fugazi. Occasionally, Big Ups even channel the pummeling noise rock of Touch & Go bands like The Jesus Lizard and Shellac, or more recent groups like Pissed Jeans and Raspberry Bulbs. Throughout, Galarraga’s lyrics take on everything from consumer culture to organized religion and existential dread, and in the live setting, he’s the star of the show - writhing around and climbing on everything in sight like a young Iggy Pop or a less-macho Henry Rollins. The members of Big Ups met while studying music tech at NYU, and Galarraga, guitarist Amar Lal and drummer Brendan Finn first played together as members of an instrumental surf band named Aaron and the Burrs. “It was stuff that sounded like the Ventures or the Majestics,” Galarraga recalls, “fun, innocuous music.” The courses at NYU taught them about recording techniques and experimental music, which they would later apply to Big Ups. “It was throwing out the window a lot of what we thought we knew about music,” Galarraga explains. “Those courses helped us develop our sound a bit - like the sort of non-musical, feedback stuff Amar does on guitar.” When Aaron and the Burrs ended, Galarraga, Lal and Finn asked classmate Carlos Salguero, Jr. to play bass in their new band, Big Ups. While the initial material consisted of tongue-in-cheek pop-punk songs about high-fives and pizza (‘Down 4 Pizza,’ for example), it wasn’t long before the band decided to get serious. “It was a dead end,” Galarraga recalls about the early material. “We could have kept writing songs in that vein, but there was no point. We had been playing out a lot, seeing new bands, and realized we had sort of been pigeonholed.” Big Ups shifted their approach to songwriting, opting for a more collaborative effort that found the band jamming until something interesting materialized. “‘Fresh Meat’ was the first weird song we wrote, and it just sort of happened by accident, just jamming on a part Carlos came up with,” Lal says. Galarraga’s lyrics soon adapted to the darker, more mature sound, taking on a somber worldview that had previously been absent. “The lyrics became a mix of the political and social, or anything worth talking about,” Galarraga observes. “Anything that was interesting enough and that I could complete within a two and a half minute song!” While Galarraga and Lal grew up listening to punk, all four mem-

Currently, while Big Ups have new material in the works, they’re predominantly focused on touring behind their album, and are eagerly anticipating their next stint on the road. “We want to play anywhere where people are open-minded and ready to see something they’ve never seen before,” Galarraga says. “We would love to tour in bumfuck nowhere if it was a blast and we made enough for gas!” When asked if they think they would fit in with the New York City punk scene and specifically among the hardcore bands that played the New York’s Alright festival in April, Galarraga acknowledges that “we’re not really part of the New York punk scene, but we would like to play that scene. There’s a few NYC hardcore bands that I really like. I recently bought a Warthog seven-inch. I pay attention to that scene, but Big Ups play the indie scene, and we’re fine with that.” Finn puts it simply, stating “we just want to play with any bands that play good music.” Although Big Ups are aware that the handful of bands they play with represent a heavier side of the Brooklyn indie scene, like their aforementioned friends in Flagland (who they say they’ve played at least 40 shows with), the band members claim that this happened organically. “We just want to see and play with bands that are more exciting and energetic and don’t seem pretentious,” Galarraga says. “When I see a band that clearly has a connection, playing honest music, and I can sense it, that’s what I’m drawn to.” (bill dvorak)

Artist Equipment Box

Fulltone OCD

Boss DS-1

Electro-Harmonix Big Muff π

MXR Ten Band EQ

“I use mostly tone-shaping pedals to get differently aggressive sounds - a Fulltone OCD, a Boss DS-1, an EHX NYC Big Muff Pi re-issue, and an MXR 10-band EQ (in that order) are my go-tos, each for different sonic reasons. Also, when you step on all of them at the same time it gets really loud, so that’s cool too.”

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

Photo: josh

goleman

#2 celestial shore F

eatured on the cover of this mag’s summer 2013 issue, Celestial Shore is a band that - at this stage of their career - chooses to clip its own wings for the sake of doing what they want to do, which is experimenting. But in doing so, they produce the kind of music we want NYC bands to make: adventurous, even quirky at times, but without compromising quality on the songwriting side of things. This being said, Celestial Shore’s songwriting is so good that sometimes we are tempted to think they should tame the craziness and let us enjoy those gorgeous melodies without interferences... We noticed the trio back in 2011, when they released debut EP “California Eden,” where stunning opener ‘Pals’ already displayed the band’s schizophrenic dual identity: angelic pop melodies, often flawlessly sung in three-way harmonies, get interrupted and also a little bit raped, if you wish, by nerdy explosions of the most radical math rock, which sound approximately like something in between later King Crimson and the less rabid Naked City tracks. Also, rather than serving 2-3 reiterations of the song’s exquisite verse/chorus sequence - like any normal band would do - the trio opts instead to follow it with an instrumental, superangular closing, therefore creating an unusual, mind-boggling and hilarioulsy infuriating A-B-C song structure. Since that debut, the group has been constantly delivering solid tunes, always impressing us with their incredbily beautiful, haunting, never banal melodies. 2013 saw the release of their debut album “10x,” which featured their most accomplished single so far. ‘Valerie’ is the song where the band’s two identities are reconciled and support each other - rather than fighting against each other. Of course, Pitchfork didn’t get it - they didn’t get Buke and Gase either - but Deerhoof, after Greg Saunier mixed their album, did, and took them on tour around the US earlier this year. Now, that’s a match.

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RIYL: Deerhoof, Dirty Projectors, Beach Boys


WE’VE TAKEN DIGITAL WIRELESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL . . .

THE FLOOR

SYSTEM

STOMPBOX

DIGITAL 2.4 GHz HIGH-F IDELITY WIRELESS Combining advanced 24-bit, field-proven performance, easy setup and clear, natural sound quality, our System 10 Stompbox delivers the ultimate wireless experience. With the tap of a foot on the rugged, metal Stompbox receiver, guitarists can toggle between dual ¼” balanced outputs or mute one output without affecting the other. And, since the System operates in the 2.4 GHz range, it’s free from TV and DTV interference. You can also pair multiple UniPak® body-pack transmitters with a single receiver to easily change guitars. So go ahead, give it a try – we think you’ll be floored. audio-technica.com


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

#3 wet

RIYL: MS MR, Lo-Fang, Broods

F

or a band with just a handful of compositions to their name, Wet have very quickly untangled themselves from the myriad of NYC-based artists, standing alone as a true original in the eternally ample scene. Arriving with a fully-formed sound and with the backing of the always inventive Neon Gold label, the Brooklyn trio has already sectioned itself off a sizeable following, charming the ear of listeners with its sparse, soulful and seductive sound.

Wet are Kelly Zutrau, Joe Valle, and Marty Sulkow - Massachusetts natives drawn together in New York through university and other musical projects. “We all met in college just through mutual friends,” Zutrau told “Interview” magazine. “Marty and Joe went to NYU, and I went to Cooper Union, and we all started playing music together in a different band, and we kind of kept that going.” As well as lead singer, Zutrau writes the lyrics and melodies on each track, leaving the biggest imprint on the Wet sound. According to “Billboard,” her formative years were spent listening to nineties commercial chart R&B artists like TLC, Destiny’s Child, Usher and SWV, later turning her attention to indie folk 18

the deli Spring 2014

acts Joanna Newsom and Cat Power. This musical education is apparent in the band’s work - a concoction of expressive R&B vocals with a minimalist aesthetic that mirrors Cat Power’s 1998 classic “Moon Pix” most of all. Given this distinctive styling, it’s perhaps unsurprising that the band sees little in the Brooklyn music scene right now that they feel binds them to it. “There are a million bands here, and everyone seems to be doing their own thing. I guess what I’m saying is that I feel our music has no affiliation with Brooklyn in any real way, we just happen to live here,” Zutrau asserted to “Interview.” To my ear, the most apt comparisons are probably with London’s Jessie Ware and The xx. Like their work, Wet’s self-titled debut EP - released last October - is a fine example of no wasted motion. ‘Dreams,’ for example, is built primarily on a skittish drum beat while carefully plucked guitar lines and synth stabs gracefully work their way in and out. Elsewhere, the pretty ‘Don’t Wanna Be Your Girl’ and mournful, midnight blue ballad ‘No Lie’ seemingly plays with even fewer elements, allowing Zutrau’s vocals to take front and center. (dean van nguyen)


Small, 3-string guitars.

loogguitars.com

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

#4

whiskey bitches

S

ince forming at the beginning of 2013, Bushwick Brooklynbased Whiskey Bitches have released a mini two-track EP entitled “Wasted,” and played numerous local area shows. While their music has a distinct punk rock element to it, a closer listen reveals more than the simple song structures that genre usually provides. There is a noticeable amount of strong rhythmic punctuations and angular changes throughout those two tracks, as well as additional songs heard in the live environment. The two initial offerings were recorded under the guidance of much-heralded studio wizard Jeff Berner. Founding members Madge and Kate Black have solidified their current lineup with Eli Lopez on drums, and plan to release new material in the coming months. You’ve released a mini two-song EP entitled “Wasted” so far. Surely you have more material recorded by now, and if so, when might those tracks be released for public consumption? Madge: We are working on another EP that we’d like to have out this summer if all goes well. Probably going to see if we can partner up with a local label or something. Kate: We tracked some songs at Seizure’s Palace down in Gowanus in March, had them mixed by Daniel at Strange Weather, and mastered by Alex at Masterdisk. We’re aiming to push them out sometime this summer. What led you to choosing Jeff Berner to engineer and mix these tracks, and what are the special or unique qualities he brings to the recording process? Madge: Jeff worked with our friend Bill on a record for his band (we share a practice space with his two bands, Gunfight and The Teen Age), so when we were looking for suggestions, Jeff came highly recommended. We checked out the studio, and at our first meeting, it was clear he was a great person to have in the studio. He’s just incredibly chill, and really gracefully navigated some of our band turmoil as this was just before our then drummer quit. Kate: Yeah, Jeff is awesome to work with. When you’re doing take after take, it can be kind of hard to tell when you’ve got the right

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the deli Spring 2014

RIYL: FIDLAR, The Ramones, Distillers

vibe. It’s nice to have someone who is calm and smiling, and will say, “Yep, that was it. Come listen.” Or “maybe we should give it just one more try...” It’s really helpful to record with someone whose opinion you trust. Name some of the things that inspire the lyrics you write and incorporate into your songs. Is there perhaps a more literary side to your songs than one might not initially realize? Kate: Madge, you can answer this, but I love the imagery. Especially some of our newer stuff, the lyrics are killer if you pay attention. Madge: Benders, banging boys, boozy brunches, boobs and bitches being boss. Yeah, it’s a mixed bag. Some songs are very literal, and other songs sound straightforward, but are not intended that way. Do you have any style icons? Is there a particular visual look you are going for with this band? Does this sort of thing matter to you? Madge: I honestly just don’t think about it that much outside of do I feel good in what I’m wearing right now. I’ll let Kate talk fashion she knows what’s up, and if you pay attention, is probably the bestdressed person you’ve met. I just live in my Dad’s old motorcycle jacket that I’m obsessed with, and continue to fix up as it falls apart. Kate: Honestly, it’s just about wearing what makes you happy. Sometimes that means skinny jeans and a raggedy t-shirt; sometimes it means a leather bustier. Who wants to try to be someone else? That would be way too stressful. (dave cromwell)

Artist Equipment Box “The Tube Overdrive from Digitech is my favorite go to pedal for verses. Big Muff fuzz pedal is another one that is definitely the sound on the WASTED EP.” Digitech Bad Monkey Tube Overdrive


T

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

#17

Winner of the Readers ' Poll

late cambrian RIYL: Weezer, Phoenix, We Are Scientists

T

o all who are feeling down right now, get that frown off your face: It’s time to get happy. Late Cambrian is here! John N. Wlaysewski (guitars, vocals), O (keyboards, vocals) and Nunzio Moudatsos (bass, vocals) are a band that needs no convincing of how great things are. From the crashing rock theatrics of ‘Ryan Gosling,’ to the dance-ready ‘The Year I Cut The Cable’ on their latest record “Peach,” the good times are here right now... and dammit... they’re here to stay. Think of a much more optimistic Strokes, or a less French Phoenix, and you’re close to the sound of this excitable trio. Late Cambrian is all this and more, and the group just might make you smile too. The band is slated to release some new tracks soon, so keep an ear out for that and read below to find out more about their past, why they love Greenpoint so much, and which celebrity they plan on singing about next. You met John while playing a patient on the set of “Nurse Jackie.” You met Nunzio from a Craigslist ad... Do you have a habit of forging lasting relationships from random beginnings? O: John and I were playing patients in the episode. Joking and running around in socks trying to cover the back openings of the hospital gowns definitely made us best friends by the end of the day. Random beginnings are great. I met Richard Hawke the director of our new ‘Lover’s Point’ music video at the “No Blood For Oil” rally against the war in 2003. Wheatus’ Gabrielle Sterbenz and I also became friends at a bachelorette party. Who would have known we’d be touring together, and have such amazing adventures! So what’s your favorite section of Brooklyn? Do you prefer Greenpoint to other hoods? Nunzio: Greenpoint! I live here, and we’ve been rehearsing here since the band began. Lots of cool musicians and friends live here so it’s been awesome so far. John: I like rehearsing in Greenpoint, and I like walking home to Bushwick. I just like Brooklyn overall. It has a “real person” vibe.

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the deli Spring 2014

he results of The Deli’s Best of NYC Poll for Emerging Artists are compiled through a rather complicated process that takes into account votes coming from local scene makers, The Deli writers, and The Deli readers. Late Cambrian won the readers’ section of the poll.

The Deli Readers' Poll 2014 Top 10 1. Late Cambrian 2. PUSHMETHOD 3. I/O 4. NGHBRS 5. Whiskey Bitches 6. Active Bird Community 7. Dear Georgiana 8. Tall Tall Trees 9. Maginot 10. The Lovehowl

People living intentionally and artistically in a way I vibe with. O: The triangle made up by linking Bushwick, Williamsburg and Greenpoint on the map is my favorite section. Sometimes I’m not aware of the beginning and end of each neighborhood. I love McCarren Park and Pool in the summer! We try to swim every other day. My favorite spot is a cute and artists-filled coffee shop called Little Skips. It is basically what made Bushwick the Bushwick we love today. Is there anyone famous that you’d like to write a song about in the future? George Clooney perhaps? Bradley Cooper? John: Our friends Phantogram just released a song called ‘Bill Murray.’ That’s a great song title. Hmmm… maybe Matthew McConaughey or Scarlet Johansson. Nunzio: Maybe Wilford Brimley? Dude seems awesome. O: Haha… Amazing choices by the way! Our friend Andy had his buddy, who is a personal friend of Ryan Gosling, email him the music video of our single ‘Ryan Gosling.’ It’d be cool to hear his feedback one day. Ryan, if you are reading this... we’re still waiting. I think the next person we name a song after should be a woman; maybe my hero and mentor Cindy Gallop. (mike levine)

Artist Equipment Box

Joyo US Dream

Devi Ever Soda Meiser

John: My fuzz tones are from a Devi Ever Soda Meiser, the best fuzz pedal I’ve ever used. I also use a Digitech Supernatural reverb pedal, Boss DD-3 Delay, Overtone, Phaser and tuner. My distortion is a Joyo US Dream.


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

#5 F

the can’t tells

or The Can’t Tells first full-length “No Television,” the highly energetic rock group powers their way through a set of turbulent emotions: revealing a wealth of insecurities and anxieties set to an insistently pounding block of anthemic eagerness. From the title track’s rocking buoyancy, to the somewhat creepy, angular closer ‘Real Imitator,’ these guys lay out their inner demons for all to see. It’s an album that will keep you guessing to the finish. Just like their name implies, these are guys whose intentions may not be clear, but that’s half the fun. Watch the hilarious video for ‘Insincere’ to find out why they may be missing a band member next time you see them live. (MIKE LEVINE)

#6 emefe

W

hen Fela Kuti merged deep political discourse with funk-dance grooves, who would have thought how far that idea would extend? Fast-forward to Brooklyn 2014, and ten-piece group EMEFE is merging Fela’s vision with several musical lineages: from Sly Stone funk to big band jazz to Motown soul and back to Nigeria for highlife inspiration. It’s a whirlwind experience. One minute you’re enjoying smooth grooves and licks, floating along poolside, the next: Those horns hit you like a torpedo and you’re propelled through the stratosphere. Just check out the hard-hitting ‘Do Your Dance’ or the epic poetry of instrumental track ‘Stutter’ from 2012’s “Good Future.” The group is pretty much on a mission to make sure you’re enjoying yourself. But for a band that knows how to shake a tail feather, they’ve also got a lot to say. Heeding the call of Fela Kuti, bandleader Miles Arntzen uses music to escape the doubts and worries inside our minds, helping listeners let go of negatives through the power of great dance music. So join the movement! (MIKE LEVINE)

the deli Spring 2014

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

revival rock

nyc revival rock Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) The Parlor Mob 2) Jeremy and The Harlequins 3) The Julie Ruin 4) Locksley 5) Dirty Fences 6) Star Fucking Hipsters 7) Nude Beach 8) Gung Ho 9) Hot Blood 10) SHAPES 11) Kiss Kiss 12) Slow Warm Death 13) The Post 14) Crazy & The Brains 15) The Bloodshots 16) The Besties 17) Unicycle Loves You 18) Fantasmes 19) PORNOGRAPHY 20) Micah Brown

wyldlife

the dough rollers

the lovehowl

#7

The Dough Rollers

The only way, that we can find to explain through words how explosive this band is, is through the over-used (but over-useful) “legendary bands mix-and-match system.” If Jack White had fronted Led Zeppelin, you might have gotten the Dough Rollers. In fact, Jack White dug the band enough to put their single ‘Little Lily’ out on his label, Third Man Records, in 2013. The band - which by the way made this Best of NYC list and also last year in 83rd place has gone on to play The Late Night show, and they are scheduled to play festivals all over the country this summer. When you’re catching this kind of attention, you’ve got to be doing something right. Could it be that we are finally getting back to rock ‘n’ roll? Ozzy Osbourne was recently quoted asking, “Where are all the new rock stars?” Look no further, Prince of Darkness, the Rollers’ lead singer Malcolm Ford has the cool name, voice and enough heartbreak to last for days. (sam kogon)

#9

wyldlife

Whilst some of us were quaffing back bubbles celebrating the start of 2014, Wyldlife were back in 1979, unwrapping their newly purchased Buzzcocks records and wondering when The Clash might make it over the pond, before slicking back their hair, downing some beers, chucking on a leather jacket, shredding up their six strings and having a party in Alphabet City. The band has never hidden its passion for making sweaty, scuzzy, irreverent music, and having a damn good time as they do so. (francesca baker)

#32

nude beach

Past a first round of late ’70s references de rigueur, Petty this, 24

the deli Spring 2014

the above Thunders that, what you’re left with is not a trio of hopeless retromaniacs, but a young rock ‘n’ roll band looking for an adventure - like every other young rock ‘n’ roll band before them. And being best buddies with The Men sure helps open some doors - these guys toured with them in more than one occasion.

#54

The lovehowl

#62

the above

#94

king charles the martyr

Bringing blues and soul back home to Brooklyn, The LoveHowl is kicking up the dust behind raunchy guitars and sultry vocals. Starting out as a solo project of singer/songwriter Amy Sheehan, the quartet has since developed into something much wilder. At times, the music might kick you in the gut, but don’t worry: They’ll be there to help you out when you’re down. Down-home tracks like ‘I Don’t Know Why’ never hurt so good. (mike levine)

The band’s self-titled EP works like that amazing last scene from the original “Back to the Future,” when Michael J. Fox captures the ear of Chuck Berry with his amazing guitar solo. Only this time around, it’s a little messier and a little more sinister. (mike levine)

Remaking the classic rock ‘n’ roll of Buddy Holly and Jerry Lee Lewis for a new generation, King Charles the Martyr is punkabilly at its most fun, with lead singer Mr. Charles Edward Henry Richard Elizabeth Malcolm Anderson Berry (yes, that is an actual name) howling at the moon with band in tow, and just when you least expect it, even a bellowing sax (Pat Schlickman) for good measure, in jams like ‘Workin’ Man Blues’ and personal favorite ‘Willful Violator.’


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

garage rock shark?

flagland

Photo: gustavo

#4

ponce

boytoy

whiskey bitches

See the feature on page 20!

include the bubblegum pop of the ’60s and the more sophisticated songwriting of bands like Camera Obscura.

#35

shark?

#67

threats

#60

boytoy

#91

flagland

Shark? was one of the first bands to bring back the sound of the ’90s in Brooklyn. Their music immediately draws you in - laconic lyrics, filled with bizarre observations and poignant details, are as fun to anticipate and listen to as any Silver Jews song. Like a lot of other slacker bands, there’s not an ounce of self-importance anywhere in their music, which is what we want in a band that never lets up the energy. (john mcgovern)

In most cases, a song is really all you need to understand how talented a band is - although if you want to go anywhere (in any field), talent must be integrated with consistence and persistence. ‘Visits’ by BOYTOY is a song that beautifully updates the sound of ’90s guitar-pop in new exciting directions, with a mix of elements that

ENTER THE DELI’S DATABASE AND BE FOUND

If you’re into dirty underground rock ‘n’ roll and aren’t fussed on spilled beers, blown eardrums and packed bars that you’ve never heard of, then chances are you’ll like Threats. The band is fronted by Jack Ridley (Drowners’ guitarist), with Matt Hitt (Drowners’ lead singer) on bass and Paulo Dell’Olio on drums. Bonded by a love of booze and music, the sound is fast and loose, rough warehouse punk revival with subtle surf elements. (bianca mascheretti)

We’re going to let Flagland take us back to a simpler time. A time when bands were just being bands, playing music that meant something to them; not trying to please the entire world. The Brooklyn trio taps into a pocket once occupied by Mudhoney or Sebadoh and other secular acts from the ’90s. It’s a time we long for once again, and one that has definitely made a resurgence. (joe fish)

Whichever your scene is, you can add your band for FREE to our database organized by region, detailed genre and popularity. Industry people and fans use it to discover new talent. You’ll find all the big indie artists in there!

READ OUR QUARTERLY NYC ISSUE ONLINE

Our only other print magazine is in NYC, and it’s turning 10 this year! If you don’t live there, read it online to find out about all the best emerging NYC artists at thedelimagazine.com/pdf.

SUBMIT YOUR MUSIC TO THE DELI

If you are based in one of the scenes that we cover (list on page 2), you can submit your music for coverage in the blogs here: thedelimag.com/submit.We listen to everything, and write about many of them.

WE HAVE A BLOG ABOUT GUITAR PEDALS!

It’s called Delicious Audio, and it brings you all the news about the new stompboxes, and some useful advice about home recording: audio.thedelimag.com.

thedelimagazine.com


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

indie rock

active bird community

haybaby spirit animal

lost boy?

#8

nghbrs

Long Island quartet NGHBRS formed in 2010, and has since been releasing various EPs, mixtapes, and now a full-length album. Their sound is a dynamic and multifaceted rock explosion with arena conquering potential, which would explain why they’ve been paired to open for bands such as Third Eye Blind and Matt & Kim. On their latest effort, ‘Twenty One Rooms,’ the bluesy title track gives us a glimpse into their potential to really break out and rock a party. (joe fish)

#10

spirit animal

Spirit Animal breaks out on their latest fun-filled party anthem record with ‘The Black Jack White,’ which is begging to be blasted out of our windows to drown out the crap our inconsiderate neighbors are hitting us with. The band’s four-song EP “Kingdom Phylum” is sometimes funky and always fun. Beck (Midnight Vultures era) could be identified as the king of this band’s realm and Alexis Krauss (Sleigh Bells) would be his queen. (joe fish)

#24

steel phantoms

Steel Phantoms have been on my radar ever since I heard the first chord of ‘Curtain Call’ last year and was immediately transported to The Jam’s ‘That’s Entertainment.’ The duo of Aaron Harris, previously of Islands, and Jesse Newkirk IV pump out scrambling songs that go from broody to brash in seconds. (francesca baker)

#44

pre war

A duo obsessed with fuzz and falsetto, uplifting and epic at once, Pre War is reclaiming the spirit of stadium-shouting rock ‘n’ roll in debut LP “My Friend, the Enemy.” Fans of Band of Horses should find common ground here, but there’s also a big part of this group 26

the deli Spring 2014

that’s just as happy to paint landscapes of sound with mountains of reverb and harmony for several minutes.

#52

active bird community

#80

haybaby

#84

maginot

#85

lost boy?

Active Bird Community has the sound of a band that might hit you over the head if you mistakenly get too close to them. But their music is so inviting, you might end up in dangerous proximity for one of their electrically driven explosions. The quartet does indeed mean business. I recommend listening to as much of this impossibly catchy band as possible, and with any luck... perhaps we’ll get a full-length release out of them soon. (mike levine)

Brooklyn’s Haybaby are great for rockin’ out to, but their songs are also very catchy and tense at once, in a way that’s, at times, vaguely reminiscent of The Breeders or (depending on the song) Pavement. The lively trio offers a refreshing alternative yet punk/ thrash sound, something that molds the techniques we’ve all heard before into something new and exciting. Leslie Hong’s adorable female vocals pair nicely with Zach & Sam’s counterparts.

The Astoria pop-rock outfit Maginot’s debut EP “Big Changes” is a concise summary of what the 90’s guitar pop was all about. Their melodious hooks and verses are reminiscent of some of REM’s early catalogue and their clean guitar work shows some influence from The Strokes. Their crisp recordings - in these days of lo-fi epidemy - doesn’t hurt either. (michael haskoor)

With a frantic collection of pop-punk tunes, Lost Boy? is a buzzing


nyc indie rock Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) The Strokes 2) Interpol 3) Yeah Yeah Yeahs 4) The National 5) The Men 6) The Rapture 7) Yellow Ostrich 8) Cymbals Eat Guitars 9) Bear Hands 10) The Front Bottoms 11) The Walkmen 12) We Are Augustines 13) Guards 14) Blonde Redhead 15) Paul Banks 16) Eleanor Friedberger 17) White Rabbits 18) Julian Plenti 19) Bad Books 20) The Babies

nghbrs

maginot

steel phantoms caffeine-drenched rampage through distorted filters, immediate melodies and nervous bass lines. Their music is an exercise in songwriting delivered with petulant energy. Each track is short, to the point, and powerful. There is just one thing -that question mark. What DOES it mean? There’s nothing like an elusive edge to capture the attention.

#86

bodega bay

Psychedelic surf-rock comes to Brooklyn and finds itself fitting right in with Bodega Bay. With only a few singles recorded, the quartet already has a slew of shows under its belt, and looks forward to a bright future as a standout sound in a music Mecca.

pre war The recordings are raw and honest - the way you want music to be - barebones drum parts with clean and hazy guitar flowing over them and droning, sometimes intensely monotone vocals cutting through it all. (JP basileo)

#97

motive

With their gritty guitars and airy melodies, Motive marries the NYC scene’s poppiness and darkness in one sound. Often compared to The Strokes and Interpol, this band’s strength is in their personal songwriting, with the lyrics taking the forefront in a lot of their music. (paul jordan talbot)

Production Corner HOME VS. STUDIO — CAN YOU DO IT? Everything is relative in the world of recording, but one of the few rules that we feel like endorsing is that if your band has loud drums and you want them to sound good, you need to use a professional studio with a good sounding room. A lot of recording can be done at home, if you know what you are doing (vocals, acoustic guitar, bass, keys...), but be aware that the results will be directly proportional to the engineer’s experience (we’ve been there - early recordings always sound from bad to awful - it takes years to refine the art!). Oh, and if your bandmates aren’t good musicians, the recordings will suffer. You have to be smart about how you pursue producing music recordings. Pro audio manufacturers are offering an ever-wider array of reasonably priced tools. These tools can go a long way toward freeing the music producer from the need for pricey professional studios. But in the big picture, big professional studios still serve many needs better than most home studios, and a producer’s experience can directly improve your song - not just in the recording department, but also the composition and arrangement ones. Read Bruce Kapham’s full article on Delicious Audio: bit.ly/can-u-do-it.

Now THAT’s a Room! Manhattan’s Avatar Studio’s Room A.


nyc noise / punk rock Top 20

best of nyc Emerging Artists 2014

noise /punk rock

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Parquet Courts 2) Matt and Kim 3) Big Ups 4) A Place to Bury Strangers 5) Dads 6) Japanther 7) Thurston Moore 8) ZZZs 9) zs 10) YVETTE 11) Oneida 12) Girls Against Boys 13) Grassfight 14) Cult of Youth 15) Shark? 16) AA 17) The Terror Pigeon Dance Revolt 18) Wild Yaks 19) World Inferno Friendship Society 20) Talibam! Photo: Walter

Wlodarczyk

low fat getting high weird womb

lodro

#1

yvette

big ups

See the feature on page 14!

essence of the 1960’s psychedelic movement from Texas and Northern California is alive and well in LODRO.

#14

hunters

#67

weird womb

#26

butter the children

#72

yvette

#88

low fat getting high

We’ve always had a thing for the duo Hunters - definitely one of the best new noise-rock acts to emerge from Brooklyn in recent years (however, they now reside in Philly). Their debut full-length showcases a sound less primal and slightly more controlled. The album features the band’s signature alternating, litany-like male/female vocals and a wall of distorted power chords, but also tracks with a cleaner guitar tone, which trigger immediate nostalgia for some Sonic Youth tracks from “Daydream Nation” and The Smashing Pumpkins’ “1979.”

Formed by ex-members of Sweet Bulbs and Night Manager, Butter the Children (previously known as Fluffer) self-released their debut album in 2012, and then signed with Downtown Records and released the three-song “True Crime” EP in 2013. The band’s sound comes across like a sans-reverb, punkier, lo-fi, less pretentious version of shoegaze music. That genre’s signature noisy guitars and ethereal melodies are intact, but the overall vibe avoids the sonic expansiveness of classic shoegazer records - which is actually a good thing, considering how formulaic that genre has become.

#35

lodro

In what seems to be an age dominated by ’90s throwback grunge bands, there aren’t many acts around right now quite like LODRO. Fronted by Jeremy Cox (formerly of Royal Baths) and Lesley Hann (formerly of Friends), these self-described “neo-noir punks” have deeper roots with the 13th Floor Elevators than say, Nirvana. The 30

the deli Spring 2014

Undeniably, the electric guitar, which was almost marginalized by Brooklyn bands of the late aughts like Animal Collective, Dirty Projectors, Matt & Kim and Grizzly Bear, is taking back a dominant role in the NYC scene’s sound. Thanks to a generation of young bands like Weird Womb who find inspiration in the guitarcentric, heavy sounds of the ’90s. From that decade, these four Brooklyn dudes chose as main inspiration the rather uncompromising sound of post-hardcore, brought to fame by legendary DC band Fugazi. (joe fish)

We’ve been fans of ascetic drone’n’noise masters YVETTE for a long time. They were our NYC Record of the Month back in 2011, and played our Best of NYC Fest that same year, so seeing Pitchfork deliver an 8.1 review for their debut album “Process” totally made our day. Sure, the band will still be ignored by the pop-obsessed masses, but this review will hopefully hit the niche of noise cravers and keep the band going.

The aggressive grunge punk trio known as Low Fat Getting High puts a bullet bursting with energy, catchy choruses and rough edges right between your eyes. The band has been slowly making a name for themselves due to their energetic live shows, and has captured that sort of flare on their most recent four-song EP titled “Bad Yoga” (Money Fire Records). The EP was a hit and very popular among the local punk scene, opening interesting doors, including shows in support of Titus Andronicus, Jon Spencer and Bass Drum of Death.


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Log in with Facebook, rate the bands, organize them by genre and region.

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

indie pop

hey anna

icewater

#5

the can’t tells

See the feature on page 23!

#12

hey anna

Hey Anna’s latest EP “Pompette” is brimming over with the shimmering, sunny and pop-tastic sensibility that is making this band of three sisters get noticed. The group might come across as modest and unpretentious, but Hey Anna’s music drives home a very clear message: Get out of your house, and find yourself a piece of heaven. (mike levine)

#15

drowners

Full of bouncy melodies laced with arsenic, the lilt of internal schisms hidden under shimmering confident jangles, and a great line in domestic lyrics delivered with a sideways glance, come NYC’s Drowners. Slightly predictable for any fan of ’80s pop, Matthew Hitt and his pals exude sunny sounds, while underneath there’s a skidding darkness which makes them all the more alluring. And I didn’t mention The Smiths once. (francesca baker)

#17

late cambrian

#30

misterwives

See the feature on page 22!

I kinda wish I could be in Misterwives. Where other groups take themselves a bit too seriously, these guys obviously know how to have fun, even when living off PB&J alone on tour (or so says lead 32

the deli Spring 2014

misterwives

chumped

Photo: rebecca reed

singer Mandy Lee). They had one of the most talked about shows during CMJ, and haven’t even released their debut yet! With an electro-disco backdrop set against Lee’s roof-raising vocals, this is not a band that shies away from the spotlight. (mike levine)

#35

tropic of pisces

#35

mutual benefit

#41

daytona

It seems appropriate for a glockenspiel player to have a project with heavy tropical influences, although the origins of the instrument - as betrayed by its name - are from what is arguably one of the least tropical places: Germany. Tropic of Pisces is the new project from the guitarist/glockenspieler of Oberhofer, Mathew Scheiner. In his band’s lighthearted melodies you’ll find an affinity with Vampire Weekend, although Mathew’s melodies have a jazzier feel to them.

As the days become longer and time is spent in a halcyon haze, the wispy breezy vocals of Mutual Benefit, a.k.a. Jordan Lee, accompanied by tantalizing faint piano meanderings, wind chimes pinging as an aside, ticking percussion and wholesome woodwind, feels like the perfect joinder - a mellow orchestral serenade inspiring a laidback atmosphere. It’s not until you listen more closely that you realize how haunting and poignant the delicate sounds are. (francesca baker)

Put on Daytona’s single ‘Honey,’ and embrace the winds of change. The sing-a-long style lyrics throughout the song invite the listener to do just that, repeating - “it’s getting cold, and the leaves


nyc indie pop Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Lana Del Rey 2) Fun. 3) Sharon Van Etten 4) Real Estate 5) MGMT 6) Vampire Weekend 7) Here We Go Magic 8) St. Vincent 9) Broken Bells 10) Grizzly Bear 11) Beirut 12) Julian Casablancas 13) Oh Land 14) The Drums 15) friends 16) Lucius 17) cults 18) Darkside 19) My Midnight Heart 20) Miniature Tigers

mutual benefit

Production Corner Democracy vs. Producer Is it possible to produce a record democratically? I suppose it’s possible, but having been a band member, engineer and producer, sometimes more than one of these roles at the same time, sadly, the occasions have been rare indeed when I’ve seen democracy serve any purpose other than to compromise a project’s artistic integrity, slow it to a crawl, and dig chasms in relationships. So if you’re in a band that gets along famously, can let each member shine in their own right, and there’s a budding producer among you, let them do the job. If this isn’t your situation, then George Martin during you probably need to begin the Beatles years. pursuing someone outside the band - someone who can see the big picture, knows a good performance from a bad one, and knows how to capture the best performances - someone who has a musical vision that matches the band’s. This person can be found by reading liner notes of your favorite albums or by talking with your peers - asking around as to who might fit this description. This is a producer. The only thing better than working with a good producer is working with a good producer and a good engineer at the same time.

tropic of pisces they are nearly gone” - enticing the listener to step outside before it’s too late. Layered guitar work and these repeated phrases allow for a cerebral escape - calming and inviting. However, ‘Honey’ still seems like a warning that none of this was meant to last and to enjoy it all while you can. (joe fish)

#63

ski lodge

For a few years, Ski Lodge was one of those bands whose fanbase was almost entirely composed of music bloggers - which, I guess, is a contrived way to say that considering the quality of their music, they should have waaaay more fans. The Brooklyn based quartet - who was highlighted as the 6th best NYC emerging band in our 2011 poll, after bands like Caveman, Lucius, Friends and Widowspeak - has been obviously working hard to correct this.

#65

julia easterlin

A precise pair of vocal chords and one looping machine is all Brooklynite Julia Easterlin needs to surround a stage. During her live shows, she deconstructs the process. The performance is part learning experience and part live recording process. She recently released a new EP entitled “vestiges” that cristallizes her unique songwriting process - and talent. But tech sorcery is not what sets her apart. Jazz movement, a capella arrangements and world music flavor give Easterlin’s eclectic covers and originals flight. (bianca seidman)

#69

chumped

Drawing inspiration from punk rock legends Superchunk and riot grrrl bands from the 90s, female-fronted pop-punk quartet

Read Bruce Kapham’s full article on Delicious Audio: bit.ly/record-producer.

Chumped is another reminder that punk rock is witnessing a resurgence in NYC. The band released a self-titled debut EP in October that’s at once well-rounded, in-your-face, raw and catchy. As an added bonus, they don’t take themselves too seriously in a fun, unpretentious way. (michael haskoor)

#72

icewater

Delicate and detailed, ‘Bite Fresh Air’ by one-year-old Brooklyn band Icewater is a song of understated dexterity - all meandering melodies exploring the soundscape, waves of color, and visions of yearning. Not a folk song, it is though earnest and entrancing, with shifting strains of elegant guitars and a hazy spirit that lays over droney synths and hypnotic, gentle beats. There’s a gentle warming feel to it that endures and endears throughout its wandering. (francesca baker)

#79

seasick mama

Marial Maher (aka Seasick Mama) wants you to abandon your tedious nine to five. You know you’ve been thinking about it for a long time, and the parading progression of gorgeous (possibly unemployed) women doing dangerous and fun things in various non-office settings should probably seal the deal. Taken from the brand new debut EP “Dead Like Money,” in the video for “Quit Your Job” the trio picks up from where Florence and the Machine’s powerful torrents left off, and beats the hell out of complacency in a churning vision that gets you to know these ladies a lot more intimately (oh, there are some boys too in the mix by the way, we just noticed). From smoke-filled backrooms to Bourbon Street, Seasick Mama crashes parties across America. I guess that’s what you get to do when you quit your job. (mike levine) the deli Spring 2014

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nyc electronic pop Top 20

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

synthpop

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) ms mr 2) Blood Orange 3) St. Lucia 4) Santigold 5) Bleachers 6) lips 7) Neon Indian 8) Discovery 9) cibo matto 10) Twin Shadow 11) MNDR 12) Chairlift 13) Tanlines 14) wet 15) Holy Ghost! 16) Au Revoir Simone 17) Small Black 18) Haerts 19) Panama Wedding 20) Ghost Beach

astr

twintapes psychic twin

blank paper

#11

blank paper

Brooklyn quartet Blank Paper employs a wide palette of electronic sounds, blending ’80s synthpop elements with quirkier electro ones, all while sleepwalking through lucid lyrics fitting perfectly with the debut record sleeve’s giant, fold-out unicorns. Single ‘Ambien’ revels in this state of unconsciousness. Perhaps the band’s catchiest track to date, the song asks for somnambulance, while synthesizing one of the group’s more urgent sounding jams yet. (mike levine)

#20

twintapes

Brooklyn trio Twintapes doesn’t take the easy way out. Although their bread and butter is plush, danceable electropop, they perform sans laptops. And it’s clearly something they’re proud of - the lack of computers is one of the first things mentioned on their social pages. This unique DIY-electro approach has paid off. Twintapes celebrated the release of their single and subsequent video ‘Everyday Chemical’ in mid-March, and headlined a show this past April at Mercury Lounge. (corinne bagish)

#27

half waif

Bedroom-pop at its finest comes from Nandi Rose Plunkett, otherwise known as Half Waif. Her 2013 EP “Future Joys” is charming and artfully crafted. Plunkett’s voice - slightly reminiscent of Grace Slick and Kate Bush at once - is powerful but never belting, and it gets you right where it hurts, through melodies that defy genres. Her vocal layering makes for dreamy clusters and swells, which float on a dark and ambient soundscape that would make Brian Eno proud. (paul jordan talbot)

#42

psychic Twin

Erin Fein’s Psychic Twin was born out of a love for electronic pop music, new-wave sounds of the past, and the unattainable notion 34

the deli Spring 2014

half waif of being two places at once. Her upbeat rhythms and frantic keyboard arpeggios lay the foundation for incredibly danceable songs from another life; but it doesn’t stop there. Doubled vocals, coupled with lengthier synth drones and the backing of project-mate Sean Hutchinson, create an effect almost ghostly and disturbing, adding depth and texture to the project. (jp basileo)

#72

lips

#92

astr

#97

ejecta

The brainchild of New Zealand native Stephanie Brown, Lips plays edgy, keyboard driven synthpop of the non-breezy/summery variety. The signature tension and “noir” elements in her tracks are always counterbalanced by melodies that are memorable and sophisticated. Fans of Bjork and Lykke Li will find something very interesting here, and not just because of that cute foreign accent.

Keeping secret identities, rising R&B/electropop artists ASTR are testing the waters with slick, slightly sinister club bangers. The “NYC Duo” mixes processed vocals, 808s and heavy bass drops, producing dance tracks that sound like they came from a seasoned hit factory. Dark undertones ground their handful of high-gloss tracks, but they never dive into the creep-pop or drug-stupor of influences like Purity Ring and The Weeknd. (bianca seidman)

Ejecta is the project of Tigercity’s Joel Ford and Neon Indian’s Leanne Macomber, who “gives weight” to the band’s promotional campaign by appearing au naturel on... every single band picture passed to the press (and therefore the fans); videos included. What about Joel - you ask? He’s there somewhere, but has the gift of invisibility. There album “Dominae” showcases ethereal, somewhat detached, simple but well-crafted electropop, sung by Macomber in a breathy soprano - which by the way is exactly the kind of vocal quality you would expect (demand?) from a detached nude lady.


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

electro rock

nyc electro rock Top 20

kodacrome

glass gang

#53

wolvves

Photo: Barrett

Sweger

kodacrome

Named after one of the first successful color processes in photographic history, Brooklyn-based Kodacrome employs all the twitchiness of dubstep without losing any of the casual elements that Elissa Pociask’s vocals so boldly evoke, recalling ’90s band Everything But the Girl, whose lazy house music backdrop gave techno something of a folk air. (brian chidester)

#57

wolvves

From suspenseful to apocalyptic, that’s exactly the range where Brooklyn’s WOLVVES find their comfort zone, and the band has no problem admitting it. Single ‘It Speaks’ is a rather terrifying track where whispered vocals are stalked by unsettling electronic parts and - appropriately enough - howling wolves. ‘A Breath Away’ is a less bizarre electro-pop-goth song, showcasing that this band might actually go places without the need of too many gimmicks.

#59

leverage models

Seizing on electro and drawing on the depths of consciousness with bubbling sonic palette doused in multiple dimensions, Leverage Models create glorious glistening sounds, nuanced with commentary and clever perceptive notes, that pulse with passion, short pounds and reverberating rhythms adding a complexity that never digresses from what it is - pure pop. Churning and bristling with self-confessed dark emotions, there’s a restlessness to it all, a deliberate provocativeness that thrives. (francesca baker)

#69

brothertiger

John Jagos (a.k.a. Brothertiger) is a recent Brooklyn transplant from Athens, OH, where he wrought perfectly connived and joyfully-ren36

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Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Ratatat 2) LCD Soundsystem 3) Sleigh Bells 4) Hooray for Earth 5) Young Magic 6) Anamanaguchi 7) Mindless Self Indulgence 8) Matthew Dear 9) Le Tigre 10) American Royalty 11) Brick+Mortar 12) Fischerspooner 13) Cold Cave 14) Bowmont 15) VHS or Beta 16) Xeno & Oaklander 17) Led Er Est 18) Home Video 19) Young Love 20) Eraas

dered electropop that drifts from your speakers like a feather in the wind. 2013’s sophomore LP (and NYC debut) “Future Splendors” seems to add a layer of melancholy to his breezy upbeat tracks, always filled with ascetic pop melodies and warm analog synths.

#69

glass gang

#101

cardiknox

If you are looking for ways to spend an unsettling evening, a show with Brooklyn’s Glass Gang can surely provide that for you. The electronic band’s repertoire is all pretty dark and tense, but 2013 single “Sell It All” gets downright into disturbing territory, with sped up ghostly sampled voices that create bizarrely nightmarish melodies, on top of a macabre, plodding arrangement, dominated by suicidal vocals, droney synths and snappy drum machines. There’s enough craziness here to warp anyone’s mind - we dig!

Cardiknox is a relatively new electropop duo with only a handful of tracks out so far, but quality ones. Their music breezily walks the fine line between being pure and sweet and edgy and dirty. Cute, poppy beats and playful synths are casually laid over lyrics that teeter between remembrance and self-analysis. (brescia mascheretti)

#101

space meow

A lot happens when you listen to New York art-pop outfit, Space Meow. The trio is a cultural emulsion from the East and West, incorporating bits of punk guitar with electronica and dance from opposite corners of the globe. The convergence may seem chaotic at times, but Space Meow’s form reveals itself in every song, recollecting an initial interaction with another culture: not everything is understood at first.


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

electronica

nyc electronica+edm Top 20

oddlogic

#21

oddlogic

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Lemonade 2) Javelin 3) Com Truise 4) The American Dollar 5) Battles 6) Memory Tapes 7) FaltyDL 8) Laurel Halo 9) Teeel 10) El-P 11) Creep 12) The Juan MacLean 13) Thieves Like Us 14) ivy 15) Sinkane 16) Nico Muhly 17) Sepalcure 18) Lee Scratch Perry 19) The Crystal Ark 20) j.viewz

There’s something very alluring about NYC’s oddlogic’s really, REALLY sparse instrumental electronica. Rather than attacking you with an infinity of derivative tricks and predictable four on the floor beats (a fault of too many artists dedicated to this genre), Alex Gohorel plays his cards well, producing tracks that entrance the listener with simple but unexpected rhythmic developments or use original samples sparingly to construct an intriguing sonic collage.

hess is more

#44

hess is more

Stylish as only Europeans can be (Nikolaj Hess hails from Denmark), Hess Is More could be described as the Monet of electro. His light touch is almost transparent, the aural balance of colors trascends wisdom, and the simplicity of his music is only apparent. He also doesn’t lack a good amount of irony, as testified by his breakout single “Yes Boss,” where a ridiculously ambigious conversation between male employer and female employee is given the Hess treatment. Don’t miss the live shows with full orchestra!

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

psych rock /dream pop

nyc psych rock/dream pop Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Sharon Van Etten 2) Real Estate 3) Woods 4) My Midnight Heart 5) The Antlers 6) TV on the Radio 7) Ducktails 8) DIIV 9) Panda Bear 10) caveman 11) Amen Dunes 12) Widowspeak 13) Weekend 14) The Raveonettes 15) Frankie Rose 16) Teen 17) Crystal Stilts 18) Asobi Seksu 19) School of Seven Bells 20) Snowmine

spires

stargazy

golden animals

zula

psych Rock #13

zula

We gave Brooklyn-based psych-pop outfit Zula quite a lot of attention recently on our blog, and we’re glad to see that our non-NYC editors agree with us about the group’s potential. The quartet was voted by our editors as the best Psych Rock/Dream Pop artist in the Open Submission phase of our year-end poll. This is a band that’s been churning out a lot of good material in the past two years, and its latest album “This Hopeful” (Inflated Records), demonstrates a reached maturity.

#82

golden animals

Tommy Eisner (guitar/lead vocals) and Linda Beecroft (drums/ backing vocals) continue to evolve their bluesy psych rock sound as Golden Animals. With three previous recordings already under their belt, their latest full-length “Hear Eye Go” was released this past fall via Reverberation Appreciation Society, the label imprint closely associated with Austin’s Psych Fest. (dave cromwell)

dream pop #28

Spires

Shaggy-coifed quintet Spires not only looks like ‘60s-era psychedelic rockers, it sounds like them too. Formed in 2012 by frontman Matt Stevenson, the group brings uncommonly groovy beats to the Brooklyn scene. For a young band that has only officially released two songs, the Brooklyn act has a lot of accomplishments under their (likely fringed) belts already, like performing at larger venues 38

the deli Spring 2014

in NYC such as Irving Plaza and Bowery Ballroom, touring alongside UK act TOY, and amassing a following in England, just to name a few. (corinne bagish)

#55

stargazy

#72

brazos

#50

empress of

Brooklyn’s Stargazy is the new moniker for the artist previously known as Fish Doctor, who was the runner-up in our year-end Readers’/Fans’ poll. With this band, things are never as happygo-surfing as they seem at first listen, hinting at a sinister layer of meaning hiding under sunny melodies - fun but far from throwaway, full of confidence and frivolity that smells of experience rather than naivety. (francesca baker)

Since his debut album in 2009, Martin Crane (the man behind Brazos) fell out of touch with his musical purpose, but reclaimed it with “Saltwater,” an album dedicated to self-reflection and spirituality. Opening track ‘Always On’ is an inspired kaleidoscopic number between alt folk, psych rock and what we guess are Middle Eastern influences reminiscent of The Beatles at their most ascetic, while the rest of the album obeys to stricter impressionistic folk-pop rules with dreamy elements à la Here We Go Magic.

The brainchild of 24-year-old dream/electro/pop talent Lorely Rodriguez, Empress of had a great 2013 that led to a deal with Terrible Records (run by Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor) and to a series of important shows, including a few dates in Europe (one for a Pitchfork-curated show in Paris). If she manages to keep up with the quality of her stunning early singles ‘Champagne’ and ‘Hat Trick,’ Empress of could be the next St. Vincent.


best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

avant indie

nyc avant indie Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Yo La Tengo 2) Animal Collective 3) Yeasayer 4) Dirty Projectors 5) Son Lux 6) Gang Gang Dance 7) Kaki King 8) Department of Eagles 9) Emily Wells 10) Nat Baldwin 11) The Fiery Furnaces 12) Marnie Stern 13) Delicate Steve 14) Codeine 15) Rubblebucket 16) Ava Luna 17) Modern Rivals 18) Angels of Light 19) Mice Parade 20) Buke and Gase

life size maps

no shoes

nicholas nicholas

empty chairs

#2

Photo: oscar

celestial shore

See the feature on page 16!

#35

life size maps

There is a heroic nature to Mike McKeever’s musical project Life Size Maps. Following in the digital footprints marked out by Kurt Feldman’s Depreciation Guild and other NYC groups like Parts and Labor and Anamanaguchi, McKeever employs similar sound design concepts in personal ways. The band’s latest single, ‘This Same House,’ shimmers with a celestial background pulse as cleanly defined vocals overlay forceful guitar washes and precise synthesizer hooks, masterfully embedding a number of surprise changes with prog rock leanings. (dave cromwell)

#77

no shoes

No Shoes claim that they offer post-apocalyptic pop, but their dissonant prog rock vibes, heavy use of track panning, and lack of open melodies place their music in the calderon of genres we call avant-indie - with an extra dose of math influences. The nature of their instrumentation, paired with distortion, odd time signatures and vocals sung by what sounds like a somewhat numb crowd, makes for a fun listen (for the non-faint of heart). (michael haskoor)

tews

#94

empty chairs

#87

christine hoberg

#90

nicholas nicholas

Brooklyn Empty Chairs don’t really play “Dream Jazz,” but the band’s songs flow like a stream of unconscious thoughts, full of gentle but still disorienting unpredictability, immersed in an atmosphere that conjures up another important quality of dreams: depth of meaning - or at least the perception of it.

From the (virtual) a cappella gem ‘All That Hate’ to the demanding chant in ‘I, II, III,’ Christine Hoberg has never been one to back down from a vocal challenge. A 2013 collaboration with Milwakee’s Kiings on electropop ditty, ‘You Can’t See Me,’ brought a fair amount to attention to her new LP “World Within,” an ambitious record that dwells between the extremes of more or less traditional songwriting and experimental tendencies - mostly centered around an unusual employment of vocals.

There was a time in the ’80s when a lot of people enjoyed truly anguishing, borderline funereal music (Dead Can Dance, anybody?). The electro-freak, kitchen project of Chris Masullo (that’s where everything is recorded), Nicholas Nicholas makes music that sounds like a bad trip that somehow becomes a surreal adventure: It’s a dense world where dissonances suddenly make perfect sense and a dreamy stream of consciousness leads to the discovery of new truths through random associations. the deli Spring 2014

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

dream folk

weyes blood

johanna warren

Cassandra jenkins

wilsen

graph rabbit

Photo: Shervin

#23

belle mare

#81

johanna warren

#34

weyes blood

#82

graph rabbit

#94

Cassandra jenkins

Listen closely, and you can actually hear your heartstrings pull, tighten, and break, as Brooklyn dream-pop duo Belle Mare carries you away into a beautifully tormenting rest. Their 2013 EP, “The Boat of the Fragile Mind,” consists of eight intoxicating, griefstricken songs that burrow into your head and your heart, and stay there. The backbone of the project is Thomas Servidone’s softspoken acoustic guitar strums, melancholy in a way that bolsters and compliments Amelia Bushell’s spacious, moaning vocals to create a sadness that is almost ethereal. (jp basileo)

Just by glancing at the name, it’s clear that ghost-folk Weyes Blood (formerly known as Weyes Bluhd) isn’t afraid to get experimental and yes, “weyes” is indeed pronounced “wise.” Natalie Mering, formerly of Jackie-O Motherfucker, brings this sense of creativity and adventure to every aspect of her Weyes Blood project, which she started back in 2006. Mering’s work is textural and multi-faceted. She layers tape samples with piano and guitar to create spectral soundscapes. Complimented by her ethereal voice, these collages are hauntingly penetrating. (corinne bagish)

#44

wilsen

Wilsen, with an “e,” (featured on the cover of this mag’s Fall 2013 issue) specializes in building emotion, using Tamsin Wilson’s wandering, hypnotic soprano and restrained but intricate layers of guitar, bass and drums. Their hybrid folk melds the dynamic shifts of classical music with modern reverb and vivid lyrics that appeal to the senses as much as they tell stories. (bianca seidman) 40

the deli Spring 2014

lainez

Johanna Warren had a busy 2013. She’s been on the road as a singer with Iron & Wine, recorded with Natalie Merchant and Elvis Perkins, and self-release her debut solo record, “Fates,” a collection of nine songs recorded over the course of three days in a haunted attic in upstate New York, and then moved to Portland. The 24-year-old songwriter’s debut solo album is stripped to the bone yet full and spacious, entirely acoustic yet lush with eery ambience.

“Less is more” - they say - and Brooklyn’s Graph Rabbit have definitely learned that lesson. The band’s dream folk is so ethereal and sparse that it can almost be mistaken for random sounds of nature. Should we call it ambient-folk then? This is music with supernatural powers. Lull yourself to a deep and satisfying sleep with ‘Only Fields,’ or stare at your best friend right in the eyes until you can read his/her mind with ‘Make It Stop.’

Brooklynite Cassandra Jenkins can sound a little like a modern Mazzy Star, but with her single ‘Rabbit,’ you find a maturation towards a more personal, super intimate, delicately layered sound. Between crashing cymbals and moonlight twinkle, you find a gentle halcyonic rolling wash of guitar and precise yet eerie keys with perfectly placed percussion dissipating into Cassandra Jenkins’ bittersweet tones that seems somewhat disillusioned but tinted with hopefulness. (francesca baker)


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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

alt folk /folk rock streets of laredo

cannonball statman

such hounds

Alt- Folk #19

Tall Tall Trees

#44

Dots will echo

One of the most solid and creative indie folk bands in Brooklyn, Tall Tall Trees, are regular hosts of our Best of NYC issue. Their latest record “Moments” (from 2012) is a psych-folk gem full of texture, character and expanding sonics. Project mastermind Mike Savino is currently plotting the release of “the most insane banjo album known to man.”

Dots Will Echo hails from Ridgewood, NJ, and put out one of the best records of 2012 - at least according to... me. But my opinion must be also shared by Mr. Sufjan Stevens, since he released their LP “Drunk Is The New Sober / Stupid Is The New Dumb” via his label Asthmatic Kitty. Frontman and main songwriter Nick Berry tackled romantic loss and apocalyptic depression with a healthy dose of Zen. Dots Will Echo is currently working on their follow-up. (ben krieger)

#60

phoebe novak

#72

Streets of laredo

The first thing that people notice about Phoebe Novak is her voice, which growls, croons, screams, wails and weeps with a jaw-dropping command of dynamics and timbre. Though they often sound as if they’ve been shoved through a meat grinder, Novak’s melodies are as sophisticated as Joni Mitchell’s. She’s a highly-admired, ballsy and beautiful artist who doesn’t give a fuck. (ben krieger)

Streets of Laredo is the kind of folk band Brooklyn was made for. A quartet that grabs what instruments they have around, and howls at the moon collectively over broken hearts, getting stuck in crappy situations, and wondering about how the hours pass by. Singing almost entirely in harmony, this band is every bit a family. They released two solid EPs in 2013, rocked SXSW, and are touring the US this summer. (Mike Levine)

Production Corner Choosing The Right Recording Studio When looking for recording options, our first advice is: Don’t start looking for studios - look for people instead (a great place to start are the Deli’s Listings for Recording Studios and Engineers & Producers). What artists should try to find is - primarily - somebody who truly enjoys his/her music and who has experience in recording that particular genre (you can find that out by taking a look at the engineers’ credits and listening to their online samples). All sound engineers are passionate music fans: Give them a project that they believe in, and they will go the extra mile, be more enthusiastic and dedicated, and - what you want to hear - might be available to charge less. Ideally the producer/sound engineer should become an extra element of the band, but a selfless one: somebody who is capable of understanding the artist’s vision to develop it rather than impose

The Friendly Smile of a Top NYC-based Engineer & Producer: Tchad Blake.

his/her own. This added member should be a musical person who has both the technical knowledge to lead you and your bandmates through the recording process and the ear to advise the band about issues related to song structure, songwriting, arrangement and delivery. Read the full article on Delicious Audio: bit.ly/rec-studio.


nyc alt folk Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Devendra Banhart 2) CocoRosie 3) Punch Brothers 4) Gregory and The Hawk 5) Deer Tick 6) Titus Andronicus 7) Akron/Family 8) Wilsen 9) Wooden Wand 10) Sam Amidon 11) Streets of Laredo 12) Luke Temple 13) Joy Kills Sorrow 14) Hiss Golden Messenger 15) Lightspeed Champion 16) She Keeps Bees 17) The Shivers 18) Michael Gira 19) Mree 20) Sorcha Richardson

great caesar

Photo: tony

dots will echo

wilde

Folk- Rock #78

brooms

#89

Cannonball statman

In case you missed it, Brooms’ latest release, “Fuzzy Waters,” is about as close to New Orleans as you’re liable to come while still being trapped between NYC’s skyscrapers. This is singer-songwriter music for fans of early Randy Newman, or late Tom Waits, operating by a simple and effective policy: Just because you’re baring your soul, it doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun. (Mike Levine)

For starters, Cannonball Statman has got the look - with an oversized afro of curly red hair and a commanding stage presence. The music delivers the acoustic punk attack of antifolk by way of black metal; it’s not unusual for a typical 5-minute song to run the BPM gamut and contain several distinct sections. Lyrically, he embraces smorgasbord surrealism, but the songs always resonate and the audience is never distanced from youthful anxieties and aspiration that fuel his fervor. (ben krieger)

making the world a better sounding place.

#44

such hounds

#65

great caesar

Here in NYC, around May-June, everybody anticipates with disgust the impending heat, and Americana-rock quartet, Such Hounds, on their latest EP, “I Hate Summer,” have a few things about the warmest season they’d like to share. Compared to their previous self-titled EP, the new record has a welcomed sense of urgency, ready to shit-kick any barn-raising party into high-gear (assuming you attend barn-raising parties, of course). They’re recommended for anyone who enjoys good old-fashioned heartland rock jams, whether you hate the summer or not. (Mike Levine)

True to their name, Great Caesar is not little in the least. They began as a jazz trio, added three members, and kept the brass. Years later, now with six dudes and horns galore, this originally Connecticut-based band has moved to Brooklyn. Great Caesar’s strength is in the explosiveness it can pack. Brass-fueled oomph and joined in voices provide extra horsepower and elevate pop moments to higher heights. (corinne bagish)

10 jay street suite 405 brooklyn, ny 11201 (718) 797-0177 www.joelambertmastering.com

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best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

rootsy pop

nyc rootsy pop Top 20

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Lucius 2) The Pierces 3) Oh Honey 4) Elizabeth & the Catapult 5) Beautiful Small Machines 6) Diane Birch 7) Nicole Atkins 8) NATTY 9) Universal Rebel 10) Laura Stevenson & the Cans 11) Hazmat Modine 12) Eytan & The Embassy 13) The Spring Standards 14) April Smith & the Great Picture show 15) Argyle Johansen 16) Antigone Rising 17) Shanya Zaid & the Catch 18) Rachel Brown 19) Les Racquet 20) Anjelia

dear georgiana

storyman

piers

poor remy

#16

dear georgiana

Dear Georgiana is the music of Brooklyn-based and Alabama-born Lauren Balthrop. If Patsy Kline had lived past 1963 and made a record produced by Barry Gordy, you might be so bold as to compare the two chanteuses. This is not the first musical project for Balthrop, in fact, she is well-seasoned having performed in numerous bands. This is, however, her first solo endeavor and possibly the most well-conceived of all.

#22

Bridget Davis + the Viking Kings

Bridget Davis + the Viking Kings - a folk ensemble that placed third in our Best of NYC Year End Readers’ Roots Music Poll - isn’t your typical crooning country songstress. Each song weaves together its own unique tapestry of interesting characters and romantic late-night adventures, and most of these characters have some dark stories to tell. These songs are narrative inspiration perfect for anyone with an axe to grind. (Mike Levine)

#25

Poor Remy

Combining the simplicity of the AGD school of songwriting with the depth of multiple instrumentation, earworm acapella style 44

the deli Spring 2014

bridget davis + the viking kings melodies and dense harmonies, Poor Remy are a Queens-based folk band who likes to shout about their feelings, their move to the apparently not always gold paved city from sleepy Ohio, in songs that suggest a sort of harmonious nervousness. Bask back and melt away to lilting soft skiffling string work, harmonicas, layered three-piece vocals, enigmatic enthusiasm and throbbing chords. (francesca baker)

#44

storyman

#62

piers (ex gondola)

When we heard that The Guggenheim Grotto changed their name to Storyman, we weren’t expecting much more than that, a new set of clothes on a well-worn groove. But the Brooklyn-by-Ireland altpop group has done far more than updating monikers. The songwriting duo of Kevin May and Mick Lynch has expanded from their coffeehouse roots to include a huge landscape filled with abstract imagery and moving lyrics. It’s quite a stylistic shift.

Piers’ tunes are propelled by strummed acoustic guitars, but they are not really folky. They are indie-pop tunes featuring an element of blues thoughtfulness that falls somewhere in the middle, between The Shins’ early lo-fi gems, Belle and Sebastian’s suggestive storytelling, and The Beta Band’s quirky pop experiments. Charming.


nyc alt soul Top 20

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

alt soul greg banks

emily king

niia

julie outrage

Photo: dan

#3

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) Lewis 2) Gramatik 3) SZA 4) Theophilus London 5) Hercules and Love Affair 6) Antony and the Johnsons 7) Sharon Jones and the Dap-kings 8) Cole Williams 9) Jamie Lidell 10) Citizen Cope 11) Daniel Merriweather 12) Alice Smith 13) Kendra Morris 14) Trixie Whitley 15) Doe Paoro 16) Emily King 17) Fiona Silver 18) denitia and sene. 19) Rush Midnight 20) Dreams in Static

monick

wet

See the feature on page 18!

#30

Denitia and sene.

denitia and sene. were probably the best live act at our 2013 CMJ Marathon electronic showcase at The Delancey. The Brooklyn duo plays music that - if hard pressed - we would label as “trip’n’b,” with many similarities to Tricky’s early records, but without the British artist’s insane “bakedness,” and the rap component replaced by a sexier soul one.

#32

emily king

I think if Marvin Gaye was born of the fairer sex, he may have come out singing somewhat like soul singer Emily King, a woman that can weave the hidden sweetness of pain into an irresistible set of soul jams. Her EP “Seven” and last year’s “Ordinary Heart” are the perfect challenge to any cloudy day. (Mike Levine)

#50

i/o

The most talented artists know how to make a lot from very little. R’n’B songwriter I/O seems to enjoy these limitations. Whether wondering where things went wrong in the reflective ‘Wasted My TIme’ or caught in the throes of passion in popular track ‘You Slay Me,’ I/O is a constant tinkerer with his arsenal of audio toys, using his talents to extract the hidden humanity found just beneath the surface of a robotic playground of beatbox grooves. (Mike Levine)

#56

suzanna choffel

Suzanna choffel

What’s a music teacher from Austin to do after scoring a million

Photo: Stevan Alcala

hits on YouTube with a beautiful cover of ‘Landslide’ on NBC’s “The Voice”? Move to Brooklyn and become our borough’s (not so) best kept secret. Suzanna Choffel has huge chops (despite her diminutive stature), and those pipes usually mean business. Think Dusty Springfield... with a little more grit. (Mike Levine)

#58

julie outrage

#97

greg banks

#101

niia

Musician/filmmaker/journalist Julie Outrage is a tour de force no matter how you’re introduced to her. Never one to back down from a fight, Julie’s music is mostly acoustic guitar-based, but acts like a powder keg of raw emotion. You’ll know pretty quickly that this lady is not screwing around. Her honesty might be brutal, but Julie’s vision is always complete. (Mike Levine)

Greg Banks, hailing originally from Louisiana, has been infusing the airwaves with his Big Easy sultry croon since 2007. Silky and soulful, he vacillates from a classic R’n’B lilt in ‘Magazine Street’ to a more robust vocalization reminiscent of recent Andre 3000 in ‘Brooklyn Girl.’ There is definitely a ’90’s vibe that permeates his catalogue - a nod to the New Jack Swing pioneered by Bobby Brown with hits like ‘My Prerogative.’ (brokemc)

Former jazz singer Niia has gone from crooning torch songs, to singing soul jams about burning. Her single/video, ‘Generation Blue,’ shows the artist igniting an otherwise slow and dreamy work into an explosion of well-chosen instruments (produced by Hannibal). Taken from her forthcoming record, the song takes a cosmic dreamworld and makes it your daily paper’s headline. (Mike Levine) the deli Spring 2014

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nyc hip hop Top 20

best nyc Emerging Artists 2014

hip hop + other

Full Deli Web Buzz charts: thedelimagazine.com/charts

1) nas 2) 50 Cent 3) A$ap Rocky 4) Wu-Tang Clan 5) Childish Gambino 6) A$AP Ferg 7) Fabolous 8) A$AP Mob 9) Jay-Z 10) Beastie Boys 11) Mobb Deep 12) Pharoahe Monch 13) Lloyd Banks 14) Jadakiss 15) Fat Joe 16) Kelis 17) Ghostface Killah 18) Kid Cudi 19) Raekwon 20) Le1f

Cakes Da Killa

pushmethod

Photo: Sarah

#6

emefe

#17

pushmethod

#43

after the smoke

#29

YC the cynic

#93

cakes da killa

#35

zongo junction

#97

rilgood

See the feature on page 19! ’’

NYC’s PUSHMETHOD brings the funk/hip hop/rock genre to new frontiers by effortlessly combining virtually every contemporary style of music into each song. A band that is sure to turn many heads (teen ones in particular) in the very near future, it seems that their destiny is truly in their own hands. Like the precursors of their genre, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, they’re also not a afraid to throw a ballad in for good measure. (joe fish)

Young talented rappers are a dime a dozen in NYC. But add in the social awareness of Dead Prez and wordplay that would make MF Doom chuckle, and you have a new name in the game worth following: YC The Cynic. His latest album “GNK” was released in August, and the album is beyond hot. Frank Drake’s production on the album is just as impressive as YC’s emcee-ing, with groovy beats filled with old soul samples.

When most of us travel somewhere far, we come back feeling relaxed. When Charles Ferguson came back from a trip to Ghana, Africa, he started a band. Zongo Junction, a 9-piece psychAfrobeat group from Brooklyn (via San Fran), doesn’t just look backwards to Fela Kuti’s example to craft their songs. Tracks like

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the deli Spring 2014

Natasha

‘The Van That Got Away’ have their own unique sound, while keeping the spirit of Nigerian Afrobeat very much alive. (mike levine)

As far as new-wave rappers go, most of the MCs, who attempt to push the envelope, end up getting lost in the mail bag. Musician/ Designer/Developer After The Smoke (who recently relocated to NYC from FL and made it at #43 in our most recent poll for Emerging NYC Artists) might as well be FedEx. From the hoppin’, bouncin’, jumpin’ electro smooth beats to his characteristic buttery croon, ATS’ music is magnetic and visionary. (brokemc)

Cakes Da Killa is guilty. He murders every microphone he touches. His 808-heavy beats terrorize clubs, and send dancers into hedonistic fugues. It’s cathartic to hear a rapper be lewd and lascivious to his own sex. Is it misogynistic if a male rapper sexualizes and objectifies men? Excellent dinner conversation if you ask me. Regardless, Cakes has the delivery and bounce to keep crowds grooving deep into dance floors. If you feel like dancing, pay a visit to the crime scene. (brokemc)

Rilgood spits raps like he’s furious with the microphone. In ‘Flying Pig Theory,’ he boasts, “lookin’ at my rhymebook is like lookin’ at Medusa.” Indeed, his stony perspective reflects a cold and hard world, and the gravelly character of his voice defies his youthful look and carries the weight of his sentiments like a freighter full of masonry.


VINTAGE GEAR MEETS NEW BRANDS GUITARS + AMPS + SYNTHS + DRUMS PROFESSIONAL INSTRUMENT REPAIR OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 718 388 6365 330 WYTHE AVE. - L TO BEDFORD WWW.MAINDRAGMUSIC.COM


kitchen stompbox news + reviews

DigiTech JamMan Express XT Looper Gus Green

T

he Digitech JamMan Express XT is a descendant of Digitech’s JamMan series of loopers that have been around since the ’90s. This time the US manufacturer aimed to pack all of the necessary functions and then some into the smallest enclosure possible. Did they hit it out of the park? Let’s find out. The JamMan Express XT has 1 knob, 1 switch, 3 Status LEDs, Stereo I/O, and their proprietary JamSync™ technology in and out ports, which allows chaining and synching pedals together. It is a very simple design with a retro paint job reminiscent of a ’50s diner. All the basic functions are on tap like Record, Overdub, Play, Stop, and Undo/Redo, but what blows me away are the capabilities that come alive when taking advantage of JamSync™ and the discrete stereo I/O. So you hit the foot switch, and recording commences; hit it again, and the loop closes; hit it again, and you are overdubbing; hit it again, and you close the overdub loop; tap and hold for 2 seconds while playing back, and the last action is undone; do it again, and it’s redone; double tap to stop while in play mode; tap and hold for 2 seconds when stopped to clear. After some heavy testing, I find the JamsMan a solid, functional, great sounding looper with a nice feature set and small footprint at a super low price. The added JamSync™ technology allowed me to synch my loops with the ones of my keyboardist - something I always struggled with.

SXSW Stompbox Exhibit 2014

L

ast March, The Deli’s Stompbox Exhibit, for the first time, was part of the official SXSW Music Gear Expo. The event was by far the best attended exhibit we have organized, with a total audience between four and five thousand musicians and more than thirty participating pedal manufacturers, including EarthQuaker Devices, Moog, Strymon, T-Rex, Walrus Audio, ZVex, TC Electronic, Pigtronix, ProCo, DigiTech, and SolidGoldFX among others. Organized together with Guitar World, sponsors included Washburn Guitars, Shure, PreSonus, and Pedal Genie (the Netflix of pedals - google them!). We are already working on the fall 2014 Brooklyn show at Main Drag Music, scheduled for October 2526, as well as Summer NAMM in Nashville, while making plans for the SXSW 2015 exhibit, which will also include a separate category of (super cool) musical instruments - keep checking our blog Delicious Audio (audio.thedelimagazine.com) for an announcement in this regard.

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the deli Spring 2014

Stompbox Exhibit 2014 at SXSW


kitchen stompbox news + reviews

Korg Nuvibe Vibrato Chorus Effector By Gus Green

I

t looks like Korg’s bringing back a retro classic in new school fashion. For those that know the legendary Uni-Vibe effect, originally produced by Shin-ei in the ’60s, you’ll love this. Korg’s new Nuvibe pedal was designed under close supervision by the original designer, and sports many new modern features that just make me happy. The original circuit was apparently made out of material that is now considered hazardous so a new component consisting of 79 transistors was created in its absence. This along with features like the LFO designing WAVE sliders have been added for a modern twist.

Electro-Harmonix Tortion JFET Overdrive By Gus Green

T

he folks at Electro-Harmonix are always working on something. This time it’s a new JFET Overdrive unit that they consider to be one of their new flagship devices. This looks to be a well-rounded pedal that can achieve all sorts of distorted tones. Under the hood, we’re looking at a JFET Overdrive with tube-like response and tone, a boost switch with independent Volume and Gain for two-channel flexibility, a four-way switch Pre-Gain selector with Treble, Middle and Bass tone knobs, as well as an XLR out for use as a stand alone preamp with cab emulation. Exciting stuff!

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the deli Spring 2014


the deli Spring 2014

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the deli's Pedal Board More pedal reviews at delicious-audio.com!

Source Audio OFD Guitar Modeler • Features natural sounding modeling of twelve classic amp tones. • Clever knob organization allows to control all necessary EQ, dynamics and volume settings with a few knobs. • Includes unique Preset Morphing and external Hot Hand control features.

Darkglass Microtubes B3k Bass OD • A Bass Overdrive featuring hybrid JFET and CMOS gain stages. • Two multi-way switches allow for an incredible variety of tones, from subtle EQ to full-on fuzz. • Particularly effective at the tasks of warming up the tone and cutting through the mix.

Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina • A thick fuzz with a twist. • “Clean Blend” knob lets you mix clean tone and distorted one. • Mid Boost knob lifts the 1kHz frequency to get the tone’s body back, and cut through the mix.

Amzel Electronics Cheshire Cat • A non conventional analog distortion that allows a wide range of innovative adjustments. • A high-quality filter allows to adjust frequency and resonance. • Accent knob allows fine tuning of attack and sustain.

if you are interested in reviewing pedals, plug-ins and apps for The Deli and Delicious Audio, ple ase contact delicious.editor@the delimagazine.com.

the deli's gadget synths

Teenage Engineering OP-1 • Everything you need to make a synth pop hit (vocals included) in one tiny package. • 8 Synth engines, 8 Drums patches tweakable by 4 knobs, with 1 FX, 1 LFO and 2 arpeggiators each. • 4 track recorded and built in mic (you can plug a better one in).

Dr. Blankenstein Rasta Dub Siren Synth • Animal noise based synth (loops of elephant call, monkey screams, and lion growl). • Pitch control does what you expect it to do, while the “Jah Effects” section makes things way more interesting through a combination of filters and LFOs. • “Wave” switch activates a motion/light sensor that lets you change the FX filter’s depth/pitch using your hand or a light source! 52

the deli Spring 2014

Soulsby Atmegatron • A modern take on the classic Chiptune sounds from the ’80s with a huge selection of waveforms and filters. • Very intuitive to work with, it lets you upload your own waveforms as well. • Features LFO, 2 envelops, an advanced arpeggiator, ‘wave crusher’ effect and Analogue bass boost for your bass sounds. • Open source software built on the Arduino platform.

Diabolical Devices OS4 • An affordable 4 voice drone synth (square wave oscillators) with an LFO. • The pitch of each oscillator can be controlled separately • The LFO can be applied to only one voice at a time, for interesting multilayered rhythmic drones.

The Deli NYC #38 - Best of NYC 2014, Big Ups, Wet  

Annual 'Best of NYC' issue. Featuring cover interview with poll winner Big Ups. Plus: loads of reviews on the city's latest emerging bands f...

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