Page 1

Advt. JANUARY-MARCH- 2014

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN

VOLUME - 2

ISSUE -4

January- March 2014

2 4 68

www.textilevaluechain.com


www.textilevaluechain.com Register & Read...

For Brand / Company Promotion : Write : sales@textilevaluechain.com Call : +91-22-21026386 / +91-9769442239

Advt.

 TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN Magazine issues  Latest News  Quality Articles  Meaningful Interviews  Reports / Forecast  Updated Events  Directory  Many more...


Technology from, THE NATIONAL WIRE HEALD WORKS PVT. LTD.

Every Products is designed & made specific to our customers need for the highest weaving speed avialble to day is pojectile or air Jet or Repier or water jet Plot no. 65 Block No. 65, At & Po. Mota Borasara, Tal. Mangrol, Dist Surat ( Gujarat) India Ph. : + 91-2621-234365 / 712, E-mail: karan@keytex.in, pratik@himson.in, Website : www.keytex.in

ADVT.

“ KEY” brand is the weaver’s first choice for the healds and drop pins for high speed & Quality weaving


Priority-Sector Status needed for Textile Industry New Year Greetings to all subscribers, Advertisers, well-wishers, and supporters of Textile Value Chain. May the New Year fulfil your all plans of growth and development! We are glad to present this issue of TVC, the cover story of which is confined to the realm of industrial finance. Finance is the lifeline of any industry. It is said that banks always support successful companies and companies getting adequate and timely finance on favorable terms always succeed.The reverse of this is, unless adequate banking facilities are available companies cannot succeed and because companies are unsuccessful banks do not open their cash vaults. This should not become the chicken and egg problem. The vicious circle must be broken. Since the scheme of rejuvenation has not engulfed the entire industry, and as a result a large number of mills are still struggling to find their feet. Besides, tremendous volatility in cotton prices and also in man-made fibre prices in the recent period has weakened the financial muscles of the industry. All this reflects in the long queue for availment of assistance under the Corporate Debt Restructuring Scheme (CDR). The restructured textile accounts of ten banks, accounting for 57% of the total restructured assets for all the banks covered by the RBI study, stood at Rs 190 billion as on 30th September, 2013 accounting for nearly 10 Per cent of the total restructured accounts. The power loom sector which accounts for over 60% of the aggregate cloth production in the country is still lagging behind in technology upgradation, despite the Investment-friendly Technology Upgradation Fund Scheme introduced on 1st April, 1999. The leaders of the power loom industry grieve their inability to offer collateral security to the investing banks. The Ministry of Textiles and the Textile Commissioner should consider this issue on priority. If this problem is not attacked on war footing, the backlog of modernization in the power loom sector will keep on swelling. To lend competitive edge to the industry in the international market, the rupee export credit should be made available at 7 Per cent. The interest rate for the working capital for domestic operations should also be reduced substantially. Being the premiere industry, accounting for a chunk of foreign exchange earnings and the largest provider of industrial jobs, the textile industry, with the proverbial low-profit profile, deserves the priority-sector status, the lending target for which should be jacked up from 40% to 50 %. At the same time, the banking sector will be able to multiply its resources for lending purposes, if a recent suggestion of a RBI panel, under the chairmanship of Shri Nachiket Mor, to keep the target of enlarging the banking landscape to cover every resident Indian above 18 years of age, with a fullservice account, and every account holder having an electronic payment access point within 15 minutes of the walk is accepted. Let us hope for the best.


Advt.

State-of-the-art technologies


JAN- MARCH 2014 ISSUE 9

22

49

Government News

Industry Views

10

Mr. Nilay Rathi & Mr. Surendra Shetty

Market Research Article : Teens affected by Fashion

Economy News

25 to 29

11

Cost competitiveness in Textiles and Clothing Sector

POST SHOW REPORT

By Prof. M.D. Teli

Indiatex 2013, Vapi

29

55

Rise in Restructured Assets

Fibre To Fashion 2013, Surat

By Care Rating Agency

56

30

Techtexil 2013, Mumbai

SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Technical Article: Fragrance Finishing of Textiles – A Review

57

Lesson from China on HR

32

English Communication – Employability Skill

Report : TAI – All India Textile Conference, Surat

COVER STORY : FINANCE, Lifeline of Industry.

33 to 36

Association News 12 Corporate News 13 International News 14, 15, 16

54

IRANTEX & Seminar by MANTRA 58 Company Profile : SGS Innovations & Digital Consulting 59

19

Technical Article: Biomimetics in Textiles

Bank Finance in Textile industry

39

By Mr. Avinash Mayekar 20

Launch of Enka Brand by Aditya Birla Nuvo Ltd.

Voice of Powerloom Sector

41

Interview with President Bhiwandi Powerloom Federation Ltd.

Technical Article: Composite Textile application in Aerospace Technology

21

46

Interviews from Banks

Fashion Forecast : Print Forecast

Fabric Report 61 National Household Survey findings, by Textile Committee 63 Tradeshow Details

IOB & OBC

EDITORIAL TEAM

Editor & Publisher Ms. Jigna Shah

Chief – In – Editor Ms. Rajul J. Shah

Editorial Advisor Shri V.Y. Tamhane

Advertising & Sales Md. Tanweer

Graphic Designer Editorial Support & Expert Committee Interactive Technology Mrs. Nimmi Kothari, Microbiologist

INDUSTRY Mr. Devchand Chheda – City Editor - Vyapar ( Janmabhumi Group) Mr. Manohar Samuel- Joint President, Birla Cellulose, Grasim Industries Mr. Aditya Biyani- Marketing Director, Damodar Group Dr. M. K. Talukdar – VP, Kusumgar Corporates Mr. Shailendra Pandey, VP (Head – Sales and Marketing),Indian Rayon

CONSULTANT / ASSOCIATION

EDUCATION / RESEARCH

Mr. Avinash Mayekar, MD, Suvin Advisor Pvt. Ltd.

Mr. B.V. Doctor - HOD knitting, SASMIRA ,

Mr. Shivram Krishnan, Senior Textile Advisor

Dr. Ela Dedhia- Associate Professor, Nirmala Niketan College

Mr. G. Benerjee, Management & Industrial Consultant

Dr. Mangesh D. Teli – Professor, Ex.HOD & Dean ICT (former UDCT) ,

Mr. Uttam Jain, Director- PDEXCIL; VP of Hindustan chamber of commerce

Dr. S.K. Chattopadhyay,Principal Scientist & Head MPD, CIRCOT

Mr. Jaykrishna Pathak, President, Bombay Yarn Merchant Association & Exchange Ltd.

Dr. Rajan Nachane, Retired Scientist, CIRCOT

Mr. Shiv Kanodia- Sec General, Bharat Merchant Chamber Mr. N.D. Mhatre, Dy. Director, ITAMMA


See the latest textile machinery Meet the industry experts Learn the trends and opportunities. PLAN YOUR VISIT

BHILWARA

AHMEDABAD

BHOPAL INDORE

BARODA

ITMACH

SURAT

INTERNATIONAL

BURHANPUR VAPI MALEGAON

SILVASSA TARAPUR

NASHIK

MUMBAI

BHIWANDI

NAVI MUMBAI

TEXTILE MACHINERY & ACCESSORIES EXHIBITION

PUNE

SOLAPUR

January 22-24, 2014 Bhiwandi, India

ICHALKARANJI KOLHAPUR BELGAUM

Exhibitors

Supporting Partners:

Media Partners:

THE

S Sm i r a KAESER C O M P R E S S O R S

PRETEX

Advt.

BEST AIR ENGINEERING (INDIA) PVT. LTD.

SPACE BOOKING ENQUIRY

VISITOR REGISTRATION

Arvind Semlani: Cell: +91-9833977743, Farid K S: Cell: +91-9869185102 Tel. +91 (22) 22017013/61/62/63, E-mail: info@itmach.com,

Contact E-mail: services@itmach.com | Website: www.ITMACH.com Travel and Accommodation: Mr. Chandrashekar Madiwalar, Tel: 022 66091545 Cell: 09769282557 Email: chandrashekar.madiwalar@in.thomascook.com


KUMAR SILK MILLS 384 / A, Dabholkar Wadi, Ground oor, Shop no. 2, Kalbadevi Road, Mumbai - 400002 Tel : 022-32227900 Email : welworth.khadi@gmail.com Contact Person : Mr. Atul Jain - 9324169231 / Hitesh Shah - 7498207498


Advt.


GOVERNMENT NEWS Status Quo in the Definition Of Handloom Under Handloom Reservation Act The apprehension of a change in definition of ‘handloom’ has triggered speculation and insecurity amongst a section of weavers and handloom activities and given a mistaken impression on handloom activists that Government has taken a decision to allow the introduction of automatic machines to replace handlooms and that the Government intends to change the definition of ‘handlooms to include such mechanized looms’. In this regard, it is clarified that no change is contemplated by Ministry of Textiles, in definition of ‘handloom’, which has been defined as “any loom other than powerloom”under the Handlooms (Reservation of Articles for Production) Act, 1985. Handloom weaving constitutes one of the richest and most vibrant aspects of the Indian cultural heritage. As per handloom census 2009-10, the handloom sector provides employment to 43.3 lakh weavers and allied workers whereas the number was 65 lakh in 1995-96. The reduction in number of handloom weavers has been a cause of concern for Government. The sector is facing constraints such as lack of technological upgradation, inadequate availability of inputs, non-availability of adequate and timely credit, lack of contemporary designs etc. Further a trend is noticed that the younger generation is not willing to continue with this profession or be attracted to it owing to low generation of income and hard labour required to operate looms whereas easier earning options are available. The Government has been considering various ways to arrest this decline and has been implementing various developmental and welfare schemes to sustain the handloom sector. To improve the productivity and reduce the manual

labour on loom, the Advisory Committee on Handloom Reservation Act, in its meeting held on August 10, 2012 had recommended the modifications in definition of handloom as“handloom means any loom, other than powerloom; and includes any hybrid loom on which at least one process for weaving requires manual intervention or human energy for production’. Various aspects pertaining to amendment of the definition and other incidental issues has recently been studied in greater detail by a sub-committee of the Advisory Committee which was constituted for the purpose. The committee of officials comprising of representatives from various states, Textile Committee, Textile Commissioner, Powerloom division and Development Commissioner for handlooms have studied the matter in depth and submitted a report. The Sub-Committee while visiting different parts of the country examined various issues including different types of looms being operated by handloom weavers in handloom clusters across the c o u n t r y, t h e e x t e n t o f modernization/mechanization being carried out in different parts of the country, scope for further improvement /upgradation of looms mechanically without use of power to reduce manual labour and to improve productivity without compromising the quality of handloom fabric and the possibility of replicating such interventions in other handloom clusters/pockets. The Sub-Committee submitted its report on 29th October, 2013 to Government. The Sub-Committee has recommended that in the process of weaving, the weaver does not use power and hence definition of handloom need not be changed and it should remain in the purest form.The Ministry of Textiles has accepted the report of the subcommittee and no amendment in the Handloom Reservation Actto change the definition of handloom is contemplated.

Petrapole, Benapole Land Customs Stations to be Operational Seven Days A Week , Major Relief to Exporters from Congestion on Bangladesh Border Petrapole and Benapole (Bangladesh side) Land Customs Stations will now be made operational 7 days a week from 1st January, 2014. This move came in the wake of Union Minister of Textiles Dr. K.S. Rao writing to Union Finance Minister S h r i P. C h i d a m b a r a m a b o u t t h e congestion at Bangladesh border. Various exporters had raised this issue with the Textiles Minister in a recent meeting. “The move will ease off the way for trade between the two countries and it will especially benefit the textiles sectors of both the countries,” said Dr. Rao. The Finance Ministry has taken measures to facilitate the trade at Petrapole including extended working hours for the functioning of Customs at Petrapole and aligning the weekly holiday with Bangladesh so as to provide more working days to the trade. The movement of trucks carrying export cargo is allowed up to the LCS of the importing country for discharge of cargo. Regular meetings are being held between the jurisdictional Commissioners of Customs of India and Bangladesh as well as meetings with trade at the border to address issues of concern to the trade. These steps are expected to ease out the traffic congestion to a large extent. The delay in movement of export cargo at Petrapole is primarily due to infrastructural inadequacies at LCS, Petrapole emerging out of road conditions, traffic congestion and lack of authorized parking facilities. These issues are being taken up with the district administration. To address these further, the Land Ports Authority of India is building an Integrated Check Post (ICP) incorporating state of the art infrastructural facilities at Petrapole, which is expected to be ready by operation in 2014 which will further reduce congestion and ensure smooth flow of goods being exported from India to Bangladesh.

NEWS

Source : Ministry of Textile

For Updated & Complete News Visit , www.textilevaluechain.com News Section 9

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


ECONOMY NEWS NEWS

Source : Ministry of commerce Implementation of Yarn Supply Scheme (YSS) during 12th Plan The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs has approved the continuation of the Mill Gate Price Scheme (MGPS) along with 10 percent subsidy component with modifications. The scheme is now renamed as the Yarn Supply Scheme (YSS). The plan outlay for YSS during the 12th Plan will be Rs.443 crore. The scheme will cover the weavers who are under privileged as also vulnerable groups, by providing them subsidized yarn so that they can compete with the powerloom and mill sector. The target for the 12th Plan will be to supply 3506lakh kg yarn worth Rs.4364 crore. The target of providing service to beneficiaries under YSS has been accordingly fixed to serve all 23 lakh handloom units. The following modifications have been carried out in the existing scheme in the 12th Plan: 1.At present, 10 percent subsidy on mill gate price is payable to cotton yarn and domestic silk with quantity restrictions. Under the new scheme restriction for cotton yarn will be as follows: (I) up to and including 40s 30 kg per loom/month (ii) above 40s - 10 kg per loom/month. For domestic silk, quantity restriction will continue to be four kg per loom/month. 2. Along with hank yarn and domestic silk, 10 percent subsidy will also be applicable to wool for individual weavers and weavers cooperative societies only, with the following quantity

limitation/maximum limit: 3. To increase the coverage of primary weavers societies and individual weavers

and also to introduce cash sale of yarn especially to small weavers instead of payment of advance to precede indenting and supply of yarn with a gap of about 15 to 45 days, National Handloom Development Corporation (NHDC) now proposes to open distribution centres/warehouses in various parts of the country. To begin with 10 such distribution centres are to be set up.

cost of our exporters," added Shri Sharma.

Bank Realization Certificate (BRC) is required for discharge of export obligation and claiming of incentives under Foreign Trade Policy. BRC is also used by state government departments for refund of VAT. In addition, this data is an important economic indicator as it quantifies transaction level export 4. Service charges to NHDC are earnings. proposed to be enhanced by 0.5 percent Earlier, the banks issued physical copy of in all the States. BRC to the exporters and no data mining Background: or analysis was possible. The process for The Government of India has been BRC issuance and subsequent utilization implementing MGPS since 1992 for were largely manual and department making yarn available to handloom centric. The exporters suffered most as weavers at mill gate price by reimbursing they had to run to banks and government transportation charges to depot operating departments for claiming benefits. agencies, which are primary weavers The eBRC project was launched on June cooperative societies, apex societies and 5, 2012, which made the process secure other handloom organisations. and online. It created an integrated DGFT and Enforcement Directorate platform for receipt, processing and Sign MoU on Foreign Exchange Data subsequent use of all Bank Realization Sharing related information by exporters, banks, The Enforcement Directorate today c e n t r a l a n d s t a t e g o v e r n m e n t signed a Memorandum of Understanding departments. It was made mandatory (MoU) with Director General of Foreign with effect from August 17, 2012. Trade (DGFT) for sharing of foreign e-BRC project enables banks to upload exchange realization data. This data is also Foreign Exchange realisation information known as eBRC (Electronic Bank relating to merchandise goods exports on Realization Certificate) data. to the DGFT server under a secured The Union Minister of Commerce and protocol. So far 90 banks operating in Industry Shri Anand Sharma presided over India, including foreign banks and the ceremony in which Dr. Rajan Katoch, cooperative banks have uploaded more Director, Enforcement, Ministry of than 75 lakh e-BRCs on to the DGFT Finance and Director General of Foreign server. This initiative has reduced the cost Trade Dr. Anup K Pujari signed the MoU of transaction for exporters by eliminating for sharing of foreign exchange realization their interface with bank (for issuance of data. Finance Secretary Shri Sumit Bose, BRC purposes) and enhanced the Commerce Secretary Shri S R Rao and productivity of banks and DGFT. At the other senior officials were present during state level, Commercial Tax Departments the event. of Maharashtra, Delhi, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, Haryana and Chhattisgarh have Speaking on the occasion, Shri Sharma said that data sharing with government signed MoU with DGFT for receiving ed e p a r t m e n t s w o u l d i n c r e a s e BRC data for VAT refund purposes. Many transparency, reduce the human interface other states are in the process of signing and improve the ease of doing business in MOUs. DGFT is in talks with RBI for India. “The eBRC project is a significant expanding the coverage of this data for step in this direction and will contribute setting up an efficient mechanism for considerably in reducing the transaction foreign exchange monitoring.

For Updated & Complete News Visit , www.textilevaluechain.com News Section TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

10


ASSOCIATION NEWS

The DGFT has issued Notication No.63 dated 3rd January 2014 dispensing with the requirements of submission of hard copies of the documents even when applications for issuance of Registration Certicate for items like cotton and cotton yarn were being accepted on line. Shri Manikam Ramaswami, Chairman, Texprocil has welcomed the move of the DGFT to simplify the procedures in the case of commodities like cotton and cotton yarn which are under a registration process. He stated that most of the procedures have been simplied by the DGFT’s ofce and this was the only pending requirement which will give a huge relief to the exporters by saving their time, money and energy and enable them to concentrate on market development programmes. With the online registration of cotton and cotton yarn being operationalized fully the data can also now be published on a regular basis for both cotton and cotton yarn registration so that the exporters can be informed about the extent of the export of these commodities and take proper steps to implement their strategies. With the online system fully in operation, it should be easy for the Commerce Ministry to publish such data. Shri Manikam Ramaswami pointed out that these procedural simplication will go a long way in reducing the transaction costs of exporters and with the necessary policy support the target set for the textile sector for the scal year 2013-14 will be achieved. VIRENDER UPPAL, TAKES OVER AS CHAIRMAN of AEPC

Virender Uppal has been unanimously elected as Chairman of Apparel Export Promotion Council, by the Executive Committee of AEPC, for a term of two years i.e 2014- 15. It will be his second tenure as Chairman AEPC. Prior to this he was Chairman AEPC, during 2002-03 and Senior Vice Chairman, Northern Region AEPC between 2000-01. He has been in the Executive Committee of the AEPC since 1988. He was Chairman Finance & Budget SubCommittee, AEPC during 1999. Uppal was also the Chairman of the Project Implementation Committee which headed the various projects of the Council especially the current head ofce of AEPC i.e Apparel House under his guidance. He also spearheaded the Garment Export Association as the President during 1992-93. Virender Uppal is the Chairman of Richa Global Export pvt. Ltd. is a leading garment exporter. Dealing in both woven and knitted garments exporting mainly to USA & EU and is also in the business of exports of leather garments and accessories. Richa Global Exports Pvt. Ltd employs around 8000 peoples and has the manufacturing capacity of 1.5 million pieces per month. With his resilient dynamism and encompassing vision, he has been instrumental in providing impetus to the garment exports from the country. FAITMA MEET – An evening to remember Faitma arranged a special programme on 27th December 2013 to listen to the speeches of four experts drawn from diverse elds. Shri Ramesh Poddar, President, FAITMA welcomed all.He said, “ Like a bouquet of different owers with different fragrance, this evening brings you t h e u n i q u e opportunity to listern

to four stalwarts in diverse elds ”. In the array of speakers were two Senior Ofcers of the State Government, namely Shri Ramesh Aade and Shri S.J.Korabu. The rst-named ofcer explained the nuances of the State Textile Policy. The second ofcer unravelled the intricacies of the State Industrial Policy. The third speaker Shri Amitabh Taneja of Images India emphasised on the consumption story and forecast a bright future for the textile industry. He referred to the forthcoming 4th edition of InFashion, a glittering opportunity to display the strength of the Textile and Fashion industry. Shri Arun Ohri, Director of Adfactors Advertising and PR Ltd., the last speaker, focussed on the importance of advertising for a consumer product like textiles. Shri Rameshji gave his best wishes to all for New year 2014, and said, ‘ All human beings always look forward to the New Year with lot of hopes. We always feel that the New Year will give opportunity to full our dreams.’ He continues “ So far as the textile industry is concerned, the New Year is bound to be good. The economy of our two major markets viz the U.S.A and Euro zone has started looking up. At the same time, China has its own problems and the cost of production of textiles in China is on the rise. With the anticipated bumper production of cotton in the cotton season 2013-2014, there may not be sharp volatility in its prices. This will also have salutary impact on prices of man-made bres and lament yarns. In view of the expected improvement in textile economy, I urge on all of you to participate in Infashion 2014 which will lead to improvement in the top line and the bottom line of your balancesheet.”

For Updated & Complete News Visit , www.textilevaluechain.com News Section 11

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

NEWS

TEXPROCIL Welcomes DGFT’s move to Simplify


NEWS

CORPORATE NEWS INVISTA and Lenzing work together to bring improved performance to denim fabrics INVISTA, owner of LYCRA® bre, and Lenzing, a leading producer of man-made cellulosics like rayon, modal, and lyocell, are working together to bring improved aesthetic performance to stretch fabrics. By combining INVISTA’s patented LYCRA® dualFX® fabric technology with LENZING’s TENCEL® bre, the two companies are delivering a unique solution to the industry: cellulosic denim fabrics with signicantly improved shape retention. “Given the growing popularity of both LYCRA® bre and TENCEL® bre in the denim market, it was only natural that people wanted to combine them to come up with really amazing fabrics”, Albiero said. “However, as mills began experimenting they encountered issues such as growth, fabrics not keeping their shape, and fabric puckering due to seam slippage.” Lenzing is pleased to work with INVISTA to help our customers develop commercial fabrics with strong marketing attributes. Both companies have global sales, marketing and technical teams supporting the developments and they will provide joint promotional materials as well as supply chain support and marketing information. “This initiative represents two globally innovative bre companies working together to provide the denim market with fabrics that meet the performance needs of modern consumers”, says Michael Kininmonth, Senior Project Manager of Denim at Lenzing Fibres Inc. “Superior comfort with stretch and long-lasting recovery are set to become the next core product in women’s wear.” Garware Wall Ropes receives ‘Top Exporter Award’ award from ‘The Plastics export Promotion Council’

Garware Wall Ropes Ltd, (GWRL), a leading manufacturer of polymer cordages for the Indian and global markets, was today honoured with the prestigious ‘TOP EXPORTER AWARD’ by The Plastics Export Promotion Council (PLEXCONCIL) sponsored by the Department of Commerce, Government of India. GWRL received the award for being the top exporter of Fishing Nets in a year. The award was received by Mr. Milind Mirashi, GM, Exports, Garware Wall Ropes Ltd. at an award function held in The Lalit hotel, Mumbai. The award was presented by Mr. M P Taparia, Managing Director The Supreme Industries Ltd during the award ceremony. The Export Award Function included promising companies that, according to PLEXCONCIL, have created a niche in the world markets, achieving excellence while showcasing a deep sense of commitment to cater to customer’s requirements. The companies had to meet the council’s criteria for contribution, dedication, protability, growth, modest indebtedness and future prospects. GWRL’s selection was made in a year wrought with global economic uncertainties but a time when GWRL spearheaded its own business in the highly technology-intensive cordage industry through sustained product and marketing innovation. The company’s reliance on customized product portfolio further helped it to continue growing much faster than many of its peers. Mr. Mr. Milind Mirashi, GM, Exports, Garware Wall Ropes Ltd. commented, “We are grateful to The Plastics export Promotion Council for honoring us with such a prestigious award. It is a matter of great pride that the Council has chosen to recognize the company’s hard work, commitment and contribution. The award is a prestigious recognition that reects our vigorous growth and protability and is an acknowledgement of our hard work, commitment and the place Garware Wall Ropes Ltd has earned in the industry segment.” “This recognition will redouble our efforts to provide customized solutions and deliver value globally.” He added.

KNITSHOW-2013 at A.T.E. A.T.E. organised ‘KNITSHOW’2013’, an unique exhibition-cum-seminar, at its ofce at Andheri on 27 & 28 November 2013. The show was formally inaugurated by Mr Kenichi Motomaru, Director, Juki India Pvt Ltd. An array of Juki automated industrial sewing machines for chain stitch operation used for knit garments like t-shirts, polo shirts, undergarments and lingerie were on display at the exhibition. The machines displayed at the exhibition were: cylinderbed atlock with puller; atbed atlock; 4-thread overlock with metering device; 4-needle atseamer; zigzag stitch machine; single needle direct drive lockstitch with auto trimmer; cylinderbed atlock with fabric trimmer and auto trimmer for bottom hemming; cylinderbed atlock with metering device for tape attaching and tape cutter; electronic bartack to join elastic ends, etc. Apart from the live demo of these Juki machines, seminars on ‘Concept of improving productivity in sewing industry and attachments and devices for knits / lingerie industry’ were held in 2 sessions on each day. The show received an excellent response with as many as 54 visitors from 24 different companies turning up for the event, which included owners of various leading lingerie brands such as Salient, Valentine, Lady Care, VIP, etc. The visitors applauded this unique initiative and suggested to organise such events more frequently as they help in keeping abreast with the technical advancements at Juki, an innovative company with a continuous stream of new developments. Many media houses such as Apparel Online, Fashion Era, Textile Value Chain and IPF Online also visited the show and took interviews of the visitors.

For Updated & Complete News Visit , www.textilevaluechain.com News Section TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

12


New Zealand wool prices rm as auction volumes remain low obtained at last week’s auction, helped by the cancellation of the South Island sale. Moreover, limited volumes are expected to be available at the next sale. Wool Services International’s Coarse Crossbred Indicator increased by 1.2% to 498 NZ cents per kilo, clean. A more detailed review of price movements is shown in the accompanying table. Of the 12,500 bales of North Island wool on offer, 93% were sold. At the same sale a year earlier, the offering totalled 21,745 bales. The cumulative volume made available at auction this season is now 23.5% down from the comparable level in 2012/13. M&S praises online approach Following on from the notable success of UK retailer John Lewis’ ‘omni-channel’ approach, high street rival Marks & Spencer (M&S) has praised the performance of its online sales during the Christmas trading period. M&S.com general merchandise sales rose by 32% over the eight weeks to December 24. For the retailer, 2013 truly was the rst ‘mobile Christmas,’ as orders from tablets and mobile phones rose by 100% and 80%, respectively. According to M&S, the company is continuing to increase the volume processed through its e-commerce distribution centre and its new web platform is on track to launch this spring. “Our strategy to transform M&S into an international, multi-channel retailer, will keep on improving our .com service with the launch of our new platform and our new warehouse at full capacity,” said Marc Bolland, chief executive. The retailer has reported early signs of improvement in its womenswear business, stating customers are responding positively to its renewed focus on quality and style. This has resulted in a small market share growth in this area during the 12 weeks to November 24, the rst for three years.

M&S is said to have benetted from good performance across its key categories (including coats, dresses and footwear), coupled with tight stock management. International business continued to perform well, especially in key markets India and China which delivered double digit growth. International sales were up 8.2% during the Christmas trading period, compared to UK sales, which increased by 2.7% Gildan Yarns to install $14m air ltration system Nederman has received an order from Gildan Yarns, LLC to supply a complete turnkey air ltration and air conditioning system to a new yarn spinning facility currently being built by the company in Salisbury, North Carolina, US. Gildan Yarns, LLC is a subsidiary of Gildan Activewear Inc, a leading supplier of quality branded basic family apparel, including T-shirts, eece, sport shirts, socks and underwear. The order is worth SEK 93 million ($14.2m). The Nederman system will reduce dust levels in the new production facility and supply conditioned air to the yarn processing equipment to maintain high production levels. The order includes more than 30 automatic panel lters, ne dust lters, a complete hi-vacuum waste removal, a reclaim system and 6km of ducts. It will reduce dust levels to meet the OSHA regulations (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) stated by US Department of Labor and at the same time reduce the energy required by as much as 25% over conventional air conditioning supply systems, according to Nederman. Sven Kristensson, Nederman CEO, said: “This is one of our largest orders ever. It has been taken in tough competition but we believe that it is an important order in a market where the textile industry increasingly moves back production to the US.” The order is booked in the fourth quarter of 2013 and installation is expected to start during the rst half of 2014 and be

Source: www.wtin.com nished during 2015. Cold Pruf launches FR baselayer Cold Pruf has developed a new baselayer made from ring spun cotton and Protex M modacrylic in a wafe knit design, designed to provide next-to-skin comfort and ame resistance. “From reghters and welders to electrical workers and even certain t y p e s o f outdoorsmen, having a level of re resistance can be incredibly valuable in some situations,” said John Willingham, president of ColdPruf's parent company Indera Mills. “So many baselayers on the market are made from synthetic materials that do not respond well to open ames. Natural bres combined with a high tech ame resistant material provide a clear alternative.” The company said the FR HRC1 garments are rated to HRC1 standards and are F1506 compliant, the standard required for electrical workers exposed to electric arcs and related thermal hazards. US-based ColdPruf is celebrating its 100year anniversary this year and is seeking new distributors at the upcoming Outdoor Retailer show in Salt Lake City. Schoeller pursues eco-path in 2015/16 Collection Schoeller Technologies, the Swiss-based manufacturer of smart and innovative textile technologies, has stated that ‘fascinating prints with eco-designs’ dominate its 2015/16 Collection which consists of sophisticated fabrics and imaginative 3D textile structures. A company communiqué added that ‘things will be colourful, mystic and spacey’ in winter 2015/16 but, as ever, the fabrics will be attuned with a degree of functionality.

For Updated & Complete News Visit , www.textilevaluechain.com News Section 13

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

NEWS

INTERNATIONAL NEWS


SKILL DEVELOPEMENT

LESSONS FROM CHINA ON HUMAN RESOURCE ... Apparel industry at the moment is facing similar acute shortage of labour force. Many factories are now working MUCH less than their installed capacity despite favourable inow of orders because of shortage of labour.

Dr. Darlie .O. Koshy DG & CEO, ATDC & IAM

Leading Economists opine that every less developed country in the world has passed or passes through a “T-shirt” manufacturing phase in the process of evolution from an Agrarian to Industrial economy. India’s organised Garment export industry also entered the scene in the early 70s much like the other under-developed economies in the world while transforming herself as a “developed economy” since 1991. The Apparel exports have grown to be US$ 14 billion industry since post 2005, with the withering away of quotas, though the industry has not grown as expected owing to a variety of reasons. The domestic branded retail fashion industry has also grown to be more or less equal to the size of India’s apparel exports post economic liberalisation. Both exports and domestic apparel sectors require State-ofart manufacturing facilities. Richard Locke, Deputy Dean of M.I.T.’s Solan School of Management argues that our insatiable hunger for cheap clothing, in constantly changing styles has created a race to the bottom in which brands perpetually push suppliers for “faster delivery” and “lower prices”. He argues that consumer needs to break that cycle by, well, buying less of the cheap, fast fashion in the stores. This unfortunately is not really going to happen as we all know but what, in this context India as an exporting country needs to do is to move up in the fashion value chain for which Indian Apparel exports need to gear-up by producing higher value garments with more fashion content, while also making an effort to move away from just “summer” goods to more Fall and Winter including structured garments etc. Similarly, we need to have highly skilled workforce with multitasking capabilities and higher productivity and efciency levels. In China, as reported in International Herald Tribune in January 2013, one of the largest factories in Yantai, a coastal city in Northeastern China called on the local government with a problem i.e. a shortage of 19,000 workers as the deadline for execution of an order approached. The ‘Yantai’ ofcials came to the rescue, ordering all vocational high schools to send students undergoing training to the plants. This is a lesson for India’s Vocational Training Providers and the ofcialdom to work with urgency in a collaborative mode to ll atleast the peak season requirements of Indian Apparel industry which in fact deals with perishable “fashion products”.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

14

In any given year at least 8 million vocational students work on China Assembly Lines, with the minimum legal working age now at 16 years. The concerned ministry in China have ordered vocational schools to ll any shortages in the workforce in China’s manufacturing plants. India has to draw many lessons from this example if it has to protect and progress an industry like Apparel which create massive employment to rural folks especially women and youth aged between 18 to 45 i.e. really, no other manufacturing industry has the potential to create so many jobs. With every Rs. 1 Cr. investment in plant and machinery, apparel industry creates about 400 jobs to the most needy sections of society. Unfortunately, the policy makers have not been paying adequate attention to the potential of the apparel industry in mitigating unemployment and even anti-national movements like Naxalism etc. in certain pockets of the country. With ATDC’s proactive efforts in the past 3 years through SMART FastTrack shopoor workforce training programmes under the Integrated Skill Development Scheme (ISDS) of Ministry of Textiles, Govt. of India, there has been visible improvement on the ground. In 2010, when ATDC took the ambitious challenge of training 1,72,000 candidates in 5 years it looked a daunting task and there were many sceptics around. Now having successfully trained over 52,000 candidates in the 2 year period of the pilot project of ISDS contributing to over 50% of entire Ministry of Textiles’ target, ATDC network has turned a new leaf in the journey of “Skilling India” and making the “mission” a movement by the involvement of many State Governments / Agencies / NGOs and leading political and other personalities. This has catalysed investments in new apparel manufacturing facilities apart from rejuvenating languishing crafts in which over 10000 women have been trained. If the Apparel industry decongests from metros and moves to where the workforce is available, there is huge opportunity to create “Apparel Economy” at work in many parts of India especially in the existing and new textile – apparel clusters. Going forward “skilling India” has been made that much more possible and achievable through the efforts of TEAM ATDC. Many thanks to all those who have directly or indirectly contributed and continue to support this exciting and challenging journey. The 2,50,000 target for training in next 45 years beckon the TEAM ATDC to put even more efforts with dedication and commitment.


The Book ‘Future of English in India’, and Research by World Bank and The Florida and Connecticut Universities reveals that 13% to 34% increase in wages results with better communication in English. In each Metro Like Mumbai, Bangalore, Delhi etc. almost 500 centres train Nurses, Drivers, Peons, Courier Agents and House Maids in English for Higher Wages. Lack of the English Language knowledge is a bottleneck in both Admission & Placement in Technical & Professional Colleges all over the Country. Those, who have good communication skills are readily selected in Campus Interview at high pay packages than those who lack communication skills. Undergraduates & Graduates with good English easily get jobs at BPO’s and Banks. The Film ‘English Vinglish’ proves how housewives can upgrade their status in the family by learning a few communication skills Source: ET, July-Aug. 2013 article ‘No Full Stop in India’

Dr.V.K Mr.Batra MOHAN KAVRIE Mrs. Parvin Batra Skills Development Experts Global Competence, Panipat, Haryana Educators, Consultants, Trainers and Auditors

The Employment Commission of India in the report The Challenges of Employment in India laid heavy stress on the issue of Skills Development in India and pointed out that serious action has to be taken in this regard. The Govt. of India has resolved to train 500 million people by 2022 in the Employability Skills including English. As a result Govt. of India has formed National Skills Development Corporation to identify skill gaps and to promote skill development in India.

500

Million by 2022

The Number of People the government want to train

This Includes imparting technical & communication skill

English will be a major part of the communication skill development initiative

ENGLISH IN THE WORKPLACE A problem faced by any general-purpose ‘English for the workplace’ training course is that job-related skills are often specic to context. Each work sphere has its own special requirements with regard to communication for example  there may be particular kinds of reports or forms to be lled in,  or perhaps interactions with customers need to conform to a corporate policy. For these reasons, Workplace English training is best carried out using materials taken from the workplace itself. In India the main focus seems now to be on the idea of ‘English for employability’, but there is equal importance of English skills in career progression. Many of the better universities now provide co-curricular courses in English communication and in soft skills to ensure that their graduates are employable. The larger employers are also working closely with the universities and colleges which supply their new recruits. But many colleges do not provide such courses, or do not have the qualied staff to do so. This forces students into private sector ‘nishing schools’ to bridge the gap Larger Indian businesses are already partnering with government departments to help improve the English and employability skills of both students in colleges and those in Class 10–12. The Delhi branch of the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), for example, worked with the Municipal Corporation of Delhi to implement a pilot programme in Delhi schools. Many large companies have similar relationships with local colleges, helping ensure that students acquire communication skills before they graduate. Much of the ‘talent pool’ crisis in India at present relates to the number of graduates who apparently lack ‘employability skills’.

WHY ENGLISH MATTERS ? English Edge: ‘Earn 34% more than others’ Those who speak English uently earn up to 34% more than those who don't speak the language, a recent report has found, conrming the link between an education in English and the scope of employment opportunities. "Men who speak English uently earn wages about 34% higher and men who speak a little English earn wages about 13% higher than those who don't speak any English," the report said. According to the report, only 20% of the Indian population can speak in English, and only 4% would be considered uent. Where one lives is a key determinant in accessing English medium education, it found. "Politicians who don't like English are captains of a sinking ship. Higher education in English helps us get better integrated into the globalized organized sector and labour market. Those without access to higher education in English are being left out," Dr Shariff told TOI. Source:Times of India dated 06/01/14

15

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

SKILL DEVELOPEMENT

ENGLISH COMMUNICATION: AN EMPLOYABILITY SKILL


SKILL DEVELOPEMENT

NASSCOM, the IT-BPO industry organisation, complains about the ‘low employability of existing talent with only 10–15% employable graduates in business services and 26% employable engineers in technology services’. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS Employability Skills can be dened as the transferable skills needed by an individual to make them ‘employable’. Along with good technical understanding and subject knowledge, employers often outline a set of skills that they want from an employee. These skills are what they believe will equip the employee to carry out their role to the best of their ability. WHAT DO EMPLOYERS WANT? Although most jobs in the corporate sector now require English, many of the ‘soft skills’ which make graduates employable are not language specic. Skills That Employers Want • Communication and interpersonal skills, Can you explain ideas patiently and clearly? Can you handle telephone calls well? Can you communicate appropriately to other employees who may be more or less senior? • Problem solving skills Are you an analytic but creative thinker? Have you a condent, polite manner? • Using your initiative and being self-motivated Can you work on your own, without being told to do so? • Working under pressure and to deadlines Can you handle stress that comes with deadline? • Organisational skills Are you punctual and dressed appropriately? • Team working Can you work in a team? • Ability to learn and adapt Are you able to learn new technologies and business processes quickly? • Numeracy Are you familiar with standard ofce software? Are you able to use data and mathematics to demonstrate a point? • Valuing diversity and difference Can you communicate well to speakers from another culture or social background?

Negotiation skills Can you make clear presentations to colleagues?

Most workers in the services sector, whether in ofces, BPOs, hotels or shops – need to communicate in at least two different directions: to clients (whether in India or abroad) and within the chain of management (both up and down, and with peers) in their own organisation. Here workers may require: • both spoken and written English language skills – can you tell the difference between a manager’s request and an instruction? • knowledge of specialist terms within the trade, profession, organisation or relating During 6th Global Skill Summit, held at FICCI, Delhi it was brought to the notice of Mr. R C M Reddy (Chairman FICCI Skills Development Forum) that along with the Employability Skills, 5 basic Life Skills are also very important at school level therefore employability skills are to be preceded by life skill based education, but it is pathetic to nd that students are qualifying +2 levels even when they don’t know the basic vocabulary and Grammar basics like proper paragraph writing, letter, application & resume writing. Global Competence has conducted various experiments in Management & Technical Institutes by giving input regarding Communication Skills & facilitated in the successfully placement of B.Tech Textile Engineering students from Panipat , for placement in the Textile Corporate Sector like Nahar, Vardhman and Aarti groups in Ludhiana. We have interviewed 100 of candidates personally to nd that only 5 % of the candidates could communicate in English which was a basic requirement in the Home Textile exports industry of Panipat which has more than 3000 crores of direct exports out of Rs 11000 crores of textile industry production from Panipat textile cluster. This supported by the facts published by various sources at national & international level BIBLIOGRAPHY:  www.Wikipedia.com  KP Narayan Kumar & Others  David Graddol  No Full Stop in India  English Next India  The Economic Times Magazine  British Council 2010

CMAI SHOW REPORT JAN 2014 The 58th Show was organized on 6th to 8th Jan, 2014 by CMAI ( Clothing Manufacturer Association of India) at Bombay Exhibition Center, Mumbai . Show has appx 130 exhibtiors from various local garment barnd in ethnic, formals, semi formals for men’s & women’s. There are visitors ow from across country, they are buying agency, distributors, retails, merchandisers , organized retail buyers, fashion designers, associations, government ofcials, many more. TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

16


Advt.


ADVT.


BANK FINANCE IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY COVER STORY

population & textile demand of this population is very high & we foresee potential increase in this demand in coming years due to change in living standard. The entire market segment is huge and if the industry serves both the opportunities i.e. exports as well as domestic, there would be a huge market that would be available.

Avinash Mayekar, MD & CEO, Suvin Advisors Pvt. Ltd.

However, the way things happens in this traditional industry, it keeps on crying for modernization and introduction of new technology. There is a huge necessity of adopting not only the state-of-the art practices with minimal labor interference but also uninterrupted quality monitoring systems. Moreover, new investments need to be brought in the country. But these factors are not getting enough support from financial institutions, due to lack of knowledge and not having clarity on the vision of the industry.

The banking sector seems to be averse to the textile industry, despite it being the premier industry of the country. These days, the way bank finance is being done, the banks seems to be more inclined to way hi-fi industries. They should also consider the industry which is there for decades in the country and contributing to the significant chunk of foreign exchange earnings in country’s economy. It is right now the second largest industry in terms of foreign exchange earnings. However, if we take a history of last decade, it has been always the number one industry which is contributing towards foreign exchange earnings consistently. India has to keep its own mark of showing dominance in the international market as the best emerging country in the world and it has to compete mainly with China. At this stage, competition has no limitation. Our textile industry is hardly competitive compare to China though we have all resources available from skilled workforce to raw materials. However, if we want to develop a base and make a foundation towards most growing economy, we have to increase our export earnings and hence, we just cannot ignore textile industry as it is the most potential industry.

If we see from financial institution point of view, they are concentrating more on more profitable business opportunities. When they scrutinize a project report having 6 to 7 years of pay-back period with DSCR ( Debt Service Coverage Ratio) of 1.5 to 1.7 or IRR ( Internal Rate of Return) of 12 to 14%, the banks are unable to find the lucrative proposition from the financial angle. Hence, they are a bit hesitant to sanction loans in this particular industry. However, there is sustainability of more than hundred years of existence and good reputation of this industry and that's why the banks have to think from the point of view of sustainability of this particular industry. Entire industry cannot be judged on the basis of a couple of bad experiences of serving term loans. If we look at the overall scenario, textile industry fared very well in servicing the term loans. Literally, it needs to be seen why financial institutions have not shown much interest in textile industry in spite of having good history of return on investments.

We have seen a major shift in global consumption from the manmade fibres towards natural fibres due to global warming issues. We are very strong as far as all types of raw materials are concerned which are required to produce textiles whereas China has its own limitations on fine quality cotton varieties. It is better to focus more on India’s strengths & weaknesses than comparing it with any other country. Just to give emphasis on how India can substitute export earnings, the comparison with China is given.

The textile industry also has advantages as far as employment is concerned. It is one of the largest industries, employing about 55 million of country's population. It has shown very good network throughout the entire nation, almost in each and every state of India. Value addition is tremendous, be it in spinning, power loom weaving, shuttlelooms, garmenting and now the technical textiles. There are many sectors and many ways by which income can be generated. If we see from the industry point of view, when they compete with other countries, they find that the financial institutions are charging interest rate that is much higher than many other countries and hence they find it difficult to sustain in the market.

If we consider the growth within textile industry, there are very few mega-scale projects and very large numbers of MSMEs. MSME industry is the one which is going to contribute to the growth of the textile industry. They have their inherent problems like shortage of funds, collateral securities, inadequate net-worth etc. As far as entrepreneurs are concerned, they are eager to invest and identify many pastures. Consultants like us, keep them busy by giving various options whereas when it comes to actual implementation part of it, most of them struggle to get approvals or green signals, mainly because lack of support by financial institutions. As a matter of fact, it is always seen that if financial institutions become a bit lenient on this industry, there would not only be large investments happening in this industry in terms of exports but also it would satisfy the needs of the large existing domestic market. We have a very large

Industry needs some sort of support from financial institutions, how the interest rates can be brought down for this particular industry in order to gain more export earnings. At the same time, the financial institutions are looking for immediate and huge returns. The payback period is almost 6 to 19

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


COVER STORY

7 years in case of most of the sectors. The industry is highly capital intensive. Hence, they find it very difficult to give loans to this industry. These are the few things that need to be improved upon and to be thought over.

The financial institutions may create a platform wherein not only the consortium of few banks but also a consultancy firm can add value in understanding the project concept, in the great interest of the industry. If at all they think of taking a call on various aspects of a project which are being prepared or submitted to various financial institutions, they can really understand how things are happening in the industry and then they can finance such project. They also need to understand that all projects are not similar and each project has its own merits and demerits.

If there is a good dialogue between the industry and the financial institutions, most of the things can be sorted out. Maybe a third party intervention e.g. consultants like us can help financial institutions as Lenders Independent Engineers i.e. LIE which is a new concept adopted by a few of the nationalized banks. We can help them in understanding the nature of the project, level of technology to be used, proper justification for the costs, appropriate marketing set up, planning and monitoring of the project on continuous basis. So whenever a new project comes to a bank, nominated consultant by the bank can keep on giving monthly or quarterly reports on regular basis which can monitor the progress of the project along with fund flow statement from project start to the completion to avoid the misuse of the funds provided by the banks. Consultants can help in executing the project with latest tools and software. This will help the financial institution to understand the crux of the industry.

Conclusion: A value addition in terms of appointing a LIE ( Lenders Independent Engineers) for all projects would bridge the gap in between the industry and the financial institute. A project monitoring committee can be formed by involving professional consulting firms to decide the effectiveness of the project. Textile industry has a tremendous potential in the global market and it would make India a strong foreign exchange earner hence financial institution should look at its sustainability rather than immediate returns from other industries.

VOICE OF POWERLOOM SECTOR... Interview with Shri Momin, President of Bhiwandi Powerloom Federation Ltd. store yarn in ware houses and create artificial scarcity. Hence we have proposed to the Government to establish yarn depot, where yarn stored and be available at Ex- mill prices. We do not want any agent in between for our yarn requirement, as it is a costly affair for powerloom sector to depend on yarn agents.

TVC : What is your experience in getting financial accommodation from banks for the constraints and it suffers from various problems. A major handicap of this sector is non availability of adequate credit on time. This happens unlike the corporate sector which has unhindered excess banking and industrial finance. Because powerloom sector is not to link to collateral security to that extent.

TVC : What about Export? As we are small scale units, we exports through exporting agents. TVC : What’s your experience about collateral Securities? The business model of the power loom industry is something which has no place in management books. The powerloom sector is in the name of one person, labour are in the name of different person and person running business has no documents with him. In such circumstances, how can you give collateral security and hence they failed to get banking funds.

There are 23 lac powerlooms in India. Of which only 1520% take loans from banks and/or even have accounts in the banks. 75- 80% of powerloom job workers sell directly to master weavers. Power loom consist of 96% contribution in Indian textile cloth production as compared to mills which only have 3-4% contribution. Major Powerloom hubs are Bhiwandi, Ichalkaranji,Surat.

TVC : Are your proposals for long term borrowing under TUFS considered without many problems?

TVC : Are powerloom workers having enough working capital limits to purchase and stock cotton yarn to cover your annual requirement?

Currently, Only 20 big companies are taking benefits of current TUFS scheme. We have proposed government a TUFS scheme Rs. 25000 to 30000 per power loom. This will enable recipient to few parts of machine which will give uniform, defect free fabrics and increase productivity of power loom. Government had announce scheme, its in process of implementation.

Power loom factories are unlike to stock cotton yarn, the main raw materials because of lack of bank finance. They carry stock of just 10-15 days. Fabric is made immediately and sold as they do not have enough money to buy excess yarn. As a result, sometimes they just sell fabrics below cost. Average rate of Production is 60-70 meter / day / loom.

Job worker do not have any source of funds / capital. Master weavers invest in sector which is borrowed from different entrepreneur.

We have also observed yarn price race where merchants

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

20


Since the cotton supply always faces large constraints, international buyers have already started extensive buying of cotton.Although, cotton crop is picked 3 to 4 times in a season, rst and second picking is always of very good quality. Indian mills also prefer to purchase cotton before the season tapers off. How will you like to meet the fund requirement of domestic mills for purchase of cotton? Do you require safeguards for this? K.R & R.K. : Cotton season is October to March. Companies buy in bulk quantity of cotton during this season as they get best quality at lower rate compared to off season. Banks provide “Additional Adopt Facility” to companies who require funds to purchase cotton during season. Before giving this facility we check their projected, expected and achieved performance via AprilOctober balance sheet. If 50% of the projected is achieved, we sanction the loan for Addition Adopt facility. Approximately 60% of our clients avail this facility. TVC : A long-standing demand of textile industry is to avail funds at low interest rate. Government gives subvention of 2-3% to give credit to some industries at cheaper rates. However this is restricted to a very small segment of export production. What would be your suggestion for a low concessional rate of interest for textile industry? K.R & R.K. : Textile ministry should decide this along with RBI. For export, lending rate is BR (Base Rate) +0.75 & for local market lending on CCR (Counter Party Credit Risk). We give rating to SME's from 1 to 8. 1 is Good & 8 is worst as per CRISIL rating. If SME have good score, interest rate is good. TVC : Some 2-3 years ago many mills were eager to avail CDR (Corporate Debt Restructuring). However very few receive it. Working of the mills has improved since then and general feeling is that credit worthiness has also improved. What is your take on it? Whether you have experience of any textile nonperforming assets in the recent years? K.R & R.K. : Yes, we have a few textile nonperforming assets. We have helped them to restructure the mill/unit by checking reasons behind thate.g. Diversication, mismanagement, loss, seasonal downtime etc. We have done many CDR in year 2006-7 in Coimbatore. TVC : If textile mill approach you for enhancement of credit limits, what is your approach? K.R & R.K. We purely give to merit criteria. We judge company on process of improvement, stagnation, funds invested in production, export etc.

Mr. R.K. Shetty, Chief Regional Manager, Mr. K. Ravichandra, Chief Manager Indian Overseas Bank , Mumbai.

TVC : The Growth and Development of the textile industry depends on:Government policies rates on excise and custom duties and bilateral trade agreements with different countriesaccording to larger access to their textile markets. It also depends upon availability and prices of cotton & its export policy. There is a feeling in textile industry that banks generally do not consider them as the most preferred clients. What would you like to comment? K.R & R.K. : Our banks have largest number of textile account from Ahmadabad & Coimbatore. Although they are not most preferred clients but these mentioned clients are. We don't consider most preferred because of heavy competition within industry, China factor, currency uctuation, import of machinery from Germany and other countries, but technology is outdated in a very fast pace now a days. TVC : Textile industry is facing cut-throat competition because of the existence of the very large industry in the country, prevailing malpractice of copying designs of reputed mills etc. Result is erce price competition andlow margin. Do you think that banking sector is therefore not enthusiastic in lending money? If so, what would you like to suggest for ensuring adequate fund ow to the textile industry without compromising on safety of banks money? K.R & R.K. : We have restructured many textile hubs like Coimbatore, Tirupur and many more. High uncertainty in the industry, Volatility in fashion trends due to new type fabrics and technology. Out of total CAP fund, we keep 10% for Textile industry. We take collateral security like x assets. We only nance 20 to 30% of collateral security value. TVC : There is a built-in constraint on availability of cotton in the world as lands are now more devoted for food grains production. Further, awareness to avoid pesticides and use of inorganic fertilizers also inuence.

ORIENTAL BANK OF COMMERCE, KADI, GUJRAT loan required 3.25 crore and CC 7.50 crores. TVC : How the loan account is operated – regularity, Ans : No delay and no defaulter due to regular collection. TVC: Is the working capital loan sanctioned to individual ginners adequate or there are unfullled demands for enhancement of working capital? Ans : During season time ie. For 2-3 months, take more amount for WC, they repay immediately after season. Fixed asset for security.

The chain of industrial activity of textiles starts with ginning. Such factories are located in cotton-growing belts and hence away from cities and towns. Ginning is a seasonal activity and functions from the time of rst cotton picking till the last picking of the crop. Ginners which do ginning on their own require larger dose of working capital credit than ginners which do job-processing. TVC had a chat with a bank & a Chartered Accountant in Kadi, Gujrat, TVC : Level of banking nance required by ginners Ans : Depend on size of production capacity, i.e for 48 gin Term 21

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

COVER STORY

INTERVIEW WITH BANK Indian Overseas Bank , Mumbai.


COVER STORY

INDUSTRY VIEWS ... Interview with Mr. Nilay Rathi, Qualied Chartered Accountant & Management Post Graduate from Jamnalal Bajaj institute, Mumbai. He has 15 years long & wide experience in different industries like Steel, Packaging & Textiles. Currently working with well reputed Textile company as General Manager- Commercial. TVC : What is your experience in getting nancial accommodation from banks? Do they respond within a reasonable time and adopt positive approach? NR : The bankers take an overall view of the running of a company. It indicates the company history, its legacy, turnover , composition of Directors etc. MSME units may have problems to get nance from banks. Textile Industry is peculiar being a “Low Margin , Long Working Capital industry cycle” TVC : What’s your feeling on export of cotton ? NR : The marketing of cotton is a virtual gamble because of tremendous volatility. The volatility factors are there due to uctuation of cotton prices, weather conditions, Government policy intervention, Commodity market, etc. Fiber & Yarn manufacturer are always insecure due to high level of volatility in this market. We need more stable market. Volatility does not benet farmers or buyers. Only middle men get beneted by volatility. China & Bangladesh due to mass production dominates price of cotton bre & yarns. Export of cotton should be to the tune of excess

production in the domestic market since cotton available in the market will be consumed for nished fabric which can generate more exchange revenue to the government. TVC : What’s your experience about collateral Securities? NR : We need to give 1.25 times collateral security for required amount of loan. TVC : Whether your proposals for long term borrowing under TUFS are considered without many problems? NR : We had faced many problems related to TUFS though we have a good position in the market. Government gives Unique Identity Number ( UID) for TUFS loans, rst come rst served basis, if any company fails to plan in advance to take TUFS loan and if it happens to apply late, company may not get UID number and hence not eligible for TUFS subsidy. Hence the equivalent benet is not available to similar industries who had done expansion on same line in same period. We request to government that application received during the black-out period should be made eligible for TUFS benets. We also request that application which were unsuccessful in getting UID number gets extension of the sectorial CAP and should get priority when the fresh TUFS start. TVC : Do you borrow funds outside TUFS for long term? If so, what is need for such funds and what is the outlook of banks? NR : Our projects are conned to textiles and hence they tailored to the TUFS format hence mostly our loans which are eligible for TUF benets are under TUFS.

Timely Support form Bankers… Views of Mr. Surendra Shetty, 3 Decades Experience in Finance, Qualied as M.Com & LLB , Currently working as Chief Financial Ofcer ( CFO) of Siyaram Silk Mills Ltd. Siyaram Silk Mills Ltd., is a public limited Company, is in four major verticals – Yarn Dyeing, Fabrics, Readymade Garments & Furnishing. The Company has paid up capital of Rs 9.75 crores of which 67% is held by promoters & balance by general public. The principal raw material is Yarn, sourced indigenously. Siyaram buys Polyester Viscose yarn in bulk & also uses

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

natural yarn in small quantities. The Company believes in remaining on the forefront by adopting innovative & state-of-art technology. It has been modernizing its facilities on regular basis & has consistently made investments in technological up-gradations. This has enabled the company in offering contemporary & value-for-money products to its customers. The company has been prudent in managing its short term & long term nances & has never diverted short term nances for long term purposes & vice versa. The Company has been aptly supported by its bankers in all times & the company believes that the bankers have been an integral part of its success story .

22


Advt.


An ISO 9001 : 2008 Certified Company Approved By Ministry of Textile (Govt. of India) & Benchmarked Under T.U.F.S.

Dashmesh Jacquard & Powerloom Pvt. Ltd. 58-A, Sec-25, Part-1st, Industrial Estate, HUDA, Panipat – 132 104 (Haryana) India (Ph) +91 180 4001938 (Talefax) +91 180 2660975

Electronic Jacquard Suitable for Narrow Weaving machine (Tape Looms / Label Looms)

Electronic Jacquard For Various Type of Looms

Electronic Jacquard Suitable for Rapier Looms & Shuttle Looms Available Hooks:- 448 – 1344

Electronic Jacquard For Handlooms (cranks or without crank type mode) Available Hooks:- 64 – 640 E-mail: info@dashmeshpowerloom.com / sales@dashmeshpowerloom.com

www.dashmeshpowerloom.com / www.warp-tex.com

Advt.

DASHMESH


COST COMPETITIVENESS IN TEXTILES AND CLOTHING SECTOR

Prof. M.D.Teli, Institute of Chemical Technology , Matunga, Mumbai 400019

• High Stake involved in Growth of Textile Industry: We all know that in Indian economy, Textile and Garment sector plays an important role as it is considered to be the mother Industry. More than 45 Million people are dependent on this segment and thus it’s financial health directly affects the Indian GDPgrowth and the people of the country. It is, hence, not only important from the point of the economy, but also from the point of looking after millions of families which are dependent on this segment. As the retail segment is increasing rapidly, this number of dependent people on textiles is further increasing. Technology Up-gradation Fund Scheme (TUFS) had been introducedby the Govt. of India in 1999 in order to remove obsolescence from the industry and to provide Indian Textile Industry a technological edge to compete with the products from other nations.India’s Textile industry is also diverse , but fragmented and highly centralized and distributed in the form of small and medium scale Industrial units(SMEs). TUFS from Government of India –Ministry of Textiles, did help the industrialists who wanted to modernize their Units and thus they obtained not only the interest subsidy to thetune of 5 %, but in some segments, some percentage of upfront subsidy on the capital invested. The important effect of this scheme is that we have seen distinct interest on the part of the entrepreneurs to modernize their units. This was especially necessary since as per Agreement on Textile and Clothing (ATC), from 1st January, 2005, the quota has been removed in respect of exports from India to anywhere in the world.Since MultiFibre Agreement (MFA)has been integrated in to WTO package, the barriers of trade were lifted and a large number of markets were left open for free-for-all fierce competition globally. Naturally consistent high quality, delivery on schedule, capacity to manufacture defect free long length fabric, right first time approach and above all cost competitivenessbecame the salient features of Textile and Clothing business. Hence in the recent years, say in last decade and half ,we have witnessed some of the large players in Textiles totally revamping their units and establishing modern composite units from fibre to not only readymade garment fabric, but in some cases up to garments. The capacity they put was individually quite huge and thus, it also depended upon their ability to attract business for such increased capacity and in this respect the collective image of Indian Textile Industry does play a significant role.

25

TUFS not only helped the industry to modernize, increasing their product quality, value realization, turnover, as well as cost per unit of production, but it also enhanced machine productivity,and reduced amount of utilities requiredper unit production. However, in India these utilities have shown drastic hike in price in many a places and specially in cities it has become difficult to the entrepreneurs to manage the cost of production at the lowest level to obtain reasonable profitability. The new TUFS also encourages investments in common infrastructure or facilities by an industry association, trust or cooperative society and at number of places special textile parks with integrated facilities are sanctioned wherein up to 50% upfront subsidy is offered.

COVER STORY

• Technology Upgradation Fund Scheme:

The government has also announced that TUFS is to continue with an allocation of Rs 12,077 crore for the 12th Five-Year Plan. As against allocation of Rs 15,404 crore , in the 11th Plan an expenditure of Rs 12,383 crore was incurred and from that point of view this provision is indeed quite welcomed one. In addition we know that various State Governments such as Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh ,Maharashtra, etc are providing impetus to the Textile industry under their state Textile Policy by further subsidizing their investments and also providing utilities at subsidized rates.All this is understandable, given that the high level of stakes involved in the growth of this industry. • Findings of the Survey by ICT: With all said and done, the point remains to be seen as to what is the level of our average cost of production? In the recent survey which we did for branded Textiles among the youth, it came out veryclearly that there is a distinct shift in the purchasing decisions of the customers who prefer to pay extra and go for the branded goods. Next query as to what salient features they expect from such branded goods? The response indicates that the consumers appreciate their consistent qualityin terms of fastness properties as well as feel good factor and modern designs with the changing fashion trends. It was also explored in our research as to whether the consumers are getting aware about eco-friendly processing and the response indicates that although in minority, but such a small proportion is slowly but steadilyincreasing which is aware about Textile and Clothingare needed to be manufactured in a safest environment and also with least of damage to the ecology. It is also expected to take care of all the workers who manufacture the same andtheirhealth, safety as well as due wages have to be paid regularly, which intern makes the Brand image.The consumers also clearly said that they would not mind paying a little extra money if they are guaranteed that their Band is involved in fair trade policy,and manufactures the goods following sustainability model with least of Carbon footprints. The good governance as well as fair trade with adherence to all

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


COVER STORY

the laws of the land is equally important for the external image of the company or the Brand, and the consumers surely would not like toendorse any Brand which is flawed on these account. Although this survey by ICT students throws light on the attitudes among the Brand customers, the question comes to one’s mind as to whyshould theybe concerned about the Brand image? Very simple, today garments are not just used as the ones for functional properties depending upon its use as formal wear, casual wear,sportswear,night wear, etc.Along with these different kinds of clothing, the affluent and also the professional class is using the particular selected branded clothing to make their style statement. They want to usethem as medium for expressing their personality and hence, naturally Branded clothings are scoringhigh as compared to unbranded ones. Of coursein volume terms, unbranded are sold in manifold as compared to Branded clothings ,but in value terms, the revenue earned and profitability achieved is highest in such niche clothings. Except for a few, Indian Brands most of these Brands are from overseas and we know most of the clothings which are sold by these Brands are actually supplied from countries like,China, Bangladesh, Srilanka, andIndia.In fact country like Bangladesh has supersededIndia in its garment export performance, the reasons being relatively lower wages, higher productivity and relatively less stringent environment laws along with special status like MFN(Most FavoredNation). • Sqqueezing the supplier to death ? How long? When we look at these developments wherein clearly Branded clothings are going to dominate the market,Technology up-gradation definitely becomes essential in order to meet the stringent quality standards required by the brands. We also know that these brands outsource their goods from countries like India,Bangladesh, Srilanka, etc. It is well known that the profitability of these Brand owners and retailers is more than 150 t o 200%. Where as the one whomanufactures such clothings, right from spinners, weavers and processors as well as Garment manufacturers, their profitability is bare minimum struggling to reach in two digit level. And what happens to those who supply other raw materials like dyes, specialty chemicals, etc? Having supplied best of these ingredients for the highest quality and performance, no payment comes in their hand before 90 days minimum. Above all, a lot of their capital is stuck up and to get the payment released of their earlier delivery, they are compelled to supply them a fresh lot carrying always a hanging sword of uncertainty that they will lose business for ever, if they do not supply. I clearly know for sure at least3-4big industry houses are refusing to pay such suppliers whose more than 3-4 crores of outstanding is lying with them? How long one could survive in such a situation?Squeezing yourprofitabilityin the presence of increasing cost of moneywith higher interest rates on the working capital, will surely take us to the path of sickness. But does that mean there cannot be profit in this business? Not at all? It is the question of collective bargaining

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

26

strength of the Indian manufacturers, who are able to provide the Brands International quality? Why should not they negotiate with the Brand owners to enhance rates for their products, as that is essential in order to maintain the financial health of all those involved in this supply chain. I am sure the maximum money if anyone is making in this business are these Brands and retailers and its time collectively the suppliers of the Garments negotiate with them with strategy and unity. I understand it is easily said than done, but of course not impossible. End of the day it is our collective responsibility to rise to that level where in we can dictate to certain extent the minimum cost of production? • Cost cutting using latest Technology: Reality check? One of my recent experiences of visits to a large process housewith composite operations and supplying to the world famous Brands has been that, although it proudly claims as the most modern process House with continuous processing operations of cotton, polyester as well as knits, the real advantages which are envisaged in such operations of continuousprocessing remained more so on the paper. This is because while these latest Machinery are supposed to process 2-3 lakhs meters of cloth per day, the ordered lot sizes on the average being processed by them arenot more than 25000 meters. The very nature of getting the order finalized is step wise, where in samples are first got approved and then although a lot of 25000 meters of specific fabric is ordered for processing, actual schedule of colours and shade willfollow and invariably it amounts to either two to three different shades( different depths) or 2-3 different hues of these shades? What does that mean as far as the final dyers is concerned? It only means the lot size processed at that stage is 8000 to 12000meters. When such a drastic reduction in lot size takes place the overall advantages of continuous processing get eroded and thus the cost per unit production rises in addition to reduction in productivity due to change over of shades etc.Any corrections required during redyeing or finishing further increases the delivery time, along with increase in reprocessing cost bringing down the profitability drastically. Sometimes the delivery by Air freight wipes away the total profitability and the wholeoperations become a futile exercise bringing about losses in order processing. • Multiple Dimensions of Production of Fabrics and Garments : Every element has to be taken into consideration when such manufacture of Textile and Clothing operation is to be considered. Besides proper quality of raw materials, their cost has to be minimum which itself offers dichotomy. Increasingly the world over, environment compliance and compliance from the point of view of REACH are becoming increasingly essential and hence certification from suppliers of dyestuffs and chemicals becomes essential, which intern increases the cost of raw material. Then comes the cost of processing and conversion, where in besides technological competence, the


COVER STORY

suppliers we achieve that Hall mark of crdibility- that position of manufacturers of niche goods with International quality and eco-compliances.Ofcourse it is not going to happen in one go. But it should start and solidarity and collective bargaining must be emphasized so that all will benefit. In real sense, you are only making these Brands which earn more than 150-300% profit, agree to shrink their profitability just by 5-10%.And forsustainability of thebusiness they should be prepared to do it.

cost of utilities and labor and machine productivity come into picture. The modern machinery requires very much significant investment and such investment has to be serviced out of the earnings of the company. Manpower, skilled as well a unskilled are to be retained, in a scenario whereinthere is a great shortage of the same.In general 30% shortage of the labor force has been observed even when we shout that there are millions without anyemployment. I have been one of the strong proponents of , not to use that high degree of automation where in such non critical steps in supply chain can be handled by the labor forcewithout compromising the International quality standards. In other words while best of technological competence has to be established with latest machinery, certain aspects such as raw material handling, delivery and finished products handling, packing and delivery can be done by unskilled labor force rather than totally dehumanizing this labor intensive Industry which is providing means of their survival. However, since last 3 years, when NREGA is being implemented in various villages , migration of workers is greatly reduced and laborcrunch in states like Punjab, Gujarat, Maharashtra is being felt and may of the industrialists are trying to see the alternative to this situation in having highly automated operations. They want to beat the uncertainty, increasing wage costs and maintain the delivery schedule. How far it becomes cost effective operation, only time will tell us.

• What are the impediments in cost cutting? What do the various reports say? One of the reports by National Productivity council on “productivity and competitiveness of Indian Textile and Garment sector recommends that, in the case ofphysical infrastructure, availability of power and road need to be improved. As far as Government interface with business/private sector is concerned, majority of the units surveyed (68%) were not satisfied with interface. There is a need to strengthen the availability of energy/power for the manufacturing units since the power outages are quite frequent. In view of such bottlenecks there is need for developing dedicated/captive power generating sources specifically for the major textile clusters”1.But small units however, have to stop their operations for the period of the power cut; as the small units can’t afford large gen-sets for alternative power supply. They have toallocate a massive sum for purchase of diesel (furnace oil) for their power generating sets,which is costly as it attract Excise Duty/Custom Duty of 16%. To mitigate the powerproblem in the short term small power loom units in a cluster can pool their resources toestablish a captive power plant or common gen-set on a shared basis and there is need for the Governmental support2.

In the fierce competitive world of Textiles and clothings, there are a number of dimensions where in your production activities can suffer; may it be poor quality of raw material making it difficult to achieve final accepted quality norms,poor quality of utilities and sometimes insufficient availability, like in Tamil Nadu, some places not more than 6 hrs,electricity is available making it incumbent to use the DG sets and thus eroding profitability, labor shortage, and stringent environment laws or infrastructure problems in maintaining delivery schedule as ports are busy.Finally business is likely to suffer and your costs of operations are going to increase if all these aspects are not given due attention.

• Sustainable Textile Production: As we see, the Brands will alsodictate the terms on sustainable Textile production where in ecology and social compliances will become equally important as the economics of the textile business operations anda number of these brands will seek their suppliers to follow the tenets of sustainability. It is here the survey done by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Economic Impact Analysis of the Fabric and Textile Printing, Coating, and Dyeinghas been a good example to quote with. This survey indicates the level of these operations affect the emission levels in the environment and what impact it will have.After studying the baseline emissions and estimated costs of complying with the environmental norms, it has been concluded that not more than 1-3 % of the total sale value is needed to incur as the cost of maintaining these compliances3.

While it is world known that costing is an important parameters, its control is one of the main aspects of maintaining the growth profile. However, when cost of living is rising, when there is such a hike in inflation and wage revision, there is always a strain on your ability to shrink your costs beyond certain level. In fact at some point of time yourealize that you cannot reduce costs beyond certain limit simply because your input costs cumulatively come much above the prevailing price you would get from your Brands whom you supply.And it is here then the need is felt that, Can we if not alone, collectively through CMAI or such bodies negotiate the minimum cots to be asked from these brands so that there is certain definite level of profitability is maintainedin your business which has to grow and along with it, the connected people have to grow? And it is here those who have ability to dictate should come forward and start venturing on this side so that costing per piece negotiated to that final Cent level, could be restrained.We can do it provided as

Whatever is said and done, indeed sustainability measures will surely increase the cost of production to some extent and hence it is naturally expected that these Brands as well as the government agencies make available some incentives for such a valuable step. Our survey by the ICT students did reveal that the normal customer of the Branded clothing is ready to pay a little extra money, if they are sure that such a premium they are

27

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


COVER STORY

paying for the respect for the environment andfor the people who manufactured it. The textile industry gets about 80% of its energy in the form of

One of the reports on comprehensive energy audit undertaken in 43 mills by SITRA revealed that the energy cost of conversion in spinning operations is 10%of sales and it is 5 times their profitability. Hence, there is tremendous scope insaving the energy in these units and thus increasing their profitability by reducing their production cost .Potential saving from energy was at about Rs. 200 per spindle per year which is almost the same as the net profit margin a spinning mill can earn under normal trading conditions. The payback period for such measures is 1.5 years and thus such kind of applications become essential in bringing down the cost of production for competitiveness7. Heat recovery is another area which is neglectedin process houses. However, as per the BTRA report a serious thought and a sincere approach to heat economy is surely going to benefit theindustry by lowering the fuel bills and hence will add to the profitability of the industry by reducing the cost of end product. It is claimed that the rich benefits to the mills participating in their Energy Audit Programmes have been received8.

heat. The energy costs vary from 5 to 17% of total manufacturing costs according to the type of process involved. The distribution of power and heat requirement in a composite Mills can be seen in following two figures. As far as Energy inputs are concerned in Textile sector, they are very important as far as final costing is to be decided. Electrical and heat energy form an important aspects of these energy requirements. There are anumber of various energy-efficiency opportunities and if implemented, the costing can be greatly brought down.However, due to lack of information or false notion that such measures are expensive, SMEs do not pay attention to them4. It is important to know that energy saving is not always a rocket science. Improving efficiency and saving money in textile dyeing need not be expensive. Simple changes to procedures and housekeeping can save considerable amounts of money and thus enable one to reduce costs. It is ofcourse necessary that you observe process inefficiencies and calculate the financial losses from these inefficiencies and prepare a road map to remedy the situation to improve your cost competitiveness.Needless to mention it will also reduce pollution and load on environment5. It has been reported that a significant benefits would be achieved byoperating the recovery plant in textile Industry and reducing thefresh water up to 63.5%.This not only will reduce stress on ground water reserve , but also the chemicals discharged.Hence, sucha recovery and reuse in a textile industry cantherefore be considered technically andeconomically feasible6.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

28

One of the reports from Harvard University Professor9studying Tirupur Cluster indicates the deficiency in the infrastructure of Tirupur and absence of domestic brand as well as high value product manufacture with more customized products of high quality rather than having volume based low value products .It recommends the need of partnering with training institutes to promote process and product designs. For the government it recommends to upgrade power, port and road infrastructure within and outside Tirupur. It needs to develop integrated cluster facility for processing. The phenomenal growth in Tirupur of 15% CAGR since 1990 and $ 2.5Bn Clothing export only from Tirupur in 2010 indicates its capacity and important role in growth of Textiles and Clothing in Tamil Nadu. However, somewhere down the line in this fast growth, environmental concerns were neglected by the manufacturers as well as government agencies till Supreme court came heavily against the polluting Industries closing down many. Now slowly Tirupur is coming back to the main stream scenario and hence the lesson has to be learnt that while cost competitiveness pressures are always going to be there, there is no short cut to ignore the planet and people for making the profit, if we need to sustain in this business. • Concluding remarks: While we look at conventional textile andgarment processing applications, since cost competitiveness has become an important issue,its high time we should also see some of the important technologies in effluent treatment, recovery of heat and chemicals, dyestuffs as well as recycling of water as these will have an impact on reduction of final cost of production. We know that Foam finishinghas been successfully tried and so also synthetic thickeners in Textile printing. Some of the coating technologies and also digital printing have tremendous scope in increasing productivity, efficiency with least of impact on environment. Super critical CO2


• Acknowledgements: I acknowledge with thanks my Research students especially Pawan, Dharmendra, Nikhil and Amol who gathered the required references and the material to put in for this paper. I also acknowledge with thanks those authorswhose names could not be traced and whose documents are referred here.

2. 3.

4. 5.

6.

Costing textile effluent recovery and reuse, Filtration +Separtaion, June 2006.

7.

K.R. Chandran and P. Muthukumaraswamy, SITRA Energy Audit – Implementation Strategy in Textile Mills.

8.

S.A.Tarabadkar and H.M. Sharma, Heat Economy in Textile Mills, BTRA & FAITMA Seminar on Conservation of Utilities in Indian Textile Industry, November 26, 2002. Michael E. Porter , The Microeconomics of Competitiveness,TIRPUR KNITWEAR CLUSTER , ( 2011)

9. • References: 1. National Productivity Council, New Delhi.

Assessing the Prospects for India’s Textile and Clothing Sector , NCAER, 2009 Economic Impact Analysis of the Fabric and Textiles Printing, Coating, and Dyeing Environmental Protection Agency,USA . Ali Hasanbeigi, Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry, (2010). Alternative Production & Cost saving in Winch Dyeing Department for International Development, UK.

COVER STORY

making possible waterless dyeing, transfer printing, plasma application and nano as well as biotechnologies are gaining increasing demand when we look at Textile and Garment manufacture in a totally holistic way-where in production activity is carried out with sustainability which respects people, planet as well as profit.We may have to be innovative as well as we have to follow lean management in production bringing down wastages to a minimum so that while our costs are kept low, value realization is of high order.We also need to look at those product mixes where competition is low and profitability is relatively high. Besides that we need to know what best we can produce and those strengths of ours should be harnessed always.

RISE IN RESTRUCTURED ASSETS Source : Banking sector performance study – h1fy14 by CARE Rating Agency The banks continued to see rise in restructured advances during H1FY14. Total restructured assets of the banks under study increased to Rs.3.6 trillion as on September 30, 2013 from Rs.3.4 trillion as on March 31, 2013. The restructured advances as a proportion of advances stood at 6.47% as compared to 6.03% as on March 31, 2013 (March 31, 2012: 5.38%). A study of the industry-wise distribution of the restructured accounts for 10 banks1 revealed that Infrastructure, Power, Iron & Steel, Textiles and Aviation industries accounted for approximately 60% of the restructured assets outstanding as on September 30, 2013 (March, 2013: 59%). Following table gives the industry wise restructured assets outstanding. INDUSTRY Infrastructure (including Power) Tex les Iron and Steel Avia on Total

AMOUNT ( Rs. Trillion) 0.77 0.19 0.18 0.11 1.26

(% Share) 36.63 9.24 8.54 5.29 59.71

An analysis of the progress report of the Corporate Debt Restructuring (CDR) Cell during the period March, 2013 and September, 2013 shows that the major sectors where maximum cases of restructuring have been approved are iron & steel, infrastructure, textiles and power. The following table

29

shows the amount approved under CDR for the top four industries as on various dates and their percentage share in the total amount approved for CDR. Industry Iron & Steel Infrastructure Tex les Power Total

31-Mar-13

52,682 21,912 17,767 18,460 229,014

% share 23.00

30-Jun-13 53,543

% share 21.39

9.60 7.80 8.10 100.00

34,676 20,662 18,460 250,279

13.85 8.26 7.38 100.00

30-Sep-13

% share

41,812 35,543 19,545 17,225 196,267

21.30 18.11 9.96 8.78 100.00

Source: www.cdrindia.org Note: These amounts do not account for the restructuring done by banks on a bilateral level. The total amount restructured under the CDR mechanism increased to Rs.2.5 trillion by June, 2013 as compared to Rs.2.3 trillion as on March, 2013. However, the amount of restructured debt under CDR declined to Rs.1.9 trillion by September, 2013 due to certain accounts exiting due to successful performance in the CDR package and certain accounts getting withdrawn on account of failure. The total number cases declined from 401 as on March 31, 2013 to 261 as on September 30, 2013. The infrastructure sector saw stress mainly during H1FY14 with the amount under CDR increasing by 62% as on September 30, 2013 as compared to March 31, 2013.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


PROCESSING FOCUS

FRAGRANCE FINISHING OF TEXTILES-A REVIEW .Every person desires for some change .i.e. something new & unique. The successful effective implementation of change has to be done to in the market. We by the medium of this paper have made an earnest attempt to present you a detailed comprehensive analysis done by fragrance nishing and which has busted this industry with exuberant value added nish with the incorporation of different scents into fabrics, leading to the production of scented fabrics and the psychology of acceptance of synthetic scents in textile goods.

Vishnu Pareek, Nikhil Bhosale, Aayushi Agrawal, Shrikant Eklahare DKTE Society’s Textile & Engineering Institute Ichalkaranji ABSTRACT Fragrance nishing of textile materials has been greatly expanded and used in recent years. Fragrance nishing can be done effectively using exhaust method than any other methods. If the fabric is treated with fragrance agents which exhibits higher durability of functionality is estimated. Fragrance nishing can be done by means of lavender aroma with non-ionic binder. This paper examines the effects of fragrance nished aloe-vera and cotton fabrics. Finally both the fragranced nished fabrics were made into wall hangings and the ambiance of the room was evaluated by comparing various factors. In this investigation, factors such as fabric performance, durability of the fragrance and laundering properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. The fragrance nished fabrics can be used in home textile applications such as wall hangings, table covers, carpets and sofa covers.

T E C H N O LO GY F O R F R A G R A N C E F I N I S H I N G (MICROENCAPSULATION) Microencapsulation is a natural phenomenon and the examples of ideal microcapsules are found in the nature i.e., spores, seeds, eggs and pollen etc only a few to mention. Due to numerous applications of microencapsulation and as a result there are a number of processes developed to encapsulate a galaxy of materials to suit the individual applicability. In the broadest sense, microencapsulation provides a means of packaging, separating and storing solid and liquid materials in a microscopic scale for a later release on your own desire under controlled conditions.

Keywords: Fragrance Finishes, Cotton Fabric, Aloe-Vera Fabric, Lavender INTRODUCTION Gone are the days when quality product was the only criterion to eye a product by a consumer. Earlier were the times when sheer competitiveness in the domestic market was very conned. But, during some past years with the emergence of globalization, competitive atmosphere and quality consciousness, has reached a new mark. With the steady improvement in technology & application standards, a gradual rise was observed in consumer demands and to reach up to that mark, manufacturers have to add something to their products to get market value for their products. A product must be able to encompass something more with it & therefore this has taken today’s market to a platform where it seems very difcult for a manufacturer to market his product until he satisfy the consumer with something new which not only rewards him for his novel concept but also lures him with considerable increase in prot . The role of the textile nisher has become increasingly demanding, and now requires a careful balance between the compatibility of different nishing products and treatments and the application processes used to provide textiles with desirable properties. Growing trends and escalating standards leave no stone unturned to boast the current scenario of textile industry. Performance with beauty describes the potential of textile nishing. Fragrance nishing of textiles is one such immaculate magnanimous entry into any textile culture. Fragrance nishing of textiles is the process where we enhance the value of the product by adding some incentives to it. The world market place is continuously changing and so is demand of people changing

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

The fragrance compound and the essential oil are volatile substances. The most difcult task in preparing the fragrance emitting textile is how to prolong its lifetime of Adour. Microencapsulation is an effective technique to solve this. Microcapsules are minute containers that are normally spherical if they enclose a liquid or gas, and roughly of the shape of the enclosed particle if they contain a solid. It can be considered as a special form of packaging, in that particulate matter can be individually coated for protection against environment and release the volatile substance from the enclosed capsule as required. This property has enabled microcapsules to serve many useful functions and nd applications in different elds of technology. For example, the storage life of a volatile compound can be increased markedly by microencapsuling. The key to aromatic textile is how to make microcapsules of fragrance compounds and essential oils without omitting any ingredient in order to ensure its effects. In addition, using a low-temperature polymer binder to attach a perfumed microcapsule to the surface of the textile is also an important part of preparing an aromatic textile. At the same time, durability in laundering and a soft handle should be carefully considered

30


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Protection of the enclosed material and improved storage life. Conversion of a liquid component to a dry solid system. Ensuring separation of incompatible components. Odor masking, dust control and pH control Controlled diffusion of active components through the shell as for example in delayed drug release.

PROCESSING FOCUS

FRAGRANCES AND HUMAN EMOTIONS

Why Use Microencapsulation Technology

APPLICATIONS : PROCESS FOR FRAGRANCE FINISHING

 Cosmeto-textiles

Procure aloe-vera and cotton yams samples

Microencapsulated skin moisturizers, vitamins and provitamins are applied in garments and known as cosmeto-textiles, designed for wear in contact with skin. These are claimed to promote a younger look, counteracting the effects of skin ageing, e.g. as a result of exposure to UV-radiation. There are also microencapsulated preparations for skin cooling.

Weaving Desizing Scouring Printing

 Aromatherapy Textiles

Fragrance Finishing

The uses of aromatherapy textile are diverse. Interior textiles such as sheets, quilt-covers, curtains, carpets and bed-gowns are suitable for the attachment of lavender, camomile, citrus or cinnamon microcapsules, which are good for hypnogenesis and eliminating fatigue. Patients suffering high blood pressure feel sedation when they use a pillow made of fabric treated with lavender, basil, and lemon or fennel microcapsules. The tired ofce clerk wearing clothing with a scent of lemon rose, or jasmine oil may nd his work efciency improved. Meanwhile, it is convenient for dermatitis sufferers to be cured with the aid of underwear containing killing gem fabric. Perfumed toys make it easier for children to get closer to nature. Generally speaking, varied per-fume fabrics create good opportunities for customers to make the ‘cocooning’ environment they prefer to live in

Test Analysis Product Development

 Weaving In the weaving process, the fabric is woven by plain weave with 60 ends per inch (EPI), 48 Picks per inch (PPI) and the yarn count used is 20s Ne (100 % cotton).  Desizing Both the cotton fabrics are treated with de-sizing process for removing starch size. The fabric is padded with malt extract enzyme (3-5%) at 60°C by using 1:20 material to liquor ratio with pH 6-7. Finally the material is washed, squeezed and dried.

 Home Textiles

Cotton Fabric

In other areas, household textiles such as curtains, sofas, cushions, sheets, as well as apparel items such as gloves, socks and ties may also be treated with microencapsulated fragrance and deodorizing nishes. The carpets can be nished with fragrances of different kinds and can be widely used in home textiles as well as automotive textiles.  Sport Wears

Aloe-vera Fabric

Ends per inch

60

course per inch

60

picks per inch

48

Wales per inch

48

Count

206 Ne

Count

206 Ne

Fabric width

60 Inch

Fabric width

60 Inch

Type of weave

Plain weave

Type of weave

Plain weave

Scouring

As the ‘second skin’ of the human body, all types of textile are excellent media for transferring fragrance compounds, and are essential to people in sport according to their preference for them. The type of the fragrance necessary for sports wear may be orange, lemon which will keep them energized on the ground for longer period

SI. No.

Recipe

Concentration

1.

Cel022 Aloe+Lavender

5-10%

2.

Binder ST

5-7%

3.

Temperature

400C

4.

Time

20-30min

After de-sizing the fabrics are treated with scouring process for

31

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


PROCESSING FOCUS

remove the natural and added impurities present in fabric such as natural oils, wax, pectins, proteins, mineral matters, dirt etc. The fabric is treated with NaOH (2-3gm/l) and (2-3gm/l) nonionic surfactant at 100°C for two hours by using 1: 20 material to liquor ratio with 12 pH. Finally the material is washed, squeezed and dried to get better absorbency.

Fragrance nish is the process by which textile materials are treated with the pleasant odors which yields better benecial effects. The pleasant smells can be created by the essential oils have pharmacological effects like antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, etc. and mood elevating effects. The fragrance of lavender proves good way to meet important psychological and emotional needs, as well as those of a purely physical and sensorial nature. Thus by comparing the laundering durability results, it justies that fragrance nished aloe-vera fabric has better laundering durability. Comparing the sensorial effect of fragrance intensity, it justies that fragrance nished aloe-vera fabric has better sensorial effect of fragrance intensity. Then based on the washing fastness results, it justies that fragrance nished aloe-vera fabric has better adjacent fabrics staining rating than cotton fabric. Comparing the light fastness rating, it justies that fragrance nished cotton fabric has slightly better light fastness rating than aloe-vera fabric. Based on the wickability results, it justies that wick-ability were good for both fabrics. Finally based on the overall performance it is concluded that the fragrance nished aloe-vera fabric is better than cotton fabric for wall hanging (curtain) and in all home textile applications.

Printing The fabrics are printed with pigment colours by using direct style roller printing machine. And the fabrics were dried at 100°C, cured at 150°C for 4 to 5 minutes. Finally the fabrics are washed with 2% non-ionic surfactant and dried. METHODOLOGY 

Fragrance Finishing

Fragrance nishing is the process of imparting aroma in any textile substrate. This is done by exhaust method which means, fragrance agents is applied on both the cotton fabrics with the help of binder. Lavender fragrance was taken as a avor for this process. 

Preparation of Recipe

The lavender fragrance agents with binder ST were formed by mixture solution containing alcohol and distilled water with ratio (1:3). The solution was emulsied with a high-speed mixer at a speed of about 10,000 rpm for 5 minutes. The emulsied system was transferred into a ask. The alcoholic fragrance solution was added into the emulsied solutions over 30 minutes, and stirred at a temperature of 40°C for 2 hours. 

CONCLUSIONS

REFERENCES 

Aromachology and its Application in the Textile Field -C. X. Wang, Sh. L. Chen ,Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe January / December 2005, Vol. 13, No. 6 (54).

Capture and Controlled Release of Fragrances by CD Finished Textiles - B. MARTEL, Journal of Inclusion Phenomena and Macrocyclic Chemistry 44: 439–442, 2002.

Odor Measurement in Textile Industries – Krzysz Gniotek , Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe January / March 2003 Vol. 11 No.1 (40).

Scent-Infused Textiles to Enhance Consumer Experiences John Pierce, leader; Fernando Tovia; Natalie Weathers (Phila U) National Textile Center Research Briefs – Fabrication Competency: June 2006.

http://www.bre2fashion.com/industry-article/textile-industryarticles/fragrance-nishing-of-textiles/fragrance-nishing-oftextiles1.asp Ÿhttp://article.sapub.org/10.5923.j.textile.20120103.01.html#Sec5

Finishing Process

Fragrance nishing was given to the fabric by exhaustion method with 5-7% binder ST which is used as cross-linking agent. The fabrics were kept immersed in the solution containing lavender fragrance, (ML ratio – 1: 10) for 20-30 minutes at 40ºC in water bath. After nishing, the fabrics were removed, squeezed and dried at 100ºC in the oven for 5 minutes and then cured at 120 ºC for 2 minutes

REPORT ON TAI – SURAT CONFERENCE Textile Association of India, South Gujarat Unit organized 11th International & 69th All India Textile Conference in Surat on 20th & 21st December, 2013 at the Gateway (Taj) Hotel. After a very long time Surat had organized conference, all are cheerful and grateful to Surat division. TAI committee member, given warm welcomed to all delegates, speakers, host, invitees. The conference theme was “Indian textile – Global Prospects & Perception.” Mr. Hrishikesh Mafatlal was the chief guest & inaugurated the ceremony. Excellence work awards given to various eld & god work done. There are eminent speakers invited from industry, education, Government. They had shared very useful information & fruitful knowledge for delegates. TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

32


BIOMIMETICS IN TEXTILE

This novel concept implementation ranges from ber forming to the nishing stages for development of products with specic applications.

Mr. MOHAN KAVRIE

BIO TEXTILE

2. BIOMIMETICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN TEXTILES

DKTE'S Textile Engineering Institute, Ichalkaranji

Can innovation be managed? Very well explained by Albert Einstein, “ Look deep into nature and you will understand everything ” History indicates that humans depend on vision and make efforts to understand rational incidence around them. Think the unthinkable and then bring it to reality. One such application is Biomimetics. These are biologically inspired textiles with concepts derived from nature and reviewed to create wonders in fabrics and apparel. Smart and intelligent textiles are important developing areas in science due to their major commercial viability and public interests. These materials and/or structures can sense and/or respond to the environmental conditions or stimuli. Nature designed biomaterials have structure–functional capabilities that are beyond the reach of man-made materials like silk, leather and wool. Success in harnessing bio-inspired approaches might create intelligent apparel which can perform sensing and actuation, currently considered as science ction.

Fig: 1 An overview of various objects from nature and their selected function 2.1 Lotus Effect - Design of anti-dust, water repellent fabrics:

1. INTRODUCTION Biomimetics – synonymous with ‘biomimesis’, ‘biomimicry’, ‘bionics’, ‘biognosis’, ‘biologically inspired design’ words and phrases that imply adaptation from biology – is a relatively young study embracing the practical use of mechanisms and functions of biological science in engineering, design, chemistry, electronics and so on. In the early 1940s George de Mestral, a Swiss agricultural engineer, went for a walk in the forest with his dog. Upon his return he noticed that dog’s fur and his trousers were covered in cockleburs (Xanthium). His inventor’s curiosity led him to study them under microscope. He discovered the hooked ends of the bristles that stick out from the seeds. This became the base for ZIP and later developed into a two-sided fastener. One side had stiff hooks like the burs; the other had loops like the fabric of his trousers. Result being Velcro, named from the French word ‘velour’ (velvet) and ‘crochet’ (hook). Next challenge was to make machinery to produce textured fabrics that would work reliably. After considerable experimentation, de Mestral developed special looms and hook- cutting machinery.

Fig 2 Lotus Effect Ever clean, anti-dust and water repellent properties of glassy lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaf arise from its surface micro-topography. The plant’s cuticle is made up of soluble lipids, embedded in a polyester matrix – wax. This Micro topography exhibits extensive folding (i.e. papillose epidermal cells) and epi-cuticular wax crystals jutting out from the plant’s surface results in a rough micro- texture. As a result, the adhesive force on trapped water droplets in the interstitial spaces of the roughened surface is reduced. Such micro architecture results in a reduced liquid-to-solid contact area, exhibiting super hydrophobicity to water and dust particles (Fig.3). Due to this reduced surface area between water and

33

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


BIO TEXTILE

leaf’s microtopography, the water drops roll off taking the attached dirt particles with them, and cleaning the leaf surface forever.

micro-topography is antibacterial fouling surfaces. Scientists are inspired to improve swimming suits design based on this hydrodynamics and antimicrobial principles of shark’s skin. In Olympic swimming competitions, where 1/100th of a second can make the difference between winning and losing the event.

Modern nano-science and micro fabrication technologies are equipped to design such features articially and incorporate them into fabrics to give water and dust repellent apparel. Super hydrophobic poly-lactic acid (PLA) fabric is created via UV-photo grafting of silica particles functionalized with vinyl surface group over silica microstructure. The result being a robust method to design water and dust repellent fabrics.

These tight tting suits mimic the properties of a shark’s skin due to superimposed vertical resin stripes -known as Riblet effect (Fig. 4). Swimsuits made with the new bers and weaving techniques mimicking shark scales cling tightly to the swimmer’s body. It may give the wearer a 6-m equivalent head start in swimming competition by dampening turbulence in the immediate layer of water, next to the skin. 2.3 Spider silk inspired anti-tear fabric design

Fig: 3 Nature inspired lotus design into fabrics to mimic water and dust repellent apparel. Micro-topography with specialized wax coated epidermal cells (left) and, conventional design mimicking the anti-lotus effect into smart fabric design. 2.2 Shark skin inspired low hydrodynamic surface drag

Fig: 5 Schematic showing spider silk inspired anti-tear fabric design. Spider (family Theridiidae) creats web by extruding proteinaceous spider silk from its spinnerets to trap the insects. This natural silk exhibits unique properties of stiffness, strength, extensibility and toughness (Fig. 5). It is due to nano-scale crystalline reinforcement where stiff nanometer-size crystallites are embedded uniquely to adhere strongly in soft, stretchy protein matrices.

Fig: 4 Shark skin feature inspired low hydrodynamic surface drag: high efciency swimsuits design with antibacterial effect Shark species (super order Selachimorpha) maintain buoyancy due to special ingenious anti-drag design of their skin that reduces drag by 5–10%. Scanning electron microscope studies have revealed tooth-like V shaped scales of shark skin dermal denticles (little skin teeth or riblets) that are ribbed with longitudinal grooves (aligned parallel to the direction of local ow of water). It produces vertical vortices or spirals of water, keeping the water closer to the shark’s body. This results in low surface drag (Fig. 4). This micro scale longitudinal ridges inuence the uid ow in the transverse direction by limiting the degree of momentum transfer. The ratio of scale height to tip-to-tip spacing plays a critical role in reducing the longitudinal and transverse drags. Another remarkable feature of this

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

Scientists are now able to model materials which have strength and stretch ability similar to spider silk. This synthetic nano-reinforced structure provides an opportunity to synthesize and conjugate polymer in future fabrics which will potentially rival the most advanced materials in nature. Using a new solvent-exchange approach, the hard micro domains of polyurethane elastomer (a polymer that consists of long chains composed of small repeating molecular units) is incorporated with tiny clay discs (about 1 nm, or a billionth of a meter thick and 25 nm in diameter). This interesting aspect can be easily tuned to make bers similar to stretchy compounds such as nylon or Lycra for traditional textile industry.

34


Mimosa pulvinus mediated touch sensitive actuation put forth an enormous opportunity to design fabrics which shrink and de-shrink in response to external stimuli such as touch, sound and/or light. In fashion industry, this would represent a dream opportunity to come true when models walking on ramp will show folding–unfolding modes of smart fabrics with novel sensing capacity. Adopting functional mimesis to the Mimosa leaf pulvinus, researchers have designed haptic fabrics by knitted smart materials with touch therapy features. Such wearable fabrics equipped with actuators and sensors perform articial massaging and aromatizing functions while walking. Most important, such fabrics could provide a sympathetic side of apparel design by attending, understanding and responding to another person’s emotional expressions, a fundamental requisite of elderly person, spending lone time in hospitals.

Fig: 6 Learning from rey glow: designing e-circuited luminescence in fabrics. Glow Light in reies arises on account of an enzyme catalyzed (luciferase) bio-chemical reaction called bioluminescence. This process occurs in specialized light-emitting organs, usually on a rey’s lower abdomen (Fig. 6). The enzyme luciferase acts on luciferin, in the presence of magnesium ions (Mg2+), adenosene triphosphate (ATP) and oxygen to produce light. This chemical process provides inciting motivation to design glowing clothes in dark that would add valuable assets to fabrics and textile industry. It is now possible to produce such light-emitting devices with fabric printed circuit boards (PCBs) at large scale and successfully connect them with wearable display format using socket buttons. Thus enabling the rey glow in fancy dresses by utilizing electronic textile engineering (e-fabric) design.

BIO TEXTILE

walled motor cells. These specialized cells undergo visible swelling and shrinking, actuated by changes in turgor pressure and rapid growth expansion across leaf epidermis involving ion transport (Fig. 7). This exhibits one of the remarkable weathering phenomena in plant tissue when touched and exemplies the fastest plant movements.

2.4 Firey glow designed e-circuited fabrics

2.6 Pine cone inspired hygroscopic movements to design smart breathing fabrics

2.5 Touch sensitive apparel design

Fig. 8 Schematic illustration of pine cone inspired hygroscopic movements to design smart breathing fabrics. The scales of seed-bearing pine (Pinus radiate) cones move in response to changes in relative humidity. This hygroscopic movement is motivated by a structural–functional mechanism at the base of each seed petal or scale of the pine cone. When dry, it automatically opens up by moving away the scales gap, facilitating release of the cone’s seed. In moist (damp) environment, scales close up (Fig. 8.)

Fig: 7 A scheme showing touch sensitive apparel design inspired by touch-me-not (Mimosa spp) pulvinus features. Touch sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has leaf-moving muscle - pulvinus similar to actin–myosin of human muscles. Pulvini are swollen part at the base of Mimosa leaf stalks or petioles which act as an autonomous organ, housing mechano- and photoreceptors that enables leaf to move in response to external stimuli resulting in touch sensitive hydraulic actuation. Anatomically, all pulvini comprise thick walled, water-conducting vascular tissue, surrounded by thin

Microscopic anatomy reveals two types of scales growing from the main body of the cone: ovuliferous scale and bract scale. The larger ovuliferous scales bear microscopic sclerenchymatous (cellulose) bers on upper and lower surface. It responds to changes in relative humidity by opening–closing cone aperture. In addition, orientation of cellulose microbrils between two layers of scales and their expansion in response to relative humidity further controls the vital bending of the scales, facilitating opening–closing of the 35

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


BIO TEXTILE

cone aperture for seed dispersal.

Natures this cryptic phenomenon has inspired scientists to design choleric liquid crystals (CLCs) that alter the visible color of an object to create the thermal and visual camouage in fabrics. The color of CLCs can be changed with temperature sensitive thermocouples. The heating–cooling ability of thermocouples can be used to adjust the color of the liquid crystals to match the object’s background color, providing camouage or adaptive concealment as schematically depicted in Fig. 9 or 10 Check original script for number. Moreover, nature- inspired camouage in animals has stimulated optical camouage research in fabric design to develop and impregnate the phased optical array (OPA) like holographic designs in three dimensional hologram of background scenery, on an object to be concealed.

This natural phenomenon inspired to design humid sensitive adaptive cloth, delivering relief from the discomfort caused by moisture in clothing microclimate as experienced in urban environments. The fabric design utilizes two layers: one of thin spikes of wool, water absorbent material which opens up when gets wet by the wearer’s sweat. When the layer dries out, the spikes automatically close up again. An underneath second layer protects the wearer from the rain and this smart fabric works like breathing cloth, taking dry air in while closing the fabric pores and moist air out while opening. Such fabric could adapt to changing temperatures just like a pinecone’s bract. 2.7 Camouage

2. 8 Self healing fabric

Fig: 9 Animated sketch of Chameleon skin derived material design approach for camouage apparel (military defense). Fig: 10 Self healing fabric design inspired by nature’s selfhealing mechanism in mammalian tissue.

The phenomenon of camouage in certain shes and amphibian occurs due to excellent iridescent lateral stripes or spots which change their color from blue–violet under low light intensity to green, orange and/or red under increased light intensities. These colors are produced by the constructive interference of light from the stacks of thin alternating transparent layers with different refractive indexes. The sh and Chameleon skin has a specialized layer of cells under their transparent outer skin which are lled with chromatophores or alternating layers of iridophores, guanine crystals. In Chameleon, a layer of dark melanin housed in melanophores is situated in deeper skin layers and contains reective iridophores, which exhibits phenomenal camouage (Fig. 9).

Self healing ability has inspired new ideas and mechanism which are of fundamental interests for the engineers in designing self healing fabric. Healing process in mammals is much complex and involves hemostasis (arrest of bleeding), inammation (recruiting immune cells to clear of any microbial population and cell debris), proliferation (growth of new tissue), and remodeling (retaining tissue shape like before injury) Fig. 11. All these events take place spontaneously and autonomously in ordered phases, triggered by injury processes at wound site albeit healing process is time consuming. Moreover, in mammals, the intrinsic mechanism of healing is evolved around the chemical reactions of a series of active enzyme cascades and their inactive precursors, known as clotting factors.

These cells are lled with efciently distributed pigment granules located in cytoplasm. High illumination causes the photoreceptor chromatophores to open up sodium channels and resulting accumulation of hydrated Na+ ion increases the thickness of the cytoplasmic layers. Reverse phenomenon takes place in low light illumination and variation in the wavelength of the reected light stimulates the pigment cells to rapidly relocate their pigments and color of the skin. It gives them inherent ability to adjust their body color and remain indiscernible from the surrounding environment.

In mimicking bio-inspired self-healing program, a reasonably rapid response is required to restore the degree of structural integrity or prevent crack propagation. In addition, mimicking such enormously complex and lengthy process has limitations due to the lack of replenishment of the engineering components in the system designed for selfhealing fabrics.

To be continue in Page no. 53... TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

36


Advt.


Advt.


Aditya Birla Nuvo Ltd’s (ABNL) division Indian Rayon has brought the unique spool spun yarn technology for manufacturing high quality super fine denier viscose filament yarn for its unit based in Gujarat from ENKA GmbH and Co., Germany. The Company can now produce and market products from the imported machines under the Enka brand in India. The uniqueness of this technology is its capability of manufacturing superfine deniers, which is most suitable in georgettes, chiffons and crepes. The Enka brand was recently launched by Indian Rayon at Surat at a fashion show in the event titled “from plantation to panache”. Ms. Archana Kochhar renowned designer showcased her collection “Chokhi – inspired by the art of Rajasthan’s historical architectures. Actor Soha Ali Khan graced the occasion. Ta l k i n g a b o u t t h e benefit of this manufacturing set up in India, Mr. Lalit Naik, Deputy Managing Director of ABNL said “The production of yarn on Enka machines would give an edge to the Indian Rayon business and also give flexibility to customers in procuring the Enka branded yarn from Indian plant.” This step is clearly aligned to the need of Indian market today, stated Dr. Bir Kapoor, the President and unit Head of Indian

Rayon. “With the growing demand of superfine fabrics in India, especially in women’s apparel and saris, Indian Rayon would be able to entrench its VFY more intensely into discerning markets”, he commented.

BRAND LAUNCH

LAUNCH OF ENKA BRAND BY INDIAN RAYON ....

Enka yarn has uniform cross sectional properties, high tensile strength, uniform elongation, high brightness and whiteness properties, in addition to the well-established properties of viscose filament yarn having high lustre and colour brilliance, extreme comfort, skin-friendly, soft and smooth feel, unique drape and fluidity. Though manmade to suit diverse textile specifications, this has its origin in cellulose drawn from wood pulp and hence is 100% natural and bio-degradable. As Ms. Archana Kochhar says “I have used fabrics made from viscose filament yarns. The fabric is a delight to work with especially for the feel and the fall in the superfine fabrics”. About ENKA GmbH and Co ENKA GmbH and Co., Germany, a subsidiary of ICIG (International Chemical Investor Group), is a world class manufacturer of Viscose Filament Yarn. It was founded in 1899 in Glanzstoff and is today reckoned not only in the European markets but also global for quality, technology and sustainability standards.

“Feels like Cotton and looks like Linen” … is the Mantra of Aryan Silk Mills.

25

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

Head Office : Andheri East ,Factory : J-2, 2nd Floor,Shree Arihant Complex,Kalher, Bhiwandi, Thane - 421302. Tel - 02522-646969 / 646901 | Mobile - 09324778264, email id : aryan.silkmills@gmail.com Contact Person : Mr.Vineet Arya : 9324525002 47 TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Oct -Dec 2013

ADVT.

Aryan Silk Mills


ADVT.


immediate unconsciousness in less than 15 seconds. The temperature range found in outer space provides a second major hazard for humans. Electrically charged particle, ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroids are the other environmental problems encountered in outer space. Hence, there is a need for a system to determine, detect and prevent certain level of radiations, pressures and temperatures encountered by the astronauts to keep him alive in that environment.

Nikhil Bhosale, Vishnu Pareek Student

Shrikant Eklahare, Vardhaman chougule Faculty D.K.T.E Society’s, Textile & Engineering Institute, Ichalkaranji 1. INTRODUCTION Today, textiles can be seen working at the interdisciplinary level by offering the several technical advantages that may not be accumulated in a single material traditionally known. The technical textile is the most important and huge sector for various product development for many functional applications. Mobiltech (automotive applications such cars, trucks, buses, trains, ships and aerospace) represent the largest single enduse area for technical textiles. Composite materials are one such class of materials that play a important role in aerospace components. They are particularly attractive to aviation and aerospace applications because of their exceptional strength and stiffness-to-density ratios and superior physical properties. Based on the applications, textiles used in aerospace are broadly divided into aircraft textiles and space textiles. The current article focuses on aerospace textiles, various composites application and their application in aviation, aircraft textiles and space textiles.

3. AEROSPACE MATERIALS The most successful materials employed for manufacturing of aerospace textile and structures are composites. A composite is commonly defined as a combination of two or more distinct materials, each of which retains its own distinctive properties, to create a new material with properties that cannot be achieved by any of the components acting alone. Composites are often stronger than conventional materials and weigh less. Composites are formed by commonly incorporate a structural fibre and a plastic, this is known as Fibre Reinforced Plastics, or FRP. The fibre provides the structure and strength to the composite, while a plastic polymer holds the fibre together. 3.1 RAW MATERIALS EMPLOYED A. FIBRES

The mobiltech segment’s growth depends largely on the growth of the automotive sector in India, which has been brisk in recent years. India’s mobiltech segment is hence expected to grow at a rate of 17% to US$ 1,870 Million by 2016-17 as per estimates of the Working Group on Textiles and Jute Industry, Ministry of Textiles, Government of India. Aerospace is one of important technical textile subdivision of Mobiltech . Aerospace is compression of Aeronautics and Space flight. Aerospace textile covers special finished products to engineered textiles. It includes the textile containing articles for specific functional necessities to work in aircrafts, space suits, space shuttles, lunar and mars mission, and space transportation. The design, manufacture and applications of textile composites in space and aerospace have become one of the most leading aspects in present-day textiles.

1. Carbon Fibres It is the material consisting of extremely thin fibres about 0.0002 - 0.0004'' in diameter and contains mostly carbon atoms as it is produced as the byproduct during the cracking process of crude oil. It is also called as graphite fibre. These fibres have excellent tensile strength, heat resistance and chemical resistance (4). The very first commercial use of carbon fibres is often attributed to Thomas Edison’s carbonization of cotton and bamboo fibres for incandescent lamp filaments (5). However, practical commercial use of carbon fibres for reinforcement applications began in the late 1950s with the pursuit of improved raw materials for the manufacture and design of special utility components of aviation machine, space rockets. Activity increased rapidly during the 1960s and 1970s to improve the performance/price ratio of carbon fibres. Much of this effort focused on evaluation of various precursors, since carbon fibre can be made from almost anything that yields a quality char upon pyrolysis. Donnet and Bansal (6) present a good overview of various researchers’ efforts to evaluate different precursors, including PAN (polyacrylonitrile), pitch, rayon, phenol, lignin, imides, amides, vinyl polymers, and various

2. SPACE AND ITS ENVIRONMENT Knowledge about the space and its environmental conditions is a mandatory before entering into developing aerospace textiles. The outer space is very complex and causes numerous health risks. Generally, the outer space environment is space or vacuum surrounds the upper most part of earth and also other objects in universe. In space the pressure is zero where as at sea level in earth the pressure is 101 kilopascals. Due to the absence of external pressure, which in turn helps in balancing the internal pressure of body fluids and gases, it can rip apart fragile tissues such as eardrum and capillaries etc. Further lack of oxygen to the brain leads to

41

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

TECHNICAL TEXTILE FOCUS

COMPOSITE TEXTILE APPLICATIONS IN AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY


TECHNICAL TEXTILE FOCUS

naturally occurring cellulosic materials. Carbon fibres are available in many of the same formats as glass fibre. These formats include continuous filament spooled fibre, milled fibre, chopped fibre, woven fabrics, felts, veils, and chopped fibre mattes.

important role in preventing the broken engine blades from damaging the aircraft or entering the compartment of the passengers. 4. Alumina-boria-silica fibres Nextel is the trade name for Alumina-boria silica fibres. Retain strength Flexibility with little shrinkage even at continuous temperatures up to 2012°F (1100°C). 5. Silicon carbide fibre These fibres are similar to carbon fibres. Major properties are heat resistance, corrosion resistance, elasticity and withstand temperature as high as 1500°C.

2. E- Glass E- Glass or electrical grade was originally developed for stand-off insulators for electrical wiring. It was later found to have excellent fibre forming capabilities and is used almost exclusively as the reinforcing phase in the material commonly known as fibreglass. Glass is extensively used in modern composites, have high tensile strength, but very brittle and extremely sensitive to cracks and defects. When used in composite plastic matrix protects its surface and prevents crack formation, which produces a strong composite. Glass is also used for its low cost. It comes in different types e.g. A, C, D, E. E-Glass, gives special electrical properties, dimensional stability, moisture resistance and low cost. S-Glass has higher tensile strength, high elastic modulus and better thermal stability but also expensive. It is used in advance composites. C-glass gives chemical resistance. D- Glass is improved form of E-glass.

6. Nylon fibre Nylon 6,6 is made of hexamethylene diamine and adipic acid, which give nylon 6,6 a total of 2 carbons. They are heat resistance, friction resistance and melting point of 256°C (7,8). B. MATRIX MATERIALS Matrices are the essential material used to embed fibres and hold them in particular positions and orientations in order to provide the composite structural integrity. It is the capability of the matrix to transfer stresses which determines the degree of realization of mechanical properties of fibres and final performance of the resultant composites. Stress-strain behavior and adhesion properties are important properties are important criteria which control the ability of the matrix to transfer stresses. The chemical properties are generally determined by this plastic component. The matrix is mostly plastics generally polymers which can be grouped into two categories:

3. Kevlar fibres The DuPont Company invented aramid fibres in the 1960’s as part of their continuing research into all types of nylon (polyamide) fibres. DuPont found that by making the polymer highly aromatic (that is, using materials containing many benzene rings) a very stiff and strong fibre could be formed. The chemical structure of Kevlar shows the benzene rings along the polymeric backbone. (See Figure) These materials were called “aramids” from a contraction of their chemical description -aromatic polyamides. They are:

Unsaturated polyester resins have been in use for decades for the production of the glass fibre reinforced plastics for many industrial applications. During recent years, because of better toughness, appropriate stress – strain behaviour, indefinite shelf life and reprocessibilty, engineering thermoplastics are emerging as promising products for matrix materials. The most widely used thermoset resin is epoxy. Epoxy resins are ideal for high temperature applications. They offer versatility, broad range of physical properties, mechanical capabilities and processing conditions. Depending on manufacturing conditions, epoxy resins can provide toughness, chemical and solvent resistance, flexibility, high strength, and hardness, creep and fatigue resistance, good fibre adhesion, heat resistance, and excellent electrical properties. Metal and Ceramics matrix materials are also researched and used for the manufacturing of composites. The metal matrix composites offer higher modulus of elasticity, ductility, and resistance to elevated temperature than polymer matrix composites. But, they are heavier and more difficult to process.

• Heat resistant • High strength and modulus. • Good resistance to abrasion. • Good fabric integrity even at elevated temperatures. • Corrosion resistance. • Malleability. Kevlar fibres are known for the ability to provide quality and consistency, which are critical for aerospace applications. Kevlar fabrics are used in containment wraps, which perform the

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

42


Based on the applications, textiles used in Aerospace are broadly divided into Aircraft Textiles and Space Textiles. 4.1 Aircraft Textiles The utility of composites in various aircrafts had predominantly increased due to the properties like strength, resistance to heat, chemical and harmful radiations, specific modulus, etc. Though the percentage of usage may vary they vastly improve the strength, performance and fuel economy, which are the credit for the air craft.

4.2 Space Textiles Clothing used in space craft’s by astronauts is generally named as Space Suit. The environment faced by the astronauts are very complex in space when compared to the earth’s, where the gravitational attraction holds atmosphere comprising a mixture of gases like nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and thick form of water vapour and this atmosphere protects us from various factors. Thus, there is a need for a system to protect, determine, detect and prevent certain level of radiations, pressures and temperatures encountered by the astronauts to keep him alive in that environment. A space suit is a complex system of equipment, specially designed to protect and keep a person comfortable in the rough environment of outer space.

The textile articles being used in aircrafts are mainly for the below purposes: • Wings, Body Parts • Curtains • Upholstery fabrics • Aerodynamic fairings • Wall covers • Head set • Floor carpet / covering • Seat Cover

Some of the Properties of a space suit must possess are the following: 1. Lighter in weight. 2. Flexible in handling. 3. Soft in touch. 4. Comparable in strength with metal. 5. Modifiable in size and shape. 6. Thermal insulated and thermal resistant. 7. Chemical Resistance

A-380 COMPOSITE COMPONENTS Properties of technical textile for spacecraft are: • • • • • • •

High specific modulus & Strength Resistant to chemicals and organic solvents Good fatigue. Thermal insulated and resistant. Impact and stress resistant Better dimensional stability& conformability. Low flammability & Non-sensitive to harmful radiations. Most of the US commercial jets have their brakes made from carbon composites as they are the only once, which can withstand the high temperatures generated, if the take off is aborted all of a sudden. Tyre cords of jet aero planes are made up of Nylon 6,6, of thickness 840 D, since they require to

A. Design of an Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) An Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was designed by the NASA Engineers. It consists of 14 layers of structures to perform random functions such as thermal resistant, vapour absorbing and impact resistant layers. The inner layers of the suit do activities like cooling and ventilation garment. An EMU consists of wide operations in it like; Drink bag, communication systems, TV camera and lights. 43

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

TECHNICAL TEXTILE FOCUS

withstand strong pressure and frictional heat developed at the time of landing. Kevlar nonwoven felt liners are being used as fire barriers to cover urethane foam seats on all the air craft’s so as to prevent the production of highly toxic cyanide gases, when such foams burn during the accidents. Carbon and other high performance fibres are used in the rocket exhausts and nose cone covers for space shuttle, so as to protect them from heat, air friction during launch and re entry.

4. APPLICATION OF AEROSPACE TEXTILES


TECHNICAL TEXTILE FOCUS

First Layer: It is made up of knitted form of Nylon tricot is lined

while ensuring safety of the aircraft / aircrew / traveler, do not directly contribute towards operational capability of the aircraft. Their addition into the aircraft thus brings a weight overhead and it is a challenging task for the designer to minimize their weights. Fabrics are now universally and extensively used in the design of safety system of aircraft due to their light weight and a host of other favorable properties. Eg: Life Jackets, Survival Pack 5.2 Environment or Protective system Fabrics are also used in other aerospace application like, protective systems viz; flying clothing, fire proof/ fire retardant zones, pressure suits etc and environment systems viz; passenger seats, cabin upholstery, pressure suits, camouflage covers.

Second Layer: Spandex material fabric (a poly-urethane elastic thread) with plastic tubing is laced. Third Layer: It is a Urethane-coated nylon fabric layer called the pressure bladder layer Fourth Layer: Over the third layer a pressure-restraining layer made of Dacron, is laced. These two layers are employed to protect the astronauts from pressures balancing both internal and external pressures. Fifth Layer: Above those two layers, a thin liner of nylon coated with Neoprene Nylon Ripstop is placed. Sixth To Twelfth Layer: Followed by a series of 7 layers, thermal micrometeoroid garment of aluminized Mylar laminated with Dacron. These 7 layers are thermal insulated, protecting the astronaut from heat phenomenon and impact resistant protecting from meteoroids.

6. CONCLUSION Aerospace textiles are the one of most important sector which is mainly built to safe guard the life of an aerospace traveler. The ultimate aim of the Aerospace textiles is to protect the human body from a disaster or from the high rays in the upper layer of the atmosphere and spaces. The development of these textiles is a great boon to the present-day textile industry. Presently, these kinds of textiles are making a significant contribution to the increasing market for textiles. Although a lot of aerospace programmes have started using advanced composites, lesser industries are aware of the development in this ever-growing area of composite technology. This is due to lack of access to this technology and non implementation of the locally manufacturing composites at a reasonable cost. There is lot of scope for research and development in aerospace textiles and also for horizontal and vertical growth in aerospace textiles to save the life.

Thirteenth and Fourteenth Layer: The final or the outer layer of space suit, which is exposed to various radiations, is made of a blend of Goretex, Kevlar and Nomex materials (9,10). B. G- Suit A G-suit, or the more accurately named anti-g suit, is a flight suit worn by aviators and astronauts who are subject to high levels of acceleration force (g). Generally, a g-suit is composed of inflatable bladders, containing air or liquid that can be pressurized using a g-sensitive valve and held firm to legs and abdomen under higher values of g (gravitational force). The principle desired function of g-suit is to resist the blood draining from brain and upper body parts to legs of aviators. The initial effect of blood pooling in lower parts is a reduced level of vision termed as grey- out (= browning of scene) called g-induced loss of consciousness (g- LOC). Black-out and g-LOC has caused a number of fatal aircraft accidents (11).

7. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Prof. Shrikant Eklahare is a Faculty of Textile Finishing, D.K.T.E Society’s, Textile & Engineering Institute and UDCT (University Department of Chemical Technology) Maharashtra, India. Prof. Vardhaman chougule is the Faculty of Textile Technology, D.K.T.E Society’s, Textile & Engineering Institute Ichalkaranji416115, India.

C. Parachute It is effectively contributing in aerospace motion for men and materials. Parachutes help the safe decent of person or material from aerospace to ground s u r f a c e . G e n e r a l l y, a parachute composes of thin lightweight fabric, supporting tapes and suspension lines. Nylon, p o l y e s t e r, K e v l a r a n d Nomex fibre types are used in fabric for parachute. It is flexible and weather resistance.

The authors wish to thank the Shahanawaj Mujawar , Avadhut Rane, Abhi Kamble and Bajirao Jadhav for their continuous support. 8. REFERENCES 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8.

5. SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS 5.1 Safety systems Safety systems are inevitable for all aircrafts. The safety systems TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

9. 10.

44

http://technotex.gov.in http://www.sasmira.org/an%20article.pdf http://www.technicaltextile.gov.in/indexf41b.html?id=10 Paul J. Walsh, ASM Handbook, Composites, 21, 2001, Pg. 35-40. T. Edison, U.S. Patent 223,898, 1880 J.B. Donnet and R.C. Bansal, Carbon Fibres, 2nd ed., Marcel Dekker, 1990 http://www.fibre2fashion.com/industry-article/25/2473/applicationof-composites-in-aerospace-textiles1.asp published on March 19, 2010. M.V.Ragavendra Pavan, Karthik Macharla, Dr. J.Hayavadana, The Indian Textile Journal, March, March 2009, Pg.71-77 Nicole C. Jordan, Joseph H. Saleh, Dava J. Newman, Acta Astronautica, 59 (12), 2006, Pg 1135–1145. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-suit


Advt.


FASHION FORECAST

PREMIERE VISION & INDIGO AUTUMN WINTER 2014 - 15 Lively Stripes / Hand-Crafted Checks / Decorative Edge / Earth's Surface / Energised Florals / Mathematic Geometry / Inked and Worn / Minute Precision / Artistic Impression / Immersed in Colour / Exquisitely Painted / Textured Precision

More Details Visit www.pinterest.com/textilevalue

REPORT ON HINDUSTAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEETING Hindustan chamber of commerce organized interactive meet with Shri Anil B. Joshi, Textile Commissioner on 11th January, 2014 on chamber ofce’s conference room, where he was invited to speak on 12th Plan new Textile Policy. Meeting was truly interactive, as members asked their queries, which was satisfactorily answered by Textile Commissioner. He has mentioned 3 important aspect of industry development ie Capital, Labour & Infrastructure. In all three, Ministry had introduced development activity for the benet of industry. Capital: TUFS ( Technology Up gradation Fund Scheme ) . In 12th Plan ( year 2012 -2017) our main focus is on Weaving & Processing. As our Ginning, Spinning industry is already established. We are giving interest Subvention at 6% & Capital Subsidy at 15% on new Machinery with more than 800 RPM Loom (benchmark), as our purpose of giving TUFS for more productivity, quality, and sustainability. Labour: As in the change of Chinese Policy, Labour in China will be higher, also their focus are more on Agriculture development then TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

Textiles. This situation is in favour of India in Asian countries. Ministry had started Integrated Skill Development Program. Infrastructure : Under Integrated Textile Park Scheme, developing organized clusters in 61 different places in India. In which 20 Park is already functioning successfully. Under “ Group Work Shed” scheme if 4 individual come together and set up 48 looms ( minimum requirement), we provide benets of Rs. 300 / Sq ft for development of small industry. He had also told about Technical textile industry & its development in India

and Internationally. 46


Advt.


swantex

The Winner.

Unmatched In Quality, Price & Service Super energy saving machine invented with Efficient direct drive DIRECT DRIVE LOCK STITCH Unmatched operator comfort Auto lubrication . Easy to use control panel. Low noise and vibration Easy maintenance Low power consumption Convenient handling

SW-7200

With our sophisticated technology , we have innovated the basic performance of lock stitchers SINGLE NEEDLE LOCK STITCH

Sewing speed 5000spm . Direct drive servo motor Stitch length 5mm Programmable computer panel Auto thread wiper Drop feed Dynamically balanced

The ideal lower tension can now be achieved as a result of improvements in the thread take- up, rotary hook and feed mechanisms.

swantex

Productivity can now be increased through boosting of the maximum sewing speed upto 5,500 rpm. A feed dog angle adjustment mechanism reduces puckering and uneven material feeding.

Swantex

SW-7340

Energy saving Motor Stable Adjustable stand

SW-7340

Compressed Table.

SW-7200

CAD

CUTTER PLOTTER

LAZER CUTTING

FABRIC INSPECTION

EMBROIDERY

swantex SW20-2

FLAT LOCK

OVER LOCK

MULTI NEEDLE

QUILTING

HEAVY DUTY

SALIENT FEATURES > CENTRAL PARTS CENTER > DESIGN STUDIO > ALT COLLEGE > TURNKEY PROJECT CONVEYOR SYSTEM

BANGALORE

Tel: 09426865877 E-mail: altcolahm@gmail.com

KANPUR

Tel: 09936450593 E-mail: altkanpur@rediffmail.com

CENTRAL PARTS CENTRE

CONSULTANCY - MACHINES - TRAINING - SPARES - DESIGN STUDIO

Branches : CHENNAI

DELHI

Tel: 09880047817 E-mail: altbl@bgl.vsnl.net.in

Tel: 09841720141 E-mail: altltdche@gmail.com

Tel: 09873414490 E-mail: altdelhiltd@gmail.com

KOLKATA

LUDHIANA

MUMBAI

PUNE

Tel: 09814705926 E-mail: altlud@yahoo.com

> TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Kaikondanahalli, Sarjapur Road, near Bellandur Gate Carmelram Post, Bangalore -560035 India Tel : 080-28439210 / 41268441 Fax: 080-41169852 E-mail : Service@altltd.com Web: www.altltd.com

Tel: 09880047817 E-mail: service@altltd.com

Tel: 09845061958 E-mail: service@altltd.com

FURNITURE

APPAREL & LEATHER TECHNICS

ALT AHMEDABAD

BUSBAR SYSTEM

Tel: 09833281810 E-mail: altbby1@vsnl.com

Tel: 09833281810 E-mail : altbby1@vsnl.com

GURGAON

Tel: 07428273304 E-mail: altggnltd@gmail.com

SURAT

Tel: 09426865877 E-mail: altcolahm@gmail.com

HYDERABAD

INDORE

Tel: 09848407138 E-mail : 7hillsgarmentmachinery@gmail.com

Tel: 09873414490

TIRUPUR

TRONICA CITY

Tel: 09894594801 E-mail: alttprcpc@airtelmail.in

E-mail : altdelhiltd@gmail.com

Tel: 09971339855 E-mail: alttronica@rediffmail.com

JAIPUR

Tel: 09799878536 E-mail: Service@altltd.com

ALL India Dealership Invited

Advt.

THREAD TRIMMING


3. REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Dr. Ela Manoj Dedhia Head

3.1. The Impact of Celebrities on Adolescents’ Clothing Choices

Textiles & Fashion Technology, Nirmala Niketan College of Home Science

Teenagers seek to dene themselves through their clothing, experiences, hairstyles, and, most of all, group associations. In all, this experimentation suggests that the adolescent attempts to discover himself/herself through external—rather than intrinsic—stimuli. Accordingly, images from popular culture often provide the external basis from which teenagers will benchmark their thoughts, opinions and associations. Celebrities have one thing in common, other than their successful careers they all have the ability to inuence individuals, especially teenagers, into buying a particular product. These celebrities are a few just who hold the power to structurally impact social groups, which places them among a group of highly inuential persons in society. Celebrities are more like salespersons. Though they may not explicitly try to persuade their audiences, they are subconsciously altering the thoughts of the public. This is noticeable through celebrity endorsements, press interviews, apparel worn during public events, items favored by celebrities, celebrity-branded products and celebrities’ overall brand image all of which create epidemics of societal acceptance among various social groups.

1. INTRODUCTION Young generation has tendency to imitate and follow anything which appears ‘hip’ or ‘in’. They are quick to relate and to follow what appears fashionable. Fashion is something that teens wish to t in which makes them struggle in their everyday life. “Fashion, fashion and fashion”, The entire world is running behind this key word. The one, who is not ‘in fashion’, might face low preference over fashionable. Fashion is understood by people as a well-liked style and practiced mostly in outts, footwear or accessories. It refers to the recent trend in regard of dress up or outt. Fashion can be a powerful thing as it reveals the creativity in people. Fashion being a trend setter and unpredictable, many big companies appoints designers, to setup trends that shall be followed in the next year in advance. Teenagers go through all the fashion magazines and watch many fashion related television shows. They look up to each and every idol they see on television and in their favorite fashion magazines. Media and magazines inspire many teenage girls. Magazines have a huge impact on dressing sense and the way teens try to look. When a teenager sees their favorite celebrity or model wearing something they love they will try to wear that same type of style just to be like them. Media has this same affect on teens. Teens watch all types of crazy reality shows these days to live up to the celebrities they watch on television. Teens do not realize how much media and fashion magazines are affecting their style and lifestyles

They can do so by assuming nature of the messenger and making sure audiences remember what was said by speaking with emphasis. In regards to Hollywood, “emphasis” would include the frequency a celebrity name is mentioned in headlines, repetitiveness of a celebrity image ashed on magazine covers, and the consistency of a celebrity’s brand image in stories. Often, fashion for teenagers is the result of the desire to be like a celebrity. Celebrities are perhaps the greatest inuences on teenagers in the modern world, and they can have a huge impact on a teen's ideas about fashion and its importance. http://smu.edu/ecenter/discourse/teens.htm

.http://ezinearticles.com/?Fashion-and-Teenagers&id=141857.

2. PURPOSE OF THE STUDY.

3.2 .Teens' attitudes towards clothing brands

Aim: To study whether teenagers are affected by fashion.

Clothing offers teens a means of self-expression or a way of coping with social situations argue that self-expression is especially important to the echo-boomers and found that clothing style, look and t were the three most important clothing selection criteria used by 13 to 19 year females also found that this age group was preoccupied with social acceptance, social afliation and "coolness" attached to make the "right" clothing choices. Teens that interact more with peers about consumer matters exhibit a more brand-oriented decision making style. Adolescents frequently communicate with their peers prior to making purchases in order to maintain group identity.

Objectives •

To understand the behavior of adolescent girls living in Mumbai turning to celebrities for their fashion role models.

To observe whether teenagers are inuenced by latest trend around them.

• To understand the peer pressure on teenagers for being fashion conscious. •

FASHION FOCUS

TEENS AFFECTED BY FASHION

To analyze the purchasing power of teenagers.

http://www.articleclick.com/Article/Is-Fashion-Affecting-The-Teenagers-/1903854

49

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


FASHION FOCUS

3.3: Teens affected by media and fashion magazines

As seen in g.1 majority of respondent are inuenced by current fashion around them because they feel one must be fashion oriented in today’s world, they feel as if they are walking with the world and get to know more about the latest trends. While only few are not inuenced by currents trends as they wear clothes according to their own wish and they don’t like to duplicate the fashion around them.

Teenage girls love fashion magazines. Fashion magazines have a huge impact on teens because they are a way teens nd the latest trends. Most fashion magazines know their largest target group is teenagers, particularly girls, so these magazines will put popular celebrities on the covers just so teens buy the magazine. Teens will see the cover and say “Oh look who it is! I love her! I HAVE to have that outt.” Many magazines advertise the companies where celebrities are buying their latest styles when teens see their favorite celebrities in the newest trends the teens will go out and buy what that newest trend to be just like their favorite. Without the magazines advertising, teens would create their own trends and wear what they thought was trendy rather than the celebrity styles. Not only do teens look up to celebrities in magazines, they look up to all the younger models they see in the media.

2. Teenagers Having Clothes Which Their Favorite Celebrity Have.

http://ezinearticles.com/?Fashion-and-Teenagers&id=141857 3.4. Peer Pressure On Teens. Peer pressure has a large effect on teen’s everyday choices. Peer pressure can be broken down into two groups; good peer pressure and bad peer pressure. Good peer pressure is being pushed into something that you don't have the courage to do but is relatively good for you. Teens under good peer pressure will be urged NOT to do something because it was not in their best interest. Bad peer pressure is being coerced into doing something because your friends said you should. People that aren't real friends may suggest something unhealthy, such as drugs. Peer pressure may inuence us in a number of ways, including our: • Fashion choice • Alcohol and other drug use • Decision to have a boyfriend/girlfriend • Choice of who our friends are • Academic performance 3.5: Body image

As seen in g.2 majority of the respondents said that they have almost all the clothes which their favorite star, Celebrity have, as they always desire to look the same in terms of clothing by having and wearing the same clothes. By this they also try to show off to their friends and world around. Very few of the respondents don’t have clothes which their favorite celebrity have as they don’t like to copy them in terms of clothing, and they feel it’s an individual style one must not follow blindly. 3 .Teenagers who evaluate what is fashion before going shopping

Teenage girls are not only pressured by magazines to dress like celebrities, but the magazines and media have a big inuence on the ways girls physically look. When a very skinny beautiful girl is on the cover of a teen’s favorite magazine, they will do whatever it takes to look just like them. This is causing many eating disorders amongst teenage girls, which is changing their lifestyles. All the girls in the media and magazines are told or forced to be skinny which has an inuence to other girls making them want to be skinny like them as well. http://www.ehow.com/facts_5150416_fashion-important-teens.html1

4. METHODOLOGY 

The study conducted aimed at teenage girls of Mumbai, studying in College

The methodology was planned accordingly to meet the aim and the objectives. Sample Size: 330 respondents. Girls: Age Between 13 -19 years of age. Sampling Technique: purposive sampling method was used. Questionnaire: open and close ended were formulated.

   

As seen in g.3 majority of the teenagers evaluate what are upcoming trends colours, cuts by doing looking at different source, so they exactly know what to buy and what not to buy, they want to buy the best in the market. While few of the respondents don’t evaluate what fashion styles are in trends they just pick up whatever they like and whatever is available to them. 4 . Frequency of teenagers shopping at high-end designer quality

5. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS. 1. Inuence of current fashion on teenagers.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

50


available each day and they must not miss this opportunity, these teenagers just want to have lots and lots of clothes as they do not want to repeat some of them. Few of the respondents shop monthly or so as they do not have time to shop frequently every week, and it is also alright with them to repeat their clothes. 8. Fashion world affecting teenager’s self-esteem

5. Fashion magazines affecting the selection of teenager’s clothes.

As seen in g.8 majority of respondents feel fashion world does affect teenagers self esteem because it’s necessary to follow latest fashion around them. When they do not follow it, it does not give them condence to face the world. Whereas a few of the respondents feel that fashion world does not affect one’s self esteem.

As seen in g.5.Large respondents feel that fashion magazines are affecting the selection of teenagers clothes as these teenagers buy clothes by looking at the latest fashion magazines and then decide on types and different varieties of styles available in which shop. It has the maximum effect as the clothes in the magazines are worn by celebrities. Very few of the respondents felt that fashion magazines did not affect the selection of their clothes, as they never buy fashion magazines and their selection does not depend on it.

9. Teenagers feel uncomfortable/ shy when they are with fashionable people

6. Teenagers who are brand conscious.

.As seen in g.9 moderate teenager respondents feel uncomfortable when they are with fashionable people whereas the other moderate numbers of them do not feel shy because they feel they themselves wear clothes which are latest. 10. Teenagers dress to stave off humiliation and mocking from peers.

As seen in g.6 large number of teenager are brand conscious, as they are the status symbols, and they don’t like to shop from other places as clothes from other places tend to become common soon among the general people. Few respondents said that they are not brand conscious as they can’t afford to buy branded clothes. 7. Frequency of shopping among teenagers.

As seen in g.10.Large amount of teenagers dress to stave off humiliation from peers. For them friend’s play a very important role and they do not want to lose them because of their inappropriate clothing patterns. While few of the teenagers dress well sometimes when there’s a need to dress such like in some event or friends birthday party. A very small amount of teenagers never dress to stave off humiliation from peers, because they dress according to

As seen in g.7 moderate amount of respondents go for shopping once a week as they feel there is every new style

51

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

FASHION FOCUS

As seen in g.4 large number of teenagers shop at high-end designer quality store, branded stores, as they are status symbols, and they don’t like to shop from other places as clothes from other places tends to become common soon among the general people. Few respondents said that they never shop from high-end stores as they can’t afford to buy branded clothes.


FASHION FOCUS

their needs, for them peers don’t play an important role in making decisions. 11. Media and fashion magazines affecting teenager’s lifestyle

14. Teenagers faced problems if they wore skinny or exposing clothes.

As seen in g.14 majority of them have faced problems like eve teasing, whenever they have worn skinny or exposing clothes. Few of them have faced such problems sometimes. Few others have never faced such problems.

As seen in g.11 large percentage of respondents feel that fashion magazines and media are affecting the teenagers lifestyle as these teenagers buy clothes by looking at the latest fashion magazines and then decide on types and different varieties of styles available in which shop. It has the maximum effect as the clothes in the magazines are worn by celebrities. Very few of the respondents feel that media and magazines does not affect teenagers lifestyle, as they never buy fashion magazines and their selection does not depend on it.

15. Good and high-end dressing raised teenager’s status and quality of life.

12 . Frequency of Teenagers to impress the opposite sex

As we can see in g.15 equal responses have been arrived, moderate amount of teenagers feel yes it has rasied teenagers status and quality of life, these teenagers are very fashion conscious,they shop often and that too in branded shops only. Whereas others feel it has not made much of a difference in raising teenagers and their quality of life, only the positive aspect of fashion world has been imbibed by them.

As we can see in g.12 by and large majority of teenage girls impress their opposite sex by clothing, because they feel it is a strong tool to impress them and an easy way. Moderate numbers of respondents do impress through clothing but sometimes such as during dating, while going on hangouts, movies etc. and very few of teenage girls opined that they never impress the opposite sex by clothing because it’s not their values and ethics.

16. Accessories and clothing over powering teenager’s expenditure.

13. Teenagers who buy clothes which make them look sexy and bold. As we can see in g.16 by and large respondents feel accessories and clothing is over powering teenager’s expenditure sometimes as they are spending beyond their required money. Moderate amount of respondents feel it exceeds very often as they shop a lot, but it doesn’t matter to them as their families are ok with spending that much amount. And a few respondents never felt that it is over powering their expenditure as they have never crossed that limit and do not buy branded clothes.

As seen in g.13 majority of them don’t buy clothes which makes them look sexy and bold, because they believe in being comfortable and not in showing off their body parts. Whereas others buy clothes which make them look sexy and bold, because they want others to see them and observe them when they are around. TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

52


 50% of teenagers believe fashion is being comfortable. Carrying your-self in the best possible way. They are not so much inuenced by fashion but they like to be with the fashion around them. Some come from the background where although they are not allowed they do wear trendy clothes. 7. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION • Teenagers are more prone to get affected by the glamour and the lavish lifestyle. They are quick to relate and follow what they think is fashionable. They nd their sources in magazines and media, through which it spreads like wild re. They don't mind spending time behind fashion instead of their books or anything else that adults want them to do.

As we can see from g.17 high number of respondents spend more than Rs 2000 on styling and clothing, as they feel one must walk along with upcoming fashion, and their parents do give them money to spend. While moderate of them spend between Rs 1000-2000 and many even spend less than Rs 1000 on styling and clothing as they feel it’s not a very important aspect.

• Teenagers think branded things make them look cool and classy and feel they are much like their favorite personalities. According to them being stylish also protects them from being bullied around. They hide their actual image behind these outts. • The main impact on the teens is the fashion magazines. Teen girls just watch the models and desire to look like them and they will do whatever necessary to look as the models, from dieting to exposing they try out all, but at uncertainty they lose their daily impact and creative thinking.

18. Result of fashion trends spoiling the teens.

8. REFERENCE Webliography • •

.As seen in g.18 majority of the respondents feel fashion trends and styles are affecting today’s generation as they imbibe the same culture. While few respondents are not fashion conscious all the time some say that it is affecting the teens because they don’t concentrate on other things such as studies. Few respondents love being with fashion and they feel it adds status symbol to them.

• •

19. Meaning of fashion to teenagers. s 50% of teenager’s believe fashion is termed as being fashionable. Looking best, modern, and bold, wearing trendy clothes, impressing others, exposing your-self to the world, imitating the celebrities. These teenagers are those who come

http://ezinearticles.com/?Fashion-and -Teenagers&id=141857 http://www.ehow.com/facts_5150416_fashion- importantteens.html1 http://fashion.ezinemark.com/is-fashion-affectingthe-teenagers-7d3150283c85.html http://mediaaffectteenslifestyleandfashion.blogspot.in /2011/06/conclusion.html http://smu.edu/ecenter/discourse/teens.htm http://www.articleclick.com/Article/Is-Fashion-Affecting-TheTeenagers-/1903854 Books, Newspapers -Articles

• • •

... continued from page no. 36

Hindustan Times Magazine 2010,12 Dec Magazine-Teens X Adolescence development by Santrock

splendor and memorable discoveries in the history of mankind. 4 REFERENCES

3. CONCLUSIONS After billions of years of evolution, nature developed inventions has led to the introduction of highly effective and power efcient biological mechanisms. Humans have always made efforts to imitate and have increasingly reached levels of advancement where it becomes signicantly easier to mimic biological methods, processes, and systems. Advances in science and technology are leading to knowledge and capabilities that are multiplying every year. These improvements lead to capabilities that help understand better and implement nature’s principles in more complex ways. Effectively, we have now signicant appreciation of nature’s capabilities allowing us to employ, extract, copy, and adapt its inventions. Benets from the study of biomimetics can be seen in many applications, including stronger ber, multifunctional materials, improved drugs, superior robots, and many others. The rapid growth of research motivation in bio inspired engineering and biomimetics has stimulated huge interest of scientists and researchers to apply it for technological innovations. There has been a spirited past of the engineers, architect and scientist, mimicking nature based design to develop

53

1.

Bar-Cohen Y. In: Biomimetics: biologically inspired technologies. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press; 2006. p. 2–40.

2.

Bar-Cohen Y. Biomimetics – using nature to inspire human innovation.Bioinspir Biomim 2006;1:1–12.

3.

Ahmed D. Hybridization of smart textiles in medical in medical and healthcare management. AUTEX 2009world textile conference, _Izmir, Turkey 26–28 May, 2009.

4.

Bhushan B, Jung YC, Koch K. Micro-, nano- and hierarchical structures for superhydrophobicity, selfcleaning and low adhesion. Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci 2009;367(1894):1631–72.

5.

Bae GY, Jang J, Jeong YG, Lyoo WS, Min BG. Super hydrophobic PLA fabrics prepared by UV photografting of hydrophobic silica particles possessing vinyl groups. J Colloid Inter Sci. 2010; 344(2):584–7.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

FASHION FOCUS

from a background and family which are not conservative and whose family income is high

17. Results of teenagers spend monthly on clothing and styling


POST SHOW REPORT

INDIATEX 2013 EXHIBITION by The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit successfully organized INDIATEX 2013 Exhibition at Vapi (Gujarat) from 18th to 20th October 2013. This exhibition was organized in a very professional manner with around 90 distinguished exhibitors from all over the country exhibited at the event. This exhibition was supported by Textile Commissioner, Ministry of Textiles, Govt. of India and iNDEXTb, Govt. of Gujarat was the State Partner of this exhibition. The exhibition covered the entire spectrum of the textile industry from Fibre to Fashion. Mumbai Unit gave the excellent opportunity to the technologists and technology service providers to come under one roof to provide good platform for mutual advantage and commercial interaction.

the organizing committee took the decision to hold this exhibition at Vapi. Mr. Haresh Parekh, Convenor of this Exhibition said that IndiaTex 2013 is an exhibition for suppliers, buyers, distributors and manufacturers of fabric and textile producers. He said that organizing exhibition was a big challenge as the Mumbai Unit doing it for the rst time. He thanked all the exhibitors and supporters for their kind support. Mr. Rajnikant Backhaniwala congratulated Mumbai Unit for organizing this exhibition in the fastly growing industrial belt in the state of Gujarat. He also cautioned the organizers in respect of organizing exhibition as it is a very difcult task and needs lot of manpower and efforts.

The inaugural function of the exhibition was organized in the VIA Auditorium. The Chief Guest of this function was Dr. Chandan Chatterjee, Director, CED & Head (Project & technology) iNDEXTb, Govt. of Gujarat who inaugurated the exhibition at VIA ground. The Guest of Honour were Mr. Rajnikant Backhakaniwala, Director, Palod Himson Machines Pvt. Ltd. and Mr. Diven G. Dembla, President, ITAMMA & Managing Director, Precision Rubber Industries Pvt. Ltd.

Mr. Diven Dembla thanked Mumbai Unit for giving ITAMMA to be part of this exhibition. He explained the important role played by ITAMMA in the development of the textile industry at various levels from accessories to machineries. Dr. Chandan Chatterjee, remembering his college days since when he was associated with the Textile Association. He assured all the participants and the exhibitors for all kind of assistance from the Govt. of Gujarat in setting up their business in the state. He suggested that healthy competitions amongst the industries will change the scenario for the development of the country.

Mr. C. Bose, President of TAI, Mumbai Unit welcomed the gathering and said that Mumbai Unit was happy to organize this at Vapi which is the nancial & industrial districts of the state of Gujarat.

Mr. A. V. Mantri, Hon. Secretary proposed the Vote of Thanks.The 3 day exhibition was visited by technocrats, entrepreneurs and owners from various parts of the country. The visitors and exhibitors appreciated Mumbai Unit for providing good opportunity for business networking.

Mr. G. V. Aras, Exhibition Chairman expressed his views about the industrial belt starting from Tarapur, Umargam right up to Surat, which is buzzing with manufacturing activities in different verticals textile value chain. He said for these reasons

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

54


The 5th International textile expo “Fibertofashion 2013” trade show organised by SGCCI ( Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce & Industry)& Kavish Events on 7th to 9th of December, 2013 at chamber’s own exhibition centre at Surat International Exhibition & Convention Centre, Sarsana, Surat. Main event sponsors are Reliance, Birla Cellulose, Sumilion industries. Association supported are PDEXCIL, NSIC, FOSTA, SRTEPC, ITTA, FIASWI many more. Ministry of Textiles is also major backbone of show. Exhibition offered lunch to all visitors and exhibitors.

association ; government ofcials; industry professional, budding entrepreneur; many more. Two giant ber manufacturers like Reliance & Birla displayed their new products in Polyester &Viscose Rayon respectively. Both have beautiful fabric designs, but both fabric feel is different. Feel & fall of both makes apart both ber.

POST SHOW REPORT

FIBERTOFASHION SHOW SURAT

Birla’s Viscose feel is more richer, sustainable, smooth, organic, moisture absorbent, good fall, pleasing colours, many more. As viscose is regenerated cellulosic bre, combination of natural & synthetic ber. Visitors are While, Reliance polyester have coarser feel than viscose and cotton. Have good fall, more transparent. Visitors are curious, happy to look, feel both bre together.

Event has two days conference with eminent speakers on the dias shared their views on textile industry in India & global market; polyester industry market & growth; Surat market opportunities & threat etc.

Much other company like Sumeet industries, J. Korin, Muniveer Spinning , many others displayed PET CHIPS, Polyester yarns, polypropylene yarns .

Appx 4000 visitors visited exhibition in 3 days. Visitors are from buying agency across india, weavers, manufacturer & exporter of ber, yarn, fabrics, garments; fashion designer; engineer college students, fashion institute students; media;

55

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


POST SHOW REPORT

TECHTEXTIL INDIA’S GROWTH STREAK CONTINUES FOR FOURTH CONSECUTIVE EDITION

TECHTEXTIL INDIA SYMPOSIUM 2013: THE RIGHT MIX OF EXPERTISE AND INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

The 4th edition of Techtextil India – the International Trade Fair for Technical Textiles and Nonwovens – closed its 3-day run at Hall 6 of the Bombay Exhibition Centre (BEC) on 5th October 2013, with 5,575 professional visitors in attendance. The exhibition, registering a 40 per cent increase in the number of exhibiting companies of 182 (2011: 130) from 16 countries, showcased the latest products and innovations. “Feedback from the industry, both exhibitors and visitors, was extremely encouraging. Techtextil India 2013 was an event packed with superlatives. With this year’s figures, the show has definitely established a firm position among the technical textile trade fairs in India,” commented Raj Manek, Managing Director, Messe Frankfurt Trade Fairs India Pvt Ltd.

Knowledge sharing is an essential strategy used by Messe Frankfurt to promote the development of industry verticals. A representation of which, the Techtextil India Symposium 2013 was the right mix of expertise and experience. Focused on opportunities for India in the context of the key products, technologies and application areas including Medtech, Protech, Composites and Filtration, the Symposium hosted 30 speakers and 171 delegates. It also facilitated development of new and different ideologies in terms of market potential for various products across the entire spectrum of technical textile applications, from a local as well as international perspective.

The event accommodated five country pavilions with leading companies from Belgium, China, France, Italy and Germany, focusing on new materials systems, integrated production technologies and innovations for 10 product groups and 12 application areas. More internationality and a larger product range added professional expertise and variety; Techtextil India 2013 featured the participation of visitors from 36 different countries. "I'm really impressed by the size and the quality of Techtextil India as an international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens in India. All leading enterprises of the industry are represented here," said Sushil Kapoor, President and CEO (TTB), SRF Ltd, India, Platinum Partners of Techtextil India 2013.

Speaking about the growing applications of technical textiles, especially composites, in India was Dr A Selvam, Executive Secretary, FRP Institute, India. He stated: “Technical textiles have huge applications in wind farms, and the Indian government has restored generation-based incentives for wind-energy, which is why the market will see an upward trend in the near future. A platform like the Techtextil India Symposium 2013 helps gather professionals to highlight innovations and developments for allround sector development.” “The Techtextil India Symposium makes it possible to get a glimpse of new industry developments and innovations from all over the world. I was surprised to learn about the vast technical textile market in Russia. As a manufacturer of polymers and acrylic resins, I especially enjoyed the sessions on Medtech and Protech. The Symposium was very well organised,” claimed Vijay S Patel, Executive – Technical Services, Indofil Industries Ltd, India.

Techtextil India 2013 was a gateway to the Indian technical textile industry for the exhibitors. Feedback from the exhibitors resonated satisfaction and a fantastic customer response. Tamer Pala, Vice Chairman, Istanbul Textile and Raw Materials Exporters’ Association (iTKiB), Turkey said: “There are technical textile products manufactured exclusively by Turkish companies that are in high demand in India, like fabrics and yarns with camouflage properties and other para-military textiles. We met several buyers interested in these products and are glad we decided to participate in Techtextil India 2013. We hope to come back with a bigger space at the next edition.”

Also in attendance at the Symposium and highly impressed with the exhibition and Symposium was Yash Jaipuria, Executive Officer, Ginni Filaments Ltd, India. He commented: “India’s hygiene textile market is growing in leaps and bounds, and has very interesting prospects in store. We definitely need a platform like this Symposium to ensure that India’s technical textile and nonwoven industry can compete at global levels.” With its 10 product groups and 12 application areas, Techtextil India 2013 once again proved to be the right platform to source the latest products, innovations and meet exactly the right contacts. The next edition of the exhibition will be held from 24 – 26 September 2015.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

56


his embassy in Tehran for a Hi-Tea & get-together.

TEXTILE INDUSTRY AT IRAN Textile exports from Iran reached US$ 221.1 million during the rst four months of the current Iranian calendar year that started on March 21, 2013. Where, bre, fabric, garments, machinemade oorings and threads topped the export list during the period.

This meeting was attended by the various Indian Exhibitors, while the team of ITAMMA exhibitor members was lead by the President, Mr Diven Dembla. During this meeting valuable discussions were had on the challenges faced by the Indian exporters while promoting their textile machines and components to Iran.

Around 15,581 tons of cotton bres worth US$ 38 million and 106.7 tons of garments worth US$ 937,000 were imported during the period. In addition, the sector imported around US$ 37.2 million worth of textile machineries during the period. ‘IRANTEX 2013 ‘IRANTEX 2013’ exhibition was held at Tehran International Permanent Fairground, Tehran, Iran during 28-31 October, 2013. The categories of Exhibitors were 62% from User Industry in the business of manufacturing and dealing of bre, yarn, fabric & their nishing, etc.; while 38% from Supply Industry in the business of manufacturers /dealers/agents, etc. of Machines & Spare Parts of Spinning, Weaving, Wet Processing and Garment Industry.

POST SHOW REPORT

ITAMMA’S SUCCESSFUL PARTICIPATION AT IRANTEX’2013

Shri Bharat Babu, Counsellor shared his views regarding the economic and political scenario in Iran, giving us insights into the opportunities available for the Indian exporters to the Iran market. also got clarications regarding several issues related to banking, trade and commerce, which will help our members enhance their exports to Iran.

ITAMMA’S PARTICIPATION 1. In Catalogue display 18 members participated. 2. ITAMMA’s 35 Indian Exhibitors were present. Honourable Ambassador of India in Iran Shri D.P. Srivastava invited the Indian Exhibitors & Visitors on 28th October, 2013 at

ALL INDIA SEMINAR ON NONWOVEN TECHNOLOGY BY MANTRA solutions for those challenges The seminar has been organized in two sessions taking one full day for the speakers to deliberate on different issues of prime importance to be tackled by the industry and nding answers to those issues. All the speakers are eminent in their respective elds of expertise to make the seminar meaningful and solution focussed. This has been followed by facility tour of MANTRA,COE on the next day to give the delegates how MANTRA can help TT to grow to its true potential Mr. Mohan Kavrie, MD Supreme Nonwoven highlighted key issues need to be tackled R&D,Manpower,Testing facility, and market research. Mr. Rajnibhai Bachkaniwala Vice president MANTRA highlighted the importance of the Asia region in Geotech, Indutech and Buidtech are the key growth drivers among all the TT sectors. There are 2 days seminar where various speakers given lecture on development, growth, opportunity, threat of Technical textiles industry. All the delegates and speakers of the seminar have been taken to MANTRA COE to have a rst-hand view of the Nonwoven pilot plants, Nonwoven treatment pilot plants, Technical textile testing facilities. Visitors appreciated the full range of facilities available at MANTRA to recognize it as a one stop solution for Technical Textile industry.

This is an All India seminarorganized by the Institution of Engineers (India) South Gujarat Local Centre under the aegis of Textile Engineering Division , IEI in association with Man Made Textiles Research Association (MANTRA) at The Institution of Engineers, South Gujarat LocalCentreMahida Bhavan,Ichchhanath, Surat on 26th & 27th November 2013. The delegates were drawn from diverse back grounds such as businessmen from local textile industry and technical textile manufacturers , members of Mantra Society,Representatiaves from government, members of TRAs, Academics, and consultants. This is part of continuing endeavour by the IEI to promote new technology and innovative ideas in all the eld of engineering and technology in the country. The key objective of this seminar is to bring together all the different stakeholders engaged in the growth and development of nonwoven based technical textiles and to brainstorm on the key challenges ahead for this sector with a view to nding

57

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


COMPANY PROFILE

SGS INNOVATIONS SGS Innovations or Bandhu Yarns synonymous words for Company and its Brand. Owner & Founders, Mr. Kamal Ningoo & Mrs. Kajal Ningoo have a great vision to grow business. Striving for core, visionaries of SGS Innovations have more than 33 years of experience in textile industry. It takes great pride to introduce as the leaders in the manufacturers of embroidery thread. Being a Creative entrepreneur, they invent products and methods to create new values for embellishing fabric. This creativity has made them a pioneer in our textile industry. “To Raise Fashion Industry to a New Horizon by providing Quality and Innovative products.” Said by Mrs. Kajal Ningoo. There is a saying that goes, “ A cup that is full is useless, Only when a cup is empty it is useful.” This is true for them. This has made them proactive learner. They have constantly go on improving their knowledge and then apply it to their business. This has been one of our most important habits for success. We believe there is no graduation day for us.

Few things shared by them “ For us quality is of utmost importance. We never compromise for it. We set our own standards to ascertain our quality and constantly go on improving it. Our manufacturing unit is located at Vadodara; our products are easily available at Surat and any other part of India . We are very well known by our brand name, ”Bandhu”, which means “friend”. We make products in Viscose, Polyester, Cotton etc. in different deniers like 120,150,225 etc. Our new product in cotton was launched about 6 months ago. This Product has changed the overall embroidery industry scenario. From time to time we introduce new products and color ranges. So Friends something new is coming your way very soon……. Behold your breath for it!!!!!” Kindly contact for more further details : SGS Innovations. Web Site:-www.sgsinnovations.com E-mail:- kajal@sgsinnovations.com

DIAGONAL CONSULTING (INDIA ) “TechTex Asia 2014” The First Ever Online Trade Fair for Nonwovens & Technical Textiles to be Organized by DCI Diagonal Consulting (India), a Management Consulting firm specializing in the field of Fibres, Textiles & Nonwovens is proposing to organize TechTex Asia 2014, the first ever 365 Days Online Trade Fair for the Nonwovens & Technical Textiles Industry, starting from January 2014.

Unique “Select Geographic Lead Generation Model” enables exhibitors to focus on select countries for lead generation. The event is to be promoted across 20,000 companies from the user industry & institutions in Asia. Brands can have distinct visibility directly to its user industry in Asia.

Online trade fairs can be best explained as a multidimensional platform, where a company can exhibit its products and services to the international audience, get a global exposure and discerning buyers from all across the globe. Grasping every essence of a traditional fair, these Online Trade Fairs are gaining momentum and are becoming major elements in branding and marketing for companies in non traditional domain. The visitors to an online event get a real time experience of visiting a ground event; they can view presentations & brochures, visit the exhibit booths, communicate with the companies, exchange cards and enhance their business opportunities.

To k n o w m o r e a b o u t t h e e v e n t , k i n d l y v i s i t http://diagonal.in/techtexasia/TechTex_Asia.pdf

The key highlight of TechTex Asia 2014 is its promotion across major “User Industry” & “Events” in the field of Agriculture, Automotive, Industrial, Medical & Hygiene, Building & Construction, Packaging, Protective Clothing’s, Sports, Textile Composites, Nonwovens & Industrial Fabrics. Moreover the

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

Contrasting 'on ground' events where exhibitors are given a day or two to market their products, Online trade fairs give them the opportunity to showcase their products and services throughout the year leading to a better & focused business opportunity. We seek your kind interest in “TechTex Asia 2014” and request you to kindly lock your participation for a promising opportunity to be amongst your user industry in Asia. Nirav Shah, nirav.dci@diagonal.in, Partner - Diagonal Consulting (India) (M) +91 9909904179

58


FABRIC REPORT

GREY EX MILL FABRIC PRICE * Kindly please note all prices are indicative.

Report Given By :

Mr. Kirti Shah TEXTILE WORLD Write for more queries : info@textilevaluechain.com

WIDTH IN INCHS

COUNT

REED PICK

40 x40

132 x 73

63

POWERLOOM

40 x40

92 x 88

63

40 x40

92 x 88

63

AUTOLOOM

60 x 60

92 x 88

63

POWERLOOM

60 x 60

92 x 88

47

POWERLOOM

60 x 60

92 x 88

63

MILL MADE

80 x 80

92 x 88

63

POWERLOOM

80 x 80

92 x 88

63

AUTOLOOM

60 x60

132x108 1/1

63

AIRJET

20 x 10

108x54

63

RUTIC

20 x 300

108x54

63

20 x 300

124 x 56

58

RUTIC

20 x 16

108 x 56

63

RUTIC

20 x 20

56 x 56

63

RUTIC

30 x 150

124 x 64

63

RUTIC

45 PC X 45PC

102 X 76

60

CIMCO

LOOM

* Kindly please note all prices are indicative. COUNT

REED PICK

WIDTH IN INCHS

WEAVE

CANVAS ne 20/16Ly

108x56

67

3/1 Drill

ne 20/16Ly

108x56

67

Broken Drill

COUINT

REED PICK

WIDTH

ne 20/16Ly

108x56

67

2/1 twill

2/10 x 2/10

44 x 32

60

Ne 30/10

144 x 64

63

31 drill

2/7 X 2/7

42X26

60

Ne 30/16+16 ly

144 x 56

69

4/1 satin

Ne 30/16+16 ly

144 x 56

69

Broken drill

3/10 X 3/10

42X26

60

Ne 30/20+20ly

144 x 68

69

4/1 satin

Ne 40/30 +30Ly

144 x 68

69

4/1 satin

Ne 40/20

165 x 74

63

4/1 satin

Ne 40/30

185 x 85

63

4/1 satin

Ne 40/30

185 x 90

63

4/1 satin

Ne 40/40 +150D

112 x 66

63

1/1 plain

Ne 40/40

124 x70

63

1/1 plain

Ne 40/40

124x96

63

1/1 plain

Ne 40/40

132x 72

63

1/1 plain

Ne 50/50

165 x 104

63

2/1 twill

Ne 60/60 +80D

132 x 96

63

1/1 plain

Ne 60/60 +80D

165 x 104

63

4/1 satin

Ne 60/60 +80D

165x120

63

4/1 satin

Ne 60/60

175x116

63

4/1 satin

Ne 60/60

180x115

63

4/1 satin

Ne 60/60

196x108

63

4/1 satin

Ne 60/60

196x110

63

2/1 twill

Ne 80/80

165 x 114

63

4/1 satin

59

* Kindly please note all prices are Open

3/8 X 3/8

36 X 26

60

3/7 X 3/7

36 X 26

60

* Kindly please note all prices are indicative.

Construction 40*40/132*72 40*40/124*70 40*40/124*96 40*30/185*90 60*60/165*104 40/30+30ly 173*76

Inch Weave 63" 63" 63" 63" 63" 69"

Rate

1/1 plain 70.00 1/1 plain 67.00 1/1 plain 81.00 4/1 satin 103.00 4/1 satin 91.00 4/1 satin 111.00

for Rates & other variety of fabric Quality, login to, www.textilevaluechain.com in Report Section


FABRIC REPORT

GREY EX MILL FABRIC PRICE * Kindly please note all prices are indicative. Sr. No.

QUALITY

COUNT

GSM WEAVE

REED PICK

WIDTH IN INCHS

1

10X06

76X28

63

515

DUCK

2

16X08

84X28

47

270

DUCK

3

16X08

84X28

63

365

DUCK

4

16X12

84X26

47

235

DUCK

5

16X12

84X26

63

315

DUCK

6

16X12

96X48

63

415

DRILL

7

16X12

108X56

63

470

DRILL

8

16X16

60X56

63

300

PLAIN

9

2/20X10

40X36

48

240

PLAIN

10

2/20X10

40X36

63

315

PLAIN

11

20X20

60X60

63

245

PLAIN

12

20X20

60X60

67

255

PLAIN

13

20X20

60X60

72

275

PLAIN

14

20X20

60X60

78

300

PLAIN

15

20X16

108X56

63

360

DRILL

16

20X20

108X56

63

335

DRILL

17

30X30

68X64

63

177

PLAIN

18

30X30

124X64

63

260

TWILL

19

10 x 6

76 x 28

63”

320

Duck

20

10 x 6

76 x 28

67”

320

Duck

21 22 23

10 x 10 16 x 8 16 x 8

76 x 28 84 x 28 84 x 28

63” 47” 50”

270 225 225

Duck Duck Duck

24

16 x 8

84 x 28

63”

225

Duck

25

16 x 8

84 x 28

67”

225

Duck

26 27

16 x 8 16 x 8

84 x 28 84 x 28

72” 84”

225 225

Duck Duck

39

10 x 10

38 x 34

67”

185

Plain

50

40

10 x 10

40 x 36

50”

197

Plain

40

41

10 x 10

40 x 30

80”

180

Plain

56

42

2/20 x 10

38 x 34

50”

185

Plain

44

43

2/20 x 10

38 x 34

67”

185

Plain

57

44

2/20 x 10

38 x 34

72”

185

Plain

62

45

2/20 x 10

38 x 34

76”

185

Plain

65

46

2/20 x 10

38 x 34

80”

185

Plain

69

47

2/20 x 10

38 x 36

82”

190

Plain

72

48

2/20 x 10

40 x 36

63”

197

Plain

56

49

2/20 x 10

40 x 36

72”

197

Plain

65

50

2/20 x 10

40 x 36

84”

197

Plain

76

51

2/20 x 2/20

40 x 36

63”

197

Plain

64

52

2/20 x 2/20

40 x 36

72”

197

Plain

73

53

2/20 x 2/20

40 x 36

80”

197

Plain

81

54

20 x 20

60 x 56

48”

150

Plain

41

55

20 x 20

60 x 56

49”

150

Plain

42

56

20 x 20

60 x 56

72”

150

Plain

57

57

20 x 20

60 x 56

80”

150

Plain

63

58

16 x 16

56 x 56

63”

180

Plain

56

59

30 x 30

68 x 68

72”

117

Plain

59

60

40RSK x 40RSK

52 x 36

57”

57

Plain

29

61

40RSK x 60RSK

68 x 68

81”

73

Plain

65

62

40RSK x 60RSK

68 x 68

82”

73

Plain

65

63

40RSK x 60RSK

68 x 68

84”

73

Plain

67

64

40RSK x 40RSK

68 x 44

63”

73

Plain

38

65

40RSK x 40RSK

64 x 44

67”

70

Plain

40

66

60CMP x 60CMP

92 x 86

63”

78

Plain

61

67

10 x 10

68 x 38

50”

275

Drill

54

68

10 x 10

68 x 38

63”

275

Drill

67

69

10 x 10

68 x 38

72”

275

Drill

77

70

16 x 12

108 x 56

63”

295

Drill

81

28

16 x 8

76 x 27

63”

210

Duck

29

16 x 8

76 x 27

67”

210

Duck

71

16 x 12

96 x 48

63”

258

Drill

72

16 x 12

96 x 48

67”

258

Drill

77

76 x 27

72”

210

Duck

72

16 x 10

84 x 28

63”

210

Duck

73

16 x 12

96 x 48

72”

258

Drill

83

16 x 10

84 x 28

72"

210

Duck

74

20 x 20

108 x 56

63”

212

Drill

67

33

16 x 12

84 x 26

47”

192

Duck

75

20 x 20

108 x 56

67”

212

Drill

71

34

16 x 12

84 x 26

63”

192

Duck 76

20 x 20

108 x 56

80”

212

Drill

85

35

16 x 12

84 x 26

67”

192

Duck

36

16 x 12

84 x 26

72”

192

Duck

77

40CRS x 40CRS

124 x 64

63”

122

Twill

70

37

20 x 10

76 x 28

63”

170

Duck

78

10 x 10

40 x 36

63”

197

Waffle

50

38

10 x 10

38 x 34

63”

185

Plain

79

20 x 20

108 x 52

63”

207

HB

67

30

16 x 8

31 32

* Kindly please note all prices are open. COUNT

REED PICK

BLEND

PROCESS

WEAVE

40 X 30

178 X 78

97% Cotton 3% Lycra

Dyed

Lycra Satin

40 X 30

178 X 78

97% Cotton 3% Lycra

Rfd

Lycra Satin

2/50 x 150

142 x 88

70% Cotton 30% Polyester

rfd peach

2/1 twill

2/40 x 300

134 x 56

70% Cotton 30% Polyester

Rfd

2/1 twill

30 x 10

152 x 68

100 % cotton

Rfd

3/1 Drill

30 x 30

132 x 68

100 % cotton

Bld

2/1 twill

30 x 30

124 x 64

100 % cotton

Dyed

2/1 twill

16 x 12

116 x 56

100 % cotton

Dyed

3/1 twill

16 x 12

116 x 56

100 % cotton

Dyed peach

3/1 twill

20 x 20

116 x 56

100 % cotton

dyed

3/1 twill

2/40 x 300

134 x 56

70% Cotton 30% Polyester

bld peach

2/1 twill

30 x10

152 x 68

100 % cotton

Bld

3/1 Drill

20 x 10

122 x 56

100 % cotton

Bld

2/1 twill

for Rates & other variety of fabric Quality, login to, www.textilevaluechain.com in Report Section 60


NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY: MARKET FOR TEXTILES & CLOTHING 2013 Domestic Market for Textiles

Personal clothing items:

The market for textile and clothing’s during 2011 and 2012 is 29881 million metres and 31636 million metres and $ 54.43 billion and $ 63.51 billion in value terms respectively.

The aggregate market for personal clothing is 93.03 percent (27795 million metres and 29432 million metres during 2011 and 2012) of the total purchase.The main contributors to the personal clothing market are

During 2011 , the share of man-made and blended/mixed textiles is 56.93 (17012 million metres), cotton textiles is 42.13 percent (12589 million metres), Pure silk textiles is 0.67% (200 million metres) and Woollen textiles is 0.27 % (80 million metres). During 2012 , the share of man-made and blended/mixed textiles is 57.00 (18034 million metres), cotton textiles is 42.01 percent (13289 million metres), Pure silk textiles is 0.70% (221 million metres) and Woollen textiles is 0.29 % (92 million metres). The sector wise analysis revealed that Mill made and Powerloom sector together has accounted 84.17 percent (25150 million metres) during 2011 and 83.38 percent (26687 million metres ) during 2012. The knitted/ hosiery sector has a share of 11.83 percent (3536 million metres) for 2011 and 11.92 percent (3772 million metres) for 2012. The handloom sector is reported to have a share of 4.00 percent (1195 million metres) in 2011 and 3.70 percent (1177 million metres) in 2012.

KEY FINDINGS

Source : Textile Committee

(a) Western Wear (b) Ethnic Wear Š Intimate Wear (a) Western Wear: The market size of western wear like Shirt, Bush-shirt, Trousers, Half Pant, Jeans, T-Shirts. During 2011 is 1858 million pieces and 1962 million pieces during 2012. The major contributor to the demand is shirts and bushshirts with a market size of 514 million pieces in 2011 and 546 million pieces in 2012 followed by trousers with 397 million pieces in 2011 and 421 million pieces in 2012.

Per capita consumption (b) Ethnic Wear: The total market size of ethnic wear during 2011 is 3066 million pieces and 3239 million pieces in 2012. The major contributors to the demand pattern of the ethnic wear are saree, dhoti, lungi, kameez etc. The demand for saree during 2011 and 2012 is 1918 million pieces and 2029 million pieces respectively, followed by Salwar-kameez with 406 million pieces and 433 million pieces in 2011 and 2012 respectively. The lungi has a share of 245 million pieces during 2011 and 263 million pieces in 2012.

The per capita consumption of textiles during 2011 is 24.70 metres as compared to 25.93 metres during 2012. The rate of growth is 4.98 percent. At the same time, an Indian spent Rs.2473.64 on the purchase of textiles and clothing during 2011 and Rs.2862.87 during 2012, which is higher by Rs.389.23 compared to previous year. Domestic Market at Disaggregate Level: The domestic market & household sector is broadly segregated into personal clothing & home textiles.

(b) Intimate Wear: The aggregate market for the intimate wear during 2011 is 2289 million pieces and 2406 million pieces. In this segment, the demand for vest is highest with 874 million pieces and 919 million pieces during 2011 and 2012.This is followed by brief with 610 million pieces and 648 million pieces in 2011 and 2012 respectively. The petticoat accounts for 500

61

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com


KEY FINDINGS

million pieces in 2011 and 528 million pieces in 2012.The panties has a share of 187 million pieces and 193 million pieces in 2012 respectively. The brassieres has a share of 118 million pieces for 2011 and 2012. Home Textiles: The aggregate market for home textiles is 1979 million metres in 2011 and 2086 million metres , with market share of 6.98 percent during 2011, 6.97 percent in 2012. The demand pattern is driven by products like towel with 769 million metres in 2011 and 812 million metres in 2012. This is followed by bedsheet 466 million metres in 2011 and 490 million metres in 2012.For chaddar it is 358 million meters in 2011 and 373 million metres in 2012. The furnishing material has a share of 172 million meters in 2011 and 186 million metres in 2012.

Table No. 1 Area & Fibrewise purchase of textiles during 2011 and 2012(Million Metres) Fibre

Cotton Pure Silk Woollen MM Fibres& Blended/Mixed All Textiles 11343

In Ahmadabad, manufacturer is not making good quality fabric, eg. 40x40x164 quality making in 112 x 64 , many other. This is selling in grey in market, fabric tear off after few months. Current trend is of ner count in weft, manufacturer trying coarser yarn with linen look,

• In ladies ethnic wear ( Punjabi Suits), in middle range Rs. 500, Ahmadabad is ahead, but more than Rs. 500 range Mumbai ahead, with latest fashion. Good margin in same. • Cotton linen, Grey price is Rs. 120, after different nishes it sells in Rs. 180-200. This fabric consume in small quantity like 500 to 1000 meter. Garment of this fabric sell in retail in about Rs. 1200 to 2400, Excellent Margin. • Many old spinning, composite mills closed and new are coming in Amravati, Baramati and Ichalkaranji due to development of textile park. Sometimes due to wrong intension of starting business shut down after 3 to 4 years.

11863 18538

19773

All India 2011 2012 12589 13289 200 221 80 92 17012 18034 29881

31636

The Market Size of Important Varieties , Garment in million pieces

by Mr. Kirti Shah, Textile World

• Mumbai’s wholesale market is slowing moving down due to no young generation involvement in business, now all are 50+ age person handling business in market. Where as in Gujarat, due to less education, young generation sets in market, less income lead life in good way. Rent of ofce space is only 25% as compare to Mumbai rent space. Travelling time also less in one city in Gujrat then Mumbai, • Textile ministry is developing good scheme, but due to heavy competition in textile industry, industry need more marketing expert to sell in domestic & international market. • In Tarapur & Gujarat, many process house closed, reasons are Pollution control, mis management, wrong decisions, many more. Banks feeling insecure & in loss due to heavy debt from this region 

• In surat, One Marwari manufacturer, having upgraded machinery, but still doing outside job working due to ineffective marketing, not giving proper commission to Agents, so many commissioning agent stopped working there.

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN | Jan-March 2014|www.textilevaluechain.com

Area Rural 2011 2012 7415 7829 42 50 42 50 11039 11844

Table No.2

MARKET REPORT 

Urban 2012 2011 5460 5174 171 158 42 38 6190 5973

62

Slow momentum in textile fabric market, hoping good future head. Who are not doing any new development in design fabric, they are lagging behind & closing their units. Those who are making Good quality fabric & process house, all are started for next winter season. Recently 40/50/60/80, Plain, tusser, twill, dobby weave in progress.


TRADESHOW DETAILS INFASHION 2014

TEXTREND INDIA 2014

Date: 17th & 18th January, 2014 Venue: Bombay Exhibition center, Mumbai Organizer name : Images Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. Contact details: www.indiainfashion.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Fabric Brands

Date: 20th to 22nd Jan, 2014 Venue : Pragati Maidan, Delhi Organizer name : AEPC Contact details: www.textrendsindiafair.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Apparel brands

ITMACH 2014

VASTRA 14

Date: 22nd to 24th Jan 2014 Venue: Indian corporation Premises, Bhiwandi Organizer name : ITMACH INDIA Contact details: www.itmach.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Textile Machinery

CONFERENCE DETAILS TEXTILE INVESTMENT CONCLAVE 2014 Date: 11th Feb, 2014 Venue : Hotel Courtyard, Ahmedabad Contact Details : www.citiindia.com

TECHNOTEX 2014 Date: 20th to 22nd March, 2014 Venue: I Bombay Exhibition center, Mumbai Organizer name : FICCI Contact details: www.technotexindia.in Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Technical textiles FIBRES & YARNS 2014 Date: 10th to 12th April, 2014 Venue: World Trade Center, Mumbai Organizer name : Tecoya Events Contact details: www.fibersnyarns.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of fibres , yarns

Date: 30th Jan to 1st Feb, 2014 Venue: VJTI college Campus, Matunga, Mumbai Organizer name : VJTI College of Engineering Contact details: vastratpsf@gmail.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of across value chain, paper presentation, fashion show

PLACEMENT MELA Date : 26th Feb, 2014 Venue : Nehru Centre, Worli Contact details : www.cmai.in

HOMETEX TECH Date: 21st to 23rd March, 2014 Venue: Huda Ground, Panipat Organizer name : Essential Events Contact details: mktg.essential@gmail.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Machinery, home textile

F & A SHOW – HOMETEX SHOW Date: 30th May to 1st June, 2014 Venue: Trade Centre, KTPO, Whitefield, Bangalore, India Organizer name : S.S. MEDIA Contact details: www.fnashow.in, www.homtex.in Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Fabrics, accessories, Home textiles

YARNEX 2014 – TEXINDIA 2014 Date: 9th to 11th Sep, 2014 Venue: India Knit Fair Complex, Tirupur Organizer name : S.S. MEDIA Contact details: www.yarnex.in , www.texindiafair.com Exhibitor’s profile: Manufacture of Fabrics, accessories, Home textiles

For more updated details on Indian & international events kindly watch Trade Calender / Events on www.textilevaluechain.com


SUBSCRIPTION FORM

Yes, I am interested in subscribing to TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN for Period of :

1 Year ….....

2 Year……

Company Name _________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone No. : ____________________ Fax : _________________

Mobile No. : ___________________

Email Id : _______________________ Website : ____________________________________________ Contact Person Name : _____________________________ Designation : ______________________ Your Business info

INDUSTRY · Manufacturer · Trading Company · Dealer / Agent/ Distributor · Retailer · Merchant Exporter / Importer  Dealing in : · Fiber · Yarn · Fabric · Processing / Finishing · Garment · Machinery · Technical Textiles · Trimming · Any other…………  SERVICE PROVIDER: …………………………………………………….

(kind of services)

 ASSOCIATION / COUNCILS /GOVERNMENT: …………………….  EDUCATION INSTITUTES / RESEARCH CENTERS:………………………….

SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION OFFER TILL DEC 2013 … SUBSCRIBE FOR 2 YEARS IN Rs. 500 ..!!! · ·

1 YEAR : 4 ISSUES: Rs. 300 2 YEAR : 8 ISSUES : Rs. 500

For Out station cheques add Rs. 50 Extra.

PAYMENT : paying by Cash / Cheque / Demand Draft No. ________________________Rs. ________________in word for Rs. ______________________________ Dated _______________

Drawn on ( Bank Name/ Branch)…………………………………….. Favoring to “ INNOVATIVE MEDIA AND INFORMATION COMPANY” Payable at Mumbai. I would like to conrm my subscription. Date : Signed Person Name : ……… Kindly send your subscription to :

Stamp :

Signature


Advt.


Advt.


Advt.


advt.


www.textilevaluechain.com Register & Read...

For Brand / Company Promotion : Write : sales@textilevaluechain.com Call : +91-22-21026386 / +91-9769442239

Advt.

 TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN Magazine issues  Latest News  Quality Articles  Meaningful Interviews  Reports / Forecast  Updated Events  Directory  Many more...


Advt. JANUARY-MARCH- 2014

TEXTILE VALUE CHAIN

VOLUME - 2

ISSUE -4

January- March 2014

2 4 68

www.textilevaluechain.com

Jan March 2014 ( Volume 2, Issue 4)  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you