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Effect of Machine Variables on Rotor Yarn Properties Harish. R. Jambur1, Prof. P. P. Kolte2, Dr. V. G. Nadiger2* & Prof. A. M. Daberao2 1 Bapuji Institute of Engineering & Technology 2 SVKMs, NMIMS, MPSTME, Centre for Textile Functions Abstract As Open end technique is becoming very popular, an effort is made to see that how machine variables will affect the properties of the open end yarn. In this paper, we have studied the effect of various parameters of the rotor spinning machine i.e. opening roller speed, rotor diameter, rotor speed and twist of yarn on the yarn properties. The results indicate that these variables significantly affects unevenness [U%],coefficient of variation (CV%), imperfection index [IPI] and lea strength of the yarn. These parameters have to be optimized in order to get better quality of open end yarn depending up on their end uses. The opening roller speed influences the unevenness [U%], imperfection and yarn strength of yarn to great extent; however the speed has to optimize. The influence of change in rotor diameter is studied, it considerably influence the lea strength of the yarn. This may be due to wrapper fibers.Whereas rotor speed are influences on coefficient of variation (CV%),twist factor has an influence strength of yarn. However, all these parameters have to be optimized in order to get better quality of open end yarn depending up on their end uses. Keywords Opening roller speed, Rotor diameter, Rotor speed, Twist, Rotor yarn properties.

Rotor spinning is considered as most suitable and successful spinning process among many open-end spinning methods [6]. For high production rate of yarn, open-end spinning principle is significantly acceptable not only by using low to medium grade cotton but also from wastage at relatively lower cost than any other existing spinning technology [7]. Cotton yarn produce by rotor spinning is more uniform, fuller, aerated and regular in strength [8]. The quantity of production on rotor spinning has increased in recent years [9]. Now a days, rotor spinning system is rising *All correspondences should be addressed to, Dr. V. G. Nadiger, SVKMs, NMIMS, MPSTME, Centre for Textile Functions, Shirpur, Maharashtra- 425405 Email : nadigervinay.7@gmail.com March - April 2018

due to the considerable reduction in space and personnel [10-11]. The positive impact of spinning parameters on yarn properties were accessed by imperfection index[12]. The yarn characteristics of rotor spun yarn are affected by various factors related to raw material, machine parameters and processing parameters. Many researchers have already investigated the effect of these parameters on yarn quality from different outlooks[7-15]. Rotor yarns are less spun yarn because of bling of fibres in the spun yarns are not as as ring yarns [7].

irregular compared to the ring multiple doubling or back dourotor groove. In addition, rotor affected by roller drafting wave

2. Materials and Methods 2.1 Materials The cotton fiber properties of the material selected for this study is shown by Table 2.1. The cotton fiber properties are assessed by Uster-HVI spectrum instrument. The processing mixture of fiber composed of 30% Brahma cotton, 15% Comber cotton and 55% Flat strip (dropping). The fibers are mixed together homogeneouslyby sandwich mixing method.

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1. Introduction New spinning technologies introduced in late sixties and early seventies, only rotor spinning sustained its promise and in the years to follow, it established itself as a worthy alternative to ring spinning in the course and medium count range [1-3]. The reasons for its phenomenal growth were very high productivity, around 5-8 times that of ring system, and amenability to automation and elimination of roving and winding process [3-5].


SPINNING Table 2.1. Properties of the cotton fiber

Quality Parameters

Details

Particulars

Parameters

Fiber length (mm)

28-30

Front roller delivery speed

300 m/min

Fiber micronairevalue (Âľg/inch)

3.7

Number Of Doubling

8

Uniformity Index (%)

80.0

Feed Hank

0.100 Ne

Short Fiber Index (%)

8.3

Delivery Hank

0.100 Ne

Moisture (%)

7.5

Front zone roller setting

38 mm

Maturity Index (%)

0.85

Back zone roller setting

32 mm

Draft

8

2.2 Methods For producing 21s Ne count, the homogeneous mixture of cotton processed through spinning process. The parameters of the process are mentioned in Table 2.2, Table 2.3, Table 2.4 & Table 2.5 respectively. Table 2.2. Blow Room Machine Particulars

Particulars

Speed (rpm)

Roto Flock

400

Blendo clean

350

Ulti clean

450

Maxi clean

450

Shell roller speed

9

Table 2.3. Carding Machine Particulars

Particulars

Parameters

Feed hank

0.10 Ne

Delivered hank

0.10 Ne

Delivery speed

180 m/min.

Production 8Hr at 95% efficiency

400 Kg/Card/

Table 2.4. Draw Frame Machine Particulars

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Table 2.5. Rotor Machine particulars

Particulars

Parameters

Rotor Speed

80000 rpm

Opening Roller Speed

9000 rpm

Delivery Speed

95 rpm

Doffing tube

50x55x170mm

Draft

80-250

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In this study, to produce rotor yarn of 21s Ne count BD 030, Elitex type rotor spinning machine was used. The yarn were produced depends on various variables. Firstly, Opening roller speed changed from 7000 rpm, 8000 rpm and 9000 rpm with rotor speed 50000 rpm,rotor diameter34 mmand TPI 25 constant. Secondly, Rotor diameter changed from 34 mm, 43 mm, and 54 mm, with Rotor speed 50,000rpm, opening roller speed 8,000 rpm andTPI 25. Thirdly, rotor speed changed 50000 rpm and 60000 rpm with opening roller speed 8,000 rpm,rotor diameter34 mm andTPI 28. Fourthly, TPI changed from 22, 25 and 28 with rotor speed 50000 rpm, opening roller speed 8,000 rpm and rotor diameter34 mm. Firstly, drawn slivers were feed through a sliver guide via a feed roller and feed plate to rapidly rotating opening roller. The rotating teeth of the opening roller comb out the separate fibers from the sliver clamped between feed plate and feed roller. Then the fibers were feed to inside wall of the rotor after completing action in transport channel. The fibers moved forward to the rotor groove from the conical rotor wall by centrifugal forces in the rapidly rotating rotor. Finally, the yarn formed in the rotor is continuously taken off by the delivery shaft and the pressure roller through the nozzle and the draw off tube and wound onto a cross wound package. [7] Figure 2.1 represents the basic working principle of rotor spinning system and flow diagram of yarn preparation respectively.

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SPINNING

Figure 2.1 Basic working principle of rotor spinning system[7].

Figure 3.1 Variables of opening roller speed 7000, 8000, 9000 rpm with rotor speed 50,000 and twist per inch 25 constant

3. Results and Discussion Table 3.1, Fig 3.1 to Fig 3.4 shows that when the opening rollers speed is increased, the U% of the yarn, imperfection and strength of the yarn has improved.Increase in the opening roller speed; fiber individualization, U% as well as strength of the yarn improves. The fiber extent as improved the draft is also increased there by the U% is has improved the imperfection has decreased and strength of the yarn has improved. However we can clearly say that opening roller speed of 8,000 rpm can be optimized since the imperfections and U% the CV% has improved to the great extent. However after 8,000rpm of opening roller when it is increased due to centrifugal force of opening roller fiber extent decreases considerably thereby detoriating the yarn quality . Hence opening roller speed has great bearing on the property of the yarn.

Figure 3.2 Opening roller 7000 rpm

Table 3.1. Variables of opening roller speed 7000, 8000, 9000 rpm with rotor speed 50,000 and twist per inch 25 constant

U%

CV%

Thin/km (-50%)

Thick /km (+50%)

Neps/km (+280)

Rel. cnt (%)

Avg. lea strength in lbs

7000

14.11

17.77

68

117

108

100

65.1

8000

10.96

13.88

4

37

50

100

53.8

9000

11.61

14.64

3

28

56

100

71.9

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Roller Speed (rpm)

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Figure 3.3Opening roller speed 8000 rpm

Figure 3.5 Variables of Rotor diameter 34, 43, 54 mm, TPI 25. Rotor speed 50,000 rpm, opening roller speed 8,000 rpm.

Figure 3.4 Opening roller speed 9,000 rpm

Table 3.1, Fig 3.1 to Fig 3.4 shown thatrotor diameter has little influence on U%, CV% and yarn imperfection but it has great bearing on strength of yarn this can be seen in the results that is keeping twist per inch rotor speed opening roller speed constant. Tensile strength of the yarn decreases.

Figure 3.5. 1(a) Rotor diameter 34mm

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When rotor diameter is increased to 34mm to 54mm this may be due to fact that as the rotor diameters increases the wrapper fibers are increased which in turn decreases the tensile strength of the yarn.Hence rotor diameter has to be optimized.

Figure 3.5. 1(b) Rotor diameter 43mm

Table 3.2. Variables of Rotor diameter 34, 43, 54 mm, TPI 25. Rotor speed 50,000 rpm , opening roller speed 8,000 rpm.

Rotor Diameter

U%

CV%

Thin/km (-50%)

Thick /km (+50%)

Neps/km (+280)

Rel. cnt (%)

Avg. lea strength in lbs

34 mm

14.11

17.77

19

108

212

100

61.9

43 mm

10.96

13.88

5

47

53

100

57.3

54 mm

11.61

14.64

33

145

242

100

51.9

380

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SPINNING

Figure 3.5.2 - Rotor diameter 54mm Figure 3.6.2. Rotorspeed 65,000 rpm

From the table 3.2 and figure3.5 to figure3.5.2 results even though increase in rotor speed deteriorate the yarn evenness. It was observed, when the speed is increased from 50,000 to 65, 000, there is no difference in the CV%.

From the table 3.3 and figure3.6 to fig 3.6.2, the twist when increased from 22TPI to 28TPI,the lea strength of the yarn gradually increases and reaches optimum

Table 3.3 Variables of Rotor speed 50,000 and 65,000 with constant TPI 28

Rotor Speed (rpm)

U%

CV%

Thin/km (-50%)

Thick /km (+50%)

Neps/km (+280)

Rel. cnt (%)

Avg. lea strength in lbs

50000

11.77

15.01

4

94

182

100

69

65000

12.89

16.15

5

59

102

100

54

Figure 3.6. Variables of Rotor speed 50,000 and 65,000 with constant TPI 28

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Figure 3.6.1 - Rotor speed 50,000 rpm March - April 2018

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level A higher twist produces yarn with a higher co efficient of friction ,hence increase in the strength , even though it has very little or no effect on uniformity of the yarn.


SPINNING Table 3.4. Variables of TPI 22, 25, 28 with constant rotor speed 50,000 and opening 8,000

TPI

U%

CV%

Thin/km (-50%)

Thick /km (+50%)

Neps/km (+280)

Rel. cnt (%)

Avg. lea strength in lbs

22

13.13

16.52

5

67

73

100

48.9

25 28

14.27 13.36

18.13 16.98

47 18

147 138

210 224

100 100

54.9 59

Fig 3.7. Variables of TPI 22, 25, 28 with constant rotor speed 50,000 and opening 8,000

Figure 3.7.3. Twist per inch 28

Figure 3.7.1 Twist per inch 22

Conclusions Result and discussion clearly show that ◆ Machine variable has definite effect on yarn properties. ◆ Rotor diameter and rotor speed influences strength of yarn considerably. ◆ Opening roller speed has influences uniformity, imperfection and strength of the yarn. ◆ Twist influences strength of the yarn considerably. Hence it is always advisable to optimize these parameters for the open end yarn depending on their end uses.

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Acknowledgment: The Author's want to acknowledge to the Dr. J S Muralidhara, Principal, White Pencil College, Bangalore. Kind support of project and industrial support by Production Manager Girish S.Joshi of SohamCottspinn, Haveri, Karnataka and AnjaneyaCotton Mill, Davangere, Karnataka. Tests carried in lab especiallyUster Evenness Tester.Mr.Ravindra K.B.B.I.E.T. Collage,Davangere for photographs of samples. Figure 3.7.2. Twist per inch 25

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References 1. Barella A., Manich MA., Marinob NP., & Garofalob .J. (1983). Factorial studies in rotor March - April 2018


SPINNING

2. 3.

4. 5.

6.

7. 8.

9.

spinning of part -I: Cotton Yarns. The Journal of the Textile Institute74, 329-339. Istiaque, Sharma N (1990). Fiber disorder in open end spinning. Grosberge P., Mansoor S.A. High speed open end rotor spinning (1975). The Journal of the Textile Institute 66, 389-396. Lord, P.R.(1976). The Structure of Open-End Spun Yarn.The Textile Research Journal, 41, 778-784. Barellaa, A., Turaa J.M., Vigoa,J.P., Esperona, H. O. (1976). An application of mini-computers to the optimization of the open-end-spinning process. Part ii: Consideration of the case of three variables. The Journal of The Textile Institute, 67, 325-333. Khan, M.K.R., Rahman, H. (2015). Study of Effect of Rotor Speed, Combing-Roll Speed and Type of Recycled Waste on Rotor Yarn Quality Using Response Surface Methodology. IOSR. Journal of Polymer and Textile Engineering, 2,47 55. Klein, W, Manual of Textile Technology, The Textile Institute, (1995), 20-25. Nawaz, S.M., Jamil, N.A., Iftikhar, M. and Farooqi, B.(2003). How Does Open-End Processing Variables Effect Imperfections for Different Yarn Count.Pakistan Textile Journal, 22-26. Ishtiaque, S.M., Spinning of Synthetic Fibres and Blends on Rotor-Spinning Machine. Indian Journal of Fibre and Textile Research,17, 224230,(1992).

10. Ahmed, S., Syduzzaman, M., Mahmud, M.S., Ashique, S.M. and Rahman, M.M. (2015). Comparative Study on Ring, Rotor and Air-Jet Spun Yarn. European Scientific Journal,11, 411-424. 11. Rameshkumar, C., Anandkumar, P., Senthilnathan, P., Jeevitha, R.,& Anbumani, N. (2008) Comparative Studies on Ring Rotor and Vortex Yarn Knitted Fabrics. Autex Research Journal, 8,100-105. 12. Md. ReazuddinRepon., Rajib Al Mamun., Selim Reza., MithunKumer Das., Tarikul Islam.(2016). Effect of Spinning Parameters on Thick, Thin Places and Neps of Rotor Spun Yarn, Journal of Textile Science and Technology, 2, 47-55. 13. Gnanasekar K., Chellamani P., Karthikeyan S.(1990). Influence of rotor speed in open end spinning on yarn quality, India Journal of Fiber and Textile Research, 15, 164-168. 14. Ishtiaque S.M., Kumar P.(1994). Impact of rotor and opening roller speed on configuration of fibers in yarn, India Journal of Fiber and Textile Research, 19,71-75. 15. Bagwan A.S., Patil A.(2016).Optimization of Opening Roller Speed on Properties of Open End Yarn, Journal of Textile Science & Engineering, 6, 2-5. 16. Kolte P.P., Patil K.R., Kulabhaskar Sing, Daberao A.M., (2017).Effect of Twist on Yarn Properties. International Journal on Textile Engineering and Process, 3, 19-23. ❑❑❑

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Comparative Study of Wool Descaling Using Various Techniques Ravindra Kale*, Prerana Kane, Jidnyasa Patil & Arjunsing Girase Department of Fibers and Textile Processing Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Abstract Wool fabric was descaled using different reagents & processes and their combinations. A comparison between various techniques like chlorination using dichlorodicyanuric acid (DCCA), polyurethane based commercial product, enzyme, plasma treatment and their combinations was made to choose the best process for scale removal. It was found that a combination of plasma and enzymatic treatment gave best results in terms of hydrophilicity, whiteness and brightness index. Also the loss in tensile and tear strength were found to be less in comparison to other techniques. Change in surface morphological of the fibre was studied using scanning electron microscope. Keywords contact angle; descaling; surface energy; wettability; wool

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Graphical Abstract:

1. Introduction Wool is a natural protein fiber made of keratin protein. The outer surfaces of wool fibers have flattened overlapping cuticle cells which provide a protective sheath around cortical cells. The cuticle has many layers. The upper layer, epicuticle is composed of lipoproteins where lipoid part of lipoproteins is bound by the sulfoester bond with proteinous part. The lipoproteins are connected with upper layer of exocuticle which is crosslinked by disulfide links. The surface morphology of *All correspondences should be addressed to, Dr. R. D. Kale, Dept of Fibers & textile Prossing Tech. Institute of Chemical Technology Matunga, Mumbai - 19 Email : rd.kale@ictmumbai.edu.in 384

wool plays an important role in wool processing, since the hydrophobic nature of the cuticle and the high crosslinking density in the outermost fiber surface creates a natural diffusion barrier, making wool hydrophobic and inert to many chemicals [1-4]. The descaling treatment is to get the scales partly removed, or the edges from the overlapping scale smoothed. So wool surface must be modified before processes to improve hydrophilicity and dyeability. In dichlorodicyanuric acid (DCCA), descaling treatment a slow hydrolysis of the DCCA salt reacts to release hypochlorous acid (HClO) which acts as an oxidising agent [5-8]. While in enzymatic treatment, protease enzyme penetrates into amorphous region and causes swelling and it leads to changes in the disulphide region of cystine than amide components during chemical degradation. The important chemical reactions occurred during enzyme treatment are given in Figure 1.1 [9].

Figure 1.1: Chemical reactions between enzyme and wool fiber

In plasma treatment, when woollen materials in top or fabric form pretreated with glow discharge in presence of non-polymerizing gases like air, oxygen and nitrogen, March - April 2018


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Polyurethane based commercial product treatment is given to the wool fibres to achieve adequate adhesion of the polymer to the fibre surface to avoid deterioration of the fabric handle caused by the inter fibre bonding [11]. The aim of this work is to choose the best process for scale removal by comparing various descaling techniques like chlorination using DCCA, polyurethane based commercial product, enzyme, plasma treatment and their combinations. 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 % wool fabric with plain weave (22.26 micro) with GSM of 180. DCCA, sodium salt (96%), Cresol Red dye, potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) was purchased from Aldrich (Mumbai, India). Protease enzyme was supplied by Novozymes (Mumbai, India). Saragen SO, a dispersing agent was supplied by Sarex Chemicals, Mumbai, India. A polyurethane coating agent was obtained from one renowned company in Mumbai, India. Since the company requested not to disclose its name, this product was termed as commercial product (CP). 2.1. Wool descaling treatment The descaling of the wool was performed by conducting experiments referring the earlier literature as cited in each section and only optimized results are reported. 2.1.1. Treatment with DCCA Treatment with DCCA was given in a bath containing 1gpl DCCA and 1.5 -2 % owf (on weight of fabric) potassium permanganate at 200C and pH 3.5-4.0 for 60 minutes in an Atlas LP2 Launder-o-meter. The treated wool fabric was rinsed with warm water followed by neutralization treatment with 5% owf sodium bicarbonate at 400C and pH 8.5-9 for 20 minutes. This was followed by washing and air drying. The liquid ratio was maintained at 30:1 in all these treatments [8]. 2.1.2. Enzymatic treatment (E) Protease enzyme treatment was carried out by batch March - April 2018

method at a liquor ratio of 25:1 using a Rota Dyer machine (Rossari® Labtech, Mumbai, India) at 550C and pH 8.5 for one hour using 3 % (owf) enzyme. Treated fabric was subsequently deactivated at 900C by immersing it in hot water for 5 minutes followed by rinsing and drying at room temperature [12-13]. 2.1.3. Plasma treatment (P) A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atmospheric plasma device was used. The distance between the electrodes was 2 mm. The samples were placed between the electrodes and passed continuously at the speed of 0.45 m/minute. For generating plasma, air and argon were used under a constant power of 5Kv and 0.8 ampere current. The samples were treated for 40 seconds in the plasma [12-13]. 2.1.4. Treatment using Commercial Product (CP) This treatment was carried out by Pad-dry-cure-steam method with 70% expression with pad solution of 25 gram per liter CP, 20 gram per liter Saragen SO, 2 gram per liter Sodium bicarbonate at pH 7-7.5 which also act as cross linking agent. After the treatment the samples were dried at 1000C in an oven, cured at 1600C for 1 minute and finally steamed at 1050C for 3 minutes. Then the samples were washed properly and air dried. 2.1.5. Combine treatment Various combination of decaying treatment was tried like enzyme-DCCA, plasma-CP, plasma-enzyme, CPenzyme and DCCA- enzyme following the procedure as mention earlier [12-14]. 2.2. Assessment methods 2.2.1. Wettability The wettability of the treated and untreated fabrics was evaluated by two different tests: wicking ability and measurement of surface energy. In order to measure the wicking distance, the fabric samples were cut into 3 × 1 inches and held at the top of a measuring cylinder of 100ml capacity by a plastic tape. The cylinder was filled up to 100ml with distilled water. The bottom edge of the fabric was immersed by 2 mm in distilled water for 1 minute. The distance covered by the water was then measured. The test was repeated thrice for each sample [15]. 2.2.2. Measurement of Surface Energy The wettability of wool specimens (1 cm×2 cm) was evaluated by estimating the surface energy by three different methods. It is determined in terms of dy385

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the outer surface of wool fiber (30-50 nm) is modified due to plasma etching and surface oxidation. Plasma attacks the wool fiber surface like gun and partially abrades the fatty acid layer from the cuticle and parts of the exocuticle. Simultaneously, there is surface oxidation by oxygen radical which introduces new anionic groups i.e., sulphonic and carboxylic acid groups. Carboxylate groups are derived from the backbone of the protein chains and sulphonate groups by oxidation of disulphide bonds in the cuticle cells [9-10].


PRETREATMENT namic water adsorption mass using Tensio CAD® 140 (Cad Instruments, France) at room temperature. 2.2.3. Contact Angle measurement Contact angle of the fabric samples was measured by the Sessile drop method, using Rame-hart Model 200 Standard Contact Angle Goniometer where a drop of double distilled water with constant volume (4µL) was placed on a sample surface. Contact angle was measure after 10 seconds. 2.2.4. Drop test Colour drop (10 µL) prepared by dissolving Cresol Red dye 1gm in 100ml distilled water was put on the fabric surface and their images were taken using camera. 2.2.5. Whiteness Index The whiteness of wool fabrics was evaluated by Computer Colour Matching method using CIELAB colour space (Computer Colour Matching System- Spectra Scan 5100+, Data Color International, USA) reflectance spectrophotometer. The parameters taken for all the measurements were sample aperture size of 6.6 mm with standard illuminant D65 and 100 standard observer. 2.2.6. Mechanical Properties Tensile properties of fabrics were measured using H150KU-UTM tensile testing machine Tinius Olsen, United States of America, as per ASTM D 5035. Tearing strength was measured using Elmendorf tear tester as per ASTM D1922 standard method.

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2.2.7. Scanning Electron Microscopy The surface morphologies of the untreated and treated wool samples were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using JEOL JSM-5400 (USA) scanning electron microscope.

Figure 3.1 shows that plasma, enzymatic, chemical or combined treatments can partially destroy or remove the covalently bound fatty layer from the surface of wool fabric, thus improving the hydrophilicity of wool fabric to a certain degree [16]. In general, CP and enzymatic treatment showed lower improvement in wettability than other treatments. From Table 3.1, it was observed that increase in surface energy of wool by various descaling treatments. As per Owens Wendt method the surface energy was highest for P+E treated wool samples which were supported by other two viz. Wu and Fowkes methods. It was also observed that the surface energy decreased marginally by around 10% due to only enzyme treatment while the surface energy increased by 90% due to only plasma treatment with reference to control. Whereas combination treatment with plasma followed by enzyme increased the surface energy by around 250%. This may be due to the surface etching because of plasma treatment and weakening of disulphide linkage which is further specifically degraded easily by enzyme treatment. The proportion of polar components got enhanced by this combined treatment than other treatments resulting in improved hydrophilicity. During subsequent enzyme treatment, protease molecules not only hydrolyze the cuticle of the fibers but also penetrate deep inside the fibers, resulting in the removal of smaller peptide and protein segments with an increase in amorphous region. Thus plasma treatments facilitated the accessibility of protease creating large surface area in fibers and promoting the proteolytic reactions, making more underlying proteins (hydrophilic surface) exposed to the surface [17].

3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 3.1. Wettability

Texttreasure Even the greatest fool can accomplish a task if it were after his or her heart. But the intelligent ones are those who can convert every work into one that suits their taste - Swami Vivekanand. Figure 3.1: Wicking ability of treated wool samples 386

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PRETREATMENT Table 3.1: Effect on change in Surface energy for treated wool fabrics

Samples

OWENS

Wu (mN/m)

FOWKES (mN/m) Polar liquid: water

WENDT (mN/m)

Water Di-iodomethane Glycerol

Glycerol

Dispersive component

Polar interaction solid -liquid

Dispersive component

Polar interaction solid - liquid

Control

21.24

30.38

24.76

18.43

32.71

18.43

13.93

DCCA

28.28

34.18

32.6

17.93

75.94

14.33

41.74

E

19.63

28.48

24.76

12.8

39.39

14.9

18.98

P

41.88

27.43

28.32

12.7

48.1

17.26

79.56

CP

19.39

28.04

25.43

13.67

111.07

13.1

22.58

DCCA+ E

24.26

28.48

29.66

12.8

39.39

12.7

37.92

E+DCCA

74.06

73.41

72.82

13.1

40.3

13.67

84.88

CP+E

18.84

27.43

24.41

14.9

36.75

12.8

22.28

P+ CP

51.98

49.42

70.78

14.33

52.79

17.93

78.62

P+ E

74.63

73.72

72.82

12.7

112.32

12.7

86.44

Control

Control (137.20)

CP (122.10)

DCCA+ E

DCCA

E

E+DCCA CP+E

P

P+ CP

CP

P+ E

E (112.90)

CP+E (128.70)

Figure 3.2: Contact angles images of different wool samples

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3.2. Contact angle of samples and drop test Figure 3.2 shows the contact angle images of different wool fabrics. It can be seen that the untreated samples showed a contact angle of 137.20 which was reduced by different treatments. For the descaling treatment performed by all other treatments which is not shown in the figure 3.2, the drop sank immediately in the fabric as soon as it was put on the fabric surface. This can be easily corroborated by the drop test in Figure 3.3. We can note that the drop remains on the fabric surface for Enzyme, CP and CP + Enzyme treatment. Both these results are in agreement with what is obtained by measuring the surface energy of these samples.

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Figure 3.3: Drop test images of wool samples


PRETREATMENT 3.3. Physical and mechanical analysis The effect of the treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of wool fabric was studied and the results are mentioned in Table 3.2.

3.4. SEM observations The surface morphology of wool fabric samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (Figure 3.4). The untreated wool exhibited prominent scale structure

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Table 3.2: Whiteness index, Tenacity and Tear strength of wool fabrics

Samples

Whiteness Index

Tensile strength (KgF)

Elongation %

Tear Strength (KgF)

Control

26.347

26.05

35.21

1860.22

DCCA

-16.378

12.64

29.51

1470.1

E

29.422

22.31

34.22

1580.02

P

52.144

23.82

34

1679.31

CP

35.803

17.56

39.25

2188.5

DCCA+ E

1.773

18.56

29.67

1412.05

E+DCCA

11.619

21.76

32.54

1461.74

CP+E

32.971

14.96

22.68

1766.06

P+ CP

36.403

20.14

31.42

1590.11

P+ E

46.722

22.93

34.58

1634.48

Table 3.2 shows that, plasma-treated wool fabrics present higher whiteness than other samples. Wherever DCCA was used the whiteness index of the samples got reduced as treatment with DCCA can be attributed to the formation of degradative products formed due to the treatment. One of the reason may also be due to the presence of traces of DCCA which is a chlorine based product. Plasma treatment has resulted in maximum whiteness of the treated sample which on further treatment with enzyme has resulted in loss in whiteness to some extent. This may be due to the surface etching because of plasma treatment and weakening of disulphide linkage resulting in removal while the subsequent enzyme treatment degrades the protein linkage thereby imparting some yellowness. Further, the retention of tensile and tearing strength of various treated samples is concerned, only plasma treated sample demonstrates maximum strength retention property due to surface etching phenomena. Subsequent treatment with enzyme results in marginal strength loss in comparison to plasma sample. This may be due to the very specific action of enzyme. Loss in tensile and tear strength of wool sample treated with DCCA followed by plasma treatment can be attributed to the degradation of wool due to the chemical treatment. After polyurethane based CP treatment wool fibres were coated with film which caused improvement in tear strength and % elongation.

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on fabric surface (Figure 3.4-a). The woollen fabrics, after being treated with plasma and CP showed scale damage with film formation due to CP (Figure 3.4-d). However, enzyme-DCCA treatment produced most remarkable destruction to scales (Figure 3.4-c). PlasmaEnzyme treated fabric had a smooth surface with more surface area and the marks of scales almost disappeared, which gave better descaling effect (Figure 3.4 b).

Figure 3.4: SEM images of wool fabric treated with (a) untreated (b) P+E (c) E+DCCA (d) P+CM. March - April 2018


4. CONCLUSION Comparison of various techniques and their combination on wool descaling were studied. Among all the treatments the combined treatment of plasma followed by enzyme gave the best results. The conclusion obtained was based on the maximum increase in surface energy and polar component. The wettability and drop test also supported these results. The mechanical properties of the fabric were also preserved as compared to other methods. The whiteness index of the treated samples was also higher than the control sample. We propose that wool descaling can be effectively done first by treating the wool fabrics to plasma treatment followed by enzyme treatment. 5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT The researchers would like to acknowledge the facilities made available by the DST, Govt of India through FIST and World Bank funded TEQIP-II in successfully completing this research project and University Grants Commission (UGC) for fellowship in successful completion of this research work.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

REFERENCE 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Chvalinova R. and Wiener, Sorption properties of wool fibers after plasma treatment, II Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry, Chem. Listy.; 102, 1473-1477 (2008). Meade, SJ, Dyer, JM, Caldwell, JP. Covalent modification of the wool fiber surface: Removal of the outer lipid layer. Text Res J; 78, 943-957 (2008). M. Huson, D. Evans, J. Church, S. Hutchinson, J. Maxwell, and G. Corino, New insights into the nature of the wool fibre surface, J. Struct. Biol., 163, 127-136 (2008). Evans, D. J., and Lanczki, M., Cleavage of Integral Surface Lipids of Wool by Aminolysis, Textile Res.J. 67, 435-444 (1997). Veldsman D P and Swanepol O A, The influence of the rate of chlorination on the shrinkproofing of wool with DCCA, Appl Polym Symp, 18, 691700, (1971). Levene R and Cohen Y, An oxidative batchwise shrink-resist treatment for wool using

13. 14.

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16.

17.

monoperoxyphthalic acid, J Soc Dyers Color, 112, 44-49 (1996). Cardamone, J. M., Yao, J. and Nuñez, A., DCCA shrink-proofing of wool, Part II: improving whiteness and surface properties , Textile Res. J. 74(7), 565-570 (2004). Cardamone JM and Yao J. DCCA shrink-proofing of wool. Part I: the importance of antichlorination. Textil Res J; 74: 555-560 (2004). L. Ammayappan, Eco-friendly surface modifications of wool fiber for its improved functionality: an overview. Asian Journal of Textile, 3, 15-28, (2013). Hesse, A., Thomas, H., Hocker, H., Zero-AOX shrinkproofing treatment for wool top and fabric, part i: glow discharge treatment, Textile Res. J. 65 (6), 355-361 (1995). Cook J. R. and Fleischfresser B. E., Shrink resisting wool with Synthappret BAP: the effect of drying conditions, Textile Res J, 55, 607-614 (1985). Demir, A., Ar?k, B., Ozdogan, E., Seventekin, N., The comparison of the effect of enzyme, peroxide, plasma and chitosan processes on wool fabrics and evaluation for antimicrobial activity, Fibers and Polymers, 11(7), 989-995 (2010). Johnson NAG, Russell IM, Advances in wool technology. CRC Press, North America (2009). Barani, H. and A. Calvimontes, Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on the physical and chemical properties of wool fiber surface. Plasma Chem. Plasma Process., 34, 1291-1302 (2014). Zaman M, Liu H, Xiao H, Chibante F, Ni Y, Hydrophilic modification of polyester fabric by applying CNC containing surface finish. Carbohydrate Polymers 91(2), 560-567 (2013). Negri, A.P., Cornell, H.J., and Rivett, D.E., The nature of covalently bound fatty acids in wool fibers, Aust. J. Agric. Res. 42, 1285-1292, (1991). Fatarella, E., Ciabatti, I. and Cortez, J., Plasma and Electron-Beam Processes as Pretreatments for Enzymatic Processes, Enzyme and Microbial Technology, 46, 100-106 (2010). ❑❑❑

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Dyeing of Polyester Fabrics Using Nano TiO2 and Without Using Carrier M. M. El-Molla1,2*, M. Helmy3 & A. Abd-Elghany4 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science & Arts, Jouf University; 2 Textile Research Division, National Research Centre El- Bohouth St., 3 Chemistry Department, Faculty of science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo, 4 Technical manager of dyeing in EL-Kkoba dyeing & finishing Co. Abstract The polyester fabrics were firstly treated with nano TiO2 particles using ultrasonic rays (500W/36Hz), and then dyed with either disperse blue 56 150% and / or disperse red 60 200 % at the boil without a carrier used.The dyeing efficiency was compared to the normal dying (without treatment) of the same fabrics dyed with the same shade concentrations. The dyeing adsorption of polyester fabrics was positively affected by nano TiO2 pretreatment and an increase in nano TiO2 content led to higher color strength.The proposed method proved to have no adverse effects on fastness properties and could be considered as the new method for dyeing of different polyester fabrics as an eco-friendly method. This method is also free from some of the disadvantages involved in carrier dyeing such as toxicity. Keywords Carrier, Dyeing, Nano TiO2, Polyester Fabrics.

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1. Introduction Disperse dyes are the most important class of dyes used in dyeing of polyester fibers. The rate of dyeing may be enhanced to the level ofcommercial acceptability,either by using high temperature at 1300C,or by dyeing at 98-1000C by using carrier or by thermo sol method by impregnating the textile with suitable dispersants,drying and then curing at 190-2200C[1]. Solvent-assisted and carrier dyeing has been widely studied as a means of accelerating dyeing rate, improving dye uptake and lowering dyeing temperature by means of changes in the physical properties of polyester, notably such as Glass transition Temperature (Tg). However, both solvents and carriers have serious problems, namely toxicity and unpleasant odor, poor light fastness, an adverse effect on the physical properties of the fiber, high costs of waste water treatment and environmental contamination and destruction. Clearly, it seems sensible that efforts should be devoted toward the development of a new dyeing method to accelerate dyeing rate, improve dye uptake and lower dyeing temperature [1]. *All the Correspondence should be addressed to, Prof. Dr. M. M. El-Molla National Research Centre, Textile Research Division, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt. Email : melmolla@yahoo.com, mohamedelmolla212@gmail.com 390

Carrier dyeing of polyester has been studied [1-3], as a means of accelerating dyeing rate,improving dye uptake and lowering dyeing temperature. The glass transition temperature (Tg) is reducing by the effect of the carrier.However,the effect of carrier on the dyeing rate depends on the dye structure [3].Nanotechnology is a very complex field combining science (biology, chemistry and physics), technology (computer programming), engineering (electronics and design) and math. Nanotechnology can be applied to many areas in textiles. They are used for producing Nano fibers, Nano composites, Nano dyeing and Nano finish. Nano dyeing is the application of reduced size dyes that are smaller than 100nm in textile dyeing6. Nanotechnology is an emerging field that covers a wide range of technologies which are presently under development in Nano scale. It plays a major role in the development of innovative methods to produce new products, to substitute existing oduction equipment and to reformulate new materials and chemicals with improved performance resulting in less consumption of energy and materials and reduced harm to the environment as well as environmental remediation. Although, reduced consumption of energy and materials benefits the environment, nanotechnology will give possibilities to remediate problems associated with the existing processes in a more sustainable way. March - April 2018


DYEING Environmental applications of nanotechnology address the development of solutions to the existing environmental problems, preventive measures for future problems resulting from the interactions of energy and materials with the environment, and any possible risks that may be posed by nanotechnology itself.According to the environmental recommendations we can develop a new methodwithout need for carriers [5, 6]. Several studies reported the potential of TiO2 a nano photocatalyst for imparting multi-functional properties to different textile fabrics [7-17]. Searching for new methods to improve the disperse dyeing of polyester fabric and its fastness properties has attracted a great deal of attention [21, 22]. Application of many auxiliaries in the dyeing of polyester fabrics with disperse dyes have been extensively investigated [23, 24]. The cationic twin surfactant has been proved to be able to control the kinetics and to improve dye uptake in the disperse dyeing of polyester [25]. Plasma and laser treatment have also shown positive effects on dyeing rate and uptake of polyester fabrics [26-29]. The aim of the present study is an attempt to solve some problems with carrier dyeing of polyester fabrics through nano technology.For this purpose,the effect of nanoTiO2 particles on the dyeing behavior of polyester fabrics (Stan, gabardine, poly70) was investigated. 2. Materials and Methods 2.1. Materials 2.1.1. Fabrics Three 100% polyester woven fabrics which are:Stan,Gabardine and Poly70,their square densities are 188,312 and 114 g/m² respectively.Supplied by a private sector company.

2.1.3. Chemicals Nano titanium dioxide was employed as a photo-catalyst with 80% anatase and 20% rutile crystalline structure and average particle size of 21 nm from Degussa, Germany, dispersing agent, andacetic acid. 2.2. Methods 2.2.1. Nano TiO2 pre-treatment The polyester fabrics are firstly treating with nano TiO2particles prior to dyeing. The aqueous dispersions of nano TiO2 by different concentrations (1&3%) wereprepared in an ultrasonic bath (500W/36Hz).The fabrics were immersed in freshly prepared aqueous solutions for 3 min and then padded to 90%wet pickup,dried at 80°C for 3 min. followed by curing at either at 140°C to 220°C,for 2 min. 2.2.2. Dyeing The nanoTiO2 treated fabrics(Stan,Gabardiene,Poly70) which firstly treated with concentrations(1% and / or 3%) nanoTiO2were dyed with either disperse blue 56, 150% and / or disperse red 60, 200% by shade concentrations (0.5%,1%,2%,3%),at boil without carrier in presence of 10% o.m.f.dispersing agent,0.5 g/l acetic acid (pH=4.5-5.5) and liquor to good ratio (L:R)=1:30.The specimens were introduced into the dye-bath at 500C,then the temperature was gradually raised to boil within 20 min,and dyed for 60 min.The fabrics were rinsed in warm water and subjected to reduction clearing for 15 min at 700C using a 30:1 liquor ratio in aqueous solution containing 10% o.m.f. NaOH and 10% o.m.f. Na2S2O4 to remove excess dye and auxiliaries.The untreated fabrics are dyed with the same conditions.

Dyeing Diagram of polyester fabrics

I

II

I- Disperse Red 60 (1-Amino-4-hydroxy-2phenoxyanthraquinone) II- Disperse Blue56 (1, 5-Diamino-2-chloro-4, 8dihydroxy-9, 10-anthracenedione) March - April 2018

2.3 Measurements and Analysis 2.3.1. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Untreated & treated samples with nano TiO2 particles of Stan, gabardine, and poly70 polyester fabrics mounted on aluminum stubs, and sputter coated with gold in a 150 Å sputter (Coated Edwards), and examined by 391

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

2.1.2. Dyestuffs Disperse red (C.I. Red 60) and Disperse blue dyes (C.I. Blue56), supplied by Clarinet Co.


DYEING Jeol (JXA-840A) Electron Probe Microanalysis (Japan), magnification range 35 - 10,000, accelerating voltage 19 kV [30,31]. Inorder to confirm the presence of TiO2nano particles. 2.3.2. Color strength The relative color strength of the prints expressed as K/S value [32] of the colored samples was determined by reflection measurements using data color international model SF 500, USA. 2.3.3. Fastness properties Fastness to washing, rubbing and perspiration was assessed according to the standard methods of AATCC technical manual, viz Method 8 (1989) 68, 23 (1993); Method 36 (1972) 68 (1993) 23; and Method 15 (1989) 68, (1993) 30 respectively.

Figure 3.1. SEM images of (a) untreatedsatin polyester, (b) treated satin poly ester with1% nano TiO2 (c) treated satin polyester with 3% nano TiO2.

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3. Results and Discussion 3.1. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) Nano TiO2 concentrationpre-treatment, polyester fabrics, the SEM images of Stan, Gabardineand Poly70 polyester fabric untreated and treated with 1& 3%nano TiO2 are shown in Figures 3.1- 3.3 respectively. From the Figures we noticed that, the surface of the treated fibers is uniformly and covered by nano TiO2 particles. Also, the treated fabric at higher concentration of nano TiO2 particles 3% are covered may be equal to that obtained upon usingof nano TiO2 particles 1% concentration as show on the fiber surface in the figures 2, 3 (b & c) respectively.

Figure 3.2. SEM images of (a) untreatedGabardine poly ester, (b) treated Gabardine poly ester with1% nano TiO2 (c) treated Gabardine poly ester with 3% nano TiO2.

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DYEING Figures 3.4-3.7 show the effects of Nano TiO 2 concentrationpre-treatment Poly70, Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabrics and then dyeing upon using disperse dye blue 56at different concentration 0.5,1,2, and 3% respectively on the color strength values (K/S).

Figure 3.3. SEM images of (a) untreatedpoly70 poly ester, (b) treated poly70 poly ester with1% nano TiO2 (c) treated poly70 poly ester with 3% nano TiO2.

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Journal of the TEXTILE Association

3.2. Effect of nano TiO2 pre-treatment on dye ability using disperse dye blue 56 As we know polyester fiber has a highly compact and crystalline structure, and is markedly hydrophobic. For this reason, its aqueous dyeing is carried out at high temperature and high pressure using disperses dyes. The dyeing of polyester can be divided into several parallel processes such as dissolution and re dissolution of disperse dye, transfer of dissolved dye from bulk solution to the fiber surface, diffusion and adsorption of dye at the fiber surface, and diffusion from the surface into the interior of the fiber. It is well known that the additives in the dye bath affect the dyeing processes.

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DYEING From the Figures, we noticed that using 1 %Nano TiO2 concentration for pre-treatment of Poly70, Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabricsbefore dyeing give K/S comparable or higher than up on using 3 % Nano TiO2 concentration this is true irrespective of either the concentration of dye used or the type of fabric dyed, therefore it is not recommended to use higher than 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration, and this is may be due to increase Nano TiO2 concentration this is lead to make a layer on the surface of polyester fabrics which retard the dyeing process. Also, from the Figures, we noticed that the increasing the dye concentration this is lead to increase the K/S, for example increase the dye conc., from 0.5, 1, 2 and 3%, up on using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration pretreatment of Poly70 and / or, Stan, and / or Gabardine polyester fabrics before dyeing the K/S increase from 5.2, 11.8, 12 and19 and/or 4.1,7.5, 7.8 and 15.2 and/or 4.2, 8.7, 9.2 and 17.5 respectively.Generally speaking, poly70 fabrics pretreatment using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration has thehighest K/S compared with Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabrics which have a comparable result.This is may be due to the different in the waving structure of the using fabrics.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

3.3. Effect of nano TiO2 pre-treatment on dye ability using disperse Red FB 200% Figures 3.8-3.11 show the effects of Nano TiO2 concentration pre-treatment Poly70, Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabrics and then dyeing upon using disperse dye Red FB 200% at different concentration 0.5,1,2, and 3% respectively on the color strength values (K/ S).

From the Figures, we noticed that using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration for pre-treatment of Poly70, Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabrics before dyeing give K/ S comparable or higher than up on using 3 % Nano TiO2 concentration this is true irrespective of either the concentration of dye used or the type of fabric dyed, therefore it is not recommended to use higher than 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration, and this is may be due to increase Nano TiO2 concentration this is lead to make a layer on the surface of polyester fabrics which retard the dyeing process. Also, from the Figures, we noticed that the increasing the dye concentration this is lead to increase the K/S, for example increase the dye conc., from 0.5, 1, 2 and 3%, up on using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration pretreatment of Poly70 and / or, Stan, and / or Gabardine polyester fabrics before dyeing the K/S increase from 6.2, 14.5, 20.5 and 24 and/ or 4.8, 9.8, 16.5 and 18 and/or 5.1, 10.3, 18 and 21 respectively. Generally speaking, poly70 fabrics pretreatment using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration has the highest K/S compared with Stan, and Gabardine polyester fabrics which have a comparable result. this is may be due to the different in the waving structure of the using fabrics. It was determined that nano-sized titanium dioxide[33], zinc oxide whiskers [34], nano antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) [35] and silanenanosol [36] could impart antistatic properties to syntheticfibers. TiO2, ZnO and ATO provide anti-static effects because they are electrically conductivematerials. Such material helps to effectively dissipate the static charge which is accumulated on thefabric.

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DYEING 3.4. Fastness Properties Tables 3.1 &3.2 show, the overall fastness properties of pre-treatmentPoly70, Stan, and Gabardine fabrics using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration then dyed with either disperse blue 56 and / or disperse red 60, at (1000C, 1 h, L:R 1:20, at pH 4.5), with 3% dye o.w.f. From Tables 3.1 &3.2 we noticed that, the overall fastness properties to rubbing, washing, and perspiration for the dyed samples of poly70, Stan and gabardine their values ranging from very good to excellent.

4. Conclusions The dyeing of polyester fabrics was positively affected by a nanoTiO2 pre-treatment.WhilenanoTiO2 treated samples absorb the dye almost equally in comparison to the fabric dyed by carrier,they give good and acceptable benefit from multi-properties obtained by nanoTiO2 application including self-cleaning, hydrophilicity and UV protection and they are free from the disadvantages involved in carrier dyeing.Also,the proposed nano dyeing method showed no significant change in fastness properties of the dyed samples.

Table 3.1. Fastness properties of pre-treatment Poly70, Stan, and Gabardine fabrics using 1 % Nano TiO2 concentration then dyed with disperse blue 56, at (1000C, 1 h, L:R 1:20, at pH 4.5), with3% dye o.w.f.

Fabrics dyed

K/S

Fastness to

Wash fastness

Fastness to Perspiration

rubbing Alkaline

Acidic

Dry

Wet

Alt

SC

SW

Alt

SC

SW

Alt

SC

SW

Poly70

19

4-5

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Stan

15.2

4-5

4

4-5

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Gabardine

17.5

4-5

4

4-5

4

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Alt: color change of dyed sample; SC: staining on cotton; SW: staining on wool, Wash-scale (1-5). Table 3.2. Fastness properties of pre-treatmentPoly70, Stan, and Gabardine fabrics using 1 % Nano TiO? concentration then dyed with disperse red 60, at (100°C, 1 h, L:R 1:20, at pH 4.5), with 3% dye o.w.f.

Fabrics dyed

K/S

Fastness to

Wash fastness

Fastness to Perspiration

rubbing Alkaline

Acidic

Dry

Wet

Alt

SC

SW

Alt

SC

SW

Alt

SC

SW

Poly70

24

4-5

4

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

4-5

Stan Gabardine

18 21

4-5 4-5

4 4

4-5 4-5

4 4

4 4

4-5 4-5

4-5 4-5

4-5 4-5

4-5 4-5

4-5 4-5

4-5 4-5

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Alt: color change of dyed sample; SC: staining on cotton; SW: staining on wool, Wash-scale (1-5).

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References 1. Nunn D. M. England, Dyers company publicationstrust; (1979). 2. Arcoria A., CernianiA., DeGiorgiR., Longo M.L., ToscanoaR. M., Dyes & Pigment, 11,269-76, (1989). 3. ArcoriaA., LongoM. L., ParisiG., Dyes & Pigment, 6, 155-61,(1985). 4. Choudhury A. K., USA: Science publishers; (2006). 5. BurkinshawS.M., Jeong D.S., Dyes & Pigment, 92, 1025-30,( 2012). 6. Saligram A. N., Shukla S. R., Mathur M., Journal of the Society of Dyers and Colorists, 109,2636,(1993). 7. Montazer M, Pakdel E. J Photo chem.Photobiol C;12:293e303 (2011). 8. Montazer M, Pakdel E. J Photochem.Photobiol C; 86:255e60 (2010). 9. Montazer M, Pakdel E. J Text Inst; 102:343e52 (2011). 10. Nazari A, Montazer M, Rashidi A, Yazdanshenas ME, Anari M. ApplCatal A;371:10e6 (2009). 11. Nazari A, Montazer M, Moghadam MB, Carbohydrate Polymer; 83:1119-27(2011). 12. Montazer M, Morshedi S. Int J BiolMacromol; 50: 1018-25 (2012). 13. Montazer M, Seifollahzadeh S. Color Technol; 127:1-6(2011). 14. Montazer M, Seifollahzadeh S.J Photochem Photobiol C;87:877-83 (2011). 15. Montazer M, Pakdel E, Behzadnia A. J ApplPolymSci;121:3407-13(2011). 16. Doakhan S, Montazer M, Rashidi A, Moniri R, MoghadamMB.CarbohydratePolymer . http:// dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.01.023(2013). 17. Nazari A, Montazer M, Dehghani-Zahedani M. IndEngChem Res;52:1365-71(2013). 18. Mihailovic D, Saponjic Z, Radoicic M, Radetic T, Jovancic P, NedeljkovicJ. Carbohydrate Polymer;79:526-32(2009).

19. Dastjerdi R, Montazer M, Shahsavan S. Colloid Surf A;345:202-10(2009). 20. Dastjerdi R, Montazer M. Colloid Surf B;79:518(2010). 21. Tsatsaroni EG, Kehayoglou AH. Dyes Pigm;28:123-30(1995). 22. Tsatsaroni EG, Eleftheriadis IC. Dyes Pigm;61:1417(2004). 23. Kehayoglou AH, Tsatsaroni EG, Eleftheriadis IC, Loufakis KC, Kiriazis LE. Dyes Pigm;34:20718(1997). 24. Tsatsaroni EG, Kehayoglou AH, Eleftheriadis IC, Kiriazis LE. DyesPigm;38:65-75(1998). 25. Kehayoglou AH, Tsatsaroni EG. Dyes Pigm;23:5363(1993). 26. Choi TS, Shimizu Y, Shirai H, Hamada K. DyesPigm; 50:55-65(2001). 27. Yeung KW, Chan K, Zhang Q, Wang SY. JHKITA: 11-7(1997). 28. Esteves F, Alonso H. RJTA;11:42-7(2007). 29. Montazer M, Taheri SJ, Harifi T. J ApplPolym Sci;124:342-8(2011). 30. ReedW. F. "Automatic Mixing and Dilution Methods for Online Characterization of Equilibrium and Non-Equilib-rium Properties of Solutions Containing Polymers and/or Colloids," US Patent No. 6653150, 2003. 31. AlbA. M., DrenskiM. F. and ReedW. F. Polymer International, 57, No. 3, 390-396(2008). 32. JuddD. B. and WyszenkiG., "Color in Business, Science and Industry," 3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York, (1975). 33. Dong, W.G. and Huang, G. Journal of Textile Research, 23: 22-23(2002). 34. Zhou, Z.W., Chu, L.S., Tang, W.M., and Gu, L.X., Journal of Electrostatics, 57, 347-354(2003). 35. Wu, Y., Chi, Y.B., Nie, J.X., Yu, A.P., Chen, X.H., and Gu, H.C., Journal of Functional Polymers, 15, 43-47(2002). 36. Xu, P., Wang, W., and Chen, S.L., Melliand International, 11, 56-59(2005). ❑❑❑

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FINISHING

Modification of Banana Fibres by Grafting for Application in Composites M. D. Teli*, Jignesh S. Mahajan & Pintu Pandit Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology, Abstract Graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto bananafibre was carried out using hydrogen peroxide, ammonium ferrous sulphate combination as initiator in an aqueous medium. The effects oftemperature, material to liquor ratio, monomer and initiator concentration and duration of polymerization reaction on graft yield have investigated. Evidence of grafting was studied from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction and microscopic images of raw,NaOH treated and MMA grafted banana fibre. Separate composites were fabricated using raw, delignified and banana fibres modified using best graft polymerization reactions with epoxy resins.The mechanical properties of these composites were evaluated. It was found that composites based on grafted fibres showed better mechanical properties in terms of Young's modulus and tensile strength compared to that of composites based on NaOH treated banana as well as raw banana fibres and plain epoxy composite. It was also seen that as fibre loading increased better mechanical properties of composites were obtained. It was also found that increase in graft add-on percentage on fibre improved mechanical properties of final composites.

The interest in using natural fibres such as different plant fibres as reinforcement in plastics has been increasing. Various natural fibres such as coir, sisal, jute, coir, and banana are used as reinforcement materials.

Investigations carried out in this field have shown that stiffness, hardness and dimensional stability of plastics have also been improved by incorporation of lignocellulosic fillers [4]. Natural fibres have many advantages compared to man-made fibres like low cost, low density, low abrasion, reduced energy consumption, recyclability, biodegradability etc[5]. But at the same time, naturalfibre composites also have some limitations such as enormous variability, poor moisture resistance, lower durability, poor fire resistance, and lack of fibre -matrix adhesion [2]. Renewable natural fibres could be potential substitutes for energy-intensive synthetic fibres in many applications where high strength and modulus are not required. It is therefore important to improve the strength properties and other fibre properties of the existing fibres for better utility [7,5]. In addition, they are renewable raw materials and have therelatively high strength and stiffness and cause no skin irritation[5, 8]. The environment-friendly character is very important for the acceptance of natural fibres in large volume of engineering markets such as automotive, military, aeronautic and building industries[9].

*All correspondences should be addressed to, Prof. (Dr.) M. D. Teli, Institute of Chemical Technology, N. P. Marg, Matunga, Mumbai-400019. Email : mdt9pub@gmail.com

Banana fibre is hydrophilic in nature and this is the most important limitation of this fibre as far as its use as reinforcing material is concerned. It is, therefore, necessary to improve the characteristic properties of

1. Introduction In today's modern world the need for more efficient material is very significant for the development of new products. For this composites play a major role as it has thestrong load carrying material embedded in theweaker material. Reinforcement provides strength and rigidity to help and support the load [1].Variousproblems are associated with synthetic fibrereinforced composites such as waste disposal, recycling landfill disposaletc and thus such composite are being increasingly excluded from the world due to growing environment sensitivity [2]. Employing natural fibres as reinforcing material in polymer composites is studied by a number of researchers. With growing environmental awareness, ecological concerns, and new legislations, bio-fibre reinforced plastic composites are receiving increasing attention during the recent decades [3].

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Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Keywords Graft copolymerization, methyl methacrylate, banana fibre, composites, tensile strength.


FINISHING these natural polymers chemically, so that they are improved with respect to durability, sustainability, and mechanical strength, but will, at the same time, be degradable and ecofriendly. With this aim in mind, attempts are made to modify its quality and characteristic properties, both genetically and by improving its end products, with a view to diversifying its applications in various fields. Grafting of themonomer onto cellulose fibres is one of the most effective methods to improve mechanical properties and reduce the water uptake tendency [5, 10]. A lot of work has been done on graft copolymerization of monomers onto cellulose and other tensile fibres and yarns. However, very much less work has been reported on grafting of vinyl monomers onto banana fibres. In the present work, graft polymerization of methyl methacrylate on to banana fibres was carried out using ferrous ammonium sulphate and hydrogen peroxide as initiator system. The grafted material is then treated for its contribution in improving composite properties and results of this study are reported and discussed here in this paper.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

2. Materials and Methods 2.1 Materials Banana fibre used for the research was obtained from Central Institute of Research on Cotton Technology, Mumbai. Ferrous ammoniumsulphate from Thomas Baker, Mumbai was used. Other chemicals like methyl methacrylate (MMA), hydrogen peroxide, N,N'Methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), sodium hydroxide, acetone, methanol, dimethylformamide, hydrochloric acid were used of laboratory grade and were purchased from S.D. Fine chemicals ltd. Mumbai. Epoxy Resin Lapox andepoxy Hardener Lapox from Atul Industry were used. 2.2 Chemical treatment of banana fibres Banana fibres were treated with 2% NaOH solution for 1 hour at 750C temperature. After the treatment, fibres were thoroughly washed with water and further neutralization was done by acetic acid to remove the alkali. The fibres were then dried in anoven at 1050C temperature. 2.3 Grafting procedure Alkali-treated banana fibres were immersed in therequired amount of water along with arequired solution of Ferrous ammonium sulphate (FAS) (8.0x10-3 M) and H2O2 (0.12 M) in a three-necked flask at the 600C temperature. Nitrogen gas was allowed to bubble through the solution and required amount of MMA and MBA were added to the conical flask. The reaction 398

was carried out in the N2 atmosphere with continuous stirring at required temperature and time. After thereaction was allowed to proceed for the desired interval of time, the fibres were taken out, washed with cold and hot water and then dried. The grafted material was then subjected to Soxhlet extraction with acetone for 12 hours and then dried at 1050C.Graftadd on % was calculated as per increase over the original weight of the sample.The graft add on (%) was calculated as:

2.4. Chemical resistance test The Chemical resistance of raw, NaOH treated and grafted banana fibre was studied as a function of percent weight loss of fibre when treated with different chemicals. A known amount 0.1 gmbanana raw, NaOH treated and graftedfibre was treated with thedefinite volume of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide of different strength for atime interval of 24hrs. The fibres were then washed 2 to 3 times with distilled water and finally dried in an oven at 1100C to a constant weight to get final weight. The percent weight loss was determined as per Sangha and Rana's method.

WhereWg is the percent chemical resistance and Wo, Wtare the weights of the samples before and after treatment. 2.5 Swelling behavior test The swelling behavior of the raw, NaOH treated and grafted banana fibre was studied indifferent solvents such as water, methanol anddimethylformamide (DMF). A dry sample of grafted as well as raw fibres (0.1 g) was suspended in 100ml of the solvent kept at room temperature for 24hrs. The solvent that adhered on the surface of the samples was removed by softly pressing between the folds of the filter paper. The samples were then weighted to get the final weight. The percent swelling was calculated as per Sangha and Rana's method.

WhereWg is the percent swelling and Wo, Wtis the weight of the samples before and after treatment. March - April 2018


FINISHING 2.6 Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectra FTIR analysis was used to confirm the grafting of MMA on to banana fibre. FTIR spectra of untreated and the treated cotton were recorded using a Shimadzu FTIR-8400S spectrometer at a resolution of 1cm-1 in the wavelengths region of 800-4000 cm-1.

was then placed on compression moulding machine at 120oC for 1hour at 150 psi pressure. The setup was left to cure for 12 hours at room temperature. The prepared composite was cut for testing to conform to the dimensions of the specimen as per ASTM standards.

2.7 X-Ray Diffraction XRD measurement was performed to check the crystallinity.Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) spectra were obtained using Lab X XRD-6100 of Shimadzu Ltd. with radiation from 100 to 400. The crystallite sizes of the fibres were determined by modified Scherer's formula whereas the degree of crystallinity is computed by comparing the areas under crystalline peak and amorphous curve i.e., the area under the crystalline peak is compared with thesum of the areas of amorphous peaks.

2.10 Tensile strength analysis After the fibres reinforced composite was dried, it was cut using a saw cutter to get the dimension of thespecimen for mechanical testing. The tensile test specimen was prepared according to ASTM D3039. The testing was done using Instron Universal Test Machine (UTM) to measure the force required to break a polymer composite specimen and the extent to which the specimen stretches or elongates to that breaking point. The specimen was mounted in the grips of the UTM with 6 mm gauge length. The stress-strain curve was plotted during the test for the determination of ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus. All the test results were taken from the average of three tests.

2.8 Morphology of grafted banana Morphological images were taken to see the surface changes of raw, NaOH treated, and grafted banana fibres. The superficial morphologies of fibre samples were observed by LEICA DMEP microscope. 2.9 Preparation of the Composite The composite was fabricated by compression moulding technique. The mould used for fabricating the composite was made up of aluminum. The inner cavity dimension of the mould was 180mm x 180mm x 2mm. The plastic sheet was laied first and wax was applied to it. Some amount of resin was sprayed uniformly over plastic sheet and then fibre mat was laid on it. After that reaming resin was poured on fibres. Then one more wax coated plastic sheet covered from thetop. The upper side was pressed using a roller at room temperature until the matrix was set properly. Mould

3. Results and Discussion 3.1 Optimization of conditions for grafting of MMA onto banana fibres In the present investigation, the physicomechanical properties of banana fibres were improved through graft copolymerization using MMA monomer. The effect of process parameters such as monomer concentration, time, temperature and material to liquor ratio on the extent of grafting, chemical resistance, swelling behavioretc was studied (refer Table 3.1). The changes in surface morphology, composition and crystallinity were investigated by using microscopic images, XRD and FTIR.

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FINISHING Table3.1 Optimization of conditions for grafting of MMA on banana fibres Sr. No. Fibre (gm)

F:M Ratio

Temperature (0C)

M:L

Time (Min)

FAS (ml) H2O2 (ml) MBA (gm)

GY (%)

1

2

1:4

70

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

71.5

2

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

182.5

3

2

1:2

70

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

76

Fibre: Monomer Concentration optimization

Temperature Optimization 4

2

1:3

55

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

Not obtained

5

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

182.5

6

2

1:3

80

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

75

Material to Liquor Ratio optimization 7

2

1:3

70

8

2

1:3

70

1:50

150

20

20

0.02

133

1:100

150

20

20

0.02

139

Process Time Optimization 9

2

1:3

70

1:75

120

20

20

0.02

145

10

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

20

20

0.02

145

Initiator Concentration Variation 11

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

20

10

0.02

139

12

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

10

20

0.02

39

20

20

0.02

70

Without Crosslinking Agent 13

2

1:3

70

1:75

150

3.1.1 Effect of fibre to monomer concentration

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

graft add-on (%) with adecrease in monomer concentration may be due to lesser monomer than required for saturation of fibre.

Fig 3.1. Effect of fibre to monomer concentration on grafting

Graft add-on (%) for graft copolymerization of MMA onto banana fibre was studied as a function of fibre to monomer concentration, and the results are shown in Fig. 3.1. It can be inferred from thetable that graft add-on (%) increased initially with increase in fibre to monomer concentration and after it reaches optimum, with further increase in fibre to monomer, the graft add-on(%)decreased, giving a maximum grafting of 182.5% at 1:3 fibre to monomer ratio. A decrease in 400

3.1.2 Effect of temperature on grafting The effect of temperature on graft add-on (%) can be seen from Fig. 3.2. The graft add-on (%) was found to be optimum at 70oC which was 182.5%. At 60oC there was no grafting occurred, which may be attributed to the fact that a low temperature cannot enhance the dynamic energy of the monomer molecules, which resulted into decrease diffusion of monomer molecules from the reaction mixture onto polymeric backbone.Also, decrease in graft add-on (%) due to an increase in temperature beyond optimum temperature may be due to more preferential homopolymerization than graft copolymerization.

March - April 2018


FINISHING

Fig. 3.2 Effect of temperature on grafting

3.1.3 Effect of liquor to material ratio on grafting The effect of material to liquor ratio on graft add-on (%) is seen in Fig. 3.3. The graft add-on (%) increased with L to M ratio, giving of highest grafting 182.5% at 75:1 :: L: M ratio. This was attributed to the fact that low liquor ratio could enhance the interaction of the fibre, monomer molecules, and initiator-catalyst system. This leads to an increase in the diffusion rate of monomer molecules from the reaction mixture onto polymeric backbone, hence resulting in increased in theamount of graft add-on (%). However, beyond the optimum liquor to material ratio, graft add-on (%) decreased due to dilution and least moment of reactant monomer in themixture.

of time and the results are represented in Fig. 3.4. As shown in the table, initially graft add-on (%) increased with an increase in time, giving maximum graft add-on (%), 182.5% at 150min. This probably because of generation of more and more monomer radicals as time increased, which interact with active sites on the polymeric backbone, resulting in increased graft addon (%). However, beyond the optimum time, graft addon (%) decreased due to mutual destruction of growing polymeric chains, leading to homopolymerization of the reactive monomer radicals. 3.1.5 Effect of initiator concentration on grafting

Fig. 3.5 Effect of initiator concentration on grafting Initiator system plays avital role in polymerization reactions. The graft add-on (%) was studied at adifferent concentration of FAS and H2O2 and the results are represented in Fig 3.5. As shown in the table, graft add-on (%) found optimum at 1:1 ratio giving maximum graft add-on of 182.5%. However on either side of this ratio graft add 0n percentage decreased. 3.2 Physical and Chemical Properties 3.2.1 Swelling behavior as a function of percentage of grafting

Fig. 3.4 Effect of time on grafting

Time plays a very important role in this grafting process. The graft add-on (%) was studied as a function March - April 2018

Fig. 3.6 Swelling behavior as a function of percentage of grafting 401

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Fig. 3.3 Effect of material to liquor ratio on grafting 3.1.4 Effect of time on grafting


FINISHING Percent swelling of the raw and MMA-grafted fibre in distilled water, methanol and dimethylformamide (DMF) is shown in Fig.3.6. It can also be seen from the Fig 3.6 that percentage swelling of alkali treated banana fibres increased compared to the raw fibres because of removal of natural hydrophobic impurities. It can also be also inferred that percentage swelling of grafted banana fibres decreased with an increase in graft addon (%). 3.2.2 Alkali and acid resistance study The acid and base resistance of raw and grafted banana fibres was studied as a function of percent weight loss against the acid/ base solution. It can be seen from Fig. 3.7 and Fig. 3.8 that with an increase in graft add-on (%), weight loss of the grafted fibre decreased. This infers that as graft add-on (%) increasedthe chemical resistance of banana fibres also increased.

istic of MMA. The medium intensity peak at 1630 cm1, which was attributed to the O-H bending of absorbed water, almost disappeared on treatment with alkali. This result indicates partial loss of lignin of banana fibre on treatment with alkali The additional peaks in the range of 100-1300 cm-1were of C-O-C and CO stretching. The peaks at 1726 cm-1 were attributed to the stretching vibration of C=O (ester) in the MMA chains. This is astrong indication of incorporation of MMA onto the banana fibre backbone, which finally enhanced the hydrophobicity thereby decreasing the amount of absorbed water.

Fig. 3.9 FTIR analysis of (a) raw banana, (b) banana treated with NaOH, banana grafted with (c) 7.6 %, (d) 139% and (e) 182.5 %. Fig. 3.7 Alkali resistance test

3.4 XRD Analysis The results of the crystallinity analysis shown in Table3.4 clearly revealed that both the percent crystallinity values decreased upon grafting. The decrease in the percent crystallinity with the graft copolymerization of MMA onto the cellulose backbone indicated a reduction in the crystallinity of the sample and the presence of a larger amorphous region compared to the unmodified sample, due to the incorporation of the monomer moieties onto the cellulose backbone.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Fig. 3.8 Acid resistance test

3.3 FTIR analysis FTIR spectroscopic analysis of banana fibres is shown in Fig. 5.9. The spectra for both the fibre samples exhibited a broad band centered around 3330-3370 cm1, which was attributed to the free stretching vibration of the -OH group; also the peak at 2900 cm-1 in all the fibres spectra was attributed to a C-H stretching vibration. A comparison of the spectra revealed that compositional changes occurred upon grafting, as evident from large and strong pick near 1726 and at 1423 cm1 in the grafted banana fibres, which were character402

Texttreasure Holding anger is a poison. It eats you from inside. We think that hating is a weapon that attacks the person who harmed us. But hatred is a curved blade. And the harms we do, we do to ourselves. -Mitch Albom March - April 2018


FINISHING Table 3.4 Crystallinity analysis of raw, NaOH treated and grafted banana fibres

Content

Raw Fibre

NaOH Treated

Crystallinity (%)

19.98

24.64

76% 14.59

139% 11.68

182.5% 9.66

Crystal (Icr)

10.55

21.25

12.10

7.05

8.95

Amorphous (Ia)

42.27

64.99

70.82

53.32

83.70

3.5 Morphological studies

MMA Grafted Fibre

surface impurities, non-cellulosic materials, inorganic substances and waxes by alkali treatment. It can be also observed due to surface deposition of MMA monomer on banana fibre during grafting treatment. This suggests that the successful grafting of MMA monomer took place onto banana fibre.

Fig. 3.10. Images of (a) Untreated, (b) NaOH treated, (c) 76% grafted, (d) 76% grafted and (e) 182.5% grafted.

Microscopic views of images shown in Fig 3.10 of raw, NaOH treated and grafted banana fibres indicate a significant change in the surface topography of bananafibre after treatment. The raw banana was having rough surface morphology with fragments and groove like structures, whereas smooth with multicellular nature was observed due to grafting treatment. This phenomenon may be attributed to the leaching of

3.6 Mechanical properties of composites Mechanical properties of plain epoxy resin composite and composites based on untreated/raw, alkali-treated and MMA grafted banana fibres with different fibre loadings are given in Table3.6.The composites based on raw fibres showed better mechanical properties than plain epoxy resin composite. The composites based on alkali treated showed better mechanical properties than the composites based on raw fibres. The composites based on grafted showed still better mechanical properties than the composites based on alkali treated fibres. With theincrease in fibreloading,better mechanical properties were obtained (refer Fig 3.11 & Fig 3.12). It was also found that increase in graft add-on (%) on fibre improved mechanical properties of final composites. Optimum mechanical properties were obtained in case of 182.5% MMA grafted banana fibres.

Table 3.6 Mechanical properties of composites

Sr. No

Composite Sample

Young's Modulus (MPa)

Tensile Strength (MPa)

1

Plain Epoxy

1374.6

9.93

2

Raw fibre 10% loading

1688.8

14.05

3

NaOH treated fibre10% loading

2210.6

22.41

4

139 % grafted fibre10% loading

2429.2

26.10

5

182.5% grafted fibre10% loading

2540.5

29.80

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

10% Banana fibre loaded Composite Samples

15% Banana fibre loaded Composite Samples 6

Raw fibre 15% loading

1859.3

17.17

7

NaOH treated fibre 15% loading

2400.7

26.16

8

139 % grafted fibre15% loading

2655.4

31.05

7

182.5% grafted fibre 15% loading

2885.3

34.15

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403


FINISHING

Fig. 3.11. Young's modulus of composites

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Fig. 3.12. Tensile strength of composites

Conclusions Graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate ontobanana fibre was carried out and the effects of temperature, material to liquor ratio, monomer, initiator concentration and duration of polymerization reaction on graft add on was investigated. Evidence of grafting was confirmed with FTIR, XRD and microscopic imagesMMA grafted banana fibre. Thebanana fibres grafted with MMA using best graft polymerization reactions parameter were mixed with epoxy resin and the mechanical properties of composites were evaluated. It was found that composites based on grafted fibres showed enhanced mechanical properties and tensile strength compared to composites based on NaOH treated, raw banana fibres and plain epoxy composite. It wasalso found that increase in graft addon % on banana fibre enhanced mechanical properties of final composites.

References 1. J.Santhosh, N.Balanarasimman, R.Chandrasekar and S.Raja, "Study of Properties of Banana Fibre Reinforced Composites", International Journal of Research in Engineering and Technology, Vol. 03 (2014), pg. 144-150. 2. K. L. Pickering, "Propertiesand Performance of Natural fibre composites", (2008), Woodhead Publishing in Materials. 3. H. Liu a, Q. Wua and Q. Zhang, "Preparation and properties of banana fibre-reinforced composites based on high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/Nylon-6 blends", Bioresource Technology, Vol. 100 (2009), pg. 6088-6097. 4. A. Ashori, "Effects of nanoparticles on the mechanical properties of rice straw/polypropylene composites", Journal of Composite Matearials, Vol. 47(2)(2013), pg. 149-154 5. H.U. Zaman, R. A. Khan, M. A. Khan and D. H. Beg, "Physico-mechanical and degradation properties of biodegradable photografted coir fibre with acrylic monomers", Polymer Bulletin, Vol.70 (2013), pg. 2277-2290. 6. J. Rout, M. Misra and A. K. Mohanty, "Surface Modification of Coir Fibres I: Studies on Graft Copolymerization of Methyl Methacrylate on to Chemically Modified Coir Fibres", Polymers for Advanced Technologies, Vol. 10 (1999), pg. 336344. 7. D.S. Varma and S. Murali, "Modification of jute by grafting for use in composites", Indian Journal of Textile Research,Vol. 14 (1989), pg 9-13. 8. A. Ashori, S. Sheshmani and F. Farhani, "Preparation and characterization of bagasse/high density polyethylene composite using multi-walled carbon nanotubes", Carbohydrate Polymers, Vol. 92(1) (2013), pg. 865-871. 9. G. Cantero, A. Arbelaiz, R. Llano-Ponte and I. Mondragon, "Effects of fibre treatment on wettability and mechanical behavior of flax/polypropylene composites", Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 09(63) (2003), pg. 1247-1258. 10. K. Ali, M. Khan and M. Ali, "Study on jute materials with urethane acrylate by UV curing", Radiation Physics and Chemistry,Vol. 49(3) (1997), pg. 383-388. ❑❑❑

Align your company with the growing authority in Textiles 404

March - April 2018


TEXPERIENCE

Crisis Management A Few Basic Elements What's Crisis Management? â—† Planning, directing and controlling an organization under pressure of danger,suspense or turning point. â—† Decision making in a rapid but unhurried actions at the time of actually problemfaced by the organization.

Mr. R.N. Yadav is having a wide experience in the Textile Industry of last 46 years' service in Spinning & Composite Mills. He has started his career from the supervisory level and gradually with his skill and talent in work experience he elevated to the Mill President.He has occupied the independent top authority of Vice President & President during his 32 years' service. Mr. Yadav worked with leading industrial houses like Bharat Commerce & Industries, BhilwaraGroup, MohotaGroup, uryalata, Siddhartha and JagdambaGroup (Nepal). Mr. Yadav independently started & worked successfully four new projects and renovated five mills. He established many new milestones in quality & productivity. He presented several papers in textile conferences and other meets affiliated to textile industries. He has78 technical & managerial papers published in textile journals and national dailies.Mr. Yadav has written a hand book "Productivity" on strategic industrial management in 2004. He was the recipient of Precitex award & Life time achievement award from The Textile Association (India), M.P.Unit. Presently Mr. Yadav is working with The R.S.R. Mohota Mills, Hinganghat (a composite textile unit) as President. March - April 2018

The list may be long but crisis must be visualized and controlled by leader ormanager who is incharge of the organization. The basic art to deal with a crisis is tomaintain the confidence of everyone around that you are managing it. Crisis must bedealt on war footing. Just convey clear intention, causes internal or external, cost, afterimpacts to both the parties, recce, tactful action and no compromise. Compromisemakes one weak and the opponent strong. If a manager is having knowledge of thesubject, control of the institution, has real information's and intelligentsia, act in time,has study of market, understands peoples need, plan the products accordingly andsupplies goods and services in time, under controlled cost and to make customersdelight, why crisis ? No crisis. No crisis at all. Crisis arises out of ignorance, arrogance, greed, lust, not understanding thesituations inside company or outside of it, no foresightedness and nonloyalty of theleader. The great management leader Henry ford once quoted: "Through all the years I have been in business I have never get found ourbusiness bad as result of any outside force. It has always been due to some defect inour own company".Internal discipline and adequate control are two basic requirements to avoid anyunfortunate situation. Sometimes collapse of the company occurs due to the talentedfool type leaders. They are often found to be directionless directors. Such type of thecompany heads are themselves the reasons of the grave crisis and collapse of thecompany. Problems further get multiplied, when such leaders are advised by their trulyfellow managers for corrective measures but they are hated and fired by the leadersunder influence of ego. And as such the work environment gets spoiled and nonco-operation, hatred, chaos like negative forces come up. The famous proverb seemscorrect here. 405

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

R. N. Yadav

WHY Crises:Crises are caused either man made or natural calamities like fire, flood, earthquake etc. But in management crises are often man-made either internal or external.Crises are never unforeseen. There are internally some signal or system which alarmabout crises and those should have been anticipated. In management crises canhappen due to: a) A take-over bid b) A collapse of foreign exchange c) Sudden market slumps d) Competitors making overshadow the product e) Innovations which make product obsolete f) A strike g) A dishonest executive h) A fire, flood or earthquake like disasters i) Departure of key management members to competitors


TEXPERIENCE "You correct a fool, he will hate you; you correct a wise he will appreciate you"Such type of leaders though having knowledge of the subject but due to theirarrogance, ignorance, ego, foolishness and indecisiveness damage the main objectivesof the company, drag it into deep crisis and ultimately a closure. Quality of a good crisis manager:Good crisis managers are decisive. They react swiftly but their great skill is inbeing able to speed up the decision making process. They do not miss out any steps inthe problem solving. They possess quality like coolness, team leadership gentlemanship,no panic, no over- reacting and enthusiastic in needed actions during crisis. How to overcome crisis:Industry organization or institute under crisis due to whatever reasons citedabove or even beyond can be

well tamed and works can be re-established attemptingfollowing steps rapidly but unhurriedly. ◆ Nothing can be changed by changing the face but everything can be changed byfacing the change. ◆ To stay competitive it is insufficient to concentrate what we are doing now wehave to pay attention what we have to do tomorrow. ◆ During an economic downturn, industries need low cost solution. ◆ Consider the human body as metaphor for organization, noting how all its partshave their separate functions yet always work in harmony, the whole systemregulating and correcting itself without active direction. ◆ If the human mentality is obvious, it will reflect in excellent creation. ◆ Who attains targets will not divulge grounds. ◆ Act with tact.

FORM IV (See Rule 8) Statement about ownership and other particulars about Newspaper

JOURNAL OF THE TEXTILE ASSOCIATION

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

1

Place of Publication

:

The Textile Association (India), Central Office 2, Dwarkanath Mansion, Near Nirmal Nursing Home, 91, Ranade Road Extension, Shivaji Park, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028.

2. Periodicity of Publication

:

Bi-Monthly (Six issues in a year)

3. Printer's Name Nationality Address

: : :

Shri Ashok Bagwe Indian Sundaram Art Printing Press 12, WadalaUdyogBhavan, Naigaum X Road, Wadala, Mumbai - 400 031.

4. Publisher's Name Nationality Address

: : :

Shri J.B. Soma Indian 7-A/203, New DindoshiGiridarshan CHS. Ltd. New Dindoshi MHADA Colony, Near NNP No. 1 &2, New Dindoshi, Goregaon (East), Mumbai - 400 065

5. Editor's Name Nationality Address

: : :

Dr. Ravindra V. Adivarekar Indian Dept. of Fibres& Textile Processing Technology Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai - 400 019

6. Name and address of individuals who own the newspaper and partners holding more than 1% of the total capital

:

The Textile Association (India), Central Office 72-A, Santosh, 2nd Floor, Dr. M.B. Raut Road, ShivajiPark, Dadar, Mumbai - 400 028

I, J.B. Soma, hereby declare that the particulars given are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Mumbai 1st APRIL 2018

406

(Sd/-) J. B. SOMA Publisher March - April 2018


TEXNOTE The series of chapters under the title, 'Graphene A Wonder Material' are being published in the Journal of the Textile Association. The nanomaterial Graphene has been attracting a lot of attention over the past few years. Thankful to its unique combination of a simple structure of bonded carbon atoms with its multitudinous and complex physical properties. This series covers the extraordinary features of graphene, its different methods of preparation and isolation, useful applications in various fields of science and technology, its science involved in the technology of textiles, and finally ending up with its future prospects. This series is written primarily as an introductory text for the readers of those interested or already working in graphene and putting up its essence in the textile related areas, who wish to acquire a broad knowledge of graphene and its application in textiles. The previous chapter dealt with the structural and chemical characteristics of graphene. The chapter explicated various methods available with different types of spectroscopy that are being widely used in the field of graphene nanotechnology for structural as well as chemical characterization. The present chapter now starts the application aspects of graphene and graphene-based materials in the ongoing series. This article specifically highlights recent research progress in graphene-based materials as supercapacitor electrodes. Applications of such materials with desirable properties to meet the specific requirements for the design and configuration of advanced supercapacitor devices are summarized and briefly discussed.

Chapter 7 GRAPHENE : A WONDER MATERIAL Supercapacitor Electrodes Graphene is a well known two dimensional monolayer of carbon that consists of only sp2 hybridized carbons. It is a promising material with some of the most intriguing properties, i.e., high electrical and thermal conductivity, very light weight, highly tunable surface area (~2675 m2/g), excellent mechanical behavior (~1 TPa) and good chemical stability. Such outstanding properties enable graphene and graphene-based materials to find applications in high performance structural nano-composites, electronics, and environmental protection and energy devices including both energy generation and storage. The combination of such outstanding physical, mechanical and chemical properties make graphene-based materials more attractive for electrochemical energy storage and sustainable energy generation, i.e., Li-ion batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, photovoltaic and solar cells. Graphene-based materials have been extensively investigated as a conducting network to support the redox reactions of transition metal oxides, hydroxides and conducting polymers. Indeed, such nanohybrid electrodes consisting of graphene and nanoparticles of transition metal oxides/hydroxides or conductive polymers show the superior electrochemical performance, as a result of the synergistic effect that graphene layers facilitate the dispersion of the metal oxides/hydroxide nanoparticles acting as highly conducting matrix for enhancing the electrical conductivity. March - April 2018

With the very fast growing market in portable electronic devices, electric vehicles as well as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), there has been an ever increasing demand for environmentally friendly, high-performance energy-storage systems. Supercapacitors, also known as electrochemical capacitors (ECs) or ultracapacitors, are such devices, with high power capability, long cyclic life, low maintenance, and fast dynamics of charge propagation. With thousands of times higher power density than lithium ion batteries and much larger energy density compared to conventional capacitors, supercapacitors are an ideal energy storage device offering advantages over other energy storage systems for applications requesting short load and high reliability, such as energy capture sources. While the energy density of supercapacitors is much higher than conventional dielectric capacitors, it's still lower than batteries and fuel cells. Most of the commercially available supercapacitor products have a specific energy density less than 10 Wh Kg-1, which is almost 3 to 15 times lower than batteries (150 Wh Kg-1 is possible for lithium ion batteries). Thus researches are being focused to increase the performance of supercapacitors at par with the batteries. A supercapacitor stores energy using either ion adsorption (electrical double layer capacitors, EDLCs) or fast and reversible Faradic reactions (pseudocapacitors). These two mechanisms can function simultaneously, depending on nature of the electrode material. 407

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Saptarshi Maiti, Pintu Pandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli


TEXNOTE Progress towards supercapacitor technologies is the outcome of the continuous development of nanostructured electrode materials. In the development of EDLCs, a proper control over the pore size and specific surface area of the electrode for an appropriate electrolyte solution is crucial to ensure a good performance of the supercapacitor in terms of both power delivery rate and energy storage capacity. To further increase the specific capacitance of the electrode, the peudo-capacitance that is due to the presence of foreign electro-active species on the electrode can be coupled with the electrical double layer capacitance. The capacitive performance of various carbonbased electrodes and the most commonly studied pseudo-capacitive materials in the literature is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: The capacitive performance for carbon and pseudocapacitor electrodes

Activated carbons (ACs) are the most widely used electrode materials because of their large surface area,

Table 1: Comparison of different carbon-based electrode materials for supercapacitors

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Carbon

Specific Density, Electrical Cost surface area, g cm-3 conductivity, m2 g-1 S cm-1

Aqueous electrolyte

Organic electrolyte

F g-1

F cm-3

F g-1

F cm-3

Fullerene

1100-1400

1.72

10-8-10-14

Medium

-

-

-

-

CNTs

120-500

0.6

104-105

High

50-100

<60

<60

<30

Graphene

2630

>1

106

High

100-205

>100-205

80-110

>80-110

Graphite

10

2.26

104

Low

-

-

-

-

Activated carbons

1000-3500

0.4-0.7

0.1-1

Low

<200

<80

<100

<50

Templated porous carbon 500-3000

0.5-1

0.3-10

High

120-350

<200

60-140

<100

Functionalized porous carbon

300-2200

0.5-0.9

>300

Medium

150-300

<180

100-150

<90

Activated carbon fibres

1000-3000

0.3-0.8

5-10

Medium

120-370

<150

80-200

<120

Carbon aerogels

400-1000

0.5-0.7

1-10

Low

100-125

<80

<80

<40

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March - April 2018


TEXNOTE

Supercapacitors The mechanism by which a supercapacitor stores energy is based on two types of capacitive behaviors: the electrical double layer (EDL) capacitance from pure electrostatic charge accumulation at the electrode-electrolyte interface and the pseudo-capacitance due to fast and reversible surface redox processes at characteristic potentials. The structure of the supercapacitor is similar to a battery. It consists of two electrodes in contact with an electrolyte solution separated by a separator as shown in Figure 2a. The components that make up the supercapacitor, including the electrodes, the separator, the current collector, as well as the electrolyte, all are important factors affecting the overall performance of the device to be considered in designing it. Porous carbon materials are often the choice of the electrode because of their good electrical conductivity coupled with large interface area. Figure 2b depicts an EDL structure (Stern model) formed on a positively charged porous electrode surface. The negative charge in both the Stern layer and diffuse layer contributes to the EDL capacitance.

Figure 2b: Schematic diagram of the EDL structure based at a positively charged electrode surface

For the EDL type of supercapacitor, the specific capacitance C (F g-1) of each electrode is usually assumed to follow that of a parallel-plate capacitor as shown in Equation 1: er eo C = ------- A (1) d Where e (a dimensionless constant) is the relative permittivity, e0 (F m-1) is the permittivity of a vacuum, A (m2 - g-1) is the specific surface area of the electrode accessible to the electrolyte ions, and d (m) is the effective thickness of the EDL (popularly known as the Debye length). Whereas, pseudo-capacitance arises for thermodynamic reasons between the extent of charge acceptance (Sq) and the change of potential (SV). The derivative C = d(Sq)/d(SV) corresponds to a peudo-capacitance. The performance of a supercapacitor depends on the criteria like power density substantially greater than batteries with acceptably high energy densities, excellent cycle ability, fast charge-discharge processes, low self-discharging, safe operation, and low cost. It must be pointed out that the time constant expressed as resistance (R) times capacitance (C) is another vital parameter for the performance of a supercapacitor. The maximum energy stored and power delivered for a single cell supercapacitor are given in equations (2) and (3) respectively: (2)

(3) Figure 2a: Schematic diagram of a two-cell supercapacitor device, made of non-porous electrode March - April 2018

where V in volts is the cell voltage, CT in farads is the total capacitance of the cell, and RS in ohms is the 409

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low cost and easy processibility. However, less energy storage capacity and higher rate dissipation capability restrict their applications. Table 1 illustrates some properties and characteristics of different carbon electrode materials based on the literature. Graphene-based materials, including zero-dimensional (0D) fullerenes, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs), twodimensional (2D) graphene, and three-dimensional (3D) graphite, are of particular interest because of their unique structures and extraordinary characteristics. Graphene, a 2D flat monolayer of sp2 hybridized carbon bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the parent of all the graphitic carbons. The 0D fullerene, 1D CNT, and 3D graphite or diamond can be formed by wrapping, rolling, and stacking of a graphene sheet, respectively.


TEXNOTE equivalent series resistance (ESR). The capacitance of the cell depends mainly upon the electrode material. The cell voltage is limited by the thermodynamic stability of any electrolyte solution. ESR comes from the various types of resistance associated with the intrinsic electronic properties of the electrode matrix and electrolyte solution, mass transfer resistance of the ions in the matrix, contact resistance between the current collector and electrode. Therefore, a high-performance supercapacitor must simultaneously satisfy the requirements of large capacitance value, high operating cell voltage, and minimum ESR. It is obvious that the development of both electrode material and the electrolyte solution are important to optimize the total performance of any supercapacitor. A supercapacitor electrode must have the characteristics of high surface area with proper pore size, highly electrically conductive with good stability. The presence of pseudo-active species for enhancing the overall capacitance is also necessary. Furthermore, the density of the electrode should be sufficiently high to produce a high volumetric energy density, that is essential for designing highly compact energy and power sources. Nevertheless, the electrolyte must be carefully chosen. Non-aqueous electrolytes of low resistivity are a good choice for designing high-energy density and high-power supercapacitors as they can be operated at high voltages (up to 4 V).

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Graphene, as Supercapacitor Electrode material Graphene is considered to be an excellent electrode material for supercapacitors because of its high electrical conductivity, high surface area, great flexibility, excellent mechanical properties. Films of graphene have been used as stretchable electrodes. Chemically modified graphene (CMG) sheets can physically adjust themselves to be accessible to different types of electrolyte ions, free from the use of conductive fillers and binders. Besides, its flexibility helps in easy fabrication of supercapacitor devices. Researches have shown that the specific capacitances of graphene can reach 135 F g-1, 99 F g-1 and 75 F g_1 in aqueous, organic, and ionic liquid electrolytes, respectively. Inspite of the keen interests and various researches, real applications of graphene have yet to be realized which is mainly due to the difficulty in reliable production of high-quality graphene from a scalable approach. The experimentally observed capacitances are mainly limited by the agglomeration of graphene sheets and do not reflect the intrinsic capacitance of an individual graphene sheet. Recently, an 410

experimental determination of EDL capacitance (~ 21 mF cm-2) and quantum capacitance of single layer and double-layer graphene were reported. Stankovich et al. reported a general approach for preparing graphenepolymer composites via exfoliation of graphite and molecular-level dispersion of CMG sheets within polymers. A polystyrene-graphene composite was found to exhibit a percolation threshold of around 0.1 vol.% for room temperature conductivity, the lowest reported value for any carbon-based composite, with a conductivity of 0.1 S m-1. Graphene-conducting polymer composites have also earned great interests. Wang et al. prepared graphene/ polyaniline composite paper (GPCP) by in situ anodic electropolymerization of aniline monomer as a PANI film on graphene paper and resulted a gravimetric capacitance of 233 F g-1 and a volumetric capacitance of 135 F cm-3. A graphene nanosheet/poyaniline (GNS/ PANI) composite had also been synthesized using the polymerization method where graphene was homogeneously coated on the surface of PANI nanoparticles resulting into a very high specific capacitance. Although graphene nanosheets are excellent electrode materials, the use of highly toxic reducing agents like hydrazine and dimethylhydrazine, remains a critical problem for production in a large-scale. Murugan et al. demonstrated a microwave-assisted solvothermal process to produce graphene nano-sheets without the need for highly toxic chemicals. After investigating the energy storage properties of such graphene associated PANI composites, 50 wt.% graphene displayed both EDL capacitance and pseudocapacitance with an overall specific capacitance of 408 F g-1. Recently PANI fibres were observed to adsorb on the graphene surface and/or filled between the graphene sheets. The composite displayed a specific capacitance as high as 480 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1. It showed that good capacitive performance can be obtained by doping either graphene with a small amount of PANI or bulky PANI with a small amount of graphene. Summary Graphene-based materials having different microtextures have proven to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitor applications. With the well-established materials processing and growth techniques, such as the Langmuir-Blodgett method for producing thin films, layer-by-layer technique for fabricating core-shell nanostructures, and self assembly under controlled colloidal chemistry, graphene-based architectures with designed physical, chemical, and morphological properMarch - April 2018


TEXNOTE ties as electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage and conversion will probably be one of the research trends. Graphene-based composite materials having the intrinsic properties of graphene and pseudocapacitive materials, such as graphene-conducting polymer composites and graphene-transition metal oxide composites, are promising supercapacitor electrodes. In future, research efforts are likely to be seen on enhancing the interactions between graphene and the pseudocapacitive material to improve the Faradic processes across the interface so as to achieve efficient pseudo-capacitance in addition to the EDL capacitance. Use of conducting polymers and transition metal oxides to pillar graphene sheets is perhaps a good research direction towards utilizing the unique properties of graphene for supercapacitor applications. Bibliography 1. Xia J., Chen F., Li J. and Tao N. Nature nanotechnology, 4, 505-509, (2009). 2. Lee C., Wei X., Kysar J. W. and Hone J. Science, 321, 385-388, (2008). 3. Liang J., Huang Y., Zhang L., Wang Y., Ma Y., Guo T. and Chen Y. Advanced Functional Materials, 19, 2297-2302, (2009). 4. Pumera M. Chemical Society Reviews, 39, 41464157, (2010). 5. Simon P. and Gogotsi Y. 7, 845-854, (2008). 6. Winter M. and Brodd R. J. Chemical Reviews, 104, 4245-4269, (2004). 7. Zhang L. L. and Zhao X. S. Chemical Society Reviews, 38, 2520-2531, (2009).

8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13.

14. 15.

16. 17.

18.

19. 20. 21.

Burke A. Journal of power sources, 91, 37-50, (2000). Largeot C., Portet C., Chmiola J., Taberna P. L., Gogotsi Y. and Simon P. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 130, 2730-2731, (2008). Pandolfo A. G. and Hollenkamp A. F. Journal of power sources, 157, 11-27, (2006). Geim A. K. and Novoselov K. S. Nature materials, 6, 183-191, (2007). Frackowiak E. Physical chemistry chemical physics, 9, 1774-1785, (2007). Kim K. S., Zhao Y., Jang H., Lee S. Y., Kim J. M., Ahn J. H., Kim P., Choi J. Y. and Hong, B. H. Nature, 457, 706-710, (2009). Stoller M. D., Park S., Zhu Y., An J. and Ruoff R. S. Nano letters, 8, 3498-3502, (2008). Rao C. E. E., Sood A. E., Subrahmanyam K. E. and Govindaraj A. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 48, 7752-7777, (2009). Xia J., Chen F., Li J. and Tao, N. Nature nanotechnology, 4, 505-509, (2009). Stankovich S., Dikin D. A., Dommett G. H., Kohlhaas K. M., Zimney E. J., Stach E. A., Piner R. D., Nguyen S. T. and Ruoff, R. S. Nature, 442, 282-286, (2006). Wang D. W., Li F., Zhao J., Ren W., Chen Z. G., Tan J., Wu Z. S., Gentle I., Lu G. Q. and Cheng, H. M. ACS nano, 3, 1745-1752, (2009). Yan J., Wei T., Shao B., Fan Z., Qian W., Zhang M. and Wei F. Carbon, 48, 487-493, (2010). Murugan A. V., Muraliganth T. and Manthiram A. Chemistry of Materials, 21, 5004-5006, (2009). Zhang K., Zhang L. L., Zhao X. S. and Wu J. Chemistry of Materials, 22, 1392-1401, (2010).

Mr. Saptarshi Maiti is currently pursuing Ph.D. (Tech.) in Fibres and Textile Processing Technology in the Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology, under Prof. (Dr.) Ravindra V. Adivarekar, at Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India. His research areas of interest are Graphene, Dendritic structures, Nanotechnology, Textile dyeing and Green processing of Textiles.

Ms. Geetal Mahajan is currently pursuing Ph.D. (Tech.) in Fibres and Textile Processing Technology in the Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology, under Prof. (Dr.) Ravindra V. Adivarekar, at Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India. Her research areas of interest are Fermentation Technology in Textiles, Textile colouration, Speciality finishes, Natural dyes, Green processing of Textiles using Natural products. Prof. (Dr.) Ravindra V. Adivarekar is currently Professor and Head of the Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology at the Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India. His research areas of interest are Textile colouration, Green processing of Textiles, Medical Textiles, Graphene, Enzyme manufacturing and application, Natural dyes for Textiles and Cosmetics, Novel Textile Processing Techniques and Textile composites. He has around 5 years of Industrial Experience mainly of Processing and Dyestuff manufacturing companies prior to being faculty for last 13 years. He has filed 4 patents and published around 150 papers in journals of National and International repute. Prof. (Dr.) Mangesh D. Teli is a senior most Professor and former Head of the Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology as well as former Dean at the Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India. He is a Fellow of CSIR-CNRS (France), Maharashtra Academy of Science, Honorary F.T.A and Shiksha Ratna. His research areas of interest are Natural dyes, Plasma Technology, Nanotechnology, Graphene, Super absorbents and Speciality finishes. He has guided 120 Master's and Doctoral students with over 370 publications/conference presentations and edited 25 books. He is an Independent Director of Siyaram Silk Mills, Chairman of Editorial Board of JTA and a Managing Trustee of Baha'i Lotus Temple, Delhi.

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Mr. Pintu Pandit is currently pursuing Ph.D. (Tech.) in Fibres and Textile Processing Technology in the Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology, under Prof. (Dr.) Mangesh D. Teli, at Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India. His research areas of interest are Graphene, Plasma Technology, Nanotechnology, Natural dyeing and Multifunctional finishing of Textile materials.


UNIT ACTIVITY

The Textile Association (India) TAI - Ichalkaranji-Miraj Unit Annual General Body Meeting The Textile Association (India) - Ichalkaranji-Miraj Unit organized their 41st Annual General Body Meeting held on 16th September, 2017 at Library Conference Hall of DKTE'S Textile & Engg. Institute, Ichalkaranji, in the presence of outgoing President Shri. R. Sampath, Vice President Shri. C. R. Jamdar, Chairman Prof. S. S. Chinchwade, Vice Chairman Shri. D. A. Patil, Dy. Director (Admin.) & Hon. Treasurer of TAIMU Prof. (Dr.) U.J. Patil, Shri. T. S.Sultanpure, Jt. Hon. Secretary. Hon. Secretary Prof. S.B. Mhetre presented Annual Reports, Accounts, Budgets & Activities carried out lastyear. He also briefed about Student Chapter Activities. Newly elected members of Student's Chapter introducedthemselves. Newly elected Office Bearers of TAIMU were felicitated at the hands of Dy. Director Prof. (Dr.) U. J.Patil. Director Prof. (Dr.) P.V. Kadole guided to conduct this event successfully. Meeting was concluded withvote of thanks by Prof. (Mrs.) A.A. Raybagi. Members of TAIMU were present for this meeting.

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Newly elected Office Bearers for the term 2017-2019 President : Shri. R. Sampath Vice-President : Shri C.R. Jamdar Chairman : Shri. S.S. Chinchwade Vice-Chairman : Shri. D.A. Patil Hon. Secretary : Prof. S.B. Mhetre Jt. Hon. Secretary : Prof. S.S. Lavate Jt. Hon. Secretary : Shri. T. S. Sultanpur Hon. Treasurer : Prof.(Dr.) U.J. Patil Jt. Hon. Treasurer : Prof. (Mrs.) A.A. Raybagi Jt. Hon. Treasurer : Shri V. A. Satpute Managing Committee Member : Prof.(Dr.) P.V. Kadole Managing Committee Member : Dr. G. Janakiraman Governing Council Member : Prof. A.U. Awasare Student Chapter The Textile Association (India) - Ichalkaranji-Miraj Unit, Student Chapter organized their selection of Student Coordinators for the period of 2017-18, carried out underthe guidance of faculty coordinators Prof A. U. Awasare and Prof. R. H. Deshpande. The first meeting of TAIMU Student Chapter for this academic year was organized on 31/07/2017 at 412

DarbarHall. The newly selected team of the Office Bearers were felicitated at the hands of Prof. (Dr.) U.J. Patil, Dy.Director (Administration). During the programme, Prof. Dr. U. J. Patil, Dy. Director guided them for arranging activities for thestudents which will benefit them for overall personality development.D.K.T.E.S Textile and Engineering Institute organizing programmes to inculcate the skills in the students.In continuation with this, a motivational speech on the topic "Joy of Work" was delivered by Prof. S. D. Mahajanwho is veteran member of Textile Association of India. He is an author of three well written books on"Personality Development". He motivated the students with his value added information and discussed varioushardships which come across the life and how to overcome them positively. Prof. S.D. Mahajan emphasized onimportance of positive attitude with practical examples from the day to day life. Student coordinators Shubhodeep, Salila, Vaishnavi anchored the event. More than hundred studentsfrom different textile programmes attended the event. Prof. A. U. Awasare& Prof. R.H. Deshpande, the faculty coordinator's of Student's Chapter & Prof. S.B. Mhetre, Hon. Secretary of Textile Association (I), Ichalkaranji Miraj Unit, course coordinators and faculty members were present for the event. Seminar on 'knitting Needles, Manufacturing and Developments' by GROZ BECKERT (Germany) The Textile Association (India) - Ichalkaranji-Miraj unit organized a half day Seminar by Department of Textileson Knitting Needles, Manufacturing and Developments on Tuesday, 26/09/2017 atLibrary Conference Hall for third year B.Text. (TPE & FT) and final year B.Text. (MMTT) students. At the beginning, Prof. (Dr.) U.J. Patil, Deputy Director (Administration) inaugurated the session bywelcoming the guests by offering a bouquet of flowers.Mr. R. Rajendran and Mr. K. Avinash, the senior executives of GrozBeckert India, Coimbatore guided theparticipants. Mr. R. Rajendran elaborated on the topic of basics of knitting needles, their functioning. Hehighlighted the activities of GrozBeckert. Mr. Avinash presented on the topic of developments in knittingneedles that had taken place in the recent past. Samples of knitting needles were exhibited with theirspecifications. The session was very informative to the students. The textile students and members of Student's Chapterbenefited by this seminar. The session presided over by the faculty coordinator of TAIMU Students Chapter Prof. A. U. Awasare. March - April 2018


UNIT ACTIVITY

West Bengal celebrated 67th Anniversary 67th Anniversary Celebration and One Day Annual Conference of The Textile Association (India), West Bengal Unit on "Development in Technical Textiles and Apparel" Held on 24th February, 2018 at Conference Room, Academy of Fine Arts, 2, Cathedral Road, Kolkata.+ Inaugural Session: The One Day Conference on "Development in Technical Textiles and Apparel" started with the welcome address by Shri JiwrajSethia, President of The Textile Association (India), West Bengal Unit. He not only extended hearty welcome to the Chief Guest and Guest of Honours on the day, and to every speakers and participants including the organizers but also stressed on the nature of research and development activities to be carried out in near future for taking leadership of the Indian textile technologists and concerned persons. After the welcome address, the dignitaries on the dais were felicitated with flower bouquets. Prof.Sadhan Chandra Ray, Chairman of TA(I), WB Unit elaborated the scope and prospects of the One Day conference on "Development in Technical Textiles and Apparel". He particularly advised the student participants for taking keen interest in attending as well as organizing such conferences/seminars for building their strong foundation in the various domains in textile technology. Shri Subodh Daga, Vice-President and Head, Wool Manufacture Division of Grasim Industries Ltd., JayaShree Textiles, RishraUnit, Hooghly, West Bengal, inaugurated the Conference by releasing the Souvenir published for the purpose, as Chief Guest of the 67th Anniversary celebration. The Key-Note Address on the Theme of the conference was given by Prof.AsisMukhopadhyay, Head, Department of Jute and Fibre Technology, University of Calcutta as Guest of Honour. He lucidly presented with the help of Power Point the genesis, varieties and applications of Technical Textiles. Dr. Aloke Nath Roy, Director ICAR-NIRJAFT (National Institute for Research on Jute and Allied Fibre Technology), the Special Guest in Chief, shared his vast experiences in the manufacture of jute and allied fibre based technical textiles as well as apparel. He also highlighted the up-coming topics where research March - April 2018

and developmental activities can be extended. The vote of thanks was extended by Shri Asoke Kumar Mukherjee, Hony. Secretary of TA(I), WB Unit, who also wished a great success of the conference by the active participation of everybody present in the hall. During the inaugural session, mourning was held for one minute to show regards to the departing souls of Late A. K. Roy, Ex-Chairman and Late S. K. Bhattacharyya, Ex-Adviser of the TA(I) WB Unit as well as to pray for resting of their souls in peace in heaven. Technical Session - I: The 1st Technical Session was chaired by Prof. Sadhan Chandra Ray, Professor (Retired) of University of Calcutta and four innovative and interesting papers were presented by Dr. S. N. Chatterjee, Shri PinakiSengupta, Dr. Kaushik Bal and Dr. Sankar Roy Maulik respectively. Dr. Chatterjeeof NIRJAFT described the processing technologies of producing blended yarns out of ligno-cellulosic fibres like jute, ramie and banana and their fabrics, including the eco-friendly chemical treatments for improvement of UV-Protection and Fire Retardancy in order to make those suitable for technical textiles. Dr. Balof University of Calcutta discussed the development of a mathematical model based on the principle of conductive heat transfer to predict the thermal resistance of cut pile carpet, which can be used for engineering of cut pile carpets to provide a desired level of thermal insulation. Dr. Roy Maulikof Visva-Bharatipresented the importance and scopes of safety requirements of textiles and apparels for the protection of consumers and environment from harmful effect of restricted substances with suitable colourful examples. Mr.Sengupta of Jaya Shree Textiles discussed in-depth the industrial policies and practices followed in the flax and wool divisions of the Jaya Shree Textiles, A Unit of the Grasim Industries Ltd., the flagship Company of the $ 41 billion Aditya Birla Group. The information provided on the steps taken for the sustainability of the Vision of the company, which includes the optimal usages of resources (energy and water) and working towards reduction of waste and carbon footprint through monitoring of Higg Index, made the audiencespellbound. Technical Session - II: The 2nd Technical Session was Chaired by Dr. N. C. Pan, Principal Scientist & Head of Chemical Processing Division, NIRJAFT and five technical papers were presented by Shri Subrata Kumar Modak, Ms. Swati 413

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TAI - West Bangal Unit


UNIT ACTIVITY Dasgupta, Md. SamsulAlam, Ms.AyisheSanyal and Prof.Sadhan Chandra Ray. Mr. Modak of Bodal Chemicals Ltd. thoroughly discussed the history of developments of Reactive dyes, including the development of Bodactive BNC Dyes based on Bodal Nano Chemistry with less salt content and almost pure reactive dyes. He also informed the application advantages of Bodactive BNC Dyes. Ms. Dasguptaintroduced the advantages and potential applications of composites in the production of technical textiles. She also shared her research experiences in bio-composite using jute, a renewable and biodegradable agricultural product. Mr. Alamof GCETT Serampore presented his research paper on the role of fibres, yarn and fabrics parameters on bending and shear rigidities of apparel. Threelevel Box and Behnken experimental methodology was used in the study, in which a strong degree of association was found between bending and shear rigidities of fabrics.

Ms. Sanyal of Department of Jute and Fibre Technology, University of Calcutta discussed the relationship between bending length and drape co-efficient of fabrics used in apparel manufacturing. They obtained good correlation between bending length and drape coefficient. The last paper of the day was presented by Prof. Ray. He lucidly presented the developments and principles of automation and robotics for textile applications in particular with colourful photographs. The One Day Conference was attended by more than one hundred persons belonging to different sectors of the textile technology, of which the major portion was from the academic institutes. The intelligent audience put a good number of questions as well as suggestions for discussion. At the end of the day "Lucky Dip Draw" was held with the participants and three awards were given to the three persons. The Vote of Thanks was extended by Shri Asoke Kumar Mukherjee, Hon. Secretary of the TA(I), WB Unit.

TAI - Ahmedabad Unit TAI Ahmedabad Unit organized Felicitation Function The Textile Association (India) Ahmedabad Unit organized Felicitation Function on 29th January, 2018 at GCCI, Sheth Shri Amrutlal Hargovandas Memorial Hall, Ashram Road, Ahmedabad. At the function,Association felicitated to Shri Hasmukhbhai S. Patel- MLA Amraiwadi Vistar, Shri Bhupendrabhai R. Patel, MLA Ghatlodia Vistar and Shri Jagdishbhai I. Panchal, MLA Nikol Vistar of Gujarat State, those who have elected during Gujarat State Assembly Election held in December 2017.

H. S. Patel delivering his response. On the Dais L to R: S/s R. R. Agarwal, Bhupendrabhai R. Patel, T. L. Patel, Shankerbhai R. Patel, Jagdishbhai I. Panchal &A. D. Patel

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During the program Shri Shankerbhai R. Patel, Chairman of Green Environment Services Co-op. Society Ltd, Vatva, Gujarat graced the chair as Chief Guest of the function.

Lighting of Lamp in the function 414

After welcoming to the all dignitaries on the dais,Shri T. L. Patel, President delivered his welcome address at the function. He talked about why thisfelicitation function is arranged and contribution of felicitating MLA's towards the Association. Near about 400 members of our Association and reputed personalities from the Textile Industries attended the program. All three March - April 2018


UNIT ACTIVITY MLA's were also delivered their response in the function. Shri Shankerbhai R. Patel, Chief Guest of the function was also addressing in the function and highlighted about the importance of the felicitation function to the MLA's. Dignitaries are welcomed by floral bouquet.

Shri R. R. Agarwal offering floral bouquet to Shri Jagdishbhai I. Panchal

Shri T. L. Patel offering floral bouquet to Shri Shankerbhai R. Patel

Shri T. L. Patel, President welcoming the audience

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Shri A. D. Patel offering floral bouquet to Shri H. S. Patel

Shri Shankerbhai R. Patel, Chief Guest delivering his address Shri H. J. Patel offering floral bouquet to Shri Bhupendrabhai R. Patel

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UNIT ACTIVITY

Shri Bhupendra R. Patel, MLA (Ghatlodia) receiving memento

Shri A. D. Patel, Hon. Secretary proposing vote of thanks

Shri Shankerbhai R. Patel, Chief Guest of the function was felicitating to the MLA's by offering Memento.

Shri Jagdish I. Panchal, MLA (Nikol) receiving memento

Shri H. S. Patel, MLA (Amraiwadi) receiving memento

Program was very successful and encourageble to the MLA's. At the end of the program Shri A. D. Patel, Hon. Secretary of the Association proposed vote of thanks.

Announcement 74th All India Textile Conference Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Hotsed by

The Textile Association (India) - South India Unit Decembaer, 2018 Contribute by way of Sponsoring, Advertisements & Enrolling Delegates

Contact: Mr. G. T. Bharath The Textile Association (India) - South India Unit Website:www.textileassociationindia.org 416

March - April 2018


NEWS

A Sell-Out Show For ITMA 2019 Show owner expanding space to accommodate overwhelming response Held every four years since 1951, ITMA has reinforced its reputation as the world's leading textile and garment technology exhibition. Exhibition space for its 18th showcase to be held in Barcelona has been fully booked by the application deadline of 6 April 2018. According to CEMATEX, the European Committee of Textile Machinery Manufacturers, owner of the ITMA exhibition, over 1,500 companies from 45 countries have applied to take part in ITMA 2019. The space booked already totals more than 110,000 square metres net. As applications continue to stream in, plans are underway to expand the exhibition to the entire Barcelona Gran Via venue. Mr Fritz P. Mayer, President of CEMATEX, said: "We are grateful for the vote of confidence from the industry. It shows that ITMA is the launch pad of choice for the latest technologies from around the world. "Interest in ITMA 2019 is extremely strong, and we have received more applications at an earlier date compared with previous editions. We continue to welcome new applicants, especially manufacturers who are launching new products, as they will help to make ITMA 2019 an even more vibrant sourcing platform for our visitors." Applicants from CEMATEX countries have booked 65 per cent of the space; the top countries are Italy,

Germany and Spain. Highlighting the positive market sentiments of textile machinery manufacturers from the rest of the world, applicants from Turkey, India and China take the top spots in terms of space applied. The top sectors are finishing (25 per cent), spinning (14 per cent), printing and weaving (12 per cent) and knitting (11 per cent). With the strong demand for space, ITMA 2019 is expected to feature a showcase of more than 115,000 square metres net, with the participation of some 1,600 exhibitors when the exhibition opens. ITMA 2019 will be held from 20 to 26 June at Fira de Barcelona, Gran Via venue. The exhibition, themed 'Innovating the World of Textiles', will showcase the latest technologies and sustainable solutions for the entire textile and garment manufacturing value chain, as well as fibres, yarns and fabrics. Visit www.itma.com for more information or email application@itma.com for participation details. Ms MariaAvery CEMATEX Tel: +44 7967 77305 Email: info@cematex.com www.cematex.com Ms Daphne Poon ITMA Services Tel: +65 94789543 Email: daphnepoon@itma.com www.itma.com

A.T.E. partners with Godrej Consoveyo to bring worldclass intelligent storage, movement and handling technology in India.

A.T.E. has joined hands with Godrej Consoveyo - pioneer and leader in offering Automated Intra-logistics solutions in India. The company offers end-to-end solutions in intra-logistic automation for various industry segments such as Pharmaceuticals, Chemicals, AgroChemicals, Food & Beverages, Textile, Paper, Paints, Automotive, Railways and Defense. A.T.E. will promote GCLA's products in India, effective from March 2018. Godrej Consoveyo Logistics Automation Ltd. (formerly Godrej Efacec Automation and Robotics Ltd.) is a joint venture between Godrej & Boyce Mfg. Co. Ltd. and

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A.T.E. has joined hands with Godrej


NEWS Consoveyo S.A. (acquired by Kรถrber AG, Germany), offering intelligent storage, movement and handling solutions in intra-logistics domain. GCLA offers technologically advanced customized solutions to meet the client requirements. As textile being one of fastest growing market for ASRS range of solution. Warehouse throughput, large no of variants and manpower availability are major concern for any textile company in India and Godrej have solutions which can add value in these areas. A.T.E. partnering with Godrej will make possible to expand market for ASRS as A.T.E. are already present in all textile pockets in India and Godrej being good brand value. With this partnership A.T.E. will be able to penetrate textile segment to design greater ware-

housing solution for textile customers. For more information, please contact: Mr. Sandeep Bharucha General Manager Product Management and Sales Textile Engineering Processing and ETP A.T.E. Enterprises Private Limited A-19, CTS No 689, Veera Desai Road, Andheri (West), Mumbai - 400 053 T (Board): +91-22-6676 6100 Ext: 290 T (Direct): +91-22-6676 6290 W: www.ategroup.com

Biodegradable Oil Absorbent Mats on the Market Biodegradable nonwoven composite oil absorbent mats have been launched. Microplastics and marine pollution have been gaining global attention, in addition to oil spill accidents. Chennai, India based WellGro Tech has recently brought biodegradable and environmentally benign oil absorbent mats to the market. Oil absorbent mats are predominantly synthetic based and with increasing awareness on issues with marine pollution by plastics, WellGro Tech has come up with non-synthetic absorbent mats. Sustainable absorbent pads and mats are devoid of plastics and can be reused multiple times. The company has tested the product in two leading research and testing laboratories in India.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Results show that as per ASTM standard, when tested using motor oil, the mat could absorb oil 13 times its weight and the cumulative absorption will be much

Texttreasure If faith in ourselves had been more and extensively thought and practiced. I am sure a very large portion of the evils and miseries we have would have vanished. - Swami Vivekananda.

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higher, as the mats can be reused. According to the company, the same mat can be used at a very minimum twenty times. Tests undertaken using ASTM and AATCC standards show that the mat and the oil soaked mat degrade and show strength loss, an indicator of degradation. Mr. VenkatakrishnanRamanujan, President of WellGro Tech, who is marketing the biodegradable mats told this scribe that the effort to develop environmentally friendly oil absorbent mats has been successful with positive third party tests carried out by two accredited laboratories. WellGro Tech is focused on export markets, where the awareness of using biodegradable oil absorbent technologies is more. Venkatakrishnan is actively seeking marketing collaborations to promote and take the product to global customers. Venkatakrishnan stated that the product is ready and just waiting for export orders. For more detail, contact: SeshadriRamkumar, Professor, Nonwovens & Advanced Materials Laboratory Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX, USA E-mail: s.ramkumar@ttu.edu Website: http://www.tiehh.ttu.edu/sramkumar

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NEWS

BRÜCKNER sustains position as market leader in the field of machines for electronic glass

The users of modern communication and semiconductor technology expect increasing capacity with lower weight. In reverse this leads to a rapid increase of the demand for electronic glass of the highest possible quality. The trend towards lower and lower weights per m² is unmistakable. Five years ago a surface weight of 48 g/m² was the standard for producers of electronic glass but in the meantime the standard is approx. 23 g/m². The leading producers in this field dare already to produce and use woven glass with a weight of 12 g/m². The extreme yarn and fiber fineness presents however a certain limit for the processing of these light woven fabrics. Currently it cannot be assessed if this trend can and will continue. These woven fabrics are disputed among doctors and biologists. Broken filaments of micro dimensions, which do inevitably occur during the processing of the glass fabric, get with the inhaled air into the lungs and from there possibly into the blood circulation.

BRÜCKNER line for the continuous desizing of glass fabric including exhaust air cleaning

The extremely low fabric weight is however an enormous challenge for the supplier of the machi-nery. The highest possible precision when control-ling minimum tractions, an absolute parallelism in the alignment of guide rollers and fabric accumulators, the use of special acid-resisting stainless steel and highly effective March - April 2018

fabric path cleaning technology are just as obligatory as a minimum consumption of electrical energy and process heat and a highly effective exhaust air cleaning according to the latest state of the art. BRÜCKNER meets these challenges for years and continuously develops its lines for continuous desizing and finishing. As a consequence almost all well-known producers of electronic glass have a BRÜCKNER glass fabric finishing line in their plants. These lines produce with the highest possible reliability on more than 330 days a year and round the clock with fabric speeds of up to 120 m/min.

BRÜCKNER line for the finishing of extremely light glass fabric.

This reliability, the high productivity and the possibility to process not only extremely light but also a wide range of fabric weights with the required quality makes BRÜCKNER a dependable partner for the producers of electronic glass. Therefore it is the rule that BRÜCKNER is awarded the contract also in case of follow-up orders. The orders placed with BRÜCKNER during the last 12 months for such lines exceeded by far all expectations. Several customers in Taiwan and China ordered glass fabric finishing lines, among them conti-nuous desizing lines and finishing lines for extremely light fabric. Some of the finishing lines were or-dered for the universal use with light and heavier fabric weights from 23 to 202 g/m². With these lines BRÜCKNER proves again their market leadership in this particular segment.

Texttreasure Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.-Antoine de Saint -Exupéry 419

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The rapid developments in the field of electronics lead to an ever increasing demand for so-called elec-tronic glass. This glass serves as basic material for printed circuit boards and is used due to its excellent dielectric characteristics with up to 16 stacked layers.


NEWS

COLORANT sponsored SDC Technical Seminar

COLORANT Ltd., Ahmedabad sponsored SDC Technical Seminar to a half day Seminar based on GSTGreen Sustainable Textile (Processing) held at the Darbar Hall of DKTE textile college, Ichalkaranji on Friday, 24th February, 2018. Mr. Subhash Bhargava, MD, Colorant Ltd. was the Guest of Honour. In his address he told the textile industry creates significant environment effects throughout the life cycle of textile products. Green chemistry principles form an integral part in product development where costs can be substantially lowered due to diminished use of dyes and chemicals, energy and water.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Being one of the technical speaker Dr. Mahapatra,President,Colorant spoke about theGSD(Green Sustainable Dyes) in which he mentioned about the role of COLORANT in introducing in the market Sustainable Dyes time to time.He emphasized on using Colron CN and Colron SF dyes for Light/Medium shades and Colron GLX/Colron CES dyes to be used for Dark/Heavy Dark Shades. All these dyes are giving very good results all over India and abroad.It will save Chemicals,time,energy,dyes and less Effluent Load.

The seminar was arranged by the SDC India officials and attended by Kolhapur and Ichalkaranjitextile process house owners,students,Faculty and technicians. There was technical interaction between the audience and COLORANT technical team represented by Mr.UmeshPatil MS(China) Technical Service Manager and a DKTE alumni. The seminar was followed by Dinner.

ColorJet displaying best selling digital textile printer VASTRAJET at GARFAB-TX ◆ ◆

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VASTRAJET offers precise dot placements and high precision printing Has a working printing width of up to 180 cms and can easily integrate into an existing process house Suitable for a variety of fabrics like cotton, silk, wool, polyester and their blends

India's biggest manufacturer and marketer of wide format digital printers, ColorJet India Ltd will be showing a live demonstration of its robust and bestsellingdirect to fabric digital textile printer, the VASTRAJET, at GARFAB-TX, which runs from March 9-11, 2018 at Sarsana Convention Centre, Surat in Hall No 2, Stall D-6. March - April 2018


NEWS Colorjet India digital textile printer portfolio,with a tried and tested method of printing. Within a short span of time, since its launch, more than 60+ VASTRAJET printers have been installed all over India," Mr Smarth Bansal, Sr. Product Manager at Colorjet India said.

The VASTRAJET is a brilliant digital textile printing machine, with a working printing width of up to 180 cms and can be easily integrated into an existing process house set-up. The VASTRAJET produces brilliant quality prints onto textiles with high colour consistency, using water based inks which are suitable for printing on a variety of fabrics like cotton, silk, wool, polyester and their blends. VASTRAJET offers precise dot placements and high precision printing and is available in 4 & 8 colour variants and is built on industrial grade jetting assembly. For outstanding print quality and perfect print registration, it uses an adhesive belt with built-in automatic washing system. The structure of the VASTRAJET is excellently designed to handle high speed production and precise dot placements, while the proprietary AIVC technology ensures high precision printing. The high speed is achieved through specially designed jetting controls to optimize printheads performance, to match the high jetting frequency. "VASTRAJET is the most successful model from the

"ColorJet India designs, manufactures and integrates every component of its printers like inks, printheads, and the control system to ensure maximum quality, reliability and uptime, combined with low total cost of ownership," he added. For those looking at higher productivity, ColorJet is also showing the METRO, which comes with 16 heads and productionspeed in the range of 200 sq. metres per hour.This model from Colorjettoo has found good response from Surat and Jaipur. ColorJet's innovative digital textile products have been installed at several textile fabric process houses in India and also several other countries and have gained the trust of the user community, due to the robustness of its printers and also the excellent after sales service and support, which is offered within 24 working hours. ColorJet's centralised customer care, team of engineers and well-maintained inventory levels of consumables or spares, with an all-India presence, ensures 100% customer satisfaction. For more information please visit www.colorjetgroup.com

Cotton Conclave 2018, driving for solutions to Agri & Textile Industries burning problems,organized by COTTONGURUÂŽ with IMC on 13th March, 2018 at Indian Merchant Chambers (IMC), Churchgate, Mumbai. It was and sponsored by MCX and supported by Kotak Commodities, Organica Biotech and V-Trans Logistics.

Mr. Manish Daga addressing the gathering

View of the dignitaries participated March - April 2018

Following eminent dignitaries were present and proposed their views and possible solutions to face the challenges on the problems faced by farmers and the industries. 421

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Cotton Conclave 2018


NEWS * Atulbhai Ganatra, President, CAI; * Arvind Sinha, Immediate Past President, TAI; * Smt. Ali Rani, CMD, CCI; * Amrut Deshmukh, Farmer; * G. Chandrashekar, Director, IMC ERTF; * Dr. Kavita Gupta, Textile Commissioner of India; * Pashabhai Patel, MLC, Chairman, State Commission for Agriculture; * Suresh Kotak, Kotak Commodity; * Sanjay Jain, President, CITI and other representatives from Agriculture and Textile Industry. There was live discussion, deliberation and decision on the solutions to the problems and the challenges being faced by Agri and Textile Industries. At the end of the conclave, a 'White Paper' incorporating most common & valid suggestions received from all the stake holders & policy makers, was drafted-printed-submitted to the present govt. officials. It was agreed by all delegates that this 'White Paper' is to be displayed on the website on all cotton & trade association,so that it becomes a roadmap for all stake holder & policy makers for further action.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Cotton Conclave 2018 honored the farmers for their efforts in producing highest cotton yield per hector in their farm.They were honored with Memento and the Certificates. The Challenge: Although India is the largest producer of cotton (nearly 25% of world share) and the second largest consumer and exporter of cotton, Indian cotton market faces the 2 main challenges of Low yield and Contamination such that; ◆ Many farmers, ginners, exporters and spinners are facing survival issues. ◆ Yields in India are lower by about 200-300% compared to those of other competitor cotton producing countries. ◆ 70% of Indian cotton farmers spend more than what they earn as lower yields and crop losses due to diseases arising out of long duration crops have put severe limitations on the income of cotton farmers. ◆ Indian cotton brand has been heavily eroding due to contamination, adulteration and contract defaults such that Indian cotton is discounted by atleast 5 cents/ lbs (Rs 1000/bale) to competitive origins like US, W.Africa, Australia, etc. leading to an annual loss of nearly USD 1 billion to the Indian cotton industry, drastically restricting the income of cotton farmers and profits of textile industry. Unless all the stake holders and policy makers make a consolidated effort with holistic long term approach, 422

growth of cotton textile industry and farmers' incomes are at a great risk. Practical & Sustainable Solutions and ways to meet the challenges: Cotton Conclave 2018, has made a humble attempt at bringing All the stake holders (farmers, seed companies, fertilizer companies, ginners, traders, exporters, spinners, brands, research scientists, investors, etc.) and the policy makers (State and Central Govt.) on a Round Table. The solutions that have been endorsed by the by the Amrut Manthan(heavy discussion, debate and decision) of All of the above, are mentioned below: Issue No.1): Doubling farmers' income: 1. Agriculture by Design: Agriculture of all crops(food, fuel, cotton) must be by design rather than by default.The Textile industry must give an advance layout of its annual cotton requirement so that the farmers can plan their crop. 2. White Revolution 2.0: Yield depends mainly on 3 things: Seeds, Soil and Weather. Seeds: (1) Urgently introduce limited varieties of certified seeds suitable to Indian agro climatic conditions. (2) Short term duration (150 days) of BT variety seeds instead of hybrids/long term (180 days), especially in rainfed areas. (3) Seeds with higher percentage of ginning outturn(atleast 40 instead of current 34). (4) Seed distribution through CCI so as to ensure authenticity and availability for the farmers. (5) Rating of Seed companies by professional audit and farmers' feedback. Incentives for R& D must be given based on above ratings. (6) Incentives to develop seed matching the requirements of Indian textile industry in terms of cotton quantity and quality (staple length, strength, etc.). ◆ Soil:

(1) Remedial action on soil health card reports. (2) Farmers counseling for crop rotation and using organic manure to enhance soil fertility. ◆ Weather: (1) Timely weather forecast reaching remotest places in India. (2) Increase direct Subsidies on drip Irrigation. (3) Water conservation - Deepening Rivers and recharging of tube wells by rain water harvesting for multiple crops/year. 3. Introduce TMC-2: TMC must be reintroduced involving cotton farming in it to improve the quality of Indian cotton with less contamination and trash. March - April 2018


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5. Public Private Partnership (PPP): Encouraging consolidated contract farming with Government as the facilitator and regulator. Encourage farmer support as CSR activity. 6. Marketing Linkages: Building marketing linkages between producers, processors and consumers by engaging private companies so as to generate better remuneration to farmers, ginners and spinners. 7. Revamp APMC: Utilise full potential of APMCs as ◆ Centres of excellence with testing facilities for soil health, cotton fibre analysis, ginning out-turn and oil content in seed. ◆ Farmer training centres. ◆ Data collection centres. 8. Promote Farmers Producers Organizations (FPO) for better access to investment, technology, inputs and markets. 9. Crop Insurance and Risk management: The biggest risk to farmer is uncertainty of crop size, quality, cost and price. Effective tools and training must be imparted to mitigate the above risks. 10. Incentives and subsidies on cost effective value addition of cotton/ seeds/ stalks promoting agri-SMEs in villages. Issue No. 2): Reducing grave disparity in Ginning and spinning Mission: SWACHH COTTON ABHIYAN 1) Coloured cement and fertilizer bags so as to eliminate HDPE/PP contamination which is the cause of great pain, cost and loss to the spinners, ginners and ultimately the farmers. 2) Improve traceability and transparency in Bale identification system by re-introduction and mandate of Press Mark system in Ginning Factories. Strict regulation or Act must be initiated to control contamination and adulteration. 3) Updated and timely data management by official declaration of export, import figures of Cotton and value added products. 4) Better seed management: Improvise seeds to get a better Ginning out-turn.Promote export of seed and March - April 2018

seed cake for better realisation to the ginners. Incentivise industries striving for value addition of cotton by-products like cotton linter, biomass, packaging material, cellulose extraction, etc. 5) Mandatorily increase the percentage of pre-shipment testing toatleast 5% from the currently dismal 2%, targeting 100% in the next few years.US cotton gets apremium of atleast 5 USC/lbs. 6) Promote Branding of Cotton as 'Made in India' to generate better value for the producers, processors and consumers. Conclusion: Indian cotton has made remarkable advancement during 2003 and 2009 but the yield has stagnatedand quality has deteriorated in the last few years. India is losing more than 1 billion US dollars in value termsagainst the least contaminated growths.This is the main reason for decrease in the farmers' income and disparity amongst cotton ginners and spinners, mainly SMEs. It is high time we discover and utilise the true potential of cotton and value added products such that we identify and enhance their derived demand. Indian cotton textile industry has the potential to scale new heights and we can achieve both thetargets of Doubling Farmers' income and Textile turnover of USD 300 billion in the next few years by initiating the 2 missions of; 1. White Revolution 2.0: To address Quantity: Planned production with Increasedyield levels, ◆ Quality:Industry specific quality with reduced contamination levels, ◆ Cost: Minimise the cost of production and processing by use of cost-effective technology, ◆

2. Swachh Cotton Abhiyan: Increase value of cotton and value added products with more transparency, traceability and integrity adopting bale identification system, mandatory Press Mark and atleast 5% testing of pre-shipped cotton. It will benefit not only Ginners and farmers but also the entire cotton Value chain of Indian Cotton Textile industry. Indian farmers & processors can generate a premium of over 5% if these solutions are implemented with immediate effect. Addendum: Issue No.1) Doubling farmers' income: 1. Agriculture by Design: Agriculture of all crops(food, fuel, cotton) must be by design rather than by default. It is a normal farmer's tendency to grow what has been sold better in the previous year which leads to 423

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4. Technology: ◆ Promote use of mechanized cotton planter and harvester since hand picking costs about 25% of the total expense. ◆ Provide subsidized power sources using renewable means like solar and wind to ensure uninterrupted supply for farming.


NEWS supply surplus and losses. The Textile industry must give an advance layout of its annual cotton requirement in terms of quantity, quality and geographical preferences so that the farmers can plan their crop. ◆

There is an urgent need to improve cotton seed technology such that we initiate a White Revolution 2.0. Limited varieties of best quality short duration certified seeds suitable to Indian agro climatic conditions with higher percentage of ginning out-turn (atleast 40 instead of current 34) and must be distributed through CCI so as to ensure authenticity and availability for the farmers. Rating of Seed companies by professional audit and farmers' feedback. Incentives for R& D must be given based on above ratings. Seed companies may also be incentivised to develop seeds that match the requirements of Indian textile industry in terms of cotton quantity and quality (staple length, strength, etc.). Soil: oil health card reports of various agriculture zones must be studied by experts thereby providing simplified and cost effective remedial solutions which must be implemented urgently.

Farmers must be counseled for crop rotation and use of organic manure so as to enhance the fertility of the soil. Govt. must provide basic elements which supplement the farmer's traditional lifestyle along with his surrounding ecosystem. One of them can be providing cattle in order to produce organic manure and generate a second source of income.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Weather: Climate change is one of the major causes of lossto the farmers across the world. This can be partially combated by-

Timely weather forecast reaching remotest places in India. Increase Subsidies on drip Irrigation with uninterrupted and subsidized power for effective usage. Water conservation - Deepening Rivers and recharging of tube wells by rain water harvesting. This will help the farmers take 2-3 crops a year thereby enhancing his income.

nation and trash.Cotton farming is an integral part of the cotton textile supply and it must be accepted as such. It must be included in the Textile Ministry as 1) Indian Textile industry is predominantly dependent on cotton. Any change in crop or quality has a very significant effect on the Textile industry. 2) Unlike Polyester (which is a very small portion of all petroleum products), 100% of lint cotton is converted into yarn and fabric. So, the farmer is equally dependent on the Textile industry. 3. Technology: Promote use of mechanized cotton planter and harvester since hand picking costs about 25% of the total expense. ◆ Provide subsidized power sources using renewable means like solar and wind to ensure uninterrupted supply for farming. ◆ Encourage shared logistics within a village or region to cut down fixed costs and ensure better access to market place. ◆ Increase the use of technical textiles in cotton farming so as to control disease spread, ensure better monitoring and increase crop yield. ◆ Promote precision agriculture with user friendly GPS technology. ◆ Providing pathways (mobile applications, helpline numbers etc.) to ensure that weather forecast reaches smallest of the farmers on a real-time basis. ◆

7. Revamp APMC for maximum utility: ◆ Convert all the APMCs to centres of excellence with testing facilities for soil health, cotton fibre analysis, ginning out-turn and oil content in seed. This will ensure price appreciation for better quality of cotton and seeds. ◆ Farmer training centres must be started in all big APMCs with an adequate Govt. budget for farmer training, nominating an audit agency for periodic monitoring of such programs to ensure good agricultural practices, seed identification and effective disease management. ◆ APMCs can be utilized to collect real time data about sowing, kapas arrivals and expected crop. Such data can be stored and analysed in a centralized system and available to the Textile industry and the Government at all times.

2. Introduce TMC-2: TMC must be reintroduced involving cotton farming in it. This will be helpful to improve the quality of Indian cotton with less contami424

March - April 2018


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At the end of Cotton conclave 2018 the A White Paper of the conclave was prepared and handed over to Mr. Pashabhai Patel, MLC, Chairman, State Commission for Agriculture to take the suitable action in the matter. This White Paper aims at exploring economics of Cotton and find quick-fix, calibrated and sustainable solutions to the burning issues of cotton supply value chain with the consent of All stake-holders (farmers to brands) and policy makers (Govt. officials). Dr. Kavita Gupta, Textile Commissioner addressing

More than 100 delegates attended this conclave. For more information, please contact: Mr. Manish Daga Managing Director COTTONGURUÂŽ Director, Cotton Association of India 210/211/227, Runwal Commercial Complex, L.B.S. Marg, Mulund (W), Mumbai - 400 080 E-mail: manish@cottonguru.org, info@cottonguru.org

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Concluded White Paper is handed over to Mr. Pashabhai Patel

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Dr. Sheshadri Ramkumar awarded Prestigious Fellowship, Oration Texas Tech Advanced Materials Expert Awarded Prestigious Fellowship, Oration SeshadriRamkumar has worked in the advanced textiles field for two decades. SeshadriRamkumar, a professor in the Texas Tech University Department of Environmental Toxicology and lead investigator in the Nonwovens and Advanced Materials Laboratory, has recently been awarded two of the most prestigious honors in the textiles field: a fellowship with The Textile Institute in the United Kingdom and the 2017-18 Professor W. B. Achwal Oration from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, India. "These two international honors are based on my research activity carried out over 19 years at Texas Tech University," Ramkumar said. "This showcases the collective effort of students who have worked in my laboratory and the continued support Texas Tech has provided me all these years. I feel it is a recognition for all of us involved." Steve Presley, chair of the Department of Environmental Toxicology, said the awards recognize Ramkumar's significant contributions to the textile industry at the national and international levels.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

"The importance of such international recognition of Dr. Ramkumar's career-long scientific achievements and contributions to the textile industry are far-reaching and reflect the world class innovative faculty of the Department of Environmental Toxicology at Texas Tech University," Presley said. Fellowship Founded in 1910, The Textile Institute, located in the United Kingdom, is the oldest chartered professional body in textiles and fiber science and, to this day, maintains an international reputation for excellence. "Fellowship is one of the highest professional recognitions for scientists/technologists," Ramkumar said. "The honor from this century-old, well-established body is an endorsement of the research and academic efforts at Texas Tech, which our global peers have considered worthy." To become a fellow, each applicant's work is first verified by three references. A committee of academ426

ics and industrialists then reviews the application and makes the award, which is ratified by the institute's governing council. "The Textile Institute was founded to promote professionalism and disseminate knowledge within textiles," said Rebecca Unsworth, executive director of The Textile Institute. "Fellowship is the highest professional qualification that can be awarded by the institute's governing council and is reserved for those members who have made a major personal contribution to the textile industry. Professor Ramkumar was awarded the fellowship for his outstanding achievement in innovation and academic research." Oration On Feb. 20, Ramkumar delivered the Professor W. B. Achwal Endowed Oration, titled "An Odyssey with Technical Textiles," at the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, which is recognized as an elite institution by the Maharashtra Government of India. His lecture focused on the status of the emerging technical textiles sector and highlighted the research of two doctoral students in the Nonwovens and Advanced Materials Laboratory who are alumni of the Institute of Chemical Technology. "In the fiber science field, this oration is deemed most coveted, as it is named after the now-deceased Professor Achwal, a most famous textile chemist," Ramkumar said. Ramkumar attributes the award not only to his research contributions, but also to a longstanding partnership between his laboratory and many institutes in India. Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter. CONTACT: SeshadriRamkumar, Professor, Nonwovens and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, (806) 445-1925 or s.ramkumar@ttu.edu March - April 2018


NEWS

German Technology meets Indian Textiles and Nonwovens Decision-makers from the Indian textile and nonwoven industry are warmly invited to register under www.germantech-indiantextile.de for the next VDMA Textile Machinery Conference and B2B-Forum from 15 to 16 May 2018 in Mumbai (Hotel The Leela). Registration is mandatory. The VDMA will bear organizational costs (no entrance fee). Deadline for registration: April 30, 2018.

Textile machinery & components for the technical textiles and nonwovens industry (May 15 & 16, 2018) Textile machinery & components for the apparel, home textile & carpet industry (May 15 & 16, 2018)-program: www.germantech-indiantextile.de/ program.html

Networking among the participants and experts will be reached also through a B2B meeting area and conference dinner / high tea.

State-of-the-art-technology will be presented in three sessions: ◆

Textile machinery & components for the fiber & yarn industry (May 15, 2018)

Participating VDMA member companies: ANDRITZ Küsters, AUTEFA Solutions Germany, Benninger Zell, BRÜCKNER Textile Technologies, DILO SYSTEMS, DILO TEMAFA, Lindauer DORNIER, ERBATECH, Erhardt+Leimer, FESTO, GROZ-BECKERT, INTERSPARE, IQ-SPS, KÜSTERS TEXTILE, MAHLO, Mayer& Cie., KARL MAYER, Monforts, Neuenhauser, Oerlikon Manmade Fibers, Reseda Binder, SAURER Accotex, SAURER Texparts,Sedo Treepoint, SETEX, TEXPA, THIES, TRÜTZSCHLER NONWOVENS &MAN-MADE FIBERS, TRÜTZSCHLER SPINNING, WEITMANN & KONRAD - WEKO, WELKER VACUUM, ZSK.

Connecting you with right audience for strengthening business promotion March - April 2018

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The VDMA organizes the event in close co-operation with the VDMA India Office, important media partners and Indian textile associations such as CITI. More than 30 well-known VDMA textile machinery and component manufacturers (link) will hold 36 application-oriented presentations about spinning, knitting, weaving, finishing, dyeing and embroidery. Other important cross topics, such as automation, digitalization (Industry 4.0) and smart production technologies will show all kind of Indian textile manufacturers how to improve their competitiveness.

In addition, a training seminar at Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute will take place on 17 May 2018 at the premises of VJTI in Mumbai. Mrs. Regina Brückner, chairperson of the VDMA Textile Machinery Association states: "The knowledge needed to keep up in the textile business is changing at a faster rate, which makes lifelong learning a must. The knowledge transfer at the VDMA event will improve the competitiveness of the Indian textile industry not only in the short but also in the medium and long-term. The students of today are the decision-makers and technical managers of tomorrow."


NEWS

Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) with innovative dual leadership GOTS certified. The independent certifiers reported more than 1,7 million workers in GOTS operations in 2017. "I am extremely pleased that we could secure my succession with these two top executives leading the Global Standard gGmbH. I am confident that together they will ensure GOTS leading position and successfully face challenges" says Herbert Ladwig, who led GOTS as Managing Director from its formation in 2002 and has been instrumental for its success. Ladwig will continue to serve as Policy and Legal Advisor.

Claudia Kersten and Rahul Bhajekar

True to its mission "working together to achieve solutions" GOTS once again lives up to its pioneer role. It began with the harmonization of existing standards in 2002 into the global standard for the processing of certified organic fibres along the entire supply chain. It continues through regular revisions by a multi-stakeholder process, for keeping GOTS always up-to-date regarding technological progress and social responsibility. Now GOTS comes up with an innovative management approach.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

With Claudia Kersten and Rahul Bhajekar GOTS now installed a dual leadership as modern management form for the non-profit operating unit Global Standard gemeinnĂźtzige GmbH. At this time more than 5.000 operations in around 63 countries around the globe are

Kersten and Bhajekar have already been working as directors for GOTS. Kersten, who holds an MBA Sustainability Management will continue to serve as head of Marketing and Finance. Bhajekar who has been working in the textile sector for more than two decades including textile and analytical laboratories remains head of Standards Development and Quality Assurance. "Mr. Ladwig's farsightedness propelled GOTS to international recognition as the standard of choice for organic textiles. His pioneering drive earns our deepest respect. Moreover, we are grateful that we can continue to rely on his support and benefit from his irreplaceable experience" say Kersten and Bhajekar. For more information please see: www.global-standard.org. Jacqueline Schneider schneider@global-standard.org

Global Organic Textile Standard Tops 5000 Facilities in 2017 Number of GOTS certified facilities increase 8,2% to 5,024 in 2017, More than 1.74 million workers reported. The number of facilities certified to GOTS shows an increase of 8,2%, from 4,642 facilities in 2016 to 5,024 facilities in 2017. GOTS certified facilities are located in 62 countries around the world with continuous growth in both production as well as consuming regions. GOTS certification covers the processing of certified organic fibres along the entire supply chain from field to finished product. 428

Countries or regions with the largest increase in GOTS certification in 2017 are (in rank order): Bangladesh (+40%), North America (+39%), Portugal (+39%), Europe (+29%). The top ten countries in terms of total number of certified facilities are: India (1658), Bangladesh (534), Germany (480), Turkey (445), Italy (307), China (292), Pakistan (194), Portugal (180), USA (99) and South Korea (69). "The growing number of GOTS certifications shows March - April 2018


NEWS that GOTS is taken as a solution for managing risks, reputation and market differentiation. We are very pleased with the development in North America. It will have the same pull effect as also seen in Europe by creating increasing capacities in the producing countries" said GOTS Director Claudia Kersten at the GOTS Annual Meeting in Charleston, South Carolina. In 2017 the 19 GOTS accredited independent Certification Bodies reported more than 1,74 million people working in GOTS certified facilities.

The number of chemicals on the GOTS Positive List also shows an increase of 14% to more than 17,900 from 720 manufacturers. The GOTS Positive List contains tradenames of approved chemicals that must be used by all textile processors for their GOTS certified production. GOTS - Global Organic Textile Standard kersten@global-standard.org www.global-standard.org

GOTS India Seminar 2018 to focus on business efficiency ◆

Chemical and Environmental Compliance: What are the latest requirements in GOTS? How does it keep pace with technical research and market requirements? What are the current trends in environmental compliances? What needs to be tested? Where should it be tested?

Future of compliances and standards: What are the latest challenges? How are other stakeholders in the market setting their requirements? How can organisations collaborate to reduce double working?

GOTS has been organising international and regional events since 2015. 'GOTS India Seminar 2018' is the third event in India organized by GOTS. Earlier events in Mumbai and New Delhi were highly appreciated by participants and industry. The Seminar Agenda can be downloaded here. The Registration Form can be downloaded here For more details, please visit Seminar Webpage on GOTS website. www.global-standard.org. Mr. Sumit Gupta GOTS Representative in India & Bangladesh gupta@global-standard.org +91 9892270594

ADVERTISE IN

JOURNAL OF THE TEXTILE ASSOCIATION For more details, contact:

THE TEXTILE ASSOCIATION (INDIA) Call: +91-22-2446 1145, Mobile: +91-9819801922 E-mail : taicnt@gmail.com, jb.soma@gmail.com, pavitra1941@gmail.com Website: www.textileassociationindia.org March - April 2018

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On 29th May 2018, Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is organising the 'GOTS India Seminar 2018' in Hotel Le Méridien Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. The theme for this seminar is 'Sustainability as Key to Business Efficiency'. Stakeholders and actors from organic textile supply chains shall come together and contemplate positive initiatives to achieve business efficiency through sustainable practices. As consumers become increasingly aware of the environmental cost of fast fashion, 2018 is predicted be the year that sustainability goes mainstream. Advances in textile process innovations can lead to sustainable development while at the same time improving efficiencies and enhancing profits. Through focused and challenging discussions, this oneday seminar shall address pressing issues relevant to the organic textiles industry. It shall equip delegates with best practices and know how relating to the biggest opportunities - and challenges - help transforming their supply chains to achieve efficiency through sustainability. The seminar shall look at key issues such as: ◆ Sustainability in Fashion Industry: What are the current trends in eco-fashion domain? What are the priorities and experiences of conscious buyers? How are Indian and international brands integrating organic textiles in their product offerings?


NEWS

Stäubli at IGATEX 2018 Stäubli at agent SIMAG's booth no. 2-111 in Hall 2 Stäubli, renowned global provider of weaving solutions, is presenting its current range of machinery at its agents' booth at IGATEX in Pakistan - Booth no. 2-111 in Hall 2. Stäubli's broad product range includes solutions for automated weaving preparation, frame and Jacquard weaving, and carpet and technical textile weaving. The machines feature state-of-the art technologies developed through more than 125 years of experience and the passion for continued research to bring even more advantages to every weaving mill.

interior remains clean and at a controlled temperature. LX Jacquard machines are available in sizes up to 6,144 hooks. The latest models in the LX Series, the LXL and LXXL, are likewise built for high speed but also for even greater load capacity. These models can be equipped with a number of hooks ranging from 6,144 to 25,600. By combining two LXXL machines, formats up to 51,200 can be achieved.

The Pakistan weaving industry is currently seeing growing demand for heavy and large-format Jacquard fabrics such as upholstery or terry cloth. Stäubli's range of Jacquard machines perfectly covers the requirements of these applications. Stäubli Jacquard machines master heavy payloads at highest speeds Since the introduction of electronic Jacquard machines in the 1990s, Stäubli SX and LX series Jacquard machines have gained significant market share and are now recognized worldwide for their high performance, easy handling, and very long service life.

TopmaticwarptyingInstallation

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

LXXL electronic Jacquard machine - Stäubli Whether weaving upholstery fabrics, terry cloth, or technical textiles, Stäubli Jacquard machines master every challenge. The recently re-engineered LX series features a lifting mechanism that allows high-speed weaving of even extremely heavy fabrics. With a coaxial drive shaft and a special chassis supporting the beams and bearings, the latest models can handle up to 26% greater loads than the previous models. Improved positioning of the fans in the LX housing optimizes internal airflow, ensuring that the machine 430

SAFIR S60 automatic drawing-in machine with operator

Both the SX and LX series include special models for the production of all sorts of velvet fabrics: the SX V, the LX V, and the LXL V. Offering the possibility of flexible combination of the 3-position modules with the height-adjustable 2-position modules, the pile and ground warp can be activated with the same machine. March - April 2018


NEWS

Weaving mills can enjoy choosing from a competitive product range of Stäubli Jacquard machines, enabling them to respond swiftly to changing market demands. And because a precisely matched Jacquard system gives mills even higher performance, Stäubli even offers high-end harnesses for any application. (Visitors can see Jacquard machinery at the booth) Automated weaving preparation solutions for optimized workflow Weaving preparation, both warp tying and drawing in, requires skilled and experienced craftsmanship in order to assure perfectly prepared warps, which are necessary if the mill wants to work efficiently. But it has become more difficult to find reliable staff willing to execute monotonous tasks like warp tying or drawing in. What's more, quick style changes present a challenge to weaving mills in terms of high quality requirements and efficiency, necessary in order to stay competitive. Stäubli offers automatic warp-tying machines for reliable single- or double-knot formation at maximum tying speeds. The machinery ensures efficiency, and the warp threads are perfectly drawn through the weaving harness. At the booth, visitors can observe the TOPMATIC tying machine, a perfect workhorse for mills weaving cotton, wool, silk, blended yarns, filament yarn, monofilaments, or technical yarns in a count range from 0.8-500 tex (Nm 2 - 1,250 / Ne 1.2 - 740, depending on the material). (The TOPMATIC warp-tying machine can be observed at the booth) For frame weaving mills, Stäubli provides SAFIR automatic drawing-in machines, which have proven their capabilities in a very wide range of applications. The SAFIR S60 drawing-in machine for instance is particularly suited for premium shirting fabrics, men's outerwear, home fabrics, and technical textiles. The yarn is drawn directly from one warp beam into the drop wires, healds, and reed. State-of-the-art technologies like optical yarn recognition assure high quality of the finished drawn-in harness, in particular, precise colour repeats and no double yarns. For woollen applications, the installation can even recognise and manage S/Ztwisted yarns. March - April 2018

The versatile range of drawing-in installations features modular design, so the machines can be exactly configured to any mill's specific requirements. ALPHA weaving systems offer creative freedom and unsurpassed flexibility Stäubli's ALPHA 500 series includes weaving systems for the creation of an extremely wide variety of rugs and wall-to-wall carpeting for the residential, contract, and transportation sectors. Many of the leading carpet weavers around the world use ALPHA machines in their mills to quickly respond to virtually any requirement. These carpet weaving systems can efficiently produce a large product range in excellent qualities, with impressive patterns up to 4 million points/sqm and weaving widths up to 5.3m. Highly flexible and responsive partner responding to the mill's specific needs No matter how good a machine is, its full potential can be realised only through perfect operation. That's why customer support is a top priority at Stäubli. As a consultancy partner, the company analyses the mill's needs with the customer to choose the best machines and solutions to cost-effectively meet the stated goals. Stäubli's experts are there to assist - from initial planning all the way through to final handover of the equipment. And after overseeing installation, testing, and fine tuning of the machinery, Stäubli trains the operators and production planning staff so that the mill is sure to derive the fullest benefit from the high-performance equipment. Highly competent service technicians complete Stäubli's comprehensive service offer. For more information please contact: Mr Fritz Legler Press Relations Phone: + 41 81 725 01 01 Direct: + 41 81 725 03 24 fritz.legler@staubli.com www.staubli.com Ms Nadine Dairain Press Contacts Executive Phone : + 33 45 0 64 31 68 Direct : + (0)7 60 28 22 19 n.dairain@staubli.com www.staubli.com

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

A key feature of every Stäubli SX or LX Jacquard machine is the MX module, which controls the precise up-and-down movement of each and every hook. The MX module is made of optimized materials and delivers remarkable service live.

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NEWS

ITAMMA Participated in INDO INTERTEX 2018 The 16th 'Indo Intertex 2018' was held during 4-7 April, 2018 in conjunction with INATEX 2018, INDODYECHEM 2018 & INDO TEXPRING 2018 at the Jakarta International Expo, Indonesia. The event was organized by PT. Peraga Nusantara Jaya Sakti and was supported by Indonesia Textile Association (API).

Activities of ITAMMA during 'Indo Intertex 2018' i) At ITAMMA Stall No. C-2, 33 (photo No.IMG20180412-WA0030) During this year 4 ITAMMA members participated in Share-a-table scheme & 14 members submitted their Catalogues under Catalogue display scheme. (Details given in the Brochure attached). The footfalls of the visitors at ITAMMA stall were good and the statistical analysis based on their business fields are given in the table below. As desired by the Members, special efforts were taken by the Director General (Tech) to visit the stalls of the Indonesian Agents and had a fruitful interactions with the Higher Authorities of their Agencies. Following Conclusions can be made from the trend of Visitors

Mr. Kaizar Z. Mahuwala, President, ITAMMA, Offering Memento to Mr. Benny

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Guest of Honour Mr. Prabir Bhattacharya delivering his speech

More than 600 suppliers from 24 countries participated in the show and there were about 20,000 visitors representing the industry associations, clothing manufacturers, textile makers, spinning mills, finishers, consultants, training institutes, retailers, designers, buying agents and whosesalers, among other professionals. More than 562 exhibitors from over 23 countries including German, China, Korea, Italy & UK participated and presented their state-of-the-art equipments, materials and services. A business matching system and networking tool, called 'B2B TEX-MATCH' was one of the key aspects of this year's edition of the exhibition. 'B2B TEX-MATCH' assisted buyers and sellers to connect and facilitated necessary meetings, allowing them to maximize their networking opportunities at the event. 432

Visitors in the Exhibition ◆ Indian visitors are mainly from Supply Industry usually Trading Agencies to an extent of about 27% against only 2.67 % from User Industry. Thus Indian Visitors come to explore business for selling their Spare parts /Components, Machines and Chemicals. ◆ Considering the figures of 30.43% of Foreign Visitors from User Industry attending this Exhibition is a good sign of trust and confidence they are having in the Exhibitor's products. ◆ Foreign Exhibitors from Supply Industry attending this Exhibition to an extent of 27% are mainly of Trading Agencies looking for good Foreign Principles of Machines & Spares. This Data can be helpful to ITAMMA Members who are looking for good Agents in Indonesia. ◆ Considering the attendance of only 17% of Foreign Visitors from Allied Industry, states that there is a wide scope of Business in the field of Energy, Power (Solar), Effluent treatment, Humidification, etc. ◆ Attendance of Academicians was poor or Academicians were not found interested in the technical discussions at stalls, thus calls for strengthening this area with frequent technical visits of students to Textile Units. Scope of proposing training programmes and setting up Excellence Centers can be explored by the Indian R & D Institutes/ March - April 2018


NEWS

Universities/Textile Research Associations. Foreign Visitors were from Spinning User Industry (21.18%), Trading Agencies (20.00%) and Dyes & Chemical/Other Industry (30.50%). While Indian Visitors 43% from Spinning, 17% from Wet-Processing & 13% from Weaving Industry were mainly from Machines & Spares area. However the participation from the grey area of other services/Allied Industry registered very less footfalls from India. We need to explore this Grey Market.

Jakarta (for photos please refer Annexure-1) A Business Meet along with the Networking Dinner was organized at Hotel Hotel Danau Sunter (Sunlake Hotel), Jakarta on 6th April, 2018. About 102 Delegates attended the same, where about 62 ITAMMA members got an opportunity to interact with 40-45 foreign delegates during the Business Meet. Also Catalogues of Member participants of Catalogue Display scheme were displayed and distributed at the reception counter to the delegates. Mr. N.D. Mhatre, Director General (Tech), ITAMMA gave an introductory remarks mentioning that it is an endeavor of ITAMMA to organize Business Meets followed by Networking Dinner in every International exhibitions where ITAMMA participate. Such events give an opportunity to our members to interact with the representatives of the textile industry of that country under one roof in a very informal atmosphere.

ITAMMA Members at their Booth

Mr. N. D. Mhatre, delivering his presentation

Mr Kaizar Z. Mahuwala, President, ITAMMA, offering Memento to the Guest of Honour, Mr. Prabir Bhattacharya,

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Delegates during Business- Meet & Networking Dinner of ITAMMA at Suntar Sunlake Hotel on 6th April'2018 Attendance of Foreign delegates to 57% and that of ITAMMA Members to 37% had made the event more fruitful. The delegates were mainly from spinning (40%) followed by those from Garment and other/ Allied Industry.

ii) Business Meet followed by Networking Dinner on 6th April, 2018 at Hotel Danau Sunter (Sunlake Hotel), March - April 2018

A section of audience at the Business Meet followed by Networking Dinner 433


NEWS Mr. Kaizar Z. Mahuwala, President, ITAMMA delivered a Welcome Address, after giving details about ITAMMA activities and thanked all the delegates present as well as the ITAMMA member-exhibitors and participants under ITAMMA Pavilion. He also mentioned about the fruitful talks had with Mr. Paul Kingsen, Project Director, Pt. Peraga Nusantara Jaya Sakti, Jakarta, in regard with the construction of ITAMMA Pavilion in the forthcoming Indo Intertex in the year 2020 and requested Mr. Paul to offer ITAMMA a substantial discount so that many ITAMMA member-companies can participate in this exhibition under ITAMMA Pavilion. Mr. Paul Kingsen being present in the Business Meet accepted and supported the request of the President of ITAMMA. Mr. Kaizar Z. Mahuwala, President, ITAMMA also informed that due to unavoidable circumstances, Chief Guest, Mr. Hanan Supangkat, Director, PT Mulia Knitting Factory was not able to make up. However at the same time, he had deputed his representative Mr. Benny. Mr. Diven Dembla, Past President, ITAMMA welcomed the Guest of Honour, Mr. Prabir Bhattacharya, while Mr. S. Senthil Kumar, Past President, ITAMMA welcomed Miss. Aida Noor, Director President, Pt. Sekawani and Mr. Mahesh P. Shah, Chairman, Members' Engagement Sub-Committee, ITAMMA welcomed Mr. Paul Kingsen with a flower bouquet, while Mr. Kaizar Z. Mahuwala, President, ITAMMA offered Memento to Mr. Prabir Bhattacharya and Mr. Benny.

Group photo of ITAMMA members and the delegates

Mr. Prabir Bhattacharya, Attche (Commercial), Embassy of India was invited as the Guest of Honour, who mentioned about the various opportunities for Indian companies for interacting with the Indonesia companies during the programmes organized by Indian Embassy at Indonesia. He also interacted with many of the ITAMMA members and invited them to participate in these events organized by the Indian Embassy at Indonesia which shall help the Indian companies for establishing and grow their business in Indonesia. He also mentioned about the growth of Indian companies especially machine and component manufacturers in Indonesian Textile Industry, and informed that the textile industrialists of Indonesia are satisfied with the quality and delivery of spare parts and components from India. The event was concluded with a Vote of Thanks delivered by Mr. J. M. Balaji, Chairman, Events & Publications Sub-Committee.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Meera At ITM 2018 :Innovative and Futuristic Twisting Solutions for Carpets, Ropes and Industrial Sewing Threads Meera Industries Limited, INDIA is going to exhibit its latest innovative yarn twisting solutionsfor 1000+ denier range at ITM 2018 which will be held in Istanbul during 14th to 17th April, 2018 at Hall No. 3, Stall No. 318B.

Setting machines For PP, PES, PA, Acrylic all under one roof.Being pioneers of many of these machines in India, Meera's technology compares very favorablyto European Machines but with extremely competitive pricing.

Meera Industries Limited, an ISO 9001 company known for innovating new twisting technologiesand providing customized solutions has a complete range of Carpet Yarn Twisting, Cabling,Continuous Bulking and Heat

Uses of Yarns has gone beyond Fashion to more course, sensitive, functional and high strengthneeds. Demands from Technical textile areas like Geotech, Medtech, Biotech, Spacetech,Automotive, Safety, Military are unique, unconventional, and and with project size not so big. AtMeera We feel proud to innovate, customize and give Futuristic solution to our customermeeting the high international standard of economics, ergonomics and energy savings. Meera isgoing to exhibit few of its most innovative products at the ITM show.

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NEWS T-50 | Transformative Innovation for the Sewing Thread Industry. Single Step, S/Z Twisting Machines upto 4 PLY and denier rage of 1000-20000. We Made IT FIRST. Strength and stability of sewing threads comes from S/Z Twisting of any Yarn. Present system of Three Steps for making S/Z twisting are quite lengthy, cumbersome and highly labour oriented. The process becomes even more unproductive and wasteful when it comes to S/Z the course denier like 1000 and above. T-50Meera's new innovation is a perfect solution where one can make S/Z Twisting for denier upto 20000 and Ply up to 4 in Just One Step. T-50 has much more diversified features and multiple uses. Come and witness at Hall No. 3, Stall No. 318B one of its kind twisting machine which is going to disrupt the sewing application for coarse denier applications like Fish Net, Tirecord, High Tenacity

Threads, High Strength Sewing Thread for Geotextile, Industrial Bags, Flat Web, Web Slings, Tarps, Hose Reinforcement, Wire and Cable Applications, Synthetic Turf, Outdoor Athletic Gear and Many More. Single Step , T-50 will surprise not only for its optimum cost to performance ratio and ease of work, but also for first of its kind uniform twisting quality at secondary twist ensuring enhanced sewing experience with fewer breaks. Other Innovative Products on the Show will be Fiberglass Twister, PP Twister, Carpet Yarn Twister, Continuous Heat set and Bulking Machine. Meera industries Limited has a subsidiary in NC, USA for closely working with their customers in USA, Canada and Latin America. Apart from spares, sales and service support the USA facility has many latest models on display and customer can also visit us for various small lot productions and new developments. By 2019 Meera is planning to start similar operations in Europe and Middle East.

Mr. Vilas V. Gharat Felicitated by V.J.T.I. Mr. Gharat has been felicitated during VASTRA '18 by VJTI for completion of 50years in passing out from VJTI& active working in the industry for 50 years continuously.

Commercial Advisor in J.K. Cotton Mills; Kanpur, Manager in NTC, General Manger in MSTC, CEO in Bostan (Nigeria), Senior President in MorarjeeBrembana and then he has occupied the independent top authority as Senior President in S. Kumars Pvt. Ltd.

Mr. Gharat is being felicitated by Mr. G. V. Aras

Mr. Vilas Gharat, son of Ex Indian Army Man is a Textile Engineer and Diploma in Industrial Management in 1968 from VJTI, Mumbai.

He is the recipient of Best Vendor's Award from Jonson & Jonson in MSTC, Best General Manger Award in MSTC, Gold Medal for Energy Saving and Fellowship of Textile Association (FTA) from The Textile Association (India).He is Patron Member of The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit. He has a hobby of teaching & mentoring youth of India and Cricket.

He has a wide experience of more than 50 years' service in reputed Composite Textile Mills. He has started his career with leading industrial house as Spinning Master in aThackersey Group Company.

Presently Mr. Gharat is a Group Advisor for S. Kumars Pvt. Ltd., Executive Director in Suvin Advisors and Managing Director of Gharat& Associates.

With his skill and talent in work experience he elevated to various responsible positions such as Technical &

Mr. Gharat is now the President of The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit for theterm 2017-2019.

March - April 2018

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Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Mr. Gharat independently started & worked successfully for new projects and renovated the mills. He established many new milestones in quality & productivity.


NEWS

Must-have testing for staple and filament yarns USTER's new tensile test system meets spinners' need to assure smooth yarn performance in downstream processes There is one essential requirement for any yarn, whether staple or filament: it must be strong enough to cope with the rigors of downstream processes, without causing production stoppages. High-speed weaving and knitting put yarns under powerful stresses and strains, so they need to meet the strength and elongation standards for subsequent processes and the required end-uses. The new USTER®TENSORAPID 5 deliversaccurate and effective tensile testing performance that yarn producers can rely on. No matter what the demands of the fabric end-use, minimum strength and elongation properties are needed to prevent a yarn breaking or being damaged in downstream operations. The USTER ® TENSORAPID 5 offers testing of all kind of yarns. For over 50 years, the USTER® TENSORAPID has been renowned through the industry for its high precision and reliability.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

PUTR5d7146

Accurate measurements combined with smart solu-

tions Operating according globally-accepted standards for both staple and filament yarn parameters, the USTER®TENSORAPID 5 is a universal strength and elongation tester, with a testing speed that is steplessly adjustable between 50 and 5000 mm/min. With a 500 N or 1500 N measuring head, the instrument covers the complete range of force and elongation testing, including all known tensile test procedures. Measurements and results comply with all the international standards, including ISO, ASTM, BISFA and Chinese test organizations. Data also integrates directly with the acknowledged global textile quality benchmarks, the USTER®STATISTICS. The fast-moving nature of the textile industry increases the demands on quality control systems. To stay competitive, yarn producers constantly seek for new yarn structures, core yarns with a high elastane content, for example. These innovations also bring extra challenges 436

for quality control instruments. But the USTER®TENSORAPID 5 is ideally equipped to cope: this USTER® strength tester has the flexibility to measure all kind of yarns. Its wide range of force and elongation testing possibilities covers all known tensile test procedures and tensile values. The USTER®TENSORAPID 5 has an automatic function with the capability of handling 40 samples. In case of a problem during feeding, the test continues and the customer has the option to repeat the missing position at a later stage. This ensures a high sample throughput, user friendliness and test efficiency. The USTER®TENSORAPID 5 is configured for ergonomic sample preparation on the side which makes it fastest and most convenient for the operator. Vertical yarn guides allow for user-friendly operation. A limit editor shows the essential information, focusing on exceptions and outliers - ideal for presenting the most important details at a single glance. Customized reports and long-term reports are in line with the well-known USTER®TESTER 6 user interface. Comprehensive process control Integration of results with USTER®TESTER 6 allows users to profit from intelligent alarms through the Total Testing Center. Smart reports integrate results from both evenness and tensile tests, providing an overview of the quality being produced. This enables fast reaction by the Quality Manager, to minimize complaints. The result is a complete mill quality system, integrating data from fiber, yarn and tensile testing procedures, both in the laboratory and in-process from the USTER®QUANTUM 3 yarn clearers. USTER®TENSORAPID 5 is the must-have tensile testing system for staple yarn producers who are committed to the USTER approach of 'managing a spinning mill with quality in mind' for the ultimate satisfaction of their customers downstream. Tailor-made for filament The specific needs of filament yarn producers are related to the continuing development of new products and application areas in demanding sectors such as technical textiles, as well as in apparel and home textiles. The USTER® TENSORAPID 5-C is tailored specifically to high-precision filament testing, incorporating unique software covering the essential quality factors of strength and elongation. Information about the first break of a filament helps spinners guarantee high speeds March - April 2018


NEWS in subsequent processes. The determination of yield point and natural draw ratio particularly help POY yarn producers to reduce claims.

tomorrow's industry" says Gabriela Peters, Product Manager Yarn Testing, within Uster Technologies.

The newly developed USTERÂŽ TENSORAPID 5 for staple yarn and theUSTERÂŽ TENSORAPID 5-C for filament yarn play a vital role in the drive for improved handling efficiencies and precisely-specified yarn profiling between mills and their customers, through their capacity, precision and reliability. "Tensile testing has been used in textiles since the earliest days of the industry and it will doubtlessly be important in the future.

Media contact: Edith Aepli On behalf of USTER Marketing Service Uster Technologies AG Sonnenbergstrasse 10 CH - 8610 Uster / Switzerland Direct +41 43 366 38 80 Mobile +41 79 916 02 91 Fax +41 43 366 39 58 E-mail publicrelation@uster.com www.uster.com

With the new generation of tensile tester we are convinced we have products tailor-made for today's and

TRIBUTE

ArunDate,a son of wellknownclassical music conLate Shri Arun Date noisseur Shri Ramubhaiya Date, born on 04th May 1934 at Indore. Arun's true name is Arvind. Since he called 'Aru' at home, during 'Bhavsargam' Program he became singer Arun Date. He started singing on air from 1955. His father Ramubhaiyya was a government officer (IAS) in Indore and was part of Marathi literary and music circles. He encouraged his children, Arun and Ravi, to learn music. Arun Date's brother, Ravi Date, is a well-known tabla player. His initial education was in Maharaja Shivajirao High School and Holkar College, Indore. Then he studied in Textile Engineering College, Veer Jijabai Technological Institute (VJTI), Mumbai and holds B.Textin 1960. He started his career with working in textile mills. He worked with CIMMCO and reputed textile mills like Mafatlal's Standard Mills, TATA Group Mills etc. and then he worked with ATE. After that again he joined CIMMCO and in 19687 he left the textiles. He was very intelligent and wide experienced hard technocrat. Arun Date left his high-profile job after 28 years of service for pursuing career in singing. The song "Shukratara" was adjudged as song of the month by Mumbai Radio Station in 1962 and remains one of the March - April 2018

most popular song in contemporary Marathi culture. Arun Date wasfamous for non-film 'Bhavgeet' (lyrical poetry) songs, had crooned numbers like "Shukratara" and "Ya Janmavar", which became very popular among people. Arun Date was the first recipient of the state government's Gajananrav Vatave Purskar.Arun Date was adept in singing in Hindi and Urdu but was made to sing in Marathi when he became associated with the Mumbai radio station. Arun Date had performed more than 2000 concerts in India and abroad. He has several cassettes and albums of his songs in Marathi and Gazals in Hindi & Urdu. Arun Date was also actively associated with the textile industry and the professionals of Textiles. He was one of the guests in Textile Past Students Association (TPSA) of VJTI in get-together program in 1996 and Shri Khare Sir requested him to sing a few lines of his songs, he sang his famous song "Swar Gangechya Kathavarti.The Textile Association (India) once invited him as a Guest on 09-04-2014 for Platinum Jubilee function. Arun Date was a famous Singer artist and elevated in his success in all respect. He earnedwealth, popularity, Position, honour, reputation etc., He was humble in his attitude & had been very kind to all.Arun Date said that "Humanity is superior to any other Arts". He had written his biography "Shatada Prem Karave" in 1995. A big salute to him. The Textile Association (India) offers condolence and pray almighty to rest eternal peace to the departed souls. 437

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Shri ARUN DATEknown for his popular song "Shukratara",passed away at the aged 84 years, at his residence on 06th May, 2018, who survived by his sonMr. Atul, daughter in law and Grandson.


NEWS

Indian Leader ICC Ltd. Shifts Production to Himachal Plant ◆

Himachal Pradesh plant equipped with state-ofthe-art manufacturing technology Move strategic to keep up with developments for high speed cards To launch new products which improve life and surface technology of cards

The company is also in the process of further automating the plant with more advanced technologies, probably unseen in this industry. Additionally, some of the machinery from the Pune plant will be moved to Himachal Pradesh, as a lot of innovation in flexible card clothing products has been done in the Pune plant.

63-years old and NSE as well as BSE-listed Indian leader in card clothing products and card room accessories for the textile spinning industry, ICC Ltd is entirely shifting production to its already existing state-ofthe-art manufacturing facility in Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh. In doing so, ICC has closed down its Pune plant, which was manufacturing card clothing since more than six decades.

"This move to consolidate production under one roof will also enable ICC to improve on time and in full delivery parameters, thereby adding value for our esteemed customers, with better delivery lead times.However, our corporate functions will still operate from the Pune office and we will try to better customer delight, in terms of service and quality," Mr Vazhapulli informed.

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ICC has closed the Pune plant through an amicable settlement with workers, many of whom have been working at the plant since more than 35 years. It has taken the interest of all the workers working in the Pune plant into consideration, while negotiating the settlement.

ICC Himachal Plant

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

"The move is strategic, since the Pune plant is 63 years old and was primarily engaged in manufacturing card clothing catering to the low speed and low throughput carding machines segment, while the market is now gradually shifting towards high speed and high throughput carding machines," Mr. Vinod Vazhapulli, CEO at ICC said. "Being a pioneer in the industry, ICC foresaw this shift in market behaviour nine years back, when we started our facility in Himachal Pradesh. We have installed the most advanced machines which cater to precision manufacturing and highly evolved production technologies," he added. The Himachal Pradesh plant currently specialises in addressing the card clothing requirement of the latest generation of carding machines. With the strategic move of closing down the Pune facility, ICC will now be focusing production from that plant and ensure that this single plant caters to the whole range of ICC's card clothing market. 438

In the next six months, the company is planning to come up with an array of products targeting high speed carding machines with improved life and surface technology and also, productivity enhancers in the carding equipment and accessoriessegments. All these products are currently undergoing the process of Beta validation at various customer plants and are expected to be commercially launched in the market within the next six months, in readiness for ITMA 2019 in Barcelona. For more details contact: Media Contacts: ICC Ltd Mr Prasad Mahale Vice President - Sales & Marketing Mob: +91 932 599 8433 Email: pmahale@cardindia.com http://www.cardindia.com Arun Rao Founder Taurus Communications Ahmedabad, India Mob: +91 982 503 8518 Email: arun@tauruscomm.net March - April 2018


NEWS

Kusters Calico inaugurates new upgraded manufacturing facility ◆ ◆

Rs 10 crores already invested with Rs 5 crores more allocated in 2018 New facility to help timely delivery of high quality German technologies Targets revenue of Rs 120 crores as against Rs 85 crores now

Kusters Calico Machinery Pvt. Ltd. (KCM), a producer and exporter of open width wet textile processing machines for both woven and knitted fabrics, inaugurated its upgraded manufacturing facility on April 11, 2018. With this new upgraded manufacturing facility, KCM aims to provide timely delivery and high quality German products to customers in India and abroad. With strong backing of its German parent, the Jagenberg Group, which now holds 100% controlling stake in Kusters Calico since February 2018. KCM started the upgradationexercise two years back and has invested close to Rs. 10 crores, with plans to invest another Rs. 5 crores in 2018. Now, the company has set a goal to reach revenues of Rs 120 crores in the next few years, as against Rs 85 crores currently.The inaugural function was graced by Shri Rajendra Trivedi, Hon'ble Speaker, Gujarat Legislative Assembly, Shri MansukhVasava, Member of Parliament and Shri Satish Patel, Ex Member of Gujarat Legislative Assembly.The function was also attended by Dr. Erich Broeker, Group CEO, Jagenberg AG and Managing Director Kleinewefers GmbH, Germany, Mr Sushil Verma, Managing Director, Kusters Calico Machinery Pvt. Ltd and employees of KCM. Under the upgradation program, KCM has constructed a new 22,000 sq. feet assembly shed, one double column 4 metre x 1.5 metre 4 axis rotating head machining centre, converted all lathe machines to CNC and March - April 2018

commissioned separate blasting and painting booths, for both MS and SS. Also, successfully commissioned SAP B1, HRMS and PLM software. These are just a few of the more than 100 projects, KCM has initiated. "KCM has always strived to offer better products and services to its customers and has been working to further improve various processes, infrastructure, facilities to upgrade our product range to meet customer expectations and requirements of high end technologies. This new upgraded facility will help better all the above and more," Mr Sushil Verma, Managing Director at KCM said. In textile wet processing machines, KCM manufactures Washing, Dyeing, Bleaching, Singeing, Mercerizing, Finishing, Desizing and Dye Padders. It also manufactures Converting machines for Coating and Lamination lines, which are used, for converting plastic films or foils to packaging material or for further processing by creating barriers for air, moisture and light by coating with various materials. KCM has installed around 500 wet processing textile machinery in various countries worldwide, which includes Germany, Turkey, Russia, USA, Middle East, Egypt, Iran, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Africa besides selling to all major textile companies in India. This year KCM is exploring markets in other countries like Uzbekistan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar. In coming years, several Jagenberg AG Group companies want to introduce their products in India and Kusters Calico is evaluating the manufacturing of these products in India under the 'Make in India' concept of our Hon'ble Prime Minister. This will further increase the production capacity of KCM in coming years. For more details please visit http://www.kuesterscalico.com Media Contacts: ChiragChitroda Kusters Calico Machinery Pvt. Ltd. Mob: +91 957 400 0610 Email: CChitroda@kuesters-calico.com Arun Rao Taurus Communications Ahmedabad Mob: +91 982 503 8518 Email: arun@tauruscomm.net 439

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NEWS

Rieter Compact Spinning System at Nitin Spinners Ltd. Nearly 85 top executives of leading spinning mills of India followed the Nitin Spinners Ltd. and Rieter invitation to have a close impression of complete system installation of Rieter compact spinning machine. This two day event the participants had the opportunity to have deep interactions on advantages of Rieter Systems.

Profitability and Payback with a complete Rieter compact spinning system. In addition to these countable benefits, the easy cooperation with one single responsible supplier from sales to successful operation was demonstrated. Visit to Nitin Spinners Ltd. The highlight of the two day event was a special visit to Nitin Spinners Ltd. where the participants could experience a live demonstration by state of the art Nitin Spinners Ltd, Bhilwara. The live demonstration and explanations highlighted the true benefits of the complete Rieter compact spinning system.

Rieter Conference at Darbar Hall, Udaipur

Guests at Nitin Spinners Ltd. The highlight of the two day event was a special visit to Nitin Spinners Ltd. where the participants could experience a live demonstration by state of the art Nitin Spinners Ltd, Bhilwara. The live demonstration and explanations highlighted the true benefits of the complete Rieter compact spinning system.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Mr.Prasanta-Kumar Deka addressing on Rieter

The event began with a splendid get-together of all guests in Udaipur at Fateh Prakash Palace where the history-soaked interiors and the armoury of the Mewar dynasty took everyone to the great historic times. The evening began with an entertainment and cultural show at historic Jagmandir Island Palace where Mughal emperor Shah Jahan stayed himself and imbibed several ideas for the world known TajMahal. The intercession of all guests further added delight to the show. The next day began with a Rieter conference and a visit to Nitin Spinners Ltd. During the conference, Rieter experts provided an overview about the entire product range which customers were to experience at Nitin Spinners during the visit. The emphasis was on discussion on project feasibilities with insights on Investments, 440

The presence of eminent executives enlightened the event and generated an opportunity to have direct and close interaction with entire Rieter&Nitin Spinner's team and experience the benefits of being in partnership with Rieter. The event harvested a huge response and the participants got familiar with Rieter's know-how on technological innovations in the spinning industry. For further information, please contact: Maschinenfabrik Rieter AG Selma Wobben Marketing Rieter Machines & Systems T +41 52 208 76 38 / F +41 52 208 80 61 E-mail: selma.wobben@rieter.com, Website: www.rieter.com March - April 2018


NEWS

Saurer launches the innovative Allma Techno Corder TC2

For the first time Saurer Twisting Solutions will exhibit the AllmaTechnoCorder TC2 at the Tire Technology Expo. The high-performance two-for-one twisting machine has been optimized for the production of tire cord. Visitors will be shown the multistage twisting process of hybrid yarns for the carcass and cap ply as well as the production of chafer material.

Allma Cable Corder CC4 - Direct cabling machine with patented energy saving technology

Further innovative developments at the Allma Cable Corder are the production of balanced 3-ply tire cord as well as the possibility to produce hybrid yarns both in the two-for-one and cabling process. TheAllmaCableCorder CC4 with patented energy saving technology stands for highest efficiency.The cabling machine, which has been awarded the Saurer EÂł label for triple added value, has won over the market. The innovative technology allows for energy cost savings of up to 50 percent and reduces the number of yarn breaks by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, it offers low noise emission and simple ma-chine handling. The Saurer trade fair team takes pleasure in welcoming its customers and interested visitors to booth 4016and informing them on the future twisting and cabling technology. Media contacts: Gerd PĂśhlmann Senior Vice President, Sales & Marketing Saurer Technologies GmbH & Co. KG Twisting Solutions Weeserweg 60 47804 Krefeld T +49 2151 717-01 gerd.poehlmann@saurer.com Karl-Heinz Sandholzer Vice President, Product Management Saurer Technologies GmbH & Co. KG Twisting Solutions Leonhardstr. 19 87437 Kempten T +49 831 688-0 karl-heinz.sandholzer@saurer.com

Texttreasure "Many of life's failures are experienced by people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." Allma Techno Corder TC2 Two-for-one twisting machine for technical yarns March - April 2018

- Thomas Edison 441

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The Tire Technology Expo 2018takes place from 20 to 22 February 2018 in Hanover and offers visitors the world's premier technology showcase with exhibits of equipment and materials covering the complete spectrum of the tire manufacturing process. The Saurer trade fair team will welcome you at booth 4016 in hall 20 and looks forward to presenting you the AllmaTechnoCorderTC2 as innovative machine for tire cord production as well as latest developments in the tire cord twisting and cabling processes.


NEWS

Saurer Spinning Solutions with a premiere at the ITM 2018: Zinser 72XL linked with Autoconer X6 At the ITM 2018 in Istanbul, Zinser and Schlafhorst will be presenting their innovative linked winding solution for ring spinning to the global public for the first time. Saurer Spinning Solutions is represented in hall 3 with machines and services at booth 311B and with components at booth 303B. Autoconer X6 - Flow into the future With the new Autoconer X6, Schlafhorst is presenting a quantum leap in process automation to the global public at the ITM. The revolutionary Bobbin Cloud material flow system with intelligent data management ensures maximum flow rates and minimum personnel requirements. The Autoconer X6 opens up a new dimension of efficiency with smart technology: The new, E3-certified generation offers sensationally low resource consumption, palpable productivity advantages and even more ergonomic handling. With the Bobbin Cloud material flow system based on the latest RFID technology, the Autoconer X6 guarantees maximum process reliability thanks to clever, software-controlled material management.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Zinser 72XL ring spinning machine The Zinser 72XL is a highly productive ring and compact spinning machine for large spinning mills which intend to increase their rate of return by making production particularly economical. The Zinser 72XL clearly shows its advantages in almost all applications: in ring and compact yarns of any fineness as well as in fancy and special yarns. Equipped with up to 2,016 highspeed spindles, the Zinser 72XL reduces production costs by up to 11% and the required floor space by up to 22%. Rotor spinning - Highly productive with a view to the future Thanks to its single spinning position technology, achieving previously unattained rotor speeds of up to 180,000 rpm and up to 720 spinning positions, the Autocoro 9 delivers highly productive technical superiority. At the same time, intelligently automated processes and lean maintenance reduce maintenance costs by up to 60% and energy consumption by up to 25%. The new semi-automatic BD 7 machine is also in a league of its own. It offers convincing performance with all package sizes up to 320 mm diameter due to cross-wound packages in Autocoro quality. The BD 7 442

reduces spinning costs and increases profitability with energy consumption savings up to 10% and rapid takeoff speeds of 230 m/min for all machine lengths. Components for the best yarn quality With more than 80 years of market leadership in textile machine components in the area of spinning, today Texparts is able to offer you the basis for the production of high-quality staple fibre yarns. ThePK 2630 SE weighting arm series for ring spinning machines is the most versatile on the market and, together with Accotex cots and aprons as drafting system, offers the optimum solution for all yarn types in the short staple fibre range. Accotex offers a wide range of cot hardness to meet all customer needs. Saurer is also presenting components from Temco, Daytex and Fibervision. The brands are technology leaders in their respective sectors and offer high-quality solutions for the processing and monitoring of filament fibres and yarns. SUN - SERVICE UNLIMITED - Competent service for our customers The Saurer service station in the middle of the pulsating textile district of Kahramanmara? is comprehensively equipped and offers customers there service on their doorstep: 60 trained members of staff are on hand to look after all of the Turkish customers' needs. Thanks to the expanded spare parts warehouse, they can now immediately supply the spinning mills with genuine spare parts if need be. On the Autocoro 8 rotor spinning machine installed there, our team of experts produces sample spinnings directly on site. Saurer has further expanded its service network with the service station in Kahramanmara?. 20 service stations now offer customers worldwide service with lightning-fast response times and unique features, such as the unprecedented Life Cycle Innovation Management Programme. Visit at the ITM 2018 in Istanbul, 14 - 17 April 2018 - Hall 3, Booths 311B and 303B. Media contact PiaTerasa VP Marketing Saurer Spinning Solutions T + 41 71 987 43 66 pia.terasa@saurer.com March - April 2018


NEWS

SMIT Presents Brand-New-Products SMIT GS980 The fastest free flight rapier machine of the market in Hall 2 Booth 215A On the occasion of ITM 2018 SMIT is proud to present the brand-new model of the GS900 series released after the entrance in SANTEX RIMAR GROUP: SMIT GS980.

always been a reference for the market and with the new SMIT GS980 we will surely continue to exploit this advantage. The general trend of moving towards productions of higher quality fabrics is already happeningand some of our customers at the moment are exploiting some market niches where they can find more profitability: in these circumstances our new SMIT GS980 is the right technology for forward momentum. Thanks to SANTEX RIMAR GROUP combined knowhow we are committed to innovation and machinery improvement, considering the whole complementary processes and specific customers' needs.

New SMIT GS980 is the fastest free flight rapier machine of the market and has improved in terms of versatility, performance, production quality, efficiency and sustainability. The free flight ribbons system marks out SMIT weaving machine since years: smart and flexible, SMIT GS980 has been designed and manufactured in Italy combining some of the most reliable SMIT features with groundbreaking function solutions that make SMIT GS980 an asset that will keep its value for a long time. Fabrics for apparel, home textile, technical applications and exclusive yarns and patterns can today be woven with excellent quality on SMIT GS980. 2018 represents a significant milestone for SMIT which celebrates 80 years after the foundation in 1938. The machine name has been given after the 80th anniversary of SMIT which was founded in Italy and soon turned out to be an estimated leading manufacturer of weaving machines. SMIT GS980 will bring more value to our customers and the best ratio between productivity versus running costs. At our booth we will be weaving denim, curtains and our famous high-quality terry towel fabric" says Simone Rancan, SMIT CEO, who concludes: "The quality of the fabric produced with our machines has March - April 2018

SANTEX RIMAR GROUP is one of the leading players in the world market of machine manufacturers for weaving, textile finishing, nonwovens, technical textiles and green technologies for water treatment and drying processes. As a technology partner for weaving, knitted, woven fabrics and green solutions the Group started as different companies that in 2015 have evolved into SANTEX RIMAR GROUP: Smit is globally recognized as a forerunner in weaving technology; Cavitec and Isotex lead the technical textile machinery market; Has, Santex and SperottoRimar produce machinery for textile finishing; Solwa provides eco-friendly machinery for water treatment and waste management. With more than 100 years of activity the Group has the experience to be innovative yet offer reliability, premium quality and return of investment for customers. SantexRimar Group is present in Italy, Switzerland, China and India and has more than 30,000 customers throughout the world. SANTEX RIMAR GROUP Headquarters LocalitĂ Colombara 50 36070 Trissino (Vicenza) - Italy press@santexrimar.com info@santexrimar.com www.santexrimar.com

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During the tradeshow it will be possible to see SMIT GS980 for the first time and meet our staff. VISIT AT ITM 2018 FROM APRIL 14 TO 17 IN ISTANBUL: HALL 2, BOOTH 215A VISIT SANTEX RIMAR GROUP: HALL 12, BOOTH 1206


NEWS

SVITT successfully organized TEXCON 2018 Shri Vaishnav Institute of Textile Technology (SVITT) organized 2 days national Conference TEXCON 2018 on 09th - 10th March 2018 at SVVV Campus, IndoreUjjain Road, Indore (M.P.) Development is a continuous process which can be achieved through sharing of Knowledge, Interactions among each other and with teamwork. TEXCON-2018 was aimed at bringing together the entire extended textile fraternity on one platform for the intellectual interface of varied domains. This has also widened the interaction between the academia and industry. Moreover, this conference has explored the new areas of much needed innovative approaches for making the society a better version for the future generations. Each delegate has shared their experiences and discussed the practical challenges and solutions that can be adopted. Day 1 - 9th March 2018 - Inaugural Session

L to R: Prof. T. K. Sinha, Prof. (Dr.) UpinderDhar, Smt. Smita

Bharadwaj (IAS), Hon. Purushottamdas Pasari, and Shri Kamal Narayan Bhuraria

The inaugural ceremony commenced with the lamp lighting ceremony by a group of dignitaries - Smt. Smita Bharadwaj (IAS), M.P. Financial corporation, Hon'able Purushottamdas Pasari, Chancellor Shri Vaishnav Vidyapeeth Vishwavidyalaya, Dr. Upinder Dhar, Vice Chancellor Shri Vaishnav Vidyapeeth Vishwavidyalaya, Shri Kamal Narayan Bhuraria, Honorary Secretary Shri Vaishnav Vidyapeeth Trust, Prof. T. K Sinha, Director in-charge Coordinator Shri Vaishnav Institute of Textile Technology (SVITT), SVVV. Dr. UpinderDhar formally welcomed all the dignitaries and the participants from the various part of the country. He highlighted the need and requirement of innovation in the current scenario.Shri. Purushottamdas Pasari congratulated the organizing committee of TEXCON - 2018 that has provided a platform to the academia and industry to present their research work and helped everybody to gain the knowledge.Prof. T. K. Sinha then introduced TEXCON - 2018, highlighted the schedule of two days of the conference, including the number of research papers, plenary sessions, and concurrent sessions.Smt. SmitaBharadwaj, the chief guest on the occasion, congratulated everybody for organizing TEXCON - 2018 and appreciated the various research works for the benefit of the society. She emphasized on projects related to sericulture of silk, handlooms products, etc. She also told about the role of her office for the development of the overall textile industry. At the end, Shri Kamal Narayan Bhuradia proposed the vote of thanks.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Plenary Session-I: Advances in Textile Engineering and Garment & Fashion Technology. In plenary session-I, four eminent speakers have delivered their lecture. Dr. R. Chattopadhyay, Professor, Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, had presented a paper on the objective design methodologies using modern scientific principles and tools of engineering to develop textile products for more objective in nature. Chief Guest Smt. Smita Bharadwaj (IAS) is addressing the audience in the TEXCON - 2018 Inaugural Session 444

Dr. Subrata Ghosh, Professor, Department of Textile Technology, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar, National Institute of March - April 2018


NEWS

Dr. Swapan Kumar Ghosh, Professor, Department of Jute and Fibre Technology, University ofCalcutta, West Bengal, India, talked about the open weave geotextiles (Soil Saver) in geotechnical constructions with different parameters of design concerning the protection of hill slope along with the comparative analysis to show their potential and techno-economic viability. Dr. Prabir Jana, Professor, National Institute of Fashion Technology, New Delhi, had presented paper with the megatrend in apparel manufacturing with the global industry which is moving towards big data and analytics, autonomous robots, computerized simulation, industrial internet of things (IOT), the cloud, additive manufacturing, augmented reality, and artificial intelligence.

textile & clothing industry to go for ecologically sustainable business practices. Concurrent Technical Session - 1: Advances in Textile Chemistry A number of papers were presented on the theme of "Advances in Textile Chemistry". Some of the important papers are: ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

Ayurvastra: Ayurvedic Medicated Textiles Surface Treatment on Cotton Fabric by RF- Glow Discharge Plasma Plasma Technology in Textile Effect of Oxidizing and Reducing Agents on Wool Fabric Water-less Dyeing Development of Natural Dyes from Almond Hull &Babula Seeds Inspection of Compatibility of Madder and Henna Dye on Silk 3D Body Scanning Technology with Application to Fashion Industry

Plenary Session-II: Advances in Chemical Processing, Technical Textile & Textile Management

In plenary session-II, three eminent speakers have delivered their lecture.

Concurrent Technical Session - 2: Advances in Fiber Science and Technical Textile.

Dr. Ashis Kumar Samanta, Professor, Department of Jute and Fibre Technology, Institute of Jute Technology, University of Calcutta, had presented a paper on eco-friendly dyeing with natural dyes and finishing of cotton, silk and jute. Different scientific aspects of natural dyeing of natural fibres like cotton, jute and silk have been described here. A series of work on the scientific and technological aspects of natural dyeing on cotton, jute and silk have been carried and their test results are discussed with the emphasis upon the se-up of BIS, ISO standard for the same.

Few of the important papers presented in this session are: ◆ Extraction of Okra Fibre ◆ A Little Narrative about Centrifugal Spinning ◆ Effect of Carbon Fiber in Automotive Textiles ◆ Solar Curtain ◆ Sustainable Technical Textile Products Through Green Manufacturing ◆ A Review of EPS Geofoam Manufacturing and Market in India ◆ Software and Textile ◆ Impact of process parameters on the nonwoven needle punched fabric properties

Dr. MilindKoranne, Associate Professor, is from Textile Engineering Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara. He presented a paper about the development of a weaving machine to produce desired 3D shapes through modification of a shuttle loom. Instead of straight and parallel reed wires, each reed wire was given a specific curvature depending upon shape profile to produce 3D shaped textile products in his presentation. Mr. R. P. Gautam, Textile Consultant Indore, had talked about the paradigm shift in leading the cost management of textile industry. Since the impact on the environment by textile & clothing industry is affecting the water and energy consumption and also in terms of discharge of effluents. He emphasized the demands of March - April 2018

Cultural Night on 9th March 2018 in TEXCON - 2018 445

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Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab, had explained the fabrication of an instrument to measure the heat flow behaviour and design of a quilt which is suitable for the use in a cold climate.


NEWS Those concurrent sessions were followed by student poster session, cultural program, and conference dinner. Day 2 - 10th March 2018 Plenary Session-III: Advances in Fiber Science, Technical Textile & Inter-disciplinary In plenary session-III, four eminent speakers have delivered their talk. A brief overview is depicted below. Dr. Mangla Joshi, Professor, Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, had presented a paper on Nanofibers and polymer nanocompositefibres. She explained in details about the applications of nano-finish, nanofibres, nano-coatings and nano-composites in improving the characteristic of textile products. Dr. Ravindra V. Adivarekar, Professor, Department of Fibres and Textile Processing Technology,Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, had given a clear overview about the application of biotechnology in the textile processing in general and enzymatic processing in particular with the focus to understand the gaps to be filled by biotechnological research.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Dr. Hireni R. Mankodi, Associate Professor, from Department of Textile, The M.S University of Baroda, Vadodara, had delivered a lecture on the thermoplastic laminate development. She also described the fabrication of different types of preforms using different material and possible structures to improve the mechanical properties of laminates for thermoplastic composite. Dr. G. K Tyagi, Director, The Technological Institute of Textile & Sciences, Bhiwani, has enriched this session with a paper on ring spinning variants. This paper was presented by Dr. Amal Chaudhary on behalf of Dr. G. K. Tyagi. Various modifications and innovations of ring spinning frame which has led to the emergence of various ring spinning variants with focus on the major technological developments were discussed in this paper. Plenary Session - IV: Inter-disciplinary Approaches in Textile and Textile Management In plenary session-IV, two eminent speakers have delivered their talk along with two industrial participa446

tion. A brief overview is depicted below. Dr. PiyaliBasak, Assistant Professor, School of Bioscience and Engineering, Jadavpur University was the first speaker of IVth session. She has presented a paper on bio-decolourization of Azo Dyes with the help of Microbes and explained in details about the direct and indirect adverse effects of these toxic elements on the ecology and human life. She also suggested possible bio-remediation to remove such harmful elements through microorganisms. Dr. RoliPurwar, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi, has given an overview of the innovative method related to the development of silk-based skin tissue engineering materials through electro-spinning method. She explained fabrication of electrospun mats using non-mulberry silk fibroin as a skin tissue engineering material. Dr. N. N.Mahapatra,President, Colorant Ltd, Mumbai, gave his talk about the various techniques related to the processing of automotive fabrics and use of polyester multifilament air-jet textured yarn either in woven or knitted fabric to produce automotive materials. Mr. Awadhesh Sharma, Hon. JointSecretary, The Textile Association(India) - Central Office, has shared his knowledge and ideas related to dreams of beginners in the textile industry and facts related to work in Indian Textile Industry. Concurrent Technical Session - 3: Advances in Textile Engineering and Technical Textile In this session, the theme of papers presented was 'Advances in Textile Engineering and Technical Textile'. Few of them are: ◆ Application of Health Monitoring of Structures Using Piezo Transducer in Knitted Fabric ◆ Increasing the Productivity by Time and Motion Study in Garment Industry ◆ Comfort Characteristics of Active Sportswear ◆ An Approach for Energy Conservation in Spinning Mills ◆ Effect of Sewing Process on Tensile Properties of Sewing Threads in Denim Garment ◆ Comparative Study of Knitted Fabrics In Term of Mechanical Properties Made by Ring and Rotor Yarn March - April 2018


NEWS ◆ ◆

Training for Women Entrepreneurship ThroughKhadiGramoudyog Automation in Garment Industry

Concurrent Technical Session - 4: Advances in Technical Textile

Total no. of invited lectures were 14 and industrial presentation 2. Total no. of total entries was 50, out of which 24 entries were selected for Oral presentation and 8 for poster presentation. ◆

Maharshi from SVVV, Indore got best poster award and Sunny Kakade (3rd Year, SVITT, SVVV) was the runner-up in the poster session. In the Oral presentation, NayanseeRai and Tanmay Sharma (SVITT, SVVV, Indore) got the 1st place, Dhyaneshwar B. Chaudhari (CTF, NMIMS, Shirpur) got the 2nd place, and Aditi Joshi and Prachi Tiwari (SVITT, SVVV, Indore) got 3rd place. Students were also encouraged with prizes for participation in cultural program.

The two days national conference was concluded in the valedictory session with the hon'able presence of Dr. Upinder Dhar, Vice Chancellor Shri Vaishnav Vidyapeeth Vishwavidyalaya, Chief Guest Mr. HemantAmbekar, Whole Time Director, WEARIT Group, Guest Honour Mr. PranabParasar, Officer in Charge, Regional Office of the Textile Commissioner Indore, Prof. T. K Sinha, Director in-charge Coordinator Shri Vaishnav Institute of Textile Technology (SVITT), SVVV and Chairman TEXCON 2018, and Dr. ShamayitaPatraOrganising Secretary TEXCON 2018.

L to R: At Valedictory Session Prof. T. K. Sinha, Prof. (Dr.) UpinderDhar, Mr. Hemant Ambekar, Mr. Pranab Parasar, and Dr. Shamayita Patra

The valedictory session was opened with the report of TEXCON- 2018 by Prof. T. K. Sinha and announcement and inauguration of TEXCON-2019 on 4 - 5th April 2019. Mr. HemantAmbekar encouraged the young textile engineers to be a maestro in knowledge with skill and addressed them as future Presidents, C.E.Os and M.D.s. He also pointed out about the shift of spinning and dyeing industries from China to India and showed the enormous scope for the future. His point of view was resonated by the guest of honour Mr. PranabParasar. Mr. Parasar promoted several textile related policies of Government of India. He also asked the new generation to become the entrepreneur: the job giver, instead of a job seeker. At the end, Dr. ShamayitaPatra proposed the vote of thanks.

Chief Guest Mr. Hemant Ambekar is addressing the audience in the Valedictory Session

TEXCON-2018 was concluded with our beloved National Anthem 'Jana GanaMana'. March - April 2018

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Some the papers presented in this session are: ◆ Implantable Material for Medical Textile ◆ Application of Electronics in Technical Textile ◆ Sports Textile -Recent Developments and Market Potential in India ◆ Application of Nanotechnology in Sports Textiles ◆ Uses of Textiles in Agriculture ◆ Application of Nonwoven in Medical Textile ◆ Online Quality Monitoring of Nonwoven Fabrics Using Digital Image ◆ Application Prefabrication Vertical Drains (PVD) in Geotextile


NEWS

USTER offers combined technology to the customers more potential USTER closes acquisition of EVS - Combined technology offers customers more potential for further automation and improvement for increased and sustainable performance.

enable us to strengthening our offering to customers, and offer new, interesting perspectives to the colleagues of USTER and EVS. The acquisition fits perfectly into our vision to be the world's leading supplier of quality solutions for the textile industry from fiber to fabric." Sam Cohen, CEO of EVS, commented: "I am proud of the progress we have made during the last few years in improving our products and services leading to increased customer satisfaction, expanding our footprint while delivering on our financial targets. Now, I am very much looking forward to continue working for EVS, now part of USTER, and combining our offering. I believe that we will demonstrate the potential to provide our customers with new, innovative products that can address unmet needs."

Uster Technologies AG has announced the successful closing of the acquisition of Elbit Vision Systems Ltd. (EVS), a world-leading high-technology supplier for automated vision inspection in the textile industry. This expands USTER's competencies in quality control and strengthens its product portfolio. EVS's products are used to automaticallylocate, label and trace defects of fabric and web products, and ultimately to grade the quality and determine the value of the produced goods. Thomas Nasiou, Chief Executive Officer of USTER, said: "I am delighted that we are now able to finalize this major milestone, which embodies the strengthening of USTER's activities across the globe. The access to innovative technology and the enhanced presence will

Contacts Thomas Nasiou, Chief Executive Officer Uster Technologies AG Sonnenbergstrasse 10 CH-8610 Uster / Switzerland Phone +41 43 366 36 36 Media contact Joachim Maier, Marketing Manager Uster Technologies AG Sonnenbergstrasse 10 CH - 8610 Uster / Switzerland Direct +41 43 366 36 29 Mobile +41 79 422 26 49 Fax +41 43 366 39 37 joachim.maier@uster.com

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Connecting you with right audience for strengthening business promotion www.textileassociationindia.org 448

March - April 2018


NEWS

Savio Eco PulsarS scores at Falcon Yarns Pvt. Ltd. Falcon Yarns Pvt. Ltd., a part of the Falcon Group, is a textile spinning unit at Gondal, Gujarat. The company is ably headed by its Directors, Mr.RichiKotadia and Mr.BhargavSuvagiya. The total turnover of the Falcon Group stands at a whopping Rs. 500 crores. Falcon Yarns has a 36,000 spindles unit running on average 30's count, which exports a major portion of its production to markets like China, Vietnam, Egypt and Bangladesh. In a release issued by the company recently, Falcon Yarn appreciated the quality and cost-effectiveness of Savio automatic winders Eco PulsarS and has strongly recommended this model to other spinning mills.

was that at the time of taking the decision A.T.E. had tied-up with Savio and that gave us more confidence," continued Mr.Suvagiya. Going into the details, Mr.RichiKotadia added, "The best feature of Savio winder is that at any point of time as per the production requirements we can add drums. No other manufacturer has this flexibility. All quality and production data can be seen on the colour display along with the running parameters." Strongly recommending the EcoPulsarS to others, Mr.Kotadia stated "We strongly recommend Savio's Eco PulsarS to everybody. Our technical team is of the opinion that Savio machines are user friendly and very easy to maintain. The pioneering Italian technology ensures high quality and low maintenance costs. The best part is the low consumption of power by the Savio winders." Mr.Kotadia also had a word of praise for A.T.E. "A.T.E. has always provided the best technology to the Indian textile industry. Addition of Savio to its portfolio added to our comfort level. A.T.E. has helped us throughout the project stage and even now it is closely monitoring the machines through frequent visits and updating us with the latest technical information."

Mr.BhargavSuvagiya elucidated the company view, stating that "During our project discussions we compared automatic winders of several manufacturers. We visited ITMA Milan to have a look at all the winders. We even gathered information from other spinners in the region. Technological superiority and future ready machines were our priorities. We also visited Savio's Italian factory and found that the Savio automatic winder Eco PulsarS had advantages over other machines. Savio winders gave the best efficiency in the studies conducted by us. Looking back, it was a right decision as now we are enjoying the benefits of Savio's Italian technology". "There are three main reasons for choosing Savio winders; namely, latest technology, timely after sales service, and consistent and competitive quality output. What also made us tilt our decision in Savio'sfavour March - April 2018

Texttreasure First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. - Mahatma Gandhi 449

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Falcon

In a short time Falcon Yarns has become a respected name in the textile industry and enjoys a reputation for values and reliability when it comes to meeting its commitment to its customers. The mill has plans to expand even further by giving value added yarns in the near future.


EVENT REPORT

Textile 4.0 conference gets an overwhelming response from industry The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit organized International Textile Conference on "Textile 4.0 - Global and Indian Perspective" on 22nd & 23rd March 2018 at Hotel The Lalit, Mumbai. This was the first such conference on the subject to be held both in Asia and India and therefore, received an overwhelming response from the industry.

Adviser, Jost's Engineering Co. Ltd., the Awardees, Speakers, Press, Media and delegates. Mr. T. K. Sengupta, President, TAI welcomed all the dignitaries and thanked them for their presence in the conference inspite of their busy schedule. He congratulated TAI, Mumbai Unit for selecting innovative topic as the theme of the conference. Dr. Kavita Gupta, the Chief Guest in her inaugural address said "With the implementation of Textile 4.0 and automation, we should maintain a balance between man and machine and be careful that machines don't overtake human beings." She observed, we need human beings and a little bit of unpredictability in our lives to keep it interesting.

Chief Guest, Dr. Kavita Gupta, IAS, Textile Commissioner, Ministry of Textiles, Government of India and other dignitaries lighting the lamp

Key Note Speaker Mr. R. D. Udeshi, President-Polyester Chain, Reliance Industries Limited addressing the gathering

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Dignitaries on the Dais

Mr. V. C. Gupte, Chairman, TAI, Mumbai Unit and also the Convener of this Conference took the lead in selecting the innovative topics & speakers for the success of this conference. The entire organising work of this conference was done under his able leadership. Mr. Vilas Gharat, President, TAI, Mumbai Unit welcomed the Chief Guest, Dr. Kavita Gupta, IAS, Textile Commissioner, Ministry of Textiles, Government of India and Key Note Speaker, Mr. R. D. Udeshi, PresidentPolyester Chain, Reliance Industries Limited. He also welcomed Mr. Shailesh R. Sheth, Director & Strategy 450

Mr. R. D. Udeshi in his Key Note Address highlighted Indian textile industry has to focus on holistic growth across the value chain and needs to focus on building quality and scale. This will be possible only by adopting digitalisation and cyber physical systems, which will accelerate growth and build excellence both in manufacturing and consumer experience." He emphasised on planning today for a new and better tomorrow. In terms of changing dynamics because of automation and Industry 4.0, sourcing needs are also changing. Buyers do not just want to purchase a product, rather they are looking for end to end solutions. Mr. G. V. Aras, Conference Chairman while giving the highlights said that the world is on the threshold of a new industrial revolution characterized by Automation, March - April 2018


EVENT REPORT Robotics, Artificial Intelligence and Internet of Things etc. Industry 4.0 is the future of manufacturing which is based on cyber-physical systems, Internet of things, digitalization which would create a "Smart Factory". These new technologies will enter our manufacturing and supply chain sooner than expected and will have disruptive effects on the present processes followed by the industry.

Mr. Sanjiv S. Lathia, Technical Director, Lathia Rubber Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd. receiving The Lifetime Achievement Award by the hands of Chief Guest Dr. Kavita Gupta

Theme Presentation by Mr. Shailesh R. Sheth, Director & Strategy Adviser, Jost's Engineering Co. Ltd.

In this VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity) world, companies want to ensure their future investments and time of returns on investments. The objective of Textile 4.0 is to optimise inputs and maximise output. Mr. Prashant Agarwal, knowledge Partner of the Conference elaborated the Textile 4.0 introduces a new concept called "smart factories" in which technology monitors physicals systems & processes and makes decentralized decisions. Adoption of Industry 4.0 tools and technologies in textiles would result in increased efficiency, reduced lead time, improved production quality. Indian textile companies are functioning at various stages of automation depending on size of company. The organized companies need to prepare the way forward for adopting textile 4.0 and the semi organized and un organized sector needs to develop roadmap towards bridging the technology gap and gear up to align with the industry going forward. He said all teammates including top management professions like CEOs etc, need to be educated, trained and aligned with this technological advancement. March - April 2018

Mr. S. K. Khandelia, President & CEO, Sutlej Textiles and Industries Ltd. receiving The Industrial Excellence Award by the hands of Chief Guest Dr. Kavita Gupta

Honouring the best in class The Textile Association (India), Mumbai Unit has set a precedent of felicitating the textile professionals for their outstanding contribution in the field of textile industry. In this Conference, the TAI, Mumbai Unit felicitated Shri Sanjiv S. Lathia, Technical Director, Lathia Rubber Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd. with "The Lifetime Achievement Awards" and Shri S. K. Khandelia, President & CEO, Sutlej Textiles and Industries Ltd. with "The Industrial Excellence Award". Knowledge and Informative technical sessions The two-day conference saw several informative sessions. The theme of the first session was "Opportunities in Global Scenario". In this session, first paper was presented by Mr. Ashish Bhat, Executive Vice President and Head - Digital Factory, Siemens Limited on "Textile 4.0 - Opportunities in Global Scenario". He pointed out, "Digitalisation is changing everything, and since 2000 over half of the top 500 global companies have disappeared, since they 451

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Mr. Shailesh R. Sheth in his theme presentation said that "Factory of the Future is here and can no longer be ignored. For Textile industry's global competitiveness, we have to grapple with the complexities and chalk out a roadmap for us to implement."


EVENT REPORT couldn't change with time. The world is changing at a rapid speed; it took 16 years for mobile to have its first 100 million users and only three years for WhatsApp to cross 100 million users. Industry 4.0 is not about the technology, it is about new business models. Digitalisation is already a part of our day to day life through mobile, social media and others, it is time we make digitalisation a part of our business. In my opinion, 'Disruption' is slightly a negative word; I would rather like to use Adoption instead of disruption. The whole idea of Industry 4.0 is to ability to produce single customised product as mass customisation at the same cost as mass production." Mr. Ram Sareen, Founder, TukaTech, USA presented the paper on "Textile 4.0: Process by Technology Providers' Perspective". He observed Disruptive Process is nothing but taking status quo process and simplifying. He believe change is constant, growth is optional." Mr. Stephan Kehry, Sales Manager India, Mahlo GmbH Co. KG, Germany made the presentation on "Textile 4.0 - Chances and Risks of a Visionary Revolution". He quoted his owner Dr Mahlo and said, "We can't manage, what we can't measure" indicating that it is important in today's business to have information and data to make informed decisions. He also mentioned that in Industry 4.0 and IoT "Human element gains on overreaching significance in development of Industry 4.0." Mr. Prabhat Pande, Manager - Professional and Business Services (India & Sri Lanka), EFI Optitex presented the paper on "'Retail Apocalypse' and Technological Disruptions".

The Second Session began with Panel Discussion on "Opportunities & Challenges in Implementation of Textile 4.0: Indian/Asian Stakeholders Perspective" which was moderated by Mr. Prashant Agarwal, Co. Founder & Jt. Managing Director, WAZIR Advisors Pvt. Ltd. The Panel comprised Mr. Rajendar K. Rewari, MD, Morarjee Textiles Ltd., Mr. Sanjiv S. Lathia, Technical Director, Lathia Rubber Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd., Mr. Arvind Mathur, CEO, Raymond Uco Denim Pvt. Ltd., Mr. Updeep Singh, Deputy CEO, Sutlej Textiles and Industries Ltd. All the Panel Members emphasized that textile industry in India has no choice but to adopt this new revolution if they want to sustain in global market. This revolution will attract technically qualified young generation to the textile industry and present workers will need to upgrade themselves to new technologies. It was a very interesting and memorable session. The Third Session was on "Textile 4.0- Approach to Textile Manufacturing from Fabrics to Finishing" which were presented by eminent speakers from India and abroad. Mr. Gianangelo Licini, Sales Area Manager and Mr. Francesco Gozio, Marketing Department, Marzoli Machines Textile srl made the presentation on "Textile 4.0 - Industrial Cyber - Physical Systems". In their presentation they explained how Marzoli focuses its development on innovation and digital integration of Spinning Mill production processes: Dr. Indu R. Keoti, Dy. General Manager, Sales & Marketing, EcoAxis spoke on "Industrial IoT for Textiles". She highlighted how a textile enterprise can become smarter by using industrial IoT solutions.

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

She also discussed challenges in implementing and adopting these technologies in the textile industry. Mr. Hans Gerhard Wroblowski, (Area Sales Director SEA & Head of Denim Technology), A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH & Co. KG, Germany presented the paper on "Textile 4.0 - Internet of Things "Overview / Outlook". Panel Discussion Session: (Sitting L to R): Mr. Arvind Mathur, CEO, Raymond Uco Denim Pvt. Ltd., Mr. Sanjiv S. Lathia, Technical Director, Lathia Rubber Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd., Mr. Prashant Agarwal, Co. Founder & Jt. Managing Director, WAZIR Advisors Pvt. Ltd., Mr. Rajendar K. Rewari, MD, Morarjee Textiles Ltd., Mr. Updeep Singh, Deputy CEO, Sutlej Textiles and Industries Ltd. 452

Mr. V. Bino George, Head of Business Consulting, Infor South Asia presented the paper on "Innovations & Competitiveness in Textile Industry". He said that the Fashion industry of today is facing a unique and dynamic set of challenges. From the rise of modern consumers to the increasing speed with which new products need to be brought to market, the technology March - April 2018


EVENT REPORT is essential to remain competitive. Mr. Ashish Sharma, Vice President-Sales & Mktg., Truetzschler India Pvt. Ltd. showed "Trutzschler's approach to Industry 4.0". He said the term "Industry 4.0" originates from a German government's project as high-tech strategy to promote the computerization of manufacturing process. TrĂźtzschler Line Commander connects complete Blow room line and cards together, which itself is basis of IoT concept long before Industry 4.0 conceptualized. The Fourth Session was on "Textile 4.0 - Demonstrative Approach to Manufacturing from Fibre to Fabrics". Mr. Gunish Jain, Managing Director, Royal Datamatics Pvt. Ltd., presented the paper on "The Role of Machine Learning in the Textile Value Chain". He explained what activities and processes will be part of the first wave of AI and Automation. Mr. Akshar Chandra, Strategy & Business Excellence, MD Office, Grasim Industries, Aditya Birla Group expressed his views on "Future of Textile is Upon Us - Digitalization enabled Connected Value Networks".

spective". He said that the impact of Industry 4.0 on the nature of jobs would result in four different possibilities -some new jobs would be created or some of the existing jobs wound demand additional skill sets, while some jobs would continue to exist without any change in skill sets and some would disappear. The jobs that would disappear are those which require Routine Manual (RM) or Routine Cognitive (RC) skills. All such jobs would be automated. The jobs which require Non-Routine Manual (NRM) and Non-Routine Cognitive (NRC) skills will continue to survive with or without additional new skill sets. The Sixth Session was on "Risk Management". Mr. Badruddin Khan, Sr. Manager - Product Management Team, Multi Commodity Exchange of India Ltd. (MCX) made the presentation on "Awareness on Cotton Price Risk Management". Mr. Sajal Gupta, Head - Forex & Rates, Edelweiss Securities Limited and Mr. Vivek Acharya, Manger Business Development (Currency & Debt), National Stock Exchange of India Limited (NSE) made the joint presentation on "Forex Risk Management: Currency Insurance - Protection against Volatility".

Mr. Ramakrishnan Pongirivasan, Country Manager (India), IAS - India (Canias ERP) made the presentation on "Textile 4.0 - Combination of Process and Technology (In term of Business Process Management) know how". The theme of the Fifth Session was "Government Initiatives and Industry Interface".

Mr. Mihir Parekh - Director Mega Textile Park, Department of Handloom & Textiles, Government of Telangana discussed about "Textile and Apparel Sector in Telangana - Opportunities and Initiatives". Mr. Damodar Kulkarni, Deputy Secretary, Dept. of Textiles, Govt. of Maharashtra presented the newly introduced "Textile Policy of Government of Maharasthra and its advantages to various sectors". Dr. J. V. Rao, CEO, Textile Sector Skill Council (TSC) presented a paper on "Future of Textile Jobs - A PerMarch - April 2018

Dignitaries Sitting in the Auditorium

The Seventh Session was a Workshop on the theme "Demonstrative Approach in Processes in Textile 4.0" which was presented by Marzoli Machines Textile srl. Mr. Sanjay Chawla, Editor-in-Chief & Publisher & CEO, DFU Publications presented the Audio Visual Show on - Textile 4.0 which was appreciated by all. All the Papers received very high response as well as interactions from the participants. Mr. A. V. Mantri, Hon. Secretary, TAI, Mumbai Unit proposed a vote of the thanks. The Conference was a grand success and was attended by 450 participants. 453

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

Mr. R. Girish, IAS, Commissioner for Textile Development & Director of Handlooms & Textiles, Govt. of Karnataka, presented the paper on "Invest Karnataka".


SUBJECT INDEX JOURNAL OF THE TEXTILE ASSOCIATION VOLUME 78 - MAY 2017 TO APRIL 2018 SUBJECT INDEX Subject

Authors

Issue Page

EDITOTIAL: ◆ Textile Industry in 2017 - Fate or Debate: We Choose!!! ◆ We Mumbaikar!! ◆ Food, Clothing, Shelter & Antimicrobial Properties! ◆ Magic of Beginnings! ◆ State Textile University in Maharashtra¢ ◆ An opportunity, threat or a Dare!

R.V. Adivarekar R.V. Adivarekar R.V. Adivarekar R.V. Adivarekar R.V. Adivarekar R.V. Adivarekar

1 2 3 4 5 6

3 78 149 230 299 375

COMPOSIT: ◆ Development Micro and Nano-cellulose Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol Composite Film

M.D. Teli, Karan Chandrakar, PintuPandit&Gayatri T.N.

4

250

Prof M. D. Teli & Mrs. PradnyaAmbre

1

15

Sankar Roy Maulik, & Lina Chakraborty M. D. Teli, PintuPandit & Siddhesh Chaudhari M. D. Teli, PintuPandit & SamruddhiGaikwad M. M. El-Molla, M. Helmy & A. Abd-Elghany

2 3

93 163

5

312

6

390

Dr. V. D. Gotmare, S. S. Kole, Dr. (Mrs.). R. B. Athwale

3

172

Dr. D. P. Kakad, Dr. V. D Gotmare & S. S Kole

4

246

Ms. NimishaBaheti, Prof. A. M. Daberao, Prof. P. P. Kolte & Prof. R. N. Turukmane Ravindra Kale, Prerana Kane, JidnyasaPatil & ArjunsingGirase

5

309

9

384

Dr. GordanaColovic

1

26

Sambaditya Raj, Dr. Himadri Ghosh & Dr. Prabir Kumar Choudhuri M. D. Teli, Urvi A. Sawant& Pintu Pandit Al-Balakocy N. G. & Shalaby S. E. Dr. Abhay H. Shende & Prof. PrabhakarMusam M. D. Teli, Jignesh S. Mahajan &PintuPandit

1

21

2

98

3

179

5

317

6

397

DYEING: ◆ Development of Compound Shades of Indigo and Marigoldusing Natural Mordants on Cotton and Cotton/Viscose Blend ◆ Value Addition of Handloom Textiles by using Silk Yarns Eco-Friendly Herbal Dyeing for Wellness Properties on LinenFabric ◆ DelonixRegia Stem Shell Waste for Natural Dyeing of Organic Cotton Fabric ◆ Dyeing of Polyester Fabrics Using Nano TiO2 and Without Using Carrier FINISHING: ◆ Advances in Biodegradable Polymers a New Route for Development of Eco-friendly Medical Textile Products: An Overview ◆ Novel Approach for Development of Wrinkle Resistance Cotton Fabric using Polycarboxylic Acid and Sodium Hypophosphate KNITTING: ◆ The Effect of Moisture Content on Yarn Properties and Knitability ◆ Comparative Study of Wool Descaling Using Various Techniques

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

OTHERS: ◆ Importance of Mapping for Development of the Fashion Company Business Strategy REVIEW ARTICLE: ◆ Himalayan Nettle Fibre and its Possibilities in Textile: A Review ◆ Application of Sustainable Packaging Materials: A Review ◆ Imparting Antimicrobial Properties to Polyester and Polyamide Fibers-State of the Art ◆ A Study on Problems of Power Loom Entrepreneurs of Bhiwandi ◆ Modification of Banana Fibres by Grafting for Application in Composites 454

March - April 2018


SUBJECT INDEX

◆ An Attempt to Produce Cotton/corn Blended Yarn on Rotor Spinning ◆ Manual Verses Electronic Spindle Ring Alignment and its effect on Ring and Compact Yarn Properties TEXPERIENCE: ◆ Texperience - Protective Textile ◆ Texperience - The Case of the Gaping Gap ◆ Texperience - The Case of the Adamant Administrator ◆ Texperience - Manus Naturals ◆ Texperience - The Case of the Hopeless Helper ◆ Texperience - Crisis Management A few Basic Elements TEXNOTE: ◆ Chapter 1: Graphene a Wonder Material: Introduction ◆ Chapter 3: Graphene a Wonder Material: Synthesis of Graphene (Part-I) ◆ Chapter 4: Graphene a Wonder Material: Synthesis of Graphene (Part-II) ◆ Chapter 5: Grapheme a Wonder Material Characterization of Graphene (Part-I) ◆ Chapter 6: Grapheme a Wonder Material Characterization of Graphene (Part-II) ◆ Chapter 7: Grapheme a Wonder Material Supercapacitor Electrodes WEAVING: ◆ Development of Filter Fabric for Automobile Diesel Engine ◆ Indian Handmade Carpet- A Millennium Floor Covering ◆ The Influence of Using Different Textile Structures and Yarn Counts on the Mechanical Properties of Woven Sacks ◆ Effect of Machine Variables on Rotor yarn Properties

March - April 2018

Alsaid Ahmed Almetwally, 1 M. El-Sakhawy, M. H. Elshakankery & M. H. Kasem Abhijit Pal 4

5

233

Md. VaseemChavhan, Siva Jagadish Kumar M. VamshiNeta, & B.Venkatesh

4

238

Ashok Athaye A. R. Garde A. R. Garde R. N. Yadav A. R. Garde R. N. Yadav

1 2 3 4 5 6

31 106 202 256 324 405

SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli SaptarshiMaiti, PintuPandit, Geetal Mahajan, R. V. Adivarekar & M. D. Teli

1

34

2

112

3

207

4

259

5

328

6

407

Bishwaranjan Ghosha, E. Shareen Farzanaa & Dr. P. Senthilkumarb HimansuShekhar Mohapatra & Rajesh Kumar Verma Doaa H. Elgohary, Y. A. Abo & El Amaim

2

85

3

157

5

301

Harish. R. Jambur, Prof. P. P. Kolte, Dr. V. G. Nadiger, & Prof. A. M. Daberao

6

377

455

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

SPINNING: ◆ Technology of Nano-Fibers: production Techniques and Properties - Critical Review


EXAM SHUEDULE

2nd Global Textile Technology & Engineering Show (GTTES) Journal of the TEXTILE Association

On 01st to 03rd February, 2019 At Hall No. 7A, Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon (E), Mumbai. India

: Contact : India ITME Society 1210/1211, Dalamal Tower, A wing, 12th Floor, Plot No.211, Nariman Point, Mumbai - 400 021. Tel.: 91-22-22020032/22828138/22851579 Fax: 91-22-22851578 E-mail: itme@india-itme.com; admin@india-itme.com; Website: www.india-itme.com 456

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EXAM SHUEDULE

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FORTHCOMING EVENTS INDIA VDMA - German Technology Meets Indian Textiles and Nonwoven - B2B Forum & Conference Date : 15th & 16th May, 2018 Venue : The Leela Hotel, Andheri, Mumbai, India Contact : VDMA India Services Private Limited Western India Office, 102, Jaimitra, Pragati Nagar, M. G. Road No. 6, Goregaon (W),Mumbai - 400 062 E-mail : jamly.vdma@gmail.com, jamly.john@vdmaindia.org Website : www.germantech-indiantextile.de 5th Non-Woven Tech Asia 2018 Date : 06th to 08th June, 2018 Venue : Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon (E), Mumbai. India Contact : Mr. JigarChotalia Radeecal Communications 402, "Optionz" Complex, 4th Floor, Opposite Nest Hotel, off C.G. Road, Navrangpura, Sardar Patel Nagar, Ahmedabad - 380009 Mobile : +91-9173440725 E-mail : sales@nonwoventechasia.com Website : http://www.nonwoventechasia.com

Journal of the TEXTILE Association

7th International Exhibition & Conference Technical Textiles Date : 28th - 29th June, 2018 Venue : Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon (E), Mumbai. India Contact : Mr. NachiketBasole, Assistant Director Mob : +91-9867312834 E-mail : nachiket.basole@ficci.com Website : www.technotexindia.in 14th International Conference on Apparel & Home Textiles (ICAHT 2018) Date : 08th September, 2018 Venue : India Habitat Centre, New Delhi Contact : Mr. R.C. Kesar, Conference Chairman Okhla Garment & Textile Cluster (Secretariat) B-24/1, Okhla Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi - 110020 India Tel. : 011-4160 9550 E-mail : ogtc@airtelmail.in, ogtc@ogtc.in Website : www.ogtc.in Inkjet Printing India 2018 Date : 04th to 05th October, 2018 Venue : Courtyard Marriott, Mumbai, CNT Expositions and IMI Europe are jointly hosting the first of its kind Inkjet Printing focused in India. Organizer: CNT Expositions and services LLP 126, Dhuruwadi, A. V. Nagvekar Marg, Prabhadevi, Mumbai - 400 025. E-mail : aditya@catnewtech.com 460

2nd Global Textile Technology & Engineering Show (GTTES) Date : 18th to 20thJanuary, 2019 Venue : Hall No. 7A, Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon (E), Mumbai. India Contact : MsSeema Srivastava, Executive Director India ITME Society Tel. : 91-22-22020032/22828138/22851579 Fax : 91-22-22851578 E-mail : itme@india-itme.com ; admin@india-itme.com; Website : www.india-itme.com ABROAD China International Dye Industry, pigments and Textile Chemicals Exhibition Date : 11th - 13th April, 2019 Venue : Shanghai World Expo exhibition and convention center Organizer: Shanghai International Exhibition Service Co., Ltd., Room No. 2501, OOCL Plaza, 841, Yan An (M) road, Shanghai 200040 China Tel. : +86-21-62792828 / +86-21-62896829 Fax : +86-21-63865172 Contact : Ms. Wang, Ms. Chen, Mr. Gu, Mr. Chen, Ms. Xie, Mr. Zhang E-mail : chinainterdye@siec-ccpit.com ITMA 2019 - Largest International Textile and Garment Technology Exhibition Date : 20th to 26th June, 2019 Venue : FIRA CE Barcelona Gran Via,Barcelona, Spain Contact : Daphne Poon Marketing Communications Director ITMA Services Pte Ltd. 73 Ubi Road 1, #08-48 Oxley BizHub, Singapore 408733 Tel. : (65) 6849 9362 M: (65) 94789543 E-mail : Pdaphnepoon@itma.com Website : www.itma.com 3rd Edition - TEMTECH - 2018 Date : 22th to 24th September, 2018 Venue : Bhilwara, Rajasthan, India Organizer : MIRROR Events Management Mirror House, D-297/2, Near Pannadhai Circle, Azad Nagar, Bhilwara, Rajasrthan, India Contact : Mr. Govind Sharma / Mr. SharadTandon Tel. : 01482-243077 Cell No. : 9829085976 / 9322260941 E-mail : mirror.gns@gmail.com / stanton@stondanconsulting.com

Every effort is made to ensure that the information given is correct. You are however, advised to re-check the dates with the organizers, for any change in schedule, venue etc., before finalizing your travel plans. March - April 2018


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