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Visitor Information Location 2320 S Street, NW, in Washington, D.C.’s historic Dupont-Kalorama neighborhood.

Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam The work of Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, a husband and wife team, is founded on the philosophical underpinnings of classical Javanese batik. The batik that evolved in the courts of Central Java sought to integrate meditative and creative powers in order to bridge the natural and unseen worlds. Ismoyo and Fliam have selected the parang, kawung, and tree of life as their basic design elements. These traditional Javanese motifs (see drawings below) provide the seeds for their creative thinking. They see these as sharing roots with other universal forms. From their exploration of these motifs has come a magical range of hangings and scarves. The couple has shared their vision of the creative process, as expressed in batik, with different groups around the world, including artists in Nigeria, Native Americans, villagers in Java, and Aboriginal Australians. Their studio Brahma Tirta Sari in Yogyakarta, Central Java, is also a place of creative interchange and visiting artists are a regular presence. In the face of today’s commercialism, Ismoyo and Fliam strive to retain the artistic heritage of ancient Javanese masters by developing this art in ways to address today’s sensibilities. Mattiebelle Gittinger Research Associate, Southeast Asian Textiles

Metro Red Line, Dupont Circle, Q Street Exit. Museum and Shop Hours Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Closed federal holidays.

Above: Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Red Fire (Api Merah), 2003. TM 2008.15.1. Museum Purchase, with funds provided by Stanley O. Roth. Below: Detail from above.

Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum Shop will be open Fridays to Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Textile Museum will be closed to visitors Mondays through Thursdays as it prepares to reopen in 2014 at the George Washington University. Learn more at www.textilemuseum.org/tmatgw. Arthur D. Jenkins Library Reading Room Hours Wednesday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday 12 to 4 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Admission Suggested donation of $8 for non-members. Public Programs For the most up-to-date list of Textile Museum programs and for complete descriptions, pick up our quarterly calendar in the lobby or visit www.textilemuseum.org. Stay in Touch For more information, visit www.textilemuseum.org (/TextileMuseum)

Museum Shop—Open Throughout 2013 The Textile Museum Shop—hailed as one of Washington, D.C.’s best museum stores— offers a unique array of handmade textiles, jewelry, books, gifts, and other merchandise created by contemporary textile artists from around the world. For more information, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 29; shop online anytime at www.textilemuseumshop.org. Beginning October 14, The TM Shop will be open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through December 31, 2013. Accessibility The Textile Museum is wheelchair accessible. Please call (202) 667-0441, ext. 35 for more information. Membership Members of The Textile Museum enjoy many benefits: a 10% TM Shop discount, the quarterly Members’ Magazine, special rates for programs, and invitations to member events. Visit www.textilemuseum.org or call (202) 667-0441, ext. 17.

(@textilemuseum) (/Textilemuseum)

Parang

Tours—Offered Throughout 2013 Highlights Tours are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and feature selections from the exhibition. After Out of Southeast Asia closes on October 13, Highlights Tours will explore the historical buildings of The Textile Museum. No reservations are required. To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 65 at least four weeks in advance.

Kawung

(textile-museum.tumblr.com)

2320 S Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008-4088 202.667.0441 | www.textilemuseum.org Right: Elliot, Inger McCabe. Batik: Fabled Cloth of Java. New York: Viking, 1984.

© The Textile Museum

This exhibition is made possible in part by grants from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation and the Asian Cultural Council. Additional support is provided by Terry Adlhock and Jeffrey Hunter, Sheridan and Richard Collins, Jeffrey P. Cunard, Tina M. deVries, Judith and Richard Livingston, Roger S. and Claire Pratt, Stanley Owen Roth, Florence and Roger Stone, and The Textile Museum Docents.

Out of

Southeast

Asia

Art that Sustains April 12 – October 13, 2013


Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains The over 1,000 ethnic groups that call Southeast Asia home offer a rich trove of the textile arts. While these textiles once served as markers of ethnic or national identity, their vibrant colors, textures, and patterns now inspire contemporary art, commercial home furnishings, and fashion designs across the globe.

Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains explores the intersection of a few of these rich traditions and their interpretation within contemporary art and design. The traditions are examined in historical textiles drawn from The Textile Museum’s collections, including batiks with motifs once restricted to the courts of Central Java and internationally flavored patterns from the trade regions of Java’s north coast. Traditional garments from Laos record the accomplished weaving heritage from the mainland and offer delightful designs that harbor symbols from a not-too-distant past. Central to this exhibition is the exploration of how four contemporary artists have been inspired by these traditional works. These adaptations range from design interpretation, to continuations of philosophical foundations, to stylistic details. The techniques of batik, weft ikat, and supplementary weft patterning are familiar, but here they are cast by new hands. Cover: Skirt (phaa sin) (detail), Laos, Oudomsai Province, Lue People, ca. 1950. TM 1992.41.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Above left: Kain panjang (detail), Indonesia, Java, Yogyakarta, 1960s. TM 1998.11.19. Gift of Beverly Deffes Labin Collection. Above right: End panel shaman’s cloth (phaa mau phii) (detail), Laos, Hua Phan Province, Tai Daeng People, ca.1900–1950. TM 1991.18.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Vernal Bogren Swift

Carol Cassidy

Vernal Bogren Swift describes herself as an “itinerant artist,” but she is also a student of the earth who understands the potential power of tectonic plates and seismic shifts—as well as the power of myth. This keen awareness informs her creativity, resulting in images that are both heroic and beguiling. As she says, she creates “cloth that speaks of the earth.” Her translations to cloth are through a masterful understanding of the batik medium. Bogren Swift understands that great batiks partially derive from the small filling elements that lend texture, density, and vibrancy to the cloth’s surface. Such details characterize the great Javanese batiks of the past, but are rarely seen in today’s work. Her artist’s view of the world is that of a structure composed of patterns; Javanese batik speaks directly to this vision. Bogren Swift gives her subject matter space to be mythic in a narrow horizontal triptych format that makes the viewer “read” the composition. In some instances this is a sequential narrative, but in others a vertical patterning supplements the horizontal, suggesting additional reading across the panels. Bogren Swift’s travels have included stays in New Guinea, Australia, Africa, and British Columbia. Each experience has enriched her mental archive of legend and myth from which she draws in her artwork.

An experienced weaver, Carol Cassidy was hired by a United Nations group to upgrade Lao traditional weaving into a commercial enterprise. Rather than bringing change, Cassidy was captivated by the beauty and skill of the work of local ethnic groups. Cassidy left the mechanical looms and industrial processes to found her own studio based on Lao traditions. She hired Lao weavers and encouraged the continuation of local designs while improving the quality of the production. Over the course of three years, Cassidy’s efforts helped standardize the raising of silk in Laos, improve dye quality, and make adjustments to the traditional looms that allowed for longer warps and wefts. In her early hangings and shawls, Cassidy directly incorporated patterns and textile structures from antique Lao textiles. Over time, she has adapted these initial renderings of older traditions, while maintaining ethnic validity at the core of her interpretations. Cassidy’s studio produces artistic textiles and upscale upholstery used by designers in Paris, London, and New York. Others in Laos now imitate her endeavors, resulting in a resurgence in local weaving. Her advice on the successful transformation of local tradition into an international commodity is now sought in many countries. This model helps sustain and carry forward local art forms for future generations.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Double Nak, 2002. Collection of the artist. Below: Vernal Bogren Swift, A Garden of Earthquakes (detail), 2007–08. Collection of the artist. Bottom: Vernal Bogren Swift, Early Lessons and Lies, 2007–08. TM 2009.12.1 A/B/C. Gift from the Collection of the Artist.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Tai Lue Revisited with Three Bands of Tapestry, 1996. Collection of the artist.


Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains The over 1,000 ethnic groups that call Southeast Asia home offer a rich trove of the textile arts. While these textiles once served as markers of ethnic or national identity, their vibrant colors, textures, and patterns now inspire contemporary art, commercial home furnishings, and fashion designs across the globe.

Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains explores the intersection of a few of these rich traditions and their interpretation within contemporary art and design. The traditions are examined in historical textiles drawn from The Textile Museum’s collections, including batiks with motifs once restricted to the courts of Central Java and internationally flavored patterns from the trade regions of Java’s north coast. Traditional garments from Laos record the accomplished weaving heritage from the mainland and offer delightful designs that harbor symbols from a not-too-distant past. Central to this exhibition is the exploration of how four contemporary artists have been inspired by these traditional works. These adaptations range from design interpretation, to continuations of philosophical foundations, to stylistic details. The techniques of batik, weft ikat, and supplementary weft patterning are familiar, but here they are cast by new hands. Cover: Skirt (phaa sin) (detail), Laos, Oudomsai Province, Lue People, ca. 1950. TM 1992.41.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Above left: Kain panjang (detail), Indonesia, Java, Yogyakarta, 1960s. TM 1998.11.19. Gift of Beverly Deffes Labin Collection. Above right: End panel shaman’s cloth (phaa mau phii) (detail), Laos, Hua Phan Province, Tai Daeng People, ca.1900–1950. TM 1991.18.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Vernal Bogren Swift

Carol Cassidy

Vernal Bogren Swift describes herself as an “itinerant artist,” but she is also a student of the earth who understands the potential power of tectonic plates and seismic shifts—as well as the power of myth. This keen awareness informs her creativity, resulting in images that are both heroic and beguiling. As she says, she creates “cloth that speaks of the earth.” Her translations to cloth are through a masterful understanding of the batik medium. Bogren Swift understands that great batiks partially derive from the small filling elements that lend texture, density, and vibrancy to the cloth’s surface. Such details characterize the great Javanese batiks of the past, but are rarely seen in today’s work. Her artist’s view of the world is that of a structure composed of patterns; Javanese batik speaks directly to this vision. Bogren Swift gives her subject matter space to be mythic in a narrow horizontal triptych format that makes the viewer “read” the composition. In some instances this is a sequential narrative, but in others a vertical patterning supplements the horizontal, suggesting additional reading across the panels. Bogren Swift’s travels have included stays in New Guinea, Australia, Africa, and British Columbia. Each experience has enriched her mental archive of legend and myth from which she draws in her artwork.

An experienced weaver, Carol Cassidy was hired by a United Nations group to upgrade Lao traditional weaving into a commercial enterprise. Rather than bringing change, Cassidy was captivated by the beauty and skill of the work of local ethnic groups. Cassidy left the mechanical looms and industrial processes to found her own studio based on Lao traditions. She hired Lao weavers and encouraged the continuation of local designs while improving the quality of the production. Over the course of three years, Cassidy’s efforts helped standardize the raising of silk in Laos, improve dye quality, and make adjustments to the traditional looms that allowed for longer warps and wefts. In her early hangings and shawls, Cassidy directly incorporated patterns and textile structures from antique Lao textiles. Over time, she has adapted these initial renderings of older traditions, while maintaining ethnic validity at the core of her interpretations. Cassidy’s studio produces artistic textiles and upscale upholstery used by designers in Paris, London, and New York. Others in Laos now imitate her endeavors, resulting in a resurgence in local weaving. Her advice on the successful transformation of local tradition into an international commodity is now sought in many countries. This model helps sustain and carry forward local art forms for future generations.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Double Nak, 2002. Collection of the artist. Below: Vernal Bogren Swift, A Garden of Earthquakes (detail), 2007–08. Collection of the artist. Bottom: Vernal Bogren Swift, Early Lessons and Lies, 2007–08. TM 2009.12.1 A/B/C. Gift from the Collection of the Artist.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Tai Lue Revisited with Three Bands of Tapestry, 1996. Collection of the artist.


Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains The over 1,000 ethnic groups that call Southeast Asia home offer a rich trove of the textile arts. While these textiles once served as markers of ethnic or national identity, their vibrant colors, textures, and patterns now inspire contemporary art, commercial home furnishings, and fashion designs across the globe.

Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains explores the intersection of a few of these rich traditions and their interpretation within contemporary art and design. The traditions are examined in historical textiles drawn from The Textile Museum’s collections, including batiks with motifs once restricted to the courts of Central Java and internationally flavored patterns from the trade regions of Java’s north coast. Traditional garments from Laos record the accomplished weaving heritage from the mainland and offer delightful designs that harbor symbols from a not-too-distant past. Central to this exhibition is the exploration of how four contemporary artists have been inspired by these traditional works. These adaptations range from design interpretation, to continuations of philosophical foundations, to stylistic details. The techniques of batik, weft ikat, and supplementary weft patterning are familiar, but here they are cast by new hands. Cover: Skirt (phaa sin) (detail), Laos, Oudomsai Province, Lue People, ca. 1950. TM 1992.41.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Above left: Kain panjang (detail), Indonesia, Java, Yogyakarta, 1960s. TM 1998.11.19. Gift of Beverly Deffes Labin Collection. Above right: End panel shaman’s cloth (phaa mau phii) (detail), Laos, Hua Phan Province, Tai Daeng People, ca.1900–1950. TM 1991.18.1. Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund.

Vernal Bogren Swift

Carol Cassidy

Vernal Bogren Swift describes herself as an “itinerant artist,” but she is also a student of the earth who understands the potential power of tectonic plates and seismic shifts—as well as the power of myth. This keen awareness informs her creativity, resulting in images that are both heroic and beguiling. As she says, she creates “cloth that speaks of the earth.” Her translations to cloth are through a masterful understanding of the batik medium. Bogren Swift understands that great batiks partially derive from the small filling elements that lend texture, density, and vibrancy to the cloth’s surface. Such details characterize the great Javanese batiks of the past, but are rarely seen in today’s work. Her artist’s view of the world is that of a structure composed of patterns; Javanese batik speaks directly to this vision. Bogren Swift gives her subject matter space to be mythic in a narrow horizontal triptych format that makes the viewer “read” the composition. In some instances this is a sequential narrative, but in others a vertical patterning supplements the horizontal, suggesting additional reading across the panels. Bogren Swift’s travels have included stays in New Guinea, Australia, Africa, and British Columbia. Each experience has enriched her mental archive of legend and myth from which she draws in her artwork.

An experienced weaver, Carol Cassidy was hired by a United Nations group to upgrade Lao traditional weaving into a commercial enterprise. Rather than bringing change, Cassidy was captivated by the beauty and skill of the work of local ethnic groups. Cassidy left the mechanical looms and industrial processes to found her own studio based on Lao traditions. She hired Lao weavers and encouraged the continuation of local designs while improving the quality of the production. Over the course of three years, Cassidy’s efforts helped standardize the raising of silk in Laos, improve dye quality, and make adjustments to the traditional looms that allowed for longer warps and wefts. In her early hangings and shawls, Cassidy directly incorporated patterns and textile structures from antique Lao textiles. Over time, she has adapted these initial renderings of older traditions, while maintaining ethnic validity at the core of her interpretations. Cassidy’s studio produces artistic textiles and upscale upholstery used by designers in Paris, London, and New York. Others in Laos now imitate her endeavors, resulting in a resurgence in local weaving. Her advice on the successful transformation of local tradition into an international commodity is now sought in many countries. This model helps sustain and carry forward local art forms for future generations.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Double Nak, 2002. Collection of the artist. Below: Vernal Bogren Swift, A Garden of Earthquakes (detail), 2007–08. Collection of the artist. Bottom: Vernal Bogren Swift, Early Lessons and Lies, 2007–08. TM 2009.12.1 A/B/C. Gift from the Collection of the Artist.

Above: Carol Cassidy, Tai Lue Revisited with Three Bands of Tapestry, 1996. Collection of the artist.


Visitor Information Location 2320 S Street, NW, in Washington, D.C.’s historic Dupont-Kalorama neighborhood.

Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam The work of Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, a husband and wife team, is founded on the philosophical underpinnings of classical Javanese batik. The batik that evolved in the courts of Central Java sought to integrate meditative and creative powers in order to bridge the natural and unseen worlds. Ismoyo and Fliam have selected the parang, kawung, and tree of life as their basic design elements. These traditional Javanese motifs (see drawings below) provide the seeds for their creative thinking. They see these as sharing roots with other universal forms. From their exploration of these motifs has come a magical range of hangings and scarves. The couple has shared their vision of the creative process, as expressed in batik, with different groups around the world, including artists in Nigeria, Native Americans, villagers in Java, and Aboriginal Australians. Their studio Brahma Tirta Sari in Yogyakarta, Central Java, is also a place of creative interchange and visiting artists are a regular presence. In the face of today’s commercialism, Ismoyo and Fliam strive to retain the artistic heritage of ancient Javanese masters by developing this art in ways to address today’s sensibilities. Mattiebelle Gittinger Research Associate, Southeast Asian Textiles

Metro Red Line, Dupont Circle, Q Street Exit. Museum and Shop Hours Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Closed federal holidays.

Above: Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Red Fire (Api Merah), 2003. TM 2008.15.1. Museum Purchase, with funds provided by Stanley O. Roth. Below: Detail from above.

Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum Shop will be open Fridays to Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Textile Museum will be closed to visitors Mondays through Thursdays as it prepares to reopen in 2014 at the George Washington University. Learn more at www.textilemuseum.org/tmatgw. Arthur D. Jenkins Library Reading Room Hours Wednesday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday 12 to 4 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Admission Suggested donation of $8 for non-members. Public Programs For the most up-to-date list of Textile Museum programs and for complete descriptions, pick up our quarterly calendar in the lobby or visit www.textilemuseum.org. Stay in Touch For more information, visit www.textilemuseum.org (/TextileMuseum)

Museum Shop—Open Throughout 2013 The Textile Museum Shop—hailed as one of Washington, D.C.’s best museum stores— offers a unique array of handmade textiles, jewelry, books, gifts, and other merchandise created by contemporary textile artists from around the world. For more information, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 29; shop online anytime at www.textilemuseumshop.org. Beginning October 14, The TM Shop will be open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through December 31, 2013. Accessibility The Textile Museum is wheelchair accessible. Please call (202) 667-0441, ext. 35 for more information. Membership Members of The Textile Museum enjoy many benefits: a 10% TM Shop discount, the quarterly Members’ Magazine, special rates for programs, and invitations to member events. Visit www.textilemuseum.org or call (202) 667-0441, ext. 17.

(@textilemuseum) (/Textilemuseum)

Parang

Tours—Offered Throughout 2013 Highlights Tours are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and feature selections from the exhibition. After Out of Southeast Asia closes on October 13, Highlights Tours will explore the historical buildings of The Textile Museum. No reservations are required. To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 65 at least four weeks in advance.

Kawung

(textile-museum.tumblr.com)

2320 S Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008-4088 202.667.0441 | www.textilemuseum.org Right: Elliot, Inger McCabe. Batik: Fabled Cloth of Java. New York: Viking, 1984.

© The Textile Museum

This exhibition is made possible in part by grants from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation and the Asian Cultural Council. Additional support is provided by Terry Adlhock and Jeffrey Hunter, Sheridan and Richard Collins, Jeffrey P. Cunard, Tina M. deVries, Judith and Richard Livingston, Roger S. and Claire Pratt, Stanley Owen Roth, Florence and Roger Stone, and The Textile Museum Docents.

Out of

Southeast

Asia

Art that Sustains April 12 – October 13, 2013


Visitor Information Location 2320 S Street, NW, in Washington, D.C.’s historic Dupont-Kalorama neighborhood.

Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam The work of Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, a husband and wife team, is founded on the philosophical underpinnings of classical Javanese batik. The batik that evolved in the courts of Central Java sought to integrate meditative and creative powers in order to bridge the natural and unseen worlds. Ismoyo and Fliam have selected the parang, kawung, and tree of life as their basic design elements. These traditional Javanese motifs (see drawings below) provide the seeds for their creative thinking. They see these as sharing roots with other universal forms. From their exploration of these motifs has come a magical range of hangings and scarves. The couple has shared their vision of the creative process, as expressed in batik, with different groups around the world, including artists in Nigeria, Native Americans, villagers in Java, and Aboriginal Australians. Their studio Brahma Tirta Sari in Yogyakarta, Central Java, is also a place of creative interchange and visiting artists are a regular presence. In the face of today’s commercialism, Ismoyo and Fliam strive to retain the artistic heritage of ancient Javanese masters by developing this art in ways to address today’s sensibilities. Mattiebelle Gittinger Research Associate, Southeast Asian Textiles

Metro Red Line, Dupont Circle, Q Street Exit. Museum and Shop Hours Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Closed federal holidays.

Above: Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Red Fire (Api Merah), 2003. TM 2008.15.1. Museum Purchase, with funds provided by Stanley O. Roth. Below: Detail from above.

Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum Shop will be open Fridays to Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Textile Museum will be closed to visitors Mondays through Thursdays as it prepares to reopen in 2014 at the George Washington University. Learn more at www.textilemuseum.org/tmatgw. Arthur D. Jenkins Library Reading Room Hours Wednesday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday 12 to 4 p.m. through October 13, 2013. Admission Suggested donation of $8 for non-members. Public Programs For the most up-to-date list of Textile Museum programs and for complete descriptions, pick up our quarterly calendar in the lobby or visit www.textilemuseum.org. Stay in Touch For more information, visit www.textilemuseum.org (/TextileMuseum)

Museum Shop—Open Throughout 2013 The Textile Museum Shop—hailed as one of Washington, D.C.’s best museum stores— offers a unique array of handmade textiles, jewelry, books, gifts, and other merchandise created by contemporary textile artists from around the world. For more information, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 29; shop online anytime at www.textilemuseumshop.org. Beginning October 14, The TM Shop will be open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through December 31, 2013. Accessibility The Textile Museum is wheelchair accessible. Please call (202) 667-0441, ext. 35 for more information. Membership Members of The Textile Museum enjoy many benefits: a 10% TM Shop discount, the quarterly Members’ Magazine, special rates for programs, and invitations to member events. Visit www.textilemuseum.org or call (202) 667-0441, ext. 17.

(@textilemuseum) (/Textilemuseum)

Parang

Tours—Offered Throughout 2013 Highlights Tours are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and feature selections from the exhibition. After Out of Southeast Asia closes on October 13, Highlights Tours will explore the historical buildings of The Textile Museum. No reservations are required. To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, call (202) 667-0441, ext. 65 at least four weeks in advance.

Kawung

(textile-museum.tumblr.com)

2320 S Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008-4088 202.667.0441 | www.textilemuseum.org Right: Elliot, Inger McCabe. Batik: Fabled Cloth of Java. New York: Viking, 1984.

© The Textile Museum

This exhibition is made possible in part by grants from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation and the Asian Cultural Council. Additional support is provided by Terry Adlhock and Jeffrey Hunter, Sheridan and Richard Collins, Jeffrey P. Cunard, Tina M. deVries, Judith and Richard Livingston, Roger S. and Claire Pratt, Stanley Owen Roth, Florence and Roger Stone, and The Textile Museum Docents.

Out of

Southeast

Asia

Art that Sustains April 12 – October 13, 2013


Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains