Page 1

rnity de o M g n ri Encounte Central Asians first encountered Europeanstyle modernity with the arrival of Russian

MATION OR F N I MUSEUM literacy campaigns and disseminated new

ideas through schools and mass media. Sanc-

Tsarist soldiers and bureaucrats at the

tioned ideas about gender roles underwent

profound engagement with modernism,

profoundly upended Central Asian social

as the omnipresent state sought to funda-

The artworks highlighted in the Encoun-

end of the nineteenth century. Their most

however, occurred during the Soviet era

mentally transform all aspects of society.

dramatic revision. Together, these dynamics classes and traditional hierarchies.

tering Modernity section of this exhibition

During this era, traditional political and

provide a window into these various ways of

sion. State-sanctioned national identities

modernity through art. At the same time,

religious elites experienced massive repres-

celebrating Central Asia’s engagement with

gradually replaced regional tribal allegiances.

they demonstrate how Central Asian artists

ized agriculture prompted fundamental

heritage throughout the Soviet moderniza-

Industrialization and large-scale collectiveconomic shifts. The state organized massive

maintained an appreciation for local cultural

tion project.

Location

The museum is located at the corner of 21st and G streets, NW, four blocks from the Foggy Bottom Metro station (Blue, Orange, and Silver lines). For directions and parking information, visit museum.gwu.edu/plan-visit.

Hours

Monday, Wednesday–Friday: 11:30 AM–6:30 PM Saturday: 10 AM–5 PM; Sunday: 1–5 PM Closed Tuesdays and university holidays.

Admission

$8 suggested donation for non-members. Free for museum members, children, and current GW students, faculty, and staff.

Accessibility

The museum is wheelchair accessible and designated garage parking is available nearby. Visit museum.gwu.edu/accessibility for more information.

Museum Shop

Visit the shop for unique jewelry, home décor, books, and gifts from Washington, D.C., and around the world.

Arthur D. Jenkins Library

The reading room is open Wednesday– Thursday 1–4 PM and by appointment. Please contact the librarian before your visit at museumlibrary@gwu.edu.

Albert H. Small Center for National Capital Area Studies

With the museum’s Washingtoniana Collection as a centerpiece, the center engages students, scholars, and the public in research and educational programs pertaining to our nation’s capital. Old Patterns, New Order: Socialist Realism in Central Asia is a collaboration between the George Washington University’s Central Asia Program and the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

Eradicate Illiteracy (Likbez), Abdurakhman Rakhimov, Soviet Union, Tajik SSR, 1986, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

The museum is grateful to Nurbek and Churek Turdukulov and Sean Roberts for their generous cooperation in lending from their collections to this exhibition.

Public Programs

For the most up-to-date list of the museum’s educational programs, visit museum.gwu.edu/calendar.

Exhibition Tours

Free walk-in tours highlighting selections from current exhibitions are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 PM (textile tour) and 2:30 PM (Washingtoniana tour). To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, email museumed@gwu.edu at least four weeks in advance.

Join or Donate

Support from members and donors is the driving force that allows the museum to continue its work bringing art, history, and culture alive for the GW community and the public. To join or renew a current membership, or to make a donation, visit museum.gwu.edu/support or call 202-994-5579.

Stay in Touch

Follow the museum online for more information about works on view, programs, and behind-thescenes activities. @GWTextileMuseum TextileMuseum GWMuseum Textile-Museum.tumblr.com

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

701 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052 202-994-5200  |  museum.gwu.edu

R OCTOBE

10

, 201 9 2 Y A – M , 2015 

6


ing Harvest

Textiles an i s A Central

helped artists to enrich their narrative, the

With a long history of irrigation techniques

Textiles have been part of Central Asian iden-

on the brink of extinction due to the political

always been predominantly agrarian.

in the long history of textile production in

the paintings.

of this tradition, the first industrialized large-

Produced by ethnically and socially diverse

changes in Central Asia have given textile

in the Tsarist period and accelerated rapidly

and settled people; dyers and tailors; women

reaching back centuries, Central Asia has

tity for centuries. The last brilliant chapter

Although cotton growing has long been part

the region was in the nineteenth century.

scale cotton production in the region began

after the Bolsheviks seized power. The Soviet

The Bazaar at Bibi Khanom, Varsham N. Yeremyan, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1945, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

F

or centuries, Central Asia’s turbulent

nations, especially Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,

were prized for their great beauty and fine

Central Asia. The cotton harvest became a cen-

history and pivotal geographic posi-

Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan, hop-

tral social event in the life of Soviet collective

peoples to varied artistic influences and

Soviet socialism could bring not only to the

Asia’s contribution to the Soviet system. The

along major trade routes, artists benefited by

Twentieth-century Central Asia, the largest

allowed for ample exploration of themes that

of India, China, Iran, Russia, and beyond. Cen-

rule, maintained a tenuous balance between

of the region as well as its dramatic landscapes.

tion have exposed the region’s diverse

traditions. In steppes, mountains, and valleys

experiencing the aesthetics and techniques

tral Asia became a ripe environment for the

ing to present them as an example of what

Islamic world, but to all developing countries. Muslim-majority region to experience Soviet

its Muslim cultural heritage and Soviet athe-

farms, and its success demonstrated Central cotton harvest was a key artistic subject that

celebrated the traditional clothing and people

gia Nostal There has always been tension within Central

Asian socialist realism between its celebration of Soviet modernization and its preoccupation

ist modernism.

with local cultural uniqueness and pre-modern

Tsarist Russia and later the Soviet Union

region’s socialist realism cultural output. Paint-

talgia for pre-Soviet life was a theme primarily

last century in Central Asia. The Soviets worked

that combined the monumentalism of Soviet

region their home. It allowed these artists to

and parochial nationalism.

culture and to indulge in a fascination with

emergence of beautiful, engaging, and often

intriguing works of art.

became the most predominant influence of the vigorously to modernize the newly created

This balance is particularly apparent in the

history. In the early years of Soviet power, nos-

ers of this era produced a unique school of art

art with exoticism, local cultural influences,

escape the politicization of modern Soviet

On one hand, Central Asian socialist real-

the exotic. By the 1970s, however, nostalgia

by the Soviets. It reproduces classic themes of

Asian artists, allowing them to explore their

urbanization, and literacy. It celebrates the

These new references to national motifs were

and the Party leader. On the other hand, the

tions of colors, textures, and faces. Although

had become the domain of native Central

industrial modernization, women’s liberation,

own heritage and infuse it with mythic ideals.

teacher, the worker, the progressive farmer,

transformed through more abstract interpreta-

works, whether created by native or non-native

this art has elements of self-exoticization, it

Central Asians, echo European colonial art. This

tradition, known as Orientalism, romanticizes

landscapes and faces by using motifs drawn from local textiles and cultural traditions.

workmanship.

The region’s vibrant textile tradition came

to a halt in the twentieth century – the result

nineteenth-century textiles are considered

porary textiles produced in traditional ways

are undergoing an unprecedented resurgence,

thanks to the perseverance of generations of artisans who kept their skills alive through

the years of Soviet rule.

This exhibition is the first in the United

of economic change and a desire to “modern-

States devoted to Central Asia’s socialist

directly contributed to the decline of the artis-

recognition to this little-known, but fasci-

ize.” The loss of private textile workshops

tic competition that had allowed artisans to

realism art movement, giving long-overdue

nating, artistic tradition. During the Soviet

push the limits of their craft artistically and

period, hundreds of Central Asian painters

In socialist realist paintings, Central Asian

careers to artistic pursuits with unprece-

technically in the previous century.

textiles were used as symbols of two some-

what opposing ideals: progress and nostalgia

and graphic artists were able to devote their dented support but often also unwelcomed

guidance from the state.

explored by Russian artists who had made the

ism celebrates the new world order sought

Bag face, Ersari, Turkmenistan, early 19th century, Wool and goat hair; knotted pile, asymmetrical knot, open right, The Textile Museum 1977.36.14, gift of Jerome A. and Mary Jane Straka

works of art and cultural artifacts, contem-

original designs, and vibrant colors. They

Samarkand, Evgeniya A. Maleina, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1955, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

Post-Soviet political, social and economic

and men—the nineteenth-century Central

cotton. In the mid-1970s, the Soviet Union

ton output with the lion’s share coming from

and economic forces that were glorified in

tradition a second chance. While the region’s

Asian textiles are distinguished by their bold,

produced one-quarter of the world global cot-

ancient textile traditions of Central Asia were

peoples—from Tajik and Turkmen; nomads

planned economy decreed that Central Asia

would specialize in agriculture, especially

for heroic times. While these textile images

was also part of an evolving exploration of Etudes for the Midday Painting, Semyon A. Chuikov, Soviet Union, Kirghiz SSR, 1935, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

national identity in the region that continues

to be a preoccupation with artists and citizens in the post-Soviet period.

Marlene Laruelle Central Asia Program Director Research Professor of International Affairs Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University Sumru Belger Krody Senior Curator The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum Details on cover and left: Munisak (woman’s robe), Uzbekistan, Bukhara, 1860-1870, silk and cotton; warp ikat, velvet, The Textile Museum 1977.31, Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund


ing Harvest

Textiles an i s A Central

helped artists to enrich their narrative, the

With a long history of irrigation techniques

Textiles have been part of Central Asian iden-

on the brink of extinction due to the political

always been predominantly agrarian.

in the long history of textile production in

the paintings.

of this tradition, the first industrialized large-

Produced by ethnically and socially diverse

changes in Central Asia have given textile

in the Tsarist period and accelerated rapidly

and settled people; dyers and tailors; women

reaching back centuries, Central Asia has

tity for centuries. The last brilliant chapter

Although cotton growing has long been part

the region was in the nineteenth century.

scale cotton production in the region began

after the Bolsheviks seized power. The Soviet

The Bazaar at Bibi Khanom, Varsham N. Yeremyan, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1945, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

F

or centuries, Central Asia’s turbulent

nations, especially Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,

were prized for their great beauty and fine

Central Asia. The cotton harvest became a cen-

history and pivotal geographic posi-

Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan, hop-

tral social event in the life of Soviet collective

peoples to varied artistic influences and

Soviet socialism could bring not only to the

Asia’s contribution to the Soviet system. The

along major trade routes, artists benefited by

Twentieth-century Central Asia, the largest

allowed for ample exploration of themes that

of India, China, Iran, Russia, and beyond. Cen-

rule, maintained a tenuous balance between

of the region as well as its dramatic landscapes.

tion have exposed the region’s diverse

traditions. In steppes, mountains, and valleys

experiencing the aesthetics and techniques

tral Asia became a ripe environment for the

ing to present them as an example of what

Islamic world, but to all developing countries. Muslim-majority region to experience Soviet

its Muslim cultural heritage and Soviet athe-

farms, and its success demonstrated Central cotton harvest was a key artistic subject that

celebrated the traditional clothing and people

gia Nostal There has always been tension within Central

Asian socialist realism between its celebration of Soviet modernization and its preoccupation

ist modernism.

with local cultural uniqueness and pre-modern

Tsarist Russia and later the Soviet Union

region’s socialist realism cultural output. Paint-

talgia for pre-Soviet life was a theme primarily

last century in Central Asia. The Soviets worked

that combined the monumentalism of Soviet

region their home. It allowed these artists to

and parochial nationalism.

culture and to indulge in a fascination with

emergence of beautiful, engaging, and often

intriguing works of art.

became the most predominant influence of the vigorously to modernize the newly created

This balance is particularly apparent in the

history. In the early years of Soviet power, nos-

ers of this era produced a unique school of art

art with exoticism, local cultural influences,

escape the politicization of modern Soviet

On one hand, Central Asian socialist real-

the exotic. By the 1970s, however, nostalgia

by the Soviets. It reproduces classic themes of

Asian artists, allowing them to explore their

urbanization, and literacy. It celebrates the

These new references to national motifs were

and the Party leader. On the other hand, the

tions of colors, textures, and faces. Although

had become the domain of native Central

industrial modernization, women’s liberation,

own heritage and infuse it with mythic ideals.

teacher, the worker, the progressive farmer,

transformed through more abstract interpreta-

works, whether created by native or non-native

this art has elements of self-exoticization, it

Central Asians, echo European colonial art. This

tradition, known as Orientalism, romanticizes

landscapes and faces by using motifs drawn from local textiles and cultural traditions.

workmanship.

The region’s vibrant textile tradition came

to a halt in the twentieth century – the result

nineteenth-century textiles are considered

porary textiles produced in traditional ways

are undergoing an unprecedented resurgence,

thanks to the perseverance of generations of artisans who kept their skills alive through

the years of Soviet rule.

This exhibition is the first in the United

of economic change and a desire to “modern-

States devoted to Central Asia’s socialist

directly contributed to the decline of the artis-

recognition to this little-known, but fasci-

ize.” The loss of private textile workshops

tic competition that had allowed artisans to

realism art movement, giving long-overdue

nating, artistic tradition. During the Soviet

push the limits of their craft artistically and

period, hundreds of Central Asian painters

In socialist realist paintings, Central Asian

careers to artistic pursuits with unprece-

technically in the previous century.

textiles were used as symbols of two some-

what opposing ideals: progress and nostalgia

and graphic artists were able to devote their dented support but often also unwelcomed

guidance from the state.

explored by Russian artists who had made the

ism celebrates the new world order sought

Bag face, Ersari, Turkmenistan, early 19th century, Wool and goat hair; knotted pile, asymmetrical knot, open right, The Textile Museum 1977.36.14, gift of Jerome A. and Mary Jane Straka

works of art and cultural artifacts, contem-

original designs, and vibrant colors. They

Samarkand, Evgeniya A. Maleina, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1955, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

Post-Soviet political, social and economic

and men—the nineteenth-century Central

cotton. In the mid-1970s, the Soviet Union

ton output with the lion’s share coming from

and economic forces that were glorified in

tradition a second chance. While the region’s

Asian textiles are distinguished by their bold,

produced one-quarter of the world global cot-

ancient textile traditions of Central Asia were

peoples—from Tajik and Turkmen; nomads

planned economy decreed that Central Asia

would specialize in agriculture, especially

for heroic times. While these textile images

was also part of an evolving exploration of Etudes for the Midday Painting, Semyon A. Chuikov, Soviet Union, Kirghiz SSR, 1935, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

national identity in the region that continues

to be a preoccupation with artists and citizens in the post-Soviet period.

Marlene Laruelle Central Asia Program Director Research Professor of International Affairs Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University Sumru Belger Krody Senior Curator The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum Details on cover and left: Munisak (woman’s robe), Uzbekistan, Bukhara, 1860-1870, silk and cotton; warp ikat, velvet, The Textile Museum 1977.31, Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund


ing Harvest

Textiles an i s A Central

helped artists to enrich their narrative, the

With a long history of irrigation techniques

Textiles have been part of Central Asian iden-

on the brink of extinction due to the political

always been predominantly agrarian.

in the long history of textile production in

the paintings.

of this tradition, the first industrialized large-

Produced by ethnically and socially diverse

changes in Central Asia have given textile

in the Tsarist period and accelerated rapidly

and settled people; dyers and tailors; women

reaching back centuries, Central Asia has

tity for centuries. The last brilliant chapter

Although cotton growing has long been part

the region was in the nineteenth century.

scale cotton production in the region began

after the Bolsheviks seized power. The Soviet

The Bazaar at Bibi Khanom, Varsham N. Yeremyan, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1945, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

F

or centuries, Central Asia’s turbulent

nations, especially Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,

were prized for their great beauty and fine

Central Asia. The cotton harvest became a cen-

history and pivotal geographic posi-

Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan, hop-

tral social event in the life of Soviet collective

peoples to varied artistic influences and

Soviet socialism could bring not only to the

Asia’s contribution to the Soviet system. The

along major trade routes, artists benefited by

Twentieth-century Central Asia, the largest

allowed for ample exploration of themes that

of India, China, Iran, Russia, and beyond. Cen-

rule, maintained a tenuous balance between

of the region as well as its dramatic landscapes.

tion have exposed the region’s diverse

traditions. In steppes, mountains, and valleys

experiencing the aesthetics and techniques

tral Asia became a ripe environment for the

ing to present them as an example of what

Islamic world, but to all developing countries. Muslim-majority region to experience Soviet

its Muslim cultural heritage and Soviet athe-

farms, and its success demonstrated Central cotton harvest was a key artistic subject that

celebrated the traditional clothing and people

gia Nostal There has always been tension within Central

Asian socialist realism between its celebration of Soviet modernization and its preoccupation

ist modernism.

with local cultural uniqueness and pre-modern

Tsarist Russia and later the Soviet Union

region’s socialist realism cultural output. Paint-

talgia for pre-Soviet life was a theme primarily

last century in Central Asia. The Soviets worked

that combined the monumentalism of Soviet

region their home. It allowed these artists to

and parochial nationalism.

culture and to indulge in a fascination with

emergence of beautiful, engaging, and often

intriguing works of art.

became the most predominant influence of the vigorously to modernize the newly created

This balance is particularly apparent in the

history. In the early years of Soviet power, nos-

ers of this era produced a unique school of art

art with exoticism, local cultural influences,

escape the politicization of modern Soviet

On one hand, Central Asian socialist real-

the exotic. By the 1970s, however, nostalgia

by the Soviets. It reproduces classic themes of

Asian artists, allowing them to explore their

urbanization, and literacy. It celebrates the

These new references to national motifs were

and the Party leader. On the other hand, the

tions of colors, textures, and faces. Although

had become the domain of native Central

industrial modernization, women’s liberation,

own heritage and infuse it with mythic ideals.

teacher, the worker, the progressive farmer,

transformed through more abstract interpreta-

works, whether created by native or non-native

this art has elements of self-exoticization, it

Central Asians, echo European colonial art. This

tradition, known as Orientalism, romanticizes

landscapes and faces by using motifs drawn from local textiles and cultural traditions.

workmanship.

The region’s vibrant textile tradition came

to a halt in the twentieth century – the result

nineteenth-century textiles are considered

porary textiles produced in traditional ways

are undergoing an unprecedented resurgence,

thanks to the perseverance of generations of artisans who kept their skills alive through

the years of Soviet rule.

This exhibition is the first in the United

of economic change and a desire to “modern-

States devoted to Central Asia’s socialist

directly contributed to the decline of the artis-

recognition to this little-known, but fasci-

ize.” The loss of private textile workshops

tic competition that had allowed artisans to

realism art movement, giving long-overdue

nating, artistic tradition. During the Soviet

push the limits of their craft artistically and

period, hundreds of Central Asian painters

In socialist realist paintings, Central Asian

careers to artistic pursuits with unprece-

technically in the previous century.

textiles were used as symbols of two some-

what opposing ideals: progress and nostalgia

and graphic artists were able to devote their dented support but often also unwelcomed

guidance from the state.

explored by Russian artists who had made the

ism celebrates the new world order sought

Bag face, Ersari, Turkmenistan, early 19th century, Wool and goat hair; knotted pile, asymmetrical knot, open right, The Textile Museum 1977.36.14, gift of Jerome A. and Mary Jane Straka

works of art and cultural artifacts, contem-

original designs, and vibrant colors. They

Samarkand, Evgeniya A. Maleina, Soviet Union, Uzbek SSR, 1955, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

Post-Soviet political, social and economic

and men—the nineteenth-century Central

cotton. In the mid-1970s, the Soviet Union

ton output with the lion’s share coming from

and economic forces that were glorified in

tradition a second chance. While the region’s

Asian textiles are distinguished by their bold,

produced one-quarter of the world global cot-

ancient textile traditions of Central Asia were

peoples—from Tajik and Turkmen; nomads

planned economy decreed that Central Asia

would specialize in agriculture, especially

for heroic times. While these textile images

was also part of an evolving exploration of Etudes for the Midday Painting, Semyon A. Chuikov, Soviet Union, Kirghiz SSR, 1935, oil on canvas, The Turdukulov Collection

national identity in the region that continues

to be a preoccupation with artists and citizens in the post-Soviet period.

Marlene Laruelle Central Asia Program Director Research Professor of International Affairs Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University Sumru Belger Krody Senior Curator The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum Details on cover and left: Munisak (woman’s robe), Uzbekistan, Bukhara, 1860-1870, silk and cotton; warp ikat, velvet, The Textile Museum 1977.31, Ruth Lincoln Fisher Memorial Fund


rnity de o M g n ri Encounte Central Asians first encountered Europeanstyle modernity with the arrival of Russian

MATION OR F N I MUSEUM literacy campaigns and disseminated new

ideas through schools and mass media. Sanc-

Tsarist soldiers and bureaucrats at the

tioned ideas about gender roles underwent

profound engagement with modernism,

profoundly upended Central Asian social

as the omnipresent state sought to funda-

The artworks highlighted in the Encoun-

end of the nineteenth century. Their most

however, occurred during the Soviet era

mentally transform all aspects of society.

dramatic revision. Together, these dynamics classes and traditional hierarchies.

tering Modernity section of this exhibition

During this era, traditional political and

provide a window into these various ways of

sion. State-sanctioned national identities

modernity through art. At the same time,

religious elites experienced massive repres-

celebrating Central Asia’s engagement with

gradually replaced regional tribal allegiances.

they demonstrate how Central Asian artists

ized agriculture prompted fundamental

heritage throughout the Soviet moderniza-

Industrialization and large-scale collectiveconomic shifts. The state organized massive

maintained an appreciation for local cultural

tion project.

Location

The museum is located at the corner of 21st and G streets, NW, four blocks from the Foggy Bottom Metro station (Blue, Orange, and Silver lines). For directions and parking information, visit museum.gwu.edu/plan-visit.

Hours

Monday, Wednesday–Friday: 11:30 AM–6:30 PM Saturday: 10 AM–5 PM; Sunday: 1–5 PM Closed Tuesdays and university holidays.

Admission

$8 suggested donation for non-members. Free for museum members, children, and current GW students, faculty, and staff.

Accessibility

The museum is wheelchair accessible and designated garage parking is available nearby. Visit museum.gwu.edu/accessibility for more information.

Museum Shop

Visit the shop for unique jewelry, home décor, books, and gifts from Washington, D.C., and around the world.

Arthur D. Jenkins Library

The reading room is open Wednesday– Thursday 1–4 PM and by appointment. Please contact the librarian before your visit at museumlibrary@gwu.edu.

Albert H. Small Center for National Capital Area Studies

With the museum’s Washingtoniana Collection as a centerpiece, the center engages students, scholars, and the public in research and educational programs pertaining to our nation’s capital. Old Patterns, New Order: Socialist Realism in Central Asia is a collaboration between the George Washington University’s Central Asia Program and the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

Eradicate Illiteracy (Likbez), Abdurakhman Rakhimov, Soviet Union, Tajik SSR, 1986, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

The museum is grateful to Nurbek and Churek Turdukulov and Sean Roberts for their generous cooperation in lending from their collections to this exhibition.

Public Programs

For the most up-to-date list of the museum’s educational programs, visit museum.gwu.edu/calendar.

Exhibition Tours

Free walk-in tours highlighting selections from current exhibitions are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 PM (textile tour) and 2:30 PM (Washingtoniana tour). To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, email museumed@gwu.edu at least four weeks in advance.

Join or Donate

Support from members and donors is the driving force that allows the museum to continue its work bringing art, history, and culture alive for the GW community and the public. To join or renew a current membership, or to make a donation, visit museum.gwu.edu/support or call 202-994-5579.

Stay in Touch

Follow the museum online for more information about works on view, programs, and behind-thescenes activities. @GWTextileMuseum TextileMuseum GWMuseum Textile-Museum.tumblr.com

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

701 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052 202-994-5200  |  museum.gwu.edu

R OCTOBE

10

, 201 9 2 Y A – M , 2015 

6


rnity de o M g n ri Encounte Central Asians first encountered Europeanstyle modernity with the arrival of Russian

MATION OR F N I MUSEUM literacy campaigns and disseminated new

ideas through schools and mass media. Sanc-

Tsarist soldiers and bureaucrats at the

tioned ideas about gender roles underwent

profound engagement with modernism,

profoundly upended Central Asian social

as the omnipresent state sought to funda-

The artworks highlighted in the Encoun-

end of the nineteenth century. Their most

however, occurred during the Soviet era

mentally transform all aspects of society.

dramatic revision. Together, these dynamics classes and traditional hierarchies.

tering Modernity section of this exhibition

During this era, traditional political and

provide a window into these various ways of

sion. State-sanctioned national identities

modernity through art. At the same time,

religious elites experienced massive repres-

celebrating Central Asia’s engagement with

gradually replaced regional tribal allegiances.

they demonstrate how Central Asian artists

ized agriculture prompted fundamental

heritage throughout the Soviet moderniza-

Industrialization and large-scale collectiveconomic shifts. The state organized massive

maintained an appreciation for local cultural

tion project.

Location

The museum is located at the corner of 21st and G streets, NW, four blocks from the Foggy Bottom Metro station (Blue, Orange, and Silver lines). For directions and parking information, visit museum.gwu.edu/plan-visit.

Hours

Monday, Wednesday–Friday: 11:30 AM–6:30 PM Saturday: 10 AM–5 PM; Sunday: 1–5 PM Closed Tuesdays and university holidays.

Admission

$8 suggested donation for non-members. Free for museum members, children, and current GW students, faculty, and staff.

Accessibility

The museum is wheelchair accessible and designated garage parking is available nearby. Visit museum.gwu.edu/accessibility for more information.

Museum Shop

Visit the shop for unique jewelry, home décor, books, and gifts from Washington, D.C., and around the world.

Arthur D. Jenkins Library

The reading room is open Wednesday– Thursday 1–4 PM and by appointment. Please contact the librarian before your visit at museumlibrary@gwu.edu.

Albert H. Small Center for National Capital Area Studies

With the museum’s Washingtoniana Collection as a centerpiece, the center engages students, scholars, and the public in research and educational programs pertaining to our nation’s capital. Old Patterns, New Order: Socialist Realism in Central Asia is a collaboration between the George Washington University’s Central Asia Program and the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

Eradicate Illiteracy (Likbez), Abdurakhman Rakhimov, Soviet Union, Tajik SSR, 1986, oil on canvas, The Roberts Collection

The museum is grateful to Nurbek and Churek Turdukulov and Sean Roberts for their generous cooperation in lending from their collections to this exhibition.

Public Programs

For the most up-to-date list of the museum’s educational programs, visit museum.gwu.edu/calendar.

Exhibition Tours

Free walk-in tours highlighting selections from current exhibitions are offered each Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 PM (textile tour) and 2:30 PM (Washingtoniana tour). To schedule a docent-led tour for groups of six to forty people, email museumed@gwu.edu at least four weeks in advance.

Join or Donate

Support from members and donors is the driving force that allows the museum to continue its work bringing art, history, and culture alive for the GW community and the public. To join or renew a current membership, or to make a donation, visit museum.gwu.edu/support or call 202-994-5579.

Stay in Touch

Follow the museum online for more information about works on view, programs, and behind-thescenes activities. @GWTextileMuseum TextileMuseum GWMuseum Textile-Museum.tumblr.com

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

701 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052 202-994-5200  |  museum.gwu.edu

R OCTOBE

10

, 201 9 2 Y A – M , 2015 

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Old Patterns, New Order: Socialist Realism in Central Asia  

Guide to the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum's exhibition (October 10, 2015 through May 29, 2016)

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