Page 1


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IJ-O }3 S. M. U ................ "How'm I Doin'?"

U be (Sreen ie Vol. 5

NOVEMBER 16, 1935

T. C. U .................. .. Headin' For Round-up. "

NO.7

"Doc" Spears .... "What's the Reason I'm Not Pleasin' You?"

CONTENTS

The Rosters. Alma Mater (song) Tulane Pictures Tulane Pictures Feature Cartoon . All-Star Team Records.

Sing-Sing............... "There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding. "

3 4 5

6

LOST ART

9 10

Drop kicking, as practiced twenty years ago, seems to be a lost art.

I 2-I 3 15

16

..

Today when a field goal is tried, which is seldom enough, it is via the place kick route. This necessitates an extra man (the ball holder), which cuts down on the blocking and results in many efforts being blocked.

I7

18 19 20 21-22

One of the chief reasons for dropkicking being a forgotten chapter of football is because the goal posts are on the end line, lengthening the distance and thereby reducing the premium for developing a good man in this specialty.

WALTZING DOWN TIN-PAN ALLEY (With apologies to Braven Dyer) of the Los Angeles Times)

Army .......................··Walking" Around Dream.

Last

Florida ................... "You're the Tops."

Official Souvenir Football Program of Tulane University, Published for Each Home Game

Editorials . Kentucky Pictures. Kentucky Pictures. "All-1'ime" Kentucky Team The Gridiron Roundup . "Time Out" (jokes) . The Line-ups , 'U nder the Baker" .

the

In

a

Illinois ..................... •'The Man on the Flying Trapeeze. "

If the rules committee would really like to give the offense a better break, let them put the goal posts back on the goal line. After all, it seems that is where they belong.

Sewanee................ "How Come You Do Me Like You Do?" Notre Dame....... "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." Miss. State........... "Massa's in De Col', Col', Groun',"

Monk Moscrip, Stanford end, has made the country three-point conscious this fall. The Cardinals have won three important games due to his successful place kick efforts.

Tulane.................... "Say It Isn't So." North Carolina .. "Yes, Sir, That's My Baby." Pittsburg............... "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes."

If Tiny Thornhill hadn't developed this specialty, the Cards would have been out of luck against Santa Clara, Washington and Southern California.

L. S. U ...................'TIl Be Hard to Handle." Minnesota .............. 'Lovely to Look At." Northwestern ..... "Without a Word of Warning. "

All of Moscrip's kicks were place.. ments, however.

Colgate...................·'Try .to Forget." .

"I,

3


33-Bert Johnson-Halfback oo-Norris McMillan-Quarterback 3 [-Eugene Meyers-Center

22-Clarence Ayers-Halfback 48-William Jobe-Guard 23-Charles McClurg-Guard

32-Langdon Hay-Fullback 5 [-James Long-End 42-Sam Potter-Guard

52-Joe Huddleston-Guard 34-Frank McCool-Halfback 47-Stanley Nevers- Tackle


53- Richard Meade-Center 44-Nicholas Lutz-Fullback 45-Joseph Bosse-Tackle

36- Joseph Hagan-End 39-Homer Nicholas-Guard 26-Ray Skaggs-Tackle

4o-Vincent Robinson- Quarterback I6-Wesley Taylor-Quarterback IS-William Jones-Halfback

24- Lawrence Boland-Halfback 37-Elmore Simpson- Fullback I3-Robert Davis-Halfback


All~ Time AII~Star Team University of Kentucky (Lexington, Ky.)

By George Trevor Richard Webb' I O.................... CENTER .............. Howard Williams '29 Birkett Pribble ·23 .............. ...... GUARD ................ Lev Forquer '29 Peter Drury ·30 ........................ GUARD ............ .... John Chambers' I I Dell Ramsey ·25 .... ................... TACKLE .............. .}oseph Thompson '3 I Ralph Wright ·32 ........ ............• .TACKLE.............. .}ohn Brittain' I 7 "Ab" Kirwan ·26 ............ ......... .END ...................... Howard Kinne' I 6 Joseph Rupert ·34 .................... END ...... ................ Richard Barbee' I 0 Wm. (Black Doc) Rodes' I 6 ..... QUARTER ............Gale Mohney '28 Wm . (Red Doc) Rodes' I 3 ....... BACK ... . ............... "Dutch" Shrader' I 6 John (Shipwreck) Kelly ·32 ..... BACK .. ......... ........ Will Ed. Covington '28 Ralph Kercheval ·33 ................. BACK ....... ............ Curtis Sanders '23

Old Kaintuck. famous for its beautiful women

Tennessee to a standstill

and its thorough-bred horses, has also turned out some pretty sweet football players.

In

192 I with a typical

Wildcat savagery.

Sport runs in

Ab Kirwan's end play in the 1925 victory over

the blood of Blue Crass reared youngsters and the

Tennessee remains a Kentucky high spot in this

University of Kentucky gets its share of high-step-

vital

ping halfbacks though line material has b e en rela-

department.

The Rodes boys-Black Doc

and Red Doc-would b e quarte r back and half-

tively scarce since Jackie Thompson of Purdue

back in the all-time Wildcat backfield.

coached the first Wildcat eleven at Lexington in

named William.

1892.

Both were

Red Doc starred on the I 9 I I - I 2

teams which conquered Tennessee, while Black Doc Back in the pre-war era Kentucky frequently

piloted the I 9 I 5 team which trimmed the Volun-

conquered its 'Orange jersied rivals from Tennessee

teers 6 to O.

but perhaps the peak of Kentucky' s football form

Who hasn't heard of Shipwreck Kelly, now part

was reached during the 1928-3 I span, when the . Wildcats

thrice

deadlocked

potentially

owner of the Brooklyn Dodger Professional Eleven,

stronger

whose

elevens from Knoxville.

devil-may-care

run ·backs

of

kicks

and

swooping flank dashes demoralized the heavily fav -

Dick W e bb, Kentucky's finest center, snapped

ored Tennessee team of

I 93 I ?

Almost single-

the ball on the 1909- I 0 teams which white washed

handed Kelly checkmated Hackman and McEver,

Tennessee 17 to 0 and 10 to O.

Tennessee's touchdown twins. Shipwreck was a wild, unorthodox gambler, but the good ship T ennessee often ran aground on shoals of his making. Kelly could quick kick expertly or snare an unexpec ted pass while on the gallop .

Birkett Pribble

still regarded as the parent of guard play at Lexington, figured in the 1922 victory over Alabama. His guard mate on the all-time Blue and White array would be Peter Drury, who stone-walled Ten-

Ralph Kercheval, perhaps the greatest punter of modern times, averaged more than 50 yards from the line of scrimmage during his career. He booted a wet ball unerringly and angled his punts into coffin corner. Kercheval was handicapped by a subnormal line yet he never had a kick blocked and gained consistently on plunges. He is booting' em a mile now for the Brooklyn Pro team.

nessee in 1928-29 by his fiery defensive play. Lexington observers rate Dell Ramsey as Kentucky's best individual tackle.

He opened the holes

which gave the Wildcats a 23 to 20 upset win over Tennessee in 1925.

Ralph Wright, of recent mem-

ory, teamed up with Joe Thompson to give Kentucky its finest tackle combination.

Copyright~d 1935 by W . W. Wells.

They fought

6


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THE GRIDIRON ROUNDUP The Score to Date:

.

I

Picked

Winners

84

61

Losers 21

Ties

2

to continue III the title race. Take your choice. P. S . : ConfidentialIy, I picks L. S. U. Alabama-Georgia Tech-The Crimson Tide to give the Engineers a few washouts along the big track. T ennessee-Vanderbil t-The Commodores to continue in the Baker's Dozen title parade and Tennessee to fade out. S. M. U.-Arkansas-The Mustangs will hardly get back from Los Angeles before they must entrain for Fayetteville. Still, we'll take Matty BelI's fine team to take the Razorbacks. Colgate-Syracuse-The Raiders to ruin Syracuse's perfect record . North Carolina-Duke-Here's one of the most important games of the week. The T arheels wiIl be battling for a chance to play in either the Rose Bowl or Sugar Bowl. Duke's Blue Devils will be in the same spot that Tulane wiIl be in against L. S. U., on November 30 . lt'I1 be a great game in which anything may happen. Yet on the basis of performances to date, we must select the Tarheels. Marquette-Temple - Here's another involving an unbeaten and untied team, the Golden Avalanche of Marquette. Temple has lost but one but we have a feeling that it'I1 be two by Saturday night. Minnesota-Michigan-The Gophers have had one hard one after another. This week they must get by the Michigan jinx at Ann Arbor. They wiIl but it won't be easy. Ohio State-Illinois-The Buckeyes seem to have lost a lot of punch in the past two weeks and Illinois' victory over Michigan was impressive. Still, we'II take Schmidt's wreckers to keep pace with Minnesota in the Big Ten title march. Rice-Texas A. & M.-The Owls by a country mile. Notre Dame-Army-The Ramblers may be slow bouncing back after their Big Headache of last week. Yet, they should have enough left to take the battered Cadets. Nebraska-Pitt.-This will be another great game in which anything may happen. A tottering vote for the Cornhuskers. There's twelve in which most anything may happen.

We were worried sick Monday over the strange disappearance of Colonel Dingelhoffer, our Demon Dopester. We had looked for a telephone calI from the old felIow all day Sunday. He didn't put in his usual chesty appearance Monday. Along about nightfaIl came a cryptic message, postmarked "Somewhere in the Dakotas." It was a wireless and somewhat jumbled: "Aloft in the Stratosphere BaIloon, Notre¡ Dame II, Somewhere over the Dakotas: "Eddyting sage. Yup hire'n kyte. Struck nor'wester at Soudtbend Sateve. Took off with Elmer and his crowd in packed gondoler. Temp now around forty below but Elmer and his felIows seem completely relaxed. "Bringing back some wonderful scientific data including study of stratospheric effects on footbalI team. Have clear proof that Elmer's boys although at altitude of 74,900 feet feel lower than sea level. They don't want to come down before Christmas, since there's no one up here to ask them "what happened Sateve?" (Signed) "David Dabster Dingelhoffer." So the Colonel had scored a real scoop. We are anxious to get the details. We knew that he was planning to take in the IrishNorthwestern game Saturday at South Bend and that as an expert he had picked Mr. Layden's team to win in a walk. Before going to South Bend, the Colonel had chiseled a sideline ticket in order to sit on the bench with the Irish. It seems that the bench and alI on it took off late in the afternoon on an uncharted and unheralded strato voyage. You can always count on the Colonel being present when history is in the making. Before departing for South Bend, the Colonel scanned this week's menu ~nd did a bit of concentrated selecting. He left a note on the desk with the folIowing picks, hedging here and there as usual: Georgia-L. S. U.-The Red Stick Tigers were wound mighty tight last Saturday. Georgia was keyed up for Tulane. Both won by correspondingly the same scores. This game is being played in Georgia's backlot. The teams wiII be battling for the right 9


TIME

OU1' All husbands would be willing to give their wives the last word if they were sure it would be the last word .

WHAT THEY THINK OF FOOTBALL Arthur Brisbane: Football players are a very strong lot. But they are not as strong as gorillas. Of course gorillas do not play football but they would be more than a match for any eleven college boys. The same thing applies to the Japanese Navy and the United States Senate, though one speculates on what would happen if the gorillas ran the Navy and were elected to the Senate.

••• The lazy employee rushed In the office thirty minutes late and hung his hat on a nail. "Hey, you, you're late again. Do you know what time we go to work in this office?" the boss roared. "No, SIr, the employee replied. "They are always at it when I arrive."

•••

Peggy Hopkins Joyce: Football is a very nice game. And football play· ers are nice, too. I think I once married a football player but I'm not sure.

Angry Patron (leaving cinema): ''I've never seen a worse picture in my life '" Commissionaire (overhearing the remark) : "Ever'ad yer photo taken?"

Charles Schwab: Prosperity is here with us. How do I know? Its tougher now to get two seats on the fifty-yard line than it ever was. Upton Sinclair: I am in favor of abolishing poverty among foot ball players. The Girl Friend: I don't know much about football but I adore yelling.

••• "I shall have to put you fellows in the same room," said the host. "That's all right," the guests replied'. "Well, I think," said the host, "you' II have a comfortable night. It's a featherbed." At 2 o'clock in the morning, one of the guests awoke his companion. "Change places with me, Dick," he groaned. "It's my turn to lie on the feather."

TULANE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Tulane 44; V. M. I. O. Tulane 0; Auburn 10. Tulane 19; Florida 7. Tulane 0; Minnesota 20. Tulane 33; Sewanee O. Tulane 14; Colgate 6. Tulane 13; Ge';rgia 26. Nov. 16-Kentucky at New Orleans. Nov. 23-Louisiana Normal at New Orleans. Nov. 30-L. S. U. at New Orleans.

Her Escort: Sit down in front . The Star Fullback: Who, me? The Stadium Janitor: Things is about the same. I got just as much dirt to sweep up as before. -(Temple Football Program)

A woman went to see a doctor. "Doctor," she exclaimed, loudly, bouncing into the room, "I want you to say frankly what's wrong with me." He surveyed her from head to foot in his best professional manner . "Madam," h e said at length, "I've just three things to tell you. First, your weight wants reducin~ by nearly 50 pounds. Secpndly, your beauty would be improved by freer use of soap and water . And, third,l,y, I'm an artist; the doctor lives on the next floor .

....

Little Mary was left to fix lunch, and when the mothe r returned with a friend she noticed Mary had the tea strained. "Did you find the lost 'straine r ?" Mothe r asked . "No, mother, I couldn't, so I used the fly swatter," Mary replied. Mother nearly swoon e d, so Mary hastily added: "Don' t get e xcite d, mother, I used the old one."

••• Waiter: "How do you like the mutton chops, sir ?" Diner: "They make me think of the fable that speaks of dressing a wolf in sheep's clothing."

••• Boob: "Why did Miss Old girl get mad at you?" Simp: "She dared me to guess her age and I hit it ri~ht the first time ."

••• Silas: "The fishing is very good here . A bass was c~:-,ght yesterday weighing nearly four pounds. Hank: " Who caught him-Bill Yapp?" Silas: "Heavens, no! If Bill had caught him he'd have weighed nearly eight ,"

••• Miss Catnip: "A man can never WIn out in an argument with a woman." Mr. Dogbo~e: "Oh, yes he can-he can refuse to marry her. 10


H EAI>QUA~TE~S IN NEW OI"?LEAN $-

k,fJlJM

~

bATH SEYMOUR WEISS M anaging D irector

IN :The ¡~oose1Jel~

Football fans from ever y w her e meet at The Bienville. If you come Ollce, you'll come again and again to this well-appointed hotel located on fashionable St. Charles Avenue overlooking I,ee Circle.

Open from 10 to 2 Dance and Dine Entertainment Circular B ar

,""it .. ~

"

00 UI>

When you enter The Bienville, the home like atmosphere bids you welcome, You'll like its hanosome suites and the cheerful 'service that only a well-trained staff can give. Even the most modest budget can afford The BienYille.

i~nvill f::


Hit the line hard and hit it square Play the game and play it fair Crash right throughdo or die You've got to be good to SATISFY.

TULANE SQUAD

KENTUCKY SQUAD

TED COX, Coach

CHET WYNNE, Coach

Henley, e

2 Carnegie, h b 3 4 5 6

Tull, c Wight, h b Neyland, e Weaver, c

Daly, t

8 9 24 32 35 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

Hillyer, e Eddy, t Flettrich, f b Accardo, c

Dalovisio, e Henderson , h

Nichols, h b

Manteris, h b Andrews, f b

56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 b 68 69 70 71

Watermeier. g johnson, h b

Schneidau, e Moreau, q b

Watson, h b Flowers, h b LaRocca, e Page, q b adorn, h b Preisser, e

Dhmann, e Evans, g

Gamble, e

55 Smither, g

Mintz, h b

00 McMillan, q b

31

Kentucky vs. Tulane THE STARTING LINEUPS (Subject to Change by Coaches)

Myers, c

Payn e, W ., h b Ott, q b Memtsas, e

Stevenson, e

32 Hay, f b

Rhod es, t

33 johnson, h b

Go uld, c Benedict, q b Graham, q b Monk, g Payne, H., h b

Enneking, e

8 Wallace, t

59

34 McCool, h b

37 Simpson, f b

Hall,g C

Friedrichs, t

52

76

Pace .................................. R. T . ____________ .... __ . ______ . ____ .Skaggs

26

18 j ones, h b

41 Goforth, e

52

Dirmann ___________________ .. ____ . __ R. E .. __ .. __________ .. ________________ .Long

51

Page. ____ . ______ . ____ . ______ ... __ .. __ Q. B... __ . ______ . __ .. __ . ____ . __ .McMillan

00

80

Thames.. __ . __ ______ .. ______________ L. H . ______ ... ____ ... ____________ .Johnson

33

56

Mintz.. __________ __ . ________________ R. H .. _______________________________ .Davis

13

66

Loftin. ______ . ____ . __________________ .F . B. ____________ ... ____________ .Simpson

37

20 Wad'ngton, hb 42 Potter,S., g

44 Lutz, f b

23 McClurg, g

45 Bosse, t

24 Boland, h b

4 7 Nevers , t

26 Skaggs, t

48 jobe, t

27 Hinkebein, c

50 Ellington, e

28 Sympson, f b

5 1 Long. e

43 Olah, t

Pace, t

Miller, t Thames, h b

OFFICIALS

Dexheimer, h b Lewis, h b Tolusso, f b

·3 1

40 Robinson, q b

22 A ye rs , h b

Nussbaum. t

47 23

16 Vanaman, c

74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 83 86 96

McGrath, t

Moss .................................. L. T ................................ Nevers Smither .................. ........ ... L. G .. ..... ... ................... McClurg

Watermeier.. ..... ...... .......... R. G ......................... Huddleston

21 C rai g, h b

Lodrigues, f b

74

Gould ............. ... _.. ........ ....... C ................................. Meyers

72 Upton, t 73 Ary, t Moss, t

50

60

q b

Buckner, g

Avants,

No.

Name

Memtsas .. ........ ........ .. ..... ... L. E ............................. Ellington

42

15 Sherman,

Freese, c

Position

38 Potter, L., g

Goll, g Loftin, c

Name

55

36 Hagan, e

13 Davis , h b

KENTUCKY

TULANE No.

29 Orr, e·

52 Huddleston, g

30 Kurachek, c

53 McIntyre, g

Referee-Buck Cheves (Georgia)

Cooley, g

Umpire-Dr. E. P . Maxwell (Ohio State) Hea d Linesman-R. K. Haxton (Ole Miss ) Field Judge-Roy B. Striegel (Tenn)

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A word of congratulations to the two Mississippi members of the Southeastern Conference for pepping up the 1 935 race is in order. Major Ralph Sasse's Mississippi Staters and Ed Walker's Ole Miss team made the October lap of the race most interesting. The two schools also served definite notice that they must be reckoned with in the future and not taken for granted as a "door mat" when the experts start prognosticating in September next. Sasse's Maroons brought great glory to Southern football by their splendid victory over Army and also furnished a dramatic touch to the Southeastern race in October by decisively beating Alabama. Ole Miss defeated St. Louis University in decisive fashion and gave Tennessee the jitters last week although losing, 14 to 13. The Flood also beat Florida in impressive fashIOn. During the past eight or ten years football dopesters have never taken Ole Miss or Mississippi State seriously. They were nice, clean teams to play and furnished a suitable Homecoming opponent to insure the old grads a happy ending. They were always valiant in defeat and game to the core. Someone called them, along with Sewanee, the sweethearts of the Conference. They can no longer be placed in that category. Their teams this year were well coached, manned by talented players and a worthy opponent for any team in the Conference. They may be expected to improve a year hence even over the fine advancement shown during the current season.

attendance at the dozen major games each week topped that figure too.

••• Navy-Penn led last week with 75,000 while Ohio State-Notre Dame set the pace the previous week with 85,000.

• •• Ralph McGill, sports editor of the Atlanta Constitution, says the Vanderbilt people, not satisfied with the three "moral" victories won over Fordham, Temple and L. S. U., are now demanding something "immoral."

••• Freddie Russell, sports editor of the Nashville Banner, believes Carly (Mutt) Ray of Dartmouth will be all-America center this year. (Mutt may be good but we'll string with Walter Gilbert of Auburn until we see better ones.)

••• Red Roberts, one time All-American star of Centre College, is now a State Senator in Kentucky.

••• The Nashville papers quote Major Bill Britton of Tennessee as predicting a Vol triumph over the Vandy Commodores. "We'll beat Vanderbilt. We've been doing it every year and I don't see why we can't do it this season," the Major is quoted as having told the press.

• ••

Mr. Arthur Brisbane, the noted columnish, laments the fact that virile, red blood of our American football players is used in the leg muscles instead of being sent to the brain. Such use of our blood is useless, he feels. Tush, tush, Mr. Brisbane, all work and no play will make Jack dull boy.

• ••

Of teams retain They cuse.

SHORTSHOTS Interest in collegiate football is growing. Twelve major games last week attracted 514,000 fans. The previous three weeks' 15

a

the eight major unbeaten and untied a year ago at this date, only three spotless records at this stage of 1 935. are Princeton, Minnesota and SyraTulane was one of the eight in 1934.


TULANE

ROSTER

No. PLAYER_ HOMEI -H enl ey, CeciL ,...... _______ .. .. ____ __ .......... __ .. Ro • ., dale, Mi ... _ 2--Ca "'e, i", Stanley.. _ .. ___ ......... . ...... Wutville, N. J . 3-Tull, Porter ...... New Orlnna 4--Wi,hl, CharI". . ....................... ___ ..................... . Kil,or e , T u u._ S-Neyland, Di e lrich ....... " .... . ___ __ __ .. ................ . ... Shreve port, La 6--W ... ve., Cl a ude __ _ ............................ . ....... B.ewton. Ala. 7-0.1,.. Bill . . ......... New Orle.n • ... . __ 8-Hillyer, H. H . . ..... ____ ______ ... . ......... New Orleana ... . 9 -Eddy . eha . leo .......................... _........ ...........New Orl". na 2 ....... F'lettrlc h, Albert ........ Ne w Orluna .. 32-Accardo, Nick ..... _........... , ............................ Paltec. on. La .. 35-0. 10"i.io, P et".............. . ............ ,........... . ........ L.ke Chu l,," , La .... 38-Hendeuon, J a m.,. (Billy) ................... ,............... .. Cla.ksdal e, Mi ....... 39-Nicho l., Bill.. ..................... .•. O.lando, Fla. <lo--Manleril, Geor. .... . ....... ....... .Monroe. La. <l 1-Andrewl , John ..................... ,......... . .. .... ..New Orlean • .................... <l2-Wat ermeiu, Dan... . ............ .. .. .. ..... ... ..New O.I.,.n • .... U-.lohn. on,Oou r l.. .. . ..... ,.. ............................. . .... New Orln n • .. 44-Schn" idau, Hu.h el ..... ...................... __ ... ..... .. ..... . New Orln n . <l5-Moruu, Jam .,... . . . .... . New Ortun • ......... <l6--W.Uon, Richard . . ................. ............ Lake Cha rI". , La .. 47_ Flowe •• , Bill .. . .. Bir Spri n ... Tn.. 4S-LaRocca, Vic ................ _.. ............ ... ............. .. ........... N ew Orlun • ... 49-Pa ..", Richard......... . .. ..... New Orl"an • .. . SO--Odom, Trp,:- .... ...... ... . ..... "... .... ... ..... . ...... O " kdale, La •... SI_Pr"i.."r, rederick . ..................... . . ......... Ne w Orl" an • ... SZ- OiTmann, John ................ __ .. . .... .Ne w Orle an ...... . ... .. _ ...... !l3-£ .... n., Bern a.d. .................................. . .... Memphi., T enn. . ..................... 54--Gambl e, Ca meron ................ New Orlean. S5--Smilh er, Charl e... .. ... . New Orlean • ... . 56--Min lz, Capl. Berna rd ....... .. ... ........ New Orl.,.n. 5 7- P . yne. William .. ...... .... ....... . ......Winl ervllle,Mill •.. . S8--()tt, Wiltz ,.. .. .... . ..... ........................... ._O .y ka, Mi • • . . S9_Meml .... H arold . ................. . ..................New Orlean • ..... 6o--Gould. Ern ul ........... , .......... ... ...... __ . . ....... Ne w Orlunl ... 61-Benedicl, Ca lvin ... ............... . ...... New Orl.,.n • ... 6Z--e.a ham, Loui... . .......... "............ .. ... .... ....... . ... _New Orlean. 63-Monk, M.rion ................. New Orlun • ....... 64-P.fln" , H" .. h .................... ," .. __ .. . .... .. Winle."ilI e, Mi ...... . 65--Go I, Ca.L ..... ... . ... ........... .New Orl.,...n l ...... ... . 66--Lollin, Noel.. ..... _ ..... S a lon Rou !fe, La •.. 67- Freeae. Sam. ............ . .... . Wheelin" W . V ..... 6S-Buck n er. Norm .. n .... . " ........... ", ... .. __ .. . . .. .................. Ma •• h.l, Te"" " .... . 69--Hall, Norm .. 1 ... ......••..•.. Sweel .. Uer,T"".. 70--A" .. nll, Ma ck.. .. .... ~Su on Rou re, L .... . . ... ..... N ew O.lea n. 7 1- Frie drich., Jerry .. 72- UpIOn, Miller.... . . ............. ,., .... ,.... ~.... . ... ........ N ew O.leans .. 73- Ary, Roy .. ,............ . ....... ,......... ....... . Sli .. ler. Okla.. ........... . .................. . 74- Mo.. , William. . ............... _ ..Monl .ome.y, AI .............................. __ 75-Lodrilu eo. S ianley .,. . .New Orlnn ........... . 76-Pace, D .. " id.............. . ................ ,......... Monroe. L a •...... 77- McGralh, Jam u ..... Mont gomery, AI ... ... . 78--Nu u b .. um, R ay. . . ............... _ New Orlean • ...... .... . . 79--Miller. Ray ...... ... . .............. , ...... ".. ... ... . .. ........... Ne .. Orl e .. n l ................................ 8O--Th.m eo, Loui. ...... . ,........ .. "................ .. Nata lbany, La .... .. . 81_0exheimer, Rob ert Abbeville, AI .. .. . . .............. ,...... . 83-Lewi. , Fr .. nk....... .... . . . ........ Balon Rou .e, L •. 86-Toluuo. L eonard.. . ....... . .I . t.ouma ,L•• ...... 96-Coo ley, Da vi d .. .. , ............ . .. Slidell, La ... .

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KENTUCKY ROSTER ND. PLAYER_ OO-M cMHlen 2-John. on .. 4--Be. m . 5-Sleven.on . 6--Rhodeo ..... 8_WaUau .. 13-0"vi•. .... ,' IS-Shu m .. n .. ... . . 16--V. n.man .. . . I S-Jone •.... " .......... Zo--Wa ddltn . ton 21--C rai r 22_Ayeu .. 23--Mc Clur lr .. 24_Botand ....

HOMEM illin . IOn, Tenn .. . . Le"inrlon. Ky. . ................ . ,. . H od.env ille. Ky •.... . .... " ...... , ..... " .. Pik eville . Ky .. . .... St.nfo rd, Ky •..... , ................... _ .. . .. Lexin , tDn, Ky •.... .. O .. yton, Ky . .. . . ... ,........ " .... Clncinnatl. Ohio ....................... " ....................... . Lexinr.on, Ky •. .... .................... _CDvin'ton. Ky ... ...... ....... Kutt ...... Ky •. A. hl.nd, Ky •. ,.... Corhin, Ky . . Erl a n .."r, Ky. .. .. " ..................... . .. William son, W. V ••....

~~~~:f:b;;i;,-::~ Loui svi ll e. Ky , ... . 28--Sympson ., .. . B .. rdslo,",n, Ky •......... 29_ 0rr. .......... , ........... . . Bowlin r Green, Ky . ... . 30--Knrach"k .. . ..... " ...... , .................... ,........ New York, N. Y 3 1- Mye.... . ........................... " ........ H"rlan, Ky .. . 32-H"y. . ........... I"'ine, K y ......... . 33-JohnsDn .. .................. . .. A. hl.nd, Ky. 34-McCoo t. . ...... .. Ko.ciul ko. Mi n 36--H a,an . .. Loui sville, Ky ..... 37-Simpson S"..emer, Ala .. 3S-P o Uer. L. ,........ " ... ,", ..... , .......... . ... . Mililione, Ky. . ...................... ... .... . 40--Robinson .. . ........ R ichmDnd. Ky .. . . 41--Goforth .. , ... ..... Louil ville, Ky 42-Potter, S. MilllI Dne , Ky. 43-QI.h ... Conneaut, Oh io 44--Lulz .. .. ... . Chic • • o, 1i1... ... .. ... . ................ . 45--Bo.. e .. .. Cincinnali, OhiD ..................... . 47_Ne ve •• .. Ne .. Brh"in, Conn •.. 4S-Jobe. ... ......... . Youn r s town. Ohio . ... 50--£lIin.ton ... . , Louisvill" , Ky. 51 - Lon , . .. She lby v ille. Ky . 52- Hllddt u ton Wina mac. Ind .. .... .. . 53- Mcinty re .. . ...... Gunterlvill", AI • .. .

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LUCKY STRIKE FASHIONS

Can now be part of your wardrobe

Lucky Strike Fashions are at last a reality. They've stepped off the cover of this Football Program to form a gay, dynamic group of styles, in colors that sparkle. Lisbeth was commissioned to design them, and it has been OUR lucky strike to have them confined exclusively to us, in New Orleans. This program cover shows you only one of the models from a complete collection that we are most anxious for you to see. Come in any day next week.

TOWN & COUNTRY, Inc. 1432 St. Charles Avenue

TULANE ALMA MATER (Sing as the Band Plays) We praise thee for thy past, 0 Alma Mater! Thy hand hath done its work full faithfully I The incense of thy spirit hath ascended And filled America from sea to sea I

II We praise thee for thy present, Alma Mater! Today thy Children look to thee for bread I Thou leadest them to dreams and actions splendid I The hunger of their soul is richly fed I

III We praise thee for thy future, Alma Mater! The vista of its glory gleameth far I We ever shall be part of thee, great Mother! There thou wilt be where e' er thy children are I CHORUS Olive, Green and Blue, we love thee I Pledge we now our fealty true Where the trees are ever greenest, Where the skies are purest bluel Hear us now, 0 Tulane, hear usl As we proudly sing to thee I Take from us our hearts' devotion I Thine we are, and thine shall be I

17


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. 1183!" "But I' m sure this is C. C . C . Project


The All Star Teams l 1928

Over the span of seven football seasons, 1928 to 1934 inclusive, the Southern spor ts

Center-Peter Pund, of Georgia Tech.

writers' board in selecting the annual allconference team, made eighty-one selections

Guards-Raleigh Drennon, of Georgia

for their teams. The

distribution

Tech ; John N. Brown, of Vanderbilt, and of

these

Ellis Hagler, of Alabama.

eighty-one

awards is interesting to say the least.

Tackles-Jesse Tinsley, of L. S.

Here

is the way the places were allotted among

Tulane....................

and

Kenneth Thrash, of Georgia Tech.

the schools: Alabama..........................

u.,

Ends-Tom Jones, of Georgia Tech, and Dale Van Sickel, of Florida.

........... 18

Quarterback-Clyde Crabtree, of Flor-

....................... 1 3

ida. Tennessee................................................ 1 3

Halfbacks-Warner Mizell and Jack G. Thomason, of Georgia Tech; Willis Ban-

Georgia Tech ........................................ 1 1

ker, of Tulane ; Eugene McEver, of TennesVanderbilt............... ............................... 6

see, and Gerald Snyder, of Maryland .

Georgia..................... ................................ 4

Fullback-Frank Peake, of V . P . I.

L. S. U.... ,............. .........................

4 1929

Florida........................................................ 3 A uburn ....................................................... 3

Center-Lloyd Roberts, of Tulane. Guards-Ray Farris, of¡ North Carolina,

Kentucky................................................... 2

and John N. Brown, of Vanderbilt. Maryland, V. P. I., North Carolina and

T a ckles-F red Sington, of Alabama, and

Duke were rated one each in those years

Peter Drury, of Ken tucky.

before 1933 , when the old Southern ConEnds-Paul Hig, of Tennessee, and Ger-

feren ce divided.

ald Dalrymple, of Tulane. These tabulations were made by Old

Quarterback-Robert L. Dodd, of Ten-

Timer, the talented and expert sports writer

nessee.

of the Atlanta Journal. Perhaps it will interest a lot of readers to have the teams recounted here:

(Continued on page 21

22)


THE ALL-STAR

TEAMS

(Continued from page 21)

Halfbacks-Willis Banker, of Tulane, and Eugene McEver, of Tennessee.

Tackles-Fred Crawford, of Duke, and Tex Leyendecker, of Vanderbilt.

Fullback-Bernard Holm, of Alabama.

Ends-Van Rayburn, of Tennessee, and David Ariail, of Auburn.

1930

Quarterback-J ohn Cain, of Alabama. Halfbacks-Jimmy Hitchcock, of Auburn, and Beattie Feathers, of Tennessee.

Center-Lloyd Roberts, of Tulane. Guards-James Steele, of Florida, and John Miller, of Alabama.

Fullback-Don Zimmerman, of Tulane.

Tackles-LeVance Maree, of Georgia Tech, and Fred Sington, of Alabama.

1933

Ends-Gerald Dalrymple, of Tulane, and Vernon Smith, of Georgia.

Center-John Kent, of L. S. U. Guards-Tom Hupke, of Alabama, and ]. B. Ellis, of Tennessee.

Quarterback-Robert L. Dodd, of Tennessee.

Tackles-Bill Lee, of Alabama, and Bob Tharpe, of Georgia Tech.

Halfbacks-John Suther, of Alabama, and Marion Dickens, of Georgia.

Ends-David Ariail, of Auburn, and Jimmy Slocum, of Georgia Tech.

F ullback-J ohn Cain, of Alabama.

Quarterback-Millard Howell, of Alabama.

1931 Center-Clarepce Gracey, of Vanderbilt.

Halfbacks-Beattie Feathers, of Tennessee, and Arston Grant, of Georgia.

Guards-J ohn Scafide, of T ulan¡e, and Herman Hickman, of Tennessee.

Fullback-D. ]. Phillip, of Georgia Tech.

Tackles-Babe Wright, of Kentucky, and Ray Saunders, of Tennessee.

1934

Ends-Gerald Dalrymple, of Tulane, and Vernon Smith, of Georgia.

Center-Homer Robinson, of Tulane.

Quarterback-J ohn Cain, of Alabama.

Guards-Charles Marr, of Alabama, and Murray Warmath, of Tennessee.

Halfbacks-Don Zimmerman, of Tulane, and Eugene McEver, of Tennessee.

Tackles-Bill Lee, of Alabama, and justin Rukas, of L. S. U.

Fullback-Nollie Felts, of Tulane.

Ends-Don Hutson, of Alabama, and William Geny, of Vanderbilt.

1932

Quarterback-Riley Smith, of Alabama.

Center-Clarence Gracey, of Vanderbilt.

Halfbacks-Millard Howell, of Alabama, and Claude Simons, Jr., of Tulane.

Guards-T om Hupke, of Alabama, and Howard Neblett, of Georgia Tech.

Fullback-Abe Mikal, of L. S. U. 22


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Physics Building.

The Tulane University oj Louisiana NEW ORLEANS

The University embraces the folloUJing departments: The College of Arts and Sciences The H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College for Women The College of Engineering The Graduate School The College of Law The School of Medicine The Graduate School of Medicine

The College of Commerce and Business Administration The Courses for Teachers and for the General Public The Department of Middle American Research The School of Social Work The Summer Schools

For Catalogue Address:

R egistrar of the Tulane U niversity of L ouisiana Gibson Hall, NeUJ Orleans

1935kentuckyattulane  
1935kentuckyattulane  
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