Page 1

The

EENIE

TULANE vs. c: ATTANOOGA Saturday, Tulane Stadium

____ ber Z9,

~934

Price ZSc ,.


Th~

Tulane U niversity Louisiana •

of

NEW ORLEANS

The University Embraces the Following Departments: The College of Arts and Sciences The H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College for Women The College of Engineering The Graduate School The College of Law The School of Medicine The Graduate School of Medicine The College of Commerce and Business Administration The Courses for Teachers The Department of Middle American Research The School of Social Work The Summer Schools

For Catalogue Address:

Registrar of ·the Tulane University of Louisiana GIBSON HALL, NEW ORLEANS


(f1 Chattanooga VS.

~ 'Tulane AMERICAN FOOTBALL 1934 SEASON

Tulane Stadium

Saturday, Sept. 29, 1934 2:30 p. m.

CONTENTS Cover Design ..... .. . Featuring Capt. Jos. Loftin

ADMINISTRATION

BUILDIKG, NEWCOMB COLLEGE,

TULAN E UNIVERSITY

Ti tle Page...... . ....... .... 3 Tulane Photos .... . .. . ... ... 4'5 Coach Scrappy Moore ....... 6 The 1934 Rules ...... '" ..... 9 "Luck Charm" -Short Story by Geo. Sydney . . ..... ... . 10 The Line· Ups ..... . ...... 12-13 Fair Tulane .. .. ..... . ...... IS The Rosters ................ 16 Alma Mater ................ IS Under the B3ker. ........... 19 . Gridiron Roundup ........ .. 20

\tbe Green fe

Time Out. .................. 21 For Old Tulane (song) ..... 22

No.

Vol. 4

Official Souvenir Program of Tulane University Published for Each Home Game. 3

I


'----


HOWDY, SCRAPPY! Tulane is honored today to have Scrappy Mo o re and his Chattanooga football team as guests and football opponents for the afternoon. Scrappy, known to baseball fans all over the Southern League, as a star outfielder of the Birmingham Barons is equally well known and liked throughout the Southern football sector. He is known to the pigskin world not only as a coach but as a former star of the University of Georgia team. His teams at 'Noogaville have always been clean playing, hard fighting and colorful. He uses the Rockne style of play, having learned it at Georgia under the Harry Mehre regime.

• •• Chattanooga has long been a power among its old rivals and its play in the Dixie Conference has been equally Impressive. So, the Greenies know they are in for a well-fought game when they line up today.

• •• A word of greeting also to the University of Chattanooga followers who are here for the game. May you enjoy the oysters, the shrimp, and the football game and come again often.

It is with pleasure that we salute the University of Chattanooga! .'

COACH SCRAPPY MOORE University of Chattanooga

6


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1934 Football Rules Discussion By JAMES E. HALUGAN

Southeastern, Sout!Hyest a nd Southern Conferences Offcial During 1933 there were many, many games that resulted in tie scores. In fact these tie games were so numerous that a change in the rules was deemed necessary for the good of the sport. The committee in charge of the rules reasoned that the defensive development of the game was more farther advanced than the scoring, or offensive, feature; the latter being the real popular side of the game to the spectators.

ploy toe running gam.e, should a forward paS3 be incompleted. The former loss of forward-pass-penalty-yardage rather forced the offensive to keep on trying forward passes in a series, whereas the 1934 rule eliminates this evident style of play, which will keep the defense guessing. The shape of the ball has been slightly changed to enable a man with an average sized hand to more easily pass the ball. The Rules Committee and coaches are endeavoring to improve the game by developing the lateral passing game as well as the forward passing. The lateral passing game is quite a feature of Canadian football and a form of football never well developed in America. This development will come, and then the fans will be electrified with the skill and thrill of the sport, even more than now. The permission of kicking the ball from one of the backs standing up holding the ball is an innovation to keep the defensive backs away from the line, so that the r un- . ning game can succeed. It will be used more as a threat than to kick the ball high and far.

Therefore the rules committee followed the experience and suggestions of the football coaches, that the forward pass rule as existed in 1933 was too formidable a weapon for the defensive team, and changed the complexion of this forward pass rule for 1934. In 1933 when a forward pass was thrown across the goal line and grounded in the end zone, it was a touchback, and brought out to the 20-yard line and given to the defenders of that goal. The result of this rule was when a team with the ball reached the 20-yard line on the way to a score, the defensive backs closed in and usually stopped the offensive team's running game. In other words, a team might gain ground readily in the center of the field, but when reaching the 20yard line the closing in of the defensive backs mired the attack.

The foregoing are the mam changes in the 1934 rules and really the only changes that vitally concern the spectators. The great game of American College Football is conducted and regulated by the highest type of American sportsmen; a game beyond all taint and fixing. The rules of the game are such as to protect our flaming hemen athletes who make up the college squads and teams, and to thrill the spectators who love real mental and physical contests. The game is a real game for the enjoyment of the best in a person's character, and played with sheer abandon and ever~ lasting loyalty and enthusiasm unparalleled in any sphere of American sports. It is a MAN maker that inculcates discipline and the power of taking defeats of life as they come.

The forward pass rule for 1934 allows the team with the ball to try for a score with a forward pass, and if the pass fails and is grounded behind the goal line, the play counts as a down and another try is allowed, except on a fourth down. This new rule will keep the defense open in the scoring area, and permit a team with a good running game a better chance to function. In the open field, the grounding of a forward pass will not carry a loss of five yards on the second, third and fourth unsuccessful tries as in 1933. This will save loss of yardage and enable the offensive team to em9


Laugh, Scoffers, LA UGH! - But a Team Is Only as Strong as Its

CHARM"By GEORGE SYDNEY the train signified he was going to the game, and his being there brought luck to me and to State." "But," Bob persisted, "supposing he didn't go, then what?" "I suppose State would have lost, but he did go! He got off the train at Berkely." "What happened to his charm last year?" Bob asked caustically. "He didn't go to t he game," Charley said hap pily . "And how do you know that? " "He wasn't on the train!" "Go ahead, fool, it's your money," Bob said resignedly, "bet on State."

C harley Hubert squirmed. The mohair tr"in-seat itched him and added another small annoyance t o his world of worry. He turned to Bob Martin, stretched indifferently on the seat across from him. "Tell me, Bob," he began, "what do you really t hink about it?" "About what?" "The game, Mug. The game." "Oh, the game! I guess, Berkely'll win though I'll s~ick to State. Berkely hasn't been beaten yet, while State's been swamped a couple of times. With that, I don't see how State can-Owwwww!" His voice rose and fell on a note of anguish. "Leggo my leg!" "Loo,~," Charley whisI;',ered, as he loosened his grasp, Look over there. Rubbing his limb, Bob looked. "Aw! Turtle fur. What's that old guy got to do with you digging a hunk ou~ta my leg? " "Look at 'im Bob, look at 'im." Charley repeated in a reverential tone, "I am, guy, I'm looking, and all I can see is an old cross-eyed relic, dribbling tobacco-juice over a dirty hirsute chin." "Aw, shut up! Don't talk like that." Bob looked at Ch3.rley queerly. "Since when the reverence to your elders?" "Bob," Charley said solemnly, ignoring the offe~~ive ques~io~" "That's my Luck Charm . " Your what? "My Luck Charm!" Bob turned to look at the old man again and instinctively rubbed his leg. "And how," he asked, "can an old man like that be a Luck Charm?" Charley stared a t the man for a moment or two. Then: "F our years ago when I was a freshman at State, I saw that queer old duck coming up on t his train for the game with Berkely. You remember, that was t h e time Berkely beat every te3m on its schedude and State lost two games?" "Yep." "Naturally, I wanted to bet on State, but you know how it is. So, ,iust on a hunch I walked up to the old man and asked him, 'Who do you think will win today's game?' He looked at me sorta funny-like and said, 'Why State, of course.' Well, that cinched it for me. Incidentally, I got two {or one on the bet." Bob was laughing upro'Hiously. "And you mean to tell me because you saw ', hat old man on the train , and because Joe said State would win, State won? You're crazy." "Sure," Charley cried derisively, sure I'm crazy, but I won my bet, didn't I? The next year the same thin? happened. I saw the old man on the train and bet State." "And State won," Bob supplied, "and, of course , you had previoudy asked the old man?" "'Veil, no, no I didn't-" Bob was lau e;hing again. "Well, whv didn't W)U? Supnose he didn't Va to the game. Then what?" Charley hesitated for a moment and became dignified. "Because I believed hi s very presence on

The two teams lined up. Berkely kicked off . Stevens, right half for State, received the ball on his own t hre e-yar d line. Down the right side line he r aced. Several hurled themselves at him . On, on he raced, thirty, forty, fifty yards-he was in the clear-Charley grabbed Bob. "You see," he cried excitedly, "you see-" He stopped suddenly. He was looking out on the field. Stevens had stumbled, and Morris, of Berkely, had recovered the ball as it bounced from Stevens' arms. "Well." Bob said. But Charley sat silently, glumly watching the play with intense interest. The score at the half was only 6-0 in favor of Berkely-a touchdown, and a point after touchdown would mean a win! Two minutes left to !"Iay, and the score remained th e same. The timekeeper raised his gun aloft, pointed upward. He fired! The game was over! Sta te had lost! Bob, with a benevolent air, turned to Charley. He had disappeared! Stretching himself to his full height he searched through the pushing, struggling mass crowd ing toward t he exits. Catching a glimpse of Charley racing down the stadium he sped away in pursuit. At the main exit, out of breath and gasping, Bob overhauled him. "Say, what's the big idea?" he demanded between g3.Sps. "That guy, my luck charm, something must have happ ened. He-he must not have come to the game aCte r all." "And so," Earcnstically. "you're waiting here to see if you can find him. A ll right-I'll wait, too-" "There he is," Charley shouted, pointing and waving his arms, unconrcio us of the minor catastrophes he created about several head s, "he's comin~ this vv:::l v." Shor'lv tre old man was abreast of them. Charlev s'o~",er1 him . . "D;d-did you see the whole game today, sir?" he a,ked. The old man lo oked at the two in confusion . "Why, ves, ron, yes I did, and it's too bad that St? te lost." Rob p'uffawed . "You Eee, I told you." Charley d;cln ' t understand. He looked stupidly at Ll,~k: C h ""rr>, t hen at Bob. "But, Mi,ter," he went on, "did you like the

h',

gcFP.)"

"Why yes, fan, considering State lost and that it was the firs t ryame of football I had ever seen, why, yes-yes, I enjoyed it." TO


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FAIl~

TULANE

MISS MOLLIE HAYES Student, Newcomb College of Tulane University


TULANE ROSTER N o. PLAYERHOMEIS-Tun, Port-er_____ _ ___ _________ ___ _._ . ____ . _. New Orleans _. _. _______ __ .. ____ _.. ____ _._. _______ 19-5aint, Archie ____ _ __ ____ New Orleans _________ ___ ________ .. __ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ _____ . __ ___ ______ . 2o-HalI, Thos. (Whitey) ____ ____ __ ______ ___ . _____ _________ New Orleans _______ ____ ____ ___ ______ _______ ____ ____ ____ ___ ___ __ __ _____ __ _ 24-Flettrich, Albert __ ______ ___ _____ __ .. __ ________ _ _._. ______ New Orleans __ _____ _____ _____ __ _________________ __ _____ _____ ________ ___ __ __ 25-McIllhenny, PauL _______ __ ___ __ .... __ _____ New Orleans _____________ ______ __ ______ ____ ________________ .. _______ ___ _ 26-Daly, William _____ ___ ____ .. ____ ____ __ ._. ____ ______ __ New Orleans __ ___ ___ __ . _______ _____ ____ ____ __ _____________ _. ___ 28-Dombourian, Azad .. ____ .. ________ . .. ______ _.. .. _____ __ ____ ___ .. ____ ___ ____ .... New Orleans ___ __ .. . ______ ._.. _____ ________ _." 32-Giovanni, Mi1ton ... __________ _________ __ _ . Lake Charles, La .. _.... _____ ___________ . ________ __ ___ . __ _____ _ 34-Cooley, David ____________ ______ __ ______ ____ ______________ ._____ ____ _____ Slidell, La. ________ ____ ________ . _________ ______ __ ______ ______ __ _____________ _ 35-Dalovisio, Pete____ __ ________ __ __ ___Lake Charles, La. __________ _______ _ 36-Hillyer, H. H. ___________ _____ ___ __ __ ___ _____________ __ New Orleans ____ __ __________ ___ .. ___ ___ ____ ___ ___________ .. _____________ _ 37-Eddy, Chas. ____ ___ __ ___ ____ ___ ____ ______ . ___ _____ ____ ____ New Orleans __ _________________________ _________ ____ _________ _ 38-Henderson, James _______ ___ . _______ _.. _____ ._____ ____ ___ ___ ___ ___ .. __ __ Clarksdale, Miss. _______ . ___ ________ __. _____ __ . __ ___ ._. _____ __ ____ ____ . 39-Nichols, William ___ __ ________ _.. . _____ __ ______ ___ _______ ______ . _____ __ Orlando, Fla .. ____ _____ __ ___ ___ ____ __ .. _. __ ____ ___ ______ .. ___ ___ _ 40-Kyle, Charles ___ ___ ___________________ .. ______ ________ _._ ___ ____ ___ _New Orleans ____________ _____________ __ _.. __ ____ _____________________ ___ . __ 4I-Andrews, John ______ ___ __ _. ____ .__ __ .. New Orleans ____ . __ _.. __ ____ _. ___________ . ____________ ... _.. __ 42-Thomas, FarreL ________ ____ __ .. ______________ __ __ ___________ Ft. Smith, Ark .. __ __________________________ __ __________ .. _______ __ 43-Johnson, Douglas ___ ... __ ... ___ ...... ________ . ___ _. New Orleans _____ .... _.. ___ ._._ .. __ .. _.. ___ .. _. _.. _. __ .... _.. __ _._ .. 44-Schneidau, Hugh.es __ . __ .. __ .. ___ .... ___ . ___ . __ New Orleans ___ ._ ..... _______ . ___ ._._._ .. 45-Clark, Gus .. .. __ . ______ . ____ . __ . __.. . __ ..... __ .. _.. __ .. --_Macon, Ga. _ .. __ .. __ _. __ 46-Loftin, Capt. Jos. __ . ___ . ___ ..... _._ .. .. __ . ____ _. _Baton Rouge, La. _..... ___ __ _.. __ __ ._ . .. __ . ____ _. __ . __ ._._._ .. __ . ____ . 47-Simons, Claude, Jr. ___ . ___ . New Orleans ___ , _, ___ ,_ ,,_, _ 4S-Robinson, Homer __ .... .. _____ .. .... ___ ___ Lake Charles, La. 49-Page, Richard __ .... _._. __ . __ . ____ _.. __ ... _... New Orleans_. _.. 50-0dom, Troy _________ __ ____ _____ _ -- ~:~do~i~~:~ 551-PSreisser, Frederick ___ . ___ ._.. ---·- --.... 0· ·-- Covington, La. 2 - t ro ble, Bunny __ . ___ . --------... -.. . 0 __ 0 _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ___ 0 __ 0 __ _

0 __ 0 .

_ _ _ _ _ _ . _ . __ _ _ __ . _ _ _ _ _ _

0 __ __ • _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ • • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ •

0 _______ •

_ _

0 . __ . _ • • • •

- ~::b~~:~!:~~..-.-_·_-_·.-.·_ _-_·_-. _·.-.-· -·····

~L~;::~s:~~B~:~i~~~~

55-Smither, Charles __ . __ . ___ ._ ... ___ .~~~~~~~-_~~~~._~-- - .. __ ... __ _ New Orleans __ . 56-Mintz, Barney.o___ .. _. New Orleans __ __ . 57-McDaniel, John __ ____ _______ ______ _________ _____ _.. ___ --- -- --- ------- -- -_--. Camden, Ark .. __ _ 58-Ott, Wiltz__ _______ __ ___ ____________ ------ --- ----- --- -- Osyka, Miss. 0 _ _ . _ . _ __

~~-~~:!:~~::'~~~~;~0:::::-

_. ______ _._. ___ .

--.

- -. -.- . ..- - -.- -. - - ---.: ~:: g~~::~: - - - .

~~~::.~:E;n~::.~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-61-Bryan, Howard (Bucky) 62-Tessier, George _._ .. _. ______ _. __ 63-Monk, Marion. _____ ._. _____ __. _

!i r:r:i, 1ii~~--- - :- - - - :- - --:--::-::-- - -

_ .

- Shreveport, La .. -- ------. New Orleans __ . _. _ ___ ___ ~:: g~~::~::: ::::: :::

___. __.. _____ .. _.. ___ ... _. __ .. ___. ___ ... _.... _.

. :_:_: _:_:_:_:_:_: _: _:_:_: _--

________ _____ _:::----- :t:::~eR~u::~,lf~s.s

- - - - . - - -- - - - - - - -.-- - - -: : X':~Se~~~~~~·e~:~ -

69-Tessier, Robt. 70-Simon, Robt. __ ______ . __ ._____ 71-Linam, Albert (Tex) __ __ 72-Poit.event, Ed.__ 73-Ary, Roy _______ _________ _______ 74-Moss, William_ . ______ . ___ . __ __ . 75-Lodrigues, Stanley ___ __. _____ ---- .. ----.. ----76-Pace, David. __. ____ .. __ _ 77-Rau, Howard ______ .. _.. _____ __ .... ____ . _ 78-Sanders, Hadley _.. ___ .. 79-Sinnott, Chas .___ SO-Thames, Louis

--. New Orleans ____ . ___ . __. -- -New Orleans_ ___ -- Bay St. Louis, Miss. - New Orleans -------- . Stigler, Okla. _-_-_-_-_- _-_-~_-_. ~;~t6~~:~' Ala. -- M . _onroe, La. ___ __ _. -- Covington, La. __ . - Memphis, Tenn. : Springfield, I1L __ _ _Natalbany, La.

______ __.. _._ .. __ __________ ______ __ _______ ______ _

POS. C E E FB G T G QB G E E T HB HB E FB HB HB E E FB HB C HB HB E T G QB G HB QB QB E C HB G G FB E C C G T G FB G T T FB T QB G T HB

WT. 175 168 178 194 185 190 205 187 190 180 160 183 154 170 170 191 171 172 185 180 198 190 186 170 172 170 184 191 176 196 176 194 176 170 180 167 193 180 173 191 193 190 210 228 186 180 201 200 193 178 185 171 170 192 167

POS_ G HB QB HB G E FB G HB E E G QB QB C C T E HB T FB T G

WT. 153 155 140 165 175 175 175 170 165 170 175 175 170 175 180 190 190 190 180 200 185 200 185

CHATTANOOGA ROSTER Gold 10 11 12 16 28 22 17 25 18 30 34 20 24 29 21 33 35 31 14 19 27 39 38

White With Blue and Gold Stripes 10 11

17 18 19 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 35 26 39 40 41 42

White With Blue Shoulders 30-Cubine 33-Hinds 5-Ellis 32-Ring ______ _ 9--Skillern 6-Kintzing __ 34-Watland 37-Sharpe 25-Hornsby 22-Kelley 3-Irvin~ __ 14-Shell 4-Payne 23-Ratigan 7-Frumkin __ S6-Blazek 2-Burnette_. 35-Capt. Perry 17-McCaIL IS-Klein 27-White 38-Grainger ___ ...... ____ . ____ ... _ 8-Golston ____________ ___ .. __ __

HOME___ . Chattanooga, Tenn. ___ . Rockwood, Tenn. _... Chattanooga, Tenn. __ Blue Island, Ill. ___ Soddy, Tenn. ___ ___ . Glen Ridge, N. J. ___ _____ __ ______ __ ___ Blue Island, ilL _____ _. Jacksboro, Tenn •.. ___ AthEns, Tenn. ___ .Chattanooga, Tenn. Chattanooga, Tenn. __Chattanooga, Tenn. Chattanooga, Tenn. _. ______ _Detroit, Mich. _______ . Chattanooga, Tenn. ___ ____ ___ Bel1eaire, Oh:o_. __ __ Chattanooga, Tenn. . Daytona B eac h, Fla .. _ .Hillsboro, Texas Blue Island, Ill.. _ _Chatt:lnooga, Tenn. ___ Bluefield, W_ Va. ____ ___ _____ ________ _. ___ _ _Chattanooga, Tenn.

16


Best Wishes 1934 Greenies I

Backfield , lef[ to right: Barney Mintz, hb; Captain Joe Loftin, fb; Claude (Little Monk) Simo ns' hb; John McDaniel, qb . Line, left to right: Charlie Kyle, e; Roy Ary, t; George Tessier, g; Homer Robinson, c; Bob Simon, g; Bob Tessier, t; and Dick Hardy , e .

•••

At Your ServiceYou na me it I

W e have the same or can do it I

••• FRERET SERVICE STATIONS

Fern and Maple WAlnut 6447

Broadway and Pritchard WAlnut 2400

Freret and Robert UPtown 5060


TULANE ALMA MATER (Sing as the Band Plays ) I We praise thee for thy past, 0 Alma Mater! Thy hand hath done its work full faithfully I The incense of thy spirit hath ascended And filled America from sea to sea!

II We praise thee for thy present, Alma Mater! Today thy Children look to thee for breadl T h ou leadest them to dreams and actions splendid I T h e h u n ger of their soul is richly fed!

III We praise t h ee for thy future, Alma Mater! The vista of its g lory gleameth far! We ever shall be pa r t of t h ee, great Mother! T h ere thou wilt be w h ere e'er thy children are! CHORUS O li ve, G reen and Blue, we love t h ee! P le d ge we now our fealty true W h ere the t r ees are ever greenest, W h ere th e skies a r e pu r est blue! H ear us now. 0 T u lane, h ear us! A s we p r ou dly sinÂŁ; to t h ee! Ta k e f rom us our h earts' devotion! T hine we are, a n d t h ine s h all be!

~~Time

Out"

DRINK-

PAUSE~~ RELAX~~

REFRESH YOURSELF IS


Perhaps you recall Robert Louis Stevenson's and get set for the works. He planted himself legend of Kentucky, "Fleet Foot." I believe that with a n embankment to his back and pulled his was the name. Somehow the story reminds me of knife and waited. Fleet Foot was now up close the Tulane-Georgia Tech football situation. with knife drawn. They didn't lose much time It seems that back about 1 7 7 5 when Kentucky starting to scuffle. Fleet Foot caught the Injun's was the far-western frontier, there was a huntsman arm which held the knife and the Injun likewise called Fleet Foot. He got his name, just as you caught F. F.' s knife mitt ... They finally twisted might imagine, because he could really go places the knife away from each other and then began in a hurry. On numerous occasions he had to rolling about on the ground. The Injun though prove his speed by running against Indians who was much the stronger and pretty soon he had roved the old Kentucky valleys. Fleet Foot down on his back and was choking him The particular savages ""ho roamed Kentucky proper. Well, maybe not proper but choking him were the toughest of all the species, Stevenson until it seemed that the eyes would skip their socksays. They thought nothing of scalping the women ets anyway. Just when it seemed that Fleet Foot's and children of the Dale face hunters . feet had done him mortal dirt, he heard a low Well, sir, Fleet Foot whistle. A second later heard that his sweetthe Redskin relaxed and TO PASS SEEKERS:heart and another fembit the dust a dead 'un. me had been captured It had been the whistle "Tho they roar, they shall not PASS." by the Redskins. Being of a bullet that Pleet -Jeremiah 5 :22_ a regular blood hound Phospo-no, Fleet Foot, when it carne to trailing had heard. His pal, the "The wicked shall no more PASS." Injuns through the unbrother of his sweet-Nahum 1: 15. derbrush, the speedy heart, had killed the Inone and his bosom pal jun just in the nick of "This generation shall not PASS." (who incidentally was time. -Mark 12:30. the heroine) set out •• • after 'ern. "Suffer not a man to PASS." Now, just as I said, Ta speed up the that story reminds me -Judges 3 :28. story though, let it be of the Tulane-Georgia "They shall not PASS." mentioned that the woTech situation . men-folk were duly resHere for five years, -Numbers 30: 18. cued at great peril to Tulane has been the "None shall ever PASS." the hunters. Just when Fleet Foot of this battle. the job was done, and -Isaiah 35: 15. Back in 1929, Ike ArmFleet Foot was about strong and Bill Banker "SO HE PAID HIS FARE AND WENT." ready to embrace his showed their heels to -Jonah 1: 13. girl friend, he looked up the powerful Redskins; and spied a big Injun ' beg pardon, Engineers - WILB UR C. SMITH, M . D . heading across the . . . then in 1930 and brambles. The Injun was 193 I, Don Zimmerman, meaning no harm, really being intent on getting Wop Glover and Fanny Payne showed 'ern the to safety. Fleet Foot though, being keen of sight, sprints .. . In 1932, Zimmerman and Little Preachrecognized the Injun. It was the same savage who er Roberts did the dirt and in 1933 old Snake had chased him a couple of times previously with Poison Bryan skipped 101 yards in front of 'ern. malicious intent on his scalp. Both times Fleet There you are, so far anyway . That proves Foot, of course, had out-footed him although the half the comparison to the story. Red Skin was reputedly the fastest of his tribe. The other half of the similarity merely rest in Now, the tables were reversed. Instead of runthe summary as follows. In the past the Greenies ning from the Injun, Fleet Foot gave a low grunt have been the faster and in front, running for dear and took heels after the old boy. The Injun spied lif.e or was it touchdowns ... yet, the Greenies this him right away. year must beware. If they ever let the Jackets What a race they put up ... over creek, up hill, get in the lead and they chase 'ern down, a la down gully, over logs and through thickets they Fleet Street-dash it-Fleet Foot, then We must went ... finally Fleet Foot began overtaking the be prepared for a life or death battle and hope that Injun. He closed in gradually. Seeing that he was the reinforcements from the side lines will get the soon to be overtaken, the Injun resolved to tUrn Injuns-no Injuneers-before they do their worst.


THE GRIDIRON ROUNDUP TODA Y'S GUESSES:

Mehre's great team will Win all right but don't be surprised if the score is close. Say 20 to 7.

ALABAMA over Howard. AUBURN over Oglethorpe.

Georgia Tech will take Clemson although Tech may not show a great scoring parade. This count should be about 2 J to 0 or even less, but the Tigers will hardly get one across .

FLORIDA over Rollins. GEORGIA over Stetson. GEORGIA TECH over Clemson.

Chet Wynne will get his first real test with the new Wildcats of Kentucky but the Blue Grass boys are due to come home in front by two touchdowns.

KENTUCKY over Washington and LlZe, L. S. U. over Rice. SEWANEE over Southwest'arn. TENNESSEE over Centre.

The Louisiana State Tigers have the hardest job of the day in Dixie. The game against Rice, taking place at Houston, will be a pippin and is about a toss up. We take the Tigers by a touchdown or a point after touchdown or a field goal. The Tigers will have to watch Wallace, sophomore halfback flash of the Owls every minute.

VANDERBILT over MISS. STATE. TEMPLE over V. P. I. DUKE over V. M. I. VIRGINIA over

Hampden-S~dney.

WAKE FOREST over North Carolina. N. C. STATE over Davidson.

Vandy may get a surprise from the young Mississippi State team. Brock and Anderson of State can really heave the ball. Although injured, Brock may be able to play against the Commodores. If he does, he'll worry the Vandy air defense plenty. One vote for Vandy.

NAVY over William and Mary. PITTSBURGH over Washington and Jefferson. WEST VIRGINIA over Duquesne. BROWN over Boston U. HOL Y CROSS over Loyola.

• ••

INDIANA over Ohio University. IOWA over North Dakota.

Wake Forest gets a feeble vote from this quarter to surprise the Tarheels of North Carolina. These rivals, about twenty miles apart, always put up a neat battle and the Demon Deacons look just a wee bit too strong for Coach Carl Snavely's new team.

MINNESOTA over North Dakota State. NORTHWESTERN over Marquette. KANSAS over Colorado. TEXAS A. & M. over Texas Tech.

In picking West Virginia to beat Duquesne we are going out on the limb. The same is true in a milder degree in selecting Pitt over Washington and Jefferson.

STANFORD over Santa Clara.

••• There's a few trippers In the above although it is still too early to really go hay-

While casting our ballot we are slippi.ng in one vote for Northwestern over Marquette but the Golden Avalanche may make it awful hot. Stanford too gets one vote over Santa Clara, and Texas A. & M. gets two votes to take T exas Tech.

wire. F or example, the Georgia-Stetson game may prove to be closer than most folks might think. Stetson is really throwing its hat in the ring this fall. We believe Harry 20


OUT' Father: "Daughter, isn't that young man rather fast ?" Daughter: "Yes, but I don't think he'll get away,"

Looie: "Now, Mister Fell, consider closely the following situation encountered by a landing party: You are menaced on your left flank by a superior force of infantry; on your right you have a steep hill covered with cactus and hiding twenty enemy machine gun nests, Enemy artillery are firing on you; your center is being attacked by tanks, while a cavalry troop is closing in behind you. What do?"

•••

Professor: "So you're back. I thought I expelled you last week." Student: "You did. But don't do it again because my dad was plenty sore last time."

Charlie: "Why, sir, I'd use tact, yezzir, I'd say 'Why sure, I'll marry your daughter'l" •

0111.

•••

Young Man: "Shall we waltz?" Co-Ed: "!t's all the same to me." Young Man: "Yes, I've noticed that."

....

"A curved line is the loveliest distance between two points."

Captain of Sinking Vessel: "Who knows how to pray?" " " Passenger: I do. Captain : "Yo,';" d better begin. We're one life preserver short.

Eager Playwrite: "I wish I could think up a big strong situation that would fill the audience with

• ••

tears.

H

Theater Manager: ''I'm looking for one that will fill the tiers with audience."

•••

• ••

"Good grief 1 How did you decide to dye your hair red?" "Oh, I just told the beauty parlor operator that henna color would do."

"Hello, is ~his the Girl Reserves?" "Yes." "Well, reserve me a blonde for Friday night."

1934 Tulane Football Schedule Sept. Oct. Oct, Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. NJv. Nov. Dec.

29-University of Chattanooga at New Orleans 6 - Auburn at New Orleans 13-Florida at Gainesville, Fla. 20-Georgia at New Orleans 27-Georgia Tech at New Orleans 3-University of Mississippi at New Orleans IO-Colgate at New York 17-Kentucky at Lexington. Ky. 24-Sewanee at New Orleans I-Louisiana State at Baton Rouge. La.

First: "What's your name, mister?" Second: "P-p-p ppete, sir." First: "0. K. I'll call you Pete for short."

Mr. Dollar (arriving at dinner party with family): "Please announce Mr . and Mrs. Dollar and daughter." New Butler (announcing in loud voice): "Three bucks."

•••

He: "I want to ask you a riddle. have so many boy-friends?" She: "I give up."

•••

Kind Old Lady: "My little man, I am very sorry to see you smoking a cigarette. Are you aware of what you are coming to?" Little Jimmie: "Sure. I'm coming to the butt."

Why do you

•••

In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to things girls have been thinking about all winter .

•••

• ••

A lady much above the usual size was trying to get on a street car. A passenger who was waiting to get off began to laugh at her futile efforts. "If you were half a man you would help me get on this car," she snapped. The passenger retorted: "Madam, if you were half a lady you wouldn't need any help."

"Being broke all the time makes me writhe." "Don't writhe-telegraph."

•••

"That Dame arouses the beast in mel" "Yeah-she's got your goat, and she'll probably make a monkey out of you," 21


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1934tennchattanoogaattulane  
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