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NOVEMBER 2012


30 TV-Quality DVD Episodes

HUNDREDS of Interactive Whiteboard Activities

You and your students will love our episodes on Music Theory, Instruments & Ensembles, Composers & Music History, and Music Styles! Includes Teacher Guides and resources aligned to National Standards that make lesson planning a breeze.

Eye-catching resources that grab students’ attention and encourage participation!

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Kid’s Website at QuaverMusic.com! Music-making fun for each of your students! Many activities are free, including song today! building activities, so sign-on today

iPad Apps

For use by teachers and students!

Customize your curriculum with our teacher-friendly 21st Century resources. Check it out at QuaverMusic.com/Preview

Seriously Fun! 1-866-917-3633 ™ info@QuaverMusic.com ™ Facebook.com/QuaverMusic ™ QuaverMusicBlog.com © 2012 QuaverMusic.com, LLC


21 FEATURES

NOVEMBER 2012

16

Education in the Spotlight Learn more about what to anticipate from the 83rd Texas OHJLVODWLYHVHVVLRQDQGKRZ70($ZLOOEHZRUNLQJWRNHHSÀQHDUWV in the forefront of the education policy agenda. BY MATT MATTHEWS

21

VOLUME 81 — ISSUE 4

Let Music Deliver Our Message There is no better advocacy tool than our students demonstrating the results of quality music education. Take your music ensemble to the capitol and show our state leaders why they need to support music education for all Texas schoolchildren. BY ROBERT FLOYD

On the cover: The Westwood HS Honors Band (Round Rock ISD) performs at the Texas State Capitol. Photo by Karen Kneten.

30

COLUMNS

39

Keynote Speakers Will Educate and Inspire

President’s Notes .............................................. 5 by John Gillian

52

Recording Audio

House Public Education Committee Chair Champions the Arts Texas State Representative Ryan Guillen offered inspiring words about the importance of arts education at the 2012 Texas Young Masters Ceremony.

Executive Director’s Notes..................12 by Robert Floyd

During the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention, be sure to attend the General Sessions and learn from these two intriguing speakers. Learn more about how to record individual students and your full ensembles and what to look for in recording equipment. Put these techniques into practice to ensure quality recordings and to teach your students more about the process. BY BARBARA FREEDMAN

Band Notes .............................................................22 by Ronnie Rios Orchestra Notes ...............................................32 by Lisa McCutchan Vocal Notes ........................................................... 43 by Janwin Overstreet-Goode

60

Teaching Masterworks Through Known Songs

Help students of any grade level begin to develop an understanding and appreciation of masterworks through the songs they already know. BY GEORGIA A

.

NEWLIN

UPDATES TMEA Scholarship Application Deadline Nears ...........................................2

Elementary Notes ...........................................56 by Michele Hobizal College Notes ......................................................67 by Keith Dye

2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention: More Technology Opportunities ...............4 GoArts.org: Downloadable Files Make Doing Your Part Easy .....................8 2013 President’s Concert Features Dallas Wind Symphony .................. 28 Thank You, Scholarship Donors ................................................................. 71 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

1


Editor-in-Chief: Robert Floyd

UĂ R\G@tmea.org 512-452-0710, ext. 101 Fax: 512-451-9213

Managing Editor: Karen Kneten

kkneten@tmea.org 512-452-0710, ext. 107 Fax: 512-451-9213

TMEA Executive Board President: John Gillian john.gillian@ectorcountyisd.org 3624 Loma Drive, Odessa, 79762 432-413-2266/Fax: 432-334-7174 – Ector County ISD

President-Elect: Joe Weir joseph.weir@humble.k12.tx.us 19627 Firesign Drive, Humble, 77346 281-641-7606/Fax: 281-641-7517 – Atascocita HS

Past-President: Ross Boothman rboothman@lumberton.k12.tx.us 8285 Ginger Lane, Lumberton, 77657 409-923-7858/Fax: 409-923-7819 – Lumberton HS

Band Vice-President: Ronnie Rios ronnierios@yahoo.com 22343 Paloma Blanca Court, Harlingen, 78550 956-427-3600 x 1080/Fax: 956-440-8343 – Harlingen HS

Orchestra Vice-President: Lisa McCutchan lisamccutchan1@gmail.com 17426 Emerald Canyon Drive, San Antonio, 78232 210-397-4759/Fax: 210-695-4804 – O’Connor HS

Vocal Vice-President: Janwin Overstreet-Goode MRYHUVWUHHWJRRGH#ÀVGNQHW 1406 Frontier Lane, Friendswood, 77546 281-482-3413 x 150/Fax: 281-996-2523 – Friendswood HS

Elementary Vice-President: Michele Hobizal VDOO\KREL]DO#NDW\LVGRUJ 11003 Bergamo Drive, Richmond, 77406 281-234-0050/Fax: 281-644-1690 – Wolman Elementary

College Vice-President: Keith Dye keith.dye@ttu.edu 6607 Norwood Avenue, Lubbock, 79413 806-742-2270 x 231/Fax: 806-742-4193 – Texas Tech University

TMEA Staff Executive Director: Robert Floyd |UĂ R\G@tmea.org Deputy Director: Frank Coachman | fcoachman@tmea.org Administrative Director: Kay Vanlandingham | kvanlandingham@tmea.org Advertising/Exhibits Manager: Tesa Harding | tesa@tmea.org Membership Manager: Susan Daugherty | susand@tmea.org Membership Assistant: Rita Ellinger | rellinger@tmea.org Communications Manager: Karen Kneten | kkneten@tmea.org Financial Manager: Laura Kocian | lkocian@tmea.org Information Technologist: Andrew Denman | adenman@tmea.org

70($2IÀFH Mailing Address: P.O. Box 140465, Austin, 78714-0465 Physical Address: 7900 Centre Park Drive, Austin, 78754 Phone: 512-452-0710 | Toll-Free: 888-318-TMEA | Fax: 512-451-9213 Website: www.tmea.org 2IÀFH+RXUV Monday–Friday, 8:30 A.M.–4:30 P.M.

Apply for a TMEA Scholarship Apply by November 15 to be eligible. Are you in an undergraduate music education program? Whether you just started a music education program or are preparing to begin student teaching, TMEA offers you support. Scholarships for undergraduate music majors (available only to active TMEA college student members) range from $2,000 to $2,500. One-Year Undergraduate Scholarships ‡70($DZDUGVRQH\HDUVFKRODUVKLSVWRFXUUHQWXQGHU graduate students enrolled in a music degree program at a Texas college or university leading to teacher certification. One-Semester Student Teacher Scholarships ‡70($DZDUGVRQHVHPHVWHUVFKRODUVKLSVWRFROOHJH VWXGHQWPHPEHUVVFKHGXOHGWRVWXGHQWWHDFKZLWKLQWKHWZR VHPHVWHUVIROORZLQJWKHDSSOLFDWLRQ

Are you a music teacher continuing your professional growth with graduate study? 70($VXSSRUWVLWVPHPEHUVZKRDUHFRPPLWWHGWRH[SDQGLQJWKHLU NQRZOHGJH DQG VNLOOV WKURXJK JUDGXDWH VWXG\ LQ PXVLF E\ RIIHULQJ scholarships of $1,250 to $2,500. One-Year Graduate Study Scholarships ‡$ZDUGHGWRJUDGXDWHVWXGHQWVIRURQH\HDURQO\DQGUDQJHIURP $1,250 to $2,500.

Do you teach high school seniors who want to be music educators? 70($RIIHUVXQGHUJUDGXDWHVFKRODUVKLSVIRUDSSOLFDQWVZKRHQUROO in a music degree program at a Texas college or university leading to teacher certification. Scholarships for graduating seniors range from $2,500 up to $15,000. Encourage your best and brightest seniors to apply and submit all supporting materials by November 15. Graduating Senior Scholarships ‡%LOO&RUPDFN6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWRILYH\HDUV ‡3DVW3UHVLGHQWV0HPRULDO6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWR five years ‡3DVW3UHVLGHQWV6FKRODUVKLS\HDUIRUXSWRILYH\HDUV ‡2QH\HDUVFKRODUVKLSVIRURQH\HDURQO\

Go to www.tmea.org/scholarships

Southwestern Musician (ISSN 0162-380X) (USPS 508-340) is published monthly except March, June, and July by Texas Music Educators Association, 7900 Centre Park Drive, Austin, TX 78754. 6XEVFULSWLRQUDWHV2QH<HDU²6LQJOHFRSLHV3HULRGLFDOSRVWDJHSDLGDW$XVWLQ7;DQGDGGLWLRQDOPDLOLQJRIĂ&#x20AC;FHV32670$67(56HQGDGGUHVVFKDQJHVWR6RXWKZHVWHUQ0XVLFLDQ32%R[ Austin, TX 78714-0465. Southwestern Musician was founded in 1915 by A.L. Harper. Renamed in 1934 and published by Dr. Clyde Jay Garrett. Published 1941â&#x20AC;&#x201C;47 by Dr. Stella Owsley. Incorporated in 1948 as National by Harlan-Bell Publishers, Inc. Published 1947â&#x20AC;&#x201C;54 by Dr. H. Grady Harlan. Purchased in 1954 by D.O. Wiley. Texas Music Educator was founded in 1936 by Richard J. Dunn and given to the Texas Music (GXFDWRUV$VVRFLDWLRQZKRVHRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOSXEOLFDWLRQLWKDVEHHQVLQFH,QWKHWZRPDJD]LQHVZHUHPHUJHGXVLQJWKHQDPH6RXWKZHVWHUQ0XVLFLDQFRPELQHGZLWKWKH7H[DV0XVLF(GXFDWRUXQGHUWKHHGLWRUVKLSRI'2:LOH\ZKRFRQWLQXHGWRVHUYHDVHGLWRUXQWLOKLVUHWLUHPHQWLQ$WWKDWWLPHRZQHUVKLSRIERWKPDJD]LQHVZDVDVVXPHGE\70($,Q$XJXVWWKH70($([HFXWLYH%RDUGFKDQJHGWKHQDPHRIWKH publication to Southwestern Musician.

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Southwestern Musician | November 2012


Competitive Scholarships & Performance Awards

Audition Dates November 17, 2012 January 26 – 27, 2013 February 23 – 24, 2013 (see website for details)

Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Arts Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music

Music Department Faculty Jason Hoogerhyde, Department Chair

Conducting & Ensembles

Music Literature

Lois Ferrari, Orchestra & Wind Ensemble David Guidi, Jazz Ensemble Kenny Sheppard, Chorale & Southwestern Singers

J. Michael Cooper, Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts Lindsey Evans

Keyboard Vincent Lam, piano David Polley, organ Pamela Rossman, piano Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano David Utterback, piano Robert Warren, piano

David Asbury, guitar Delaine Fedson, harp Steve Kostelnik, guitar Eri Lee Lam, violin Jessica Gilliam-Valls, double bass Tim Washecka, viola Hai Zheng, violoncello

Music Education

Theory & Composition

Lois Ferrari Kenny Sheppard

Jason Hoogerhyde Eileen Meyer Russell Kiyoshi Tamagawa

Strings

Voice & Opera Theatre Bruce Cain Kathryn Findlen Kenny Sheppard Nicholas Simpson Dana Zenobi

Woodwinds, Brass & Percussion Robert Cannon, trumpet Anna Carney, clarinet Patrick Creel, horn Susan Douglas, oboe David Guidi, saxophone Adrienne Inglis, flute Erin Martysz, percussion Eric Stone Miller, bassoon Eileen Meyer Russell, low brass 1001 E. University Ave Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 863-1504 music@southwestern.edu www.southwestern.edu/sarofim/music


2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention February 13–16

San Antonio

LEARN MORE ABOUT TECHNOLOGY December 31: Fax/Mail Preregistration Ends January 24: Online Preregistration Ends The National TI:ME Music Technology Conference is being held in conjunction with the TMEA convention. Attendees have the opportunity to extend their learning with a full day of technology workshops on Wednesday at the convention center.

Wednesday Preconference

Extend your professional development to Wednesday with a full day of 30 clinics focused on using technology in your music instruction. Make your time in San Antonio even more valuable with this additional opportunity! All preconference clinics will be in a central location within the convention center. Preregister: When you preregister for the TMEA Clinic/Convention, you can preregister for this Wednesday preconference. (If you already preregistered, just return to the preregistration page and select this option.) At only $50, this special concentration of technology clinics is an incredible value.

MANY TECHNOLOGY TOPICS, INCLUDING: iPads digital portfolios interactive multimedia free technology website development creating apps assessment podcasting social media music labs AND MUCH MORE!

I can’t imagine anything you can offer in your district that gives music teachers the kind of professional development this conference offers. At the $50 preregistration rate, it’s the bargain of our profession! — Kathy Kuddes, Plano ISD Director of Fine Arts

www.tmea.org/convention 4

Southwestern Musician | November 2012


TMEA history: part II B Y

J O H N

PRESIDENTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTES

G I L L I A N

C

RQWLQXLQJ ZLWK VRPH GLVWDQW KLVWRU\ RI 70($ that I offered in my September 2012 column, I am VKDULQJLQIRUPDWLRQKHUHDERXWRXU3UHVLGHQWVDQG RXUDVVRFLDWLRQIURPWR&HUWDLQO\WKHVH years must have been the greatest time of struggle for all edu cational associations and for most Americans because of the draconian sacrifices that had to be made during the Great Depression. As you might recall from my September column, our sixth 3UHVLGHQW3DXO$UGHDQ-DPHVVHUYHGRXUDVVRFLDWLRQWKHQFDOOHG7H[DV%DQG 7HDFKHUV$VVRFLDWLRQ 7%7$ IRURQO\GD\VEHIRUHG\LQJVXGGHQO\IURPD stroke. $WWKH-DQXDU\PHHWLQJLQ'DOODV7%7$9LFH3UHVLGHQW/W&RO5LFKDUG -'XQQ ² ZDVRIILFLDOO\QDPHG7%7$3UHVLGHQW DOWKRXJKKHOLNHO\ DVVXPHG WKRVH GXWLHV LPPHGLDWHO\ IROORZLQJ WKH GHDWK RI 0U -DPHV  'XQQ ZDV%DQGPDVWHURIWKH7H[DV$ 0$JJLH%DQGIURPWROLYLQJLQ &ROOHJH6WDWLRQXQWLOKLVGHDWK$WWKHHQGRI7%7$KDGRQO\LQ association funds. $WWKHPHHWLQJXQGHU'XQQ·VOHDGHUVKLS%RDUGPHPEHUVYRWHGWRORZHU PHPEHUVKLSGXHVIURPIRUQHZPHPEHUVDQGIRUUHQHZLQJPHPEHUVWR DIODWIHHRI'XULQJWKLVYHU\GLIILFXOWILQDQFLDOWLPHRQO\LQGXHVZDV FROOHFWHGIRUWKH\HDU$IWHUSD\LQJDOOH[SHQVHVWKHDVVRFLDWLRQZDVOHIWZLWK DEDODQFHRIDQGPRQH\ZDVRZHGWRWKHSDLGVHFUHWDU\DQGWRDSULQWLQJ FRPSDQ\)RUWKHVHFRQG\HDUSODQVZHUHPDGHIRU7%7$WRKRVWWZRZHHNVRI VXPPHUPXVLFVWXG\LQ/DPSDVDVIRUEDQGWHDFKHUVDQGRWKHUV $WWKH-DQXDU\PHHWLQJLQ)RUW:RUWK(YHUHWW00F&UDFNHQ ²  ZDVHOHFWHG3UHVLGHQW0F&UDFNHQZDV%DQGPDVWHUDW%D\ORU8QLYHUVLW\ $W WKLV VPDOO PHHWLQJ  PHPEHUVKLSV ZHUH SDLG EULQJLQJ WKH 7%7$ EDQN

IMPORTANT DATES Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Make a convention housing reservation online. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

If there is no struggle, there is no progress. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Frederick Douglass Southwestern Musician | November 2012

5


Courtney Crouse

NEW VOICE FACULTY

Oklahoma City University

announces

Dr. Kelli Holst The Bass School of Music at

www.okcu.edu/music

account to a total of $105. Despite an ear lier vote to alternate the annual meeting EHWZHHQ )RUWK :RUWK DQG 'DOODV WKH %RDUG YRWHG IRU WKH  PHHWLQJ WR EH in Waco so that South Texas members ZRXOGKDYHDVKRUWHUGULYH,WZDVDOVRDW WKLVVPDOOPHHWLQJWKDWWKHLGHDRIDQ$OO 6WDWH %DQG ZDV ILUVW PHQWLRQHG 7%7$·V EDQN EDODQFH DW WKH HQG RI WKH \HDU ZDV  ,Q WKH FLW\ RI :DFR LQ -DQXDU\  0F&UDFNHQ ZDV UHHOHFWHG 3UHVLGHQW $W WKLV PHHWLQJ WKHUH ZDV GLVFXVVLRQ DERXW the need to require band teachers to hold VRPH W\SH RI FHUWLILFDWH VKRZLQJ WKH\ ZHUHLQGHHGTXDOLILHGWRWHDFKPXVLF 7KHUHSRUWE\WKH$OO6WDWH%DQGFRP mittee recommended that certain selected members of high school bands be taken to the summer camp clinic, and that these VWXGHQWV EHFRPH WKH QXFOHXV RI DQ $OO

Learn Boldly. Live to Inspire. SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE: Da capo Award in Music Up to full tuition per year Jones Fine Arts Award for Music Majors Up to $4,000 per year Performance Awards for Non-Majors Up to $2,000 per year Scholarship Audition Dates: Sun., Feb. 24, 2013 @ 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 p.m. Sat., March 23, 2013 @ 10 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201C; noon Sat., April 20, 2013 @ 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 p.m.

Texas Lutheran University Contact 1.800.771.8521 or e-mail dboyer@tlu.edu

6

Southwestern Musician | November 2012

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

For speciďŹ c qualiďŹ cations for each award, visit www.tlu.edu/music or scan the QR code above with your smartphone.

Bachelor of Music in All-Level Music Education Bachelor of Music in Performance Bachelor of Arts in Music


6WDWH+LJK6FKRRO%DQG7KH\KRSHGWKLV JURXS ZRXOG JURZ HQRXJK WR SHUIRUP DW WKH  7H[DV &HQWHQQLDO ([SRVLWLRQ DQG JHW WKH SXEOLF·V DV ZHOO DV WKH 6WDWH %RDUG RI (GXFDWLRQ·V DWWHQWLRQ 5HFRUGV VKRZWKHUHZDVDOVRWKHKRSHWR´GHYHORS a band of this sort, as something perma QHQWDPRQJKLJKVFKRROEDQGVµ7KH EDQNEDODQFHZDVXSWR 7KH -DQXDU\  PHHWLQJ ZDV LQ 'DOODV$WWKLVPHHWLQJDQ$OO6WDWH%DQG UHSRUW ZDV JLYHQ QRWLQJ WKDW DWWHPSWV ZHUHEHLQJPDGHWRHVWDEOLVKDQ$OO6WDWH %DQGWRSHUIRUPDW7H[DV6WDWH7HDFKHUV $VVRFLDWLRQPHHWLQJV7KHZRUNWRHVWDE OLVK WKH EDQG ZDV WR FRQWLQXH $ FRQWHVW to encourage original band compositions ZDVDSSURYHGZLWKDFRPPLWWHHIRUPHGWR organize the contest. 'HZH\2WWR´3URIµ:LOH\ ²  ZDV HOHFWHG 3UHVLGHQW LQ  DQG DJDLQ LQ  DW D PHHWLQJ LQ $ELOHQH :LOH\ ZDV %DQGPDVWHU DW +DUGLQ6LPPRQV 8QLYHUVLW\ IURP  WR  DQG DW 7H[DV7HFK8QLYHUVLW\IURPWR :LOH\ HDUQHG WKH XQRIILFLDO WLWOH ´)DWKHU RI 7H[DV %DQGVµ EHFDXVH RI KLV \HDUV RI ZRUN DV D 7H[DV %DQGPDVWHU DQG KLV ORQJWLPHLQYROYHPHQWLQ7%7$70($ $IWHUEHLQJWZLFHHOHFWHG3UHVLGHQW:LOH\ continued serving our organization for PDQ\\HDUVDVHGLWRURIRXUDVVRFLDWLRQ·V magazines. Wiley also served numerous \HDUVDV6HFUHWDU\7UHDVXUHURI7%7$DQG 70($ ,Q  :LOH\ EHFDPH WKH ILUVW ([HFXWLYH 6HFUHWDU\ RI 70($ DQG ZDV SDLG  SHU \HDU ZLWK DQ DGGLWLRQDO $1,000 per year to use as pay for clerical KHOS:LOH\ZDVNQRZQWRXVHKLVSHUVRQDO IXQGVWRKHOS7%7$DQG70($GXULQJ struggling years. Through his leadership, WKHRUJDQL]DWLRQKDGJURZQWRDOHYHORI ILQDQFLDOVHOIVXIILFLHQF\7KHIR\HUDUHD in the current TMEA office is named in honor of Wiley. San Antonio hosted our convention IRUWKHILUVWWLPHLQ$WWKDWPHHWLQJ 7%7$YRWHGWRPRYHIXWXUHPHHWLQJVWR WKH ILUVW IXOO ZHHNHQG LQ )HEUXDU\ VWDUW LQJLQ:LOOLDP'5HYHOOLIURPWKH 8QLYHUVLW\RI0LFKLJDQZDVLQWURGXFHGWR PHPEHUV DV GLUHFWRU RI WKH %DQG &OLQLF KHOG LQ FRQMXQFWLRQ ZLWK WKH DQQXDO PHHWLQJFRQYHQWLRQ EHJLQQLQJ LQ  Members also voted to charge an addi tional $1 registration fee for those attend LQJWKHDQQXDOFRQYHQWLRQ3DVW3UHVLGHQW Wiley made a motion to change the name RI WKH $VVRFLDWLRQ WR ´7H[DV %DQG DQG

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Southwestern Musician | November 2012

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Print- and Web-Ready Materials Make Doing Your Part Easy! ith another legislative session nearing, it is impor tant all music educators do their part to elevate the importance of fine arts education. Since this can PHDQDQDGGHGUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUZKLFK\RXKDYH OLWWOHWLPHZHKDYHSURYLGHGSULQWDQG:HEUHDG\PDWHULDOVIRU your use. 7DNHDPRPHQWWRWKLQNDERXWWKHPDQ\ZD\VLQZKLFK\RX FRPPXQLFDWHZLWK\RXUVWXGHQWVWKHLUSDUHQWVDQG\RXUFRP PXQLW\VXSSRUWHUV'RZQORDGWKHDSSURSULDWHILOHW\SHVIURPWKH *R$UWV'RZQORDG6XSSRUW0DWHULDOVSDJHDQGSXWWKHPWRXVH 7KHIROORZLQJDUHVRPHRIWKHFRPPRQRSSRUWXQLWLHVIRUXVLQJ GoArts materials.

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Southwestern Musician | November 2012

OHDGHUVKLSWRKHOSSURPRWH*R$UWVLQWKHLUFRPPXQLFDWLRQVZLWK parents both in print and personally during their meetings.

Because every Texas student deserves a quality fine arts education Every Texas student should receive: A well-balanced education 4XDOLW\¿QHDUWVLQVWUXFWLRQ 3URWHFWHGLQVWUXFWLRQDOWLPHIRUDUWVHGXFDWLRQ 2SSRUWXQLWLHVWRSXUVXHWKHLUSDVVLRQ What is GoArts? 7KH*R$UWVFDPSDLJQLVVSRQVRUHGE\WKH7H[DV0XVLF(GXFDWRUV $VVRFLDWLRQ LQ FRQMXQFWLRQ ZLWK WKH 7H[DV &RDOLWLRQ IRU 4XDOLW\ $UWV (GXFDWLRQ D FRDOLWLRQ RI PRUH WKDQ  RUJDQL]DWLRQVZKRVHPLVVLRQLVWRSURPRWH¿QHDUWVLQRXU7H[DVVFKRROV :HDUHDGYRFDWHVIRUHGXFDWLRQSROLFLHVSULPDULO\DWWKHVWDWH OHYHOWKDWHQVXUHDOO7H[DVVWXGHQWVKDYHRSSRUWXQLWLHVWRVWXG\ PXVLFDUWWKHDWHUDQGGDQFH:HSURYLGHWKHSXEOLFDVZHOODV SROLF\PDNHUVZLWKLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKHPDQ\ZD\VWKDWDUWV HGXFDWLRQEHQH¿WVRXUVWXGHQWVDQGRXUVWDWH

How You Can Help +HOSHGXFDWHRXUVWDWH¶VGHFLVLRQPDNHUVDERXWWKHLPSRUWDQFH RISURWHFWLQJ¿QHDUWVHGXFDWLRQE\UHJLVWHULQJ\RXUVXSSRUWDW ZZZ*R$UWVRUJ

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ZZZGoArtsRUJ Download this print-ready file and include it in concert programs. It is available in color or black & white and in half- and full-page sizes.


think. perform. explore. BM Music Education Performance Composition

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Concert Programs 'RZQORDG SULQWUHDG\ ILOHV EDVHG RQ your program size and color. Files are available in a variety of formats. If you GRQ¡WILQGDIRUPDWWRVXSSRUW\RXUSULQW QHHGVHPDLONNQHWHQ#WPHDRUJZLWKWKH file type you need. Concert Slide Presentations Include slides in your preconcert or LQWHUPLVVLRQ VOLGH VKRZ WKDW IHDWXUH WKH GoArts logo and text from the GoArts VLWH H[SODLQLQJ ZK\ WKH\ VKRXOG UHJLV WHU DW *R$UWVRUJ &RQVLGHU FXVWRPL]LQJ the slide to include advocacy statements tailored to your local program needs. Concert Announcements Include a brief promotional statement about the importance of registering sup port at GoArts.org. If there are critical issues facing fine arts education, regis WHUHG PHPEHUV ZLOO EH LQIRUPHG DERXW WKHP ([SODLQ WKDW LQ WKHLU VWDWHOHYHO advocacy, our leaders promote the obvi ous breadth of support for fine arts educa tion opportunities based on the number of registered supporters. (The more peo SOHZKRUHJLVWHUWKHPRUHFRQYLQFLQJRXU

10 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

Because every Texas student deserves a quality fine arts education Download this print-ready black and white logo and include it on posters, in concert programs, or on any other print materials. Web-ready logo files are also available for download.

leaders can be in their advocacy efforts on behalf of all Texas schoolchildren.)

tion in their performance promotions just DV\RXZLOOZLWK\RXUV

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Are You Registered? As you prepare to be an effective advo cate, your first step should be to register as a GoArts supporter yourself. Take a very quick moment and go to GoArts.org and WKHQWRWKH5HJLVWHUSDJH,I\RXUHJLVWHUHG previously, you should have received an HPDLOLQ2FWREHUIURP70($FRQILUP ing that you are a registered member. If VRWKHUHLVQRQHHGWRUHUHJLVWHU<RXZLOO receive any GoArts updates at that email address. 


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EXECUTIVE DIRECTORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTES

Keeping students engaged B Y

IMPORTANT DATES Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Make a convention housing reservation online. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

R O B E R T

F L O Y D

A

Q RQJRLQJ GLVFXVVLRQ LQ WRGD\¡V HGXFDWLRQ DQG SROLWLFDOFLUFOHVLVKRZWRUHIRUPVFKRROVWRLPSURYH VWXGHQWOHDUQLQJ7KHFRQFHUQWKHQDVQRZLVWKDW RXU VFKRROV DUH IDLOLQJ WR SURGXFH VWXGHQWV ZKR FDQ PHHW WKH FKDOOHQJHV WKH\ ZLOO IDFH LQ WKHLU SURIHVVLRQDO DQGSHUVRQDOOLYHV,QWKHZRUGVRI'DQ3LQN70($ General Session speaker and author of A Whole New Mindâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future We need to make sure we are preparing our kids for their future and not our past . . . What I see in business is a premium on novelty, nuance, and customization yet I fear that our schools are going exactly in the opposite direction. They are increasingly about routines, right answers, and standardization at precisely the moment that the economy is no longer about those things. ,Q WKH UHFHQW &ROOHJH %RDUG SXEOLFDWLRQ WKDW ZDV D VXSSOHPHQW WR WKH September issue of Phi Delta Kappan*HQH%XGLJDQG$ODQ+HDSVH[SORUHGWKH SXUSRVHDQGVKDSHRI$PHULFD¡VVFKRROVDVZHOODVWKHZKROHLVVXHRIVWXGHQW HQJDJHPHQWLQOHDUQLQJ7KHVWXG\HQWLWOHG´6WXGHQWVDQG7HDFKHUV7DONDERXW 6FKRRO5HIRUPDQG6WXGHQW(QJDJHPHQWÂľZDVPRVWHQOLJKWHQLQJLQWHUPVRI guiding school reform, especially coming from those on the ground floor of education. 7KURXJKRXWWKHVWXG\LWZDVFOHDUO\VWDWHGWKDWWKHSXUSRVHRIKLJKVFKRROLV much more than academics. These goals included being an active participant in RQH¡VRZQHGXFDWLRQGHYHORSLQJSUREOHPVROYLQJVNLOOVPDNLQJJRRGFKRLFHV and being a good citizen. %RWKVWXGHQWVDQGWHDFKHUVKRZHYHUEHOLHYHGWKDWVWXGHQWHQJDJHPHQWKDG WREHWKHFRUQHUVWRQHRIDQ\VFKRROUHIRUP7KH\ZHUHFOHDUWKDWZLWKRXWVWXGHQW

Students crave variety in instructional technique, and they consider it part of a teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job to make learning engaging. 12 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


““I am so excited i d to use Q Quaver’s ’ llessons as the centerpiece of my curriculum next year.” Donna Berg – Darien Elementary, Delavan, WI

“Quaver Music has been a huge impact on my music classes.” BJ Bany – Continental Elementary, Continental, OH

“I can’t tell you how much we love it! The kids are so excited about it. I’ve been teaching for 29 years and can’t wait to get to school each day to do Quaver. Thanks so much for this most excellent program!” Sherri Stoddard Thompson Jefferson Elementary, Shawnee, OK

“My students talk about Quaver all the time! Now I have kids quoting music history facts to me – with genuine enthusiasm! They are learning so much faster and retaining concepts longer because of Quaver.”

“I love the Quaver Quizzes that

can be used after each episode. They are great to use as a formative or summative assessment. It has been such a refreshing way to introduce, enhance, and assess core content! My students love Quaver’s Marvelous World of Music!” Lisa Hussung – Rich Pond Elementary Bowling Green, KY

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Penelope Campbell – Willbern Elementary Houston, TX To see more teacher comments in detail go to QuaverMusic.com/WhatTeachersSay

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engagement, learning could not take SODFH 7KH\ IXUWKHU DJUHHG WKDW WRGD\¡V reform efforts not only failed to address the factors that influence engagement but they also tend to be disruptive to teach HUV¡HIIRUWVWRDFFRPSOLVKWKDWJRDO,QWKH ZRUGVRIWKHVWXG\´7KHÂśWHDFKWRWKHWHVW¡ imperative is considered by many to be SDUWLFXODUO\ LQVLGLRXV WDNLQJ WLPH DZD\ from activities and courses that lead to deeper and lasting learning.â&#x20AC;? In regard to engagement, students said, ´*LYH XV RSWLRQV DV IDU DV SURMHFWV JR VR WKDW SHRSOH ZKR DUH PRUH DFDGHPLF RULHQWHG KDYH RSWLRQV DQG SHRSOH ZLWK more of a creative side can do a project WKDWLVQ¡WMXVWZULWLQJDQHVVD\RQDERRNÂľ Further, students listed their top three SULRULWLHVLQHQJDJHPHQWDVIROORZVPDNH it fun, interesting, and entertaining so I ZDQWWRFRPHWRFODVVPDNHLWUHOHYDQWVR LWLVPHPRUDEOHDQG,XQGHUVWDQGZK\LWLV LPSRUWDQWDQGWDLORULWWRP\QHHGVÂłQRW so easy I am bored and not so hard I am left behind. For engagement to be successful, WHDFKHUVVDLG´6WXGHQWVPXVWIHHOYDOXHG learning must be connected to something

WKH\FDUHDERXWDQGLQVWUXFWLRQPXVWEH SDFHGÂłFKDOOHQJLQJ WKHP ZLWKRXW IUXV trating them.â&#x20AC;? And the one sentence that resonated ZLWK PH WKDW VXPV LW DOO XS ´6WXGHQWV crave variety in instructional technique, DQGWKH\FRQVLGHULWSDUWRIDWHDFKHU¡VMRE to make learning engaging.â&#x20AC;? So does any of this dialogue sound familiar? Such a study serves as both DQ DIILUPDWLRQ IRU KRZ HIIHFWLYH PXVLF teachers deliver instruction and as a chal lenge to take advantage of every opportu nity to engage our students in learning. &HUWDLQO\RXUVXEMHFWLVFRQGXFLYHWRJHW ting students excited about learning, and ZH PXVW VWHDGIDVWO\ OHDG WKH SDUDGH LQ terms of inspiring students to be engaged and successful in school. In my August column I talked about making our classrooms an experience stu GHQWV YDOXH 5HDOLVWLFDOO\ RXU VWXGHQWV continue to participate in our programs, especially at a young age, not so much for WKH PXVLFDO NQRZOHGJH WR EH JDLQHG EXW for the daily experiences they have in our FODVVURRPV 7KH\ ZDQW WR FRPH WR RXU FODVVHV EHFDXVH RI KRZ WKH\ DUH WUHDWHG

and respected, and parents recognize DQGYDOXHWKHLUFKLOG¡VH[SHULHQFHIRUWKH VDPH UHDVRQV +RZ ZH HQJDJH VWXGHQWV in learning is a key component of making that experience a positive one. Despite the importance of providing choices for students to meet individual LQWHUHVWV RQH VWXGHQW VWDWHG WKDW ZLWK D $5 million funding crisis in his district, the district has been stripping classes that he likes, such as media, theater, and music. Sadly, this is happening on too PDQ\FDPSXVHVDFURVVRXUVWDWHDVZHOO 6R ZLWK D QHZ OHJLVODWLYH VHVVLRQ DSSURDFKLQJLQZKLFKIXQGLQJZLOODJDLQ drive so many decisions at the state level, DQG ORFDO FRQWURO ZLOO EH WKH SUHYDLOLQJ philosophy of so many conservative leg LVODWRUVLWZLOOFRQWLQXHWREHFULWLFDOWKDW your program is one that your students, SDUHQWVDQGFRPPXQLW\YDOXH&XWWLQJRU OLPLWLQJVXFKDYDOXHGSURJUDPZLOOEHD difficult path for a local board of educa WLRQWRIROORZ 7RUHYLHZDFRS\RIWKHIXOOVWXG\JRWR ZZZWPHDRUJVPOLQNVFKRROUHIRUP 

Inspire The

performance of your life

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14 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

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Control your mie class with an iPad ®

Yamaha Music in Education (MIE) is a technology-based general music program with a unique and engaging method, a special two-student keyboard, and now a new iPad app that gives teachers total control of instruments and learning materials from anywhere in the room. The iPad also gives teachers instant access to MIE textbooks and other course materials, making the job of teaching far more fun and effective. The app works with the MIE3 system as well as some older configurations. For more information about MIE, visit 4wrd.it/mieswm6 or scan the code below. Or, email miesales@yamaha.com today if you have questions about the iPad app’s compatibility with your current MIE classroom system. ©2012 Yamaha Corporation of America. All rights reserved. iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


Education in the Spotlight

By Matt Matthews

W

ith the onset of fall, schools are in full gear, the general elections are days away, and the 83rd session of the Texas Legislature is right around the corner. Already, there is a buzz of activity in the halls of the capitol. Legislative staffs are busy with interim hearings and some are even in the process of drafting bills to be filed. Per the state constitution, the Texas Legislature shall meet for 140 days beginning in January of every odd-numbered year. The next regular session is set to begin on January 8, 2013. In addition to waiting for the results of the November general elections, legislators and staff are also getting updated information on the status of the budget and appropriation requests from the myriad state agencies. While there are still numerous unknowns, many factors are already in place. Governor Perry and Lieutenant Governor Dewhurst will continue their service as chief executive and presiding officer of the Senate, respectively. The Speaker of the House, Joe Straus III, will seek re-election to another term, but that will not occur until the new House members are sworn in and the election is held in early January. Historically, the two biggest budget drivers are education and health and human services. These policy areas have dominated discussions of the budget and have served to determine how much money will be left over for other purposes. This will prove true again during the 83rd session. While early projections indicate the state will have more money than it did for the last legislative session in 2011, many budgetary factors not in play before now exist. 16 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

Changes in Leadership There are other differences facing this session. The most glaring change is the high turnover in membership of both the House and Senate. We expect 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 new members of the 31-member Senate, and 48â&#x20AC;&#x201C;50 members of the 150-member House will have served at the most in only one legislative session. This is a substantial change and will affect every corner of the capitol. However, the significance of this unprecedented turnover is overshadowed by the loss of senior legislative leaders, most significantly in the area of education. Senator Florence Shapiro, a twenty-year warhorse of the Senate and decade-long chair of the powerful Senate Education Committee, is retiring. Her counterpart in the House, Representative Rob Eissler, was defeated in the Republican primary. The cumulative effect of these losses to the institutional knowledge of Texas education policy is significant for all education sectors, but nowhere more so than in fine arts. Additionally, the departure of TEA Commissioner Robert Scott, and the appointment of Michael Williams to fill that slot, is another significant change in the educational landscape. Spotlight on the Budget Every legislative session begins with a fight over money and the expectations on how and where it should be spent. Education and Health and Human Services account for more than 80% of the Texas budget. Early projections by the Comptroller of Public Accounts usually set the stage for those fights. Most analysts are


predicting the next budget will be tight but better than it was in the 2011 session. However, no one will say that Texas has a budget surplus going into the next session. Texas Taxpayers and Research Association President Dale Craymer recently stated, “Current trends suggest that the Legislature may have near sufficient funds to pay for normal 2014–15 spending pressures.” Just what is meant by “normal” has yet to be determined, but it is clear that the effects of school finance lawsuits and the Affordable Care Act are not included in that definition. A fight over the use of the state’s $8 billion Rainy Day Fund is almost a certainty. Another certainty is that the governor will hold a firm line on the growth of government. Recently he called for legislators to sign a budget compact, strictly limiting the state’s expenditures. Among the principles he articulated are truth in budgeting, supporting a stricter constitutional limit on spending (which he says should be limited, by constitution, to the rate of population growth, combined with the rate of inflation), opposing any new taxes or tax increases, preserving a strong Rainy Day Fund, and cutting wasteful

and redundant government programs and agencies. Public Education Committee Interim Charges Between legislative sessions, the presiding officers of the House and Senate issue interim charges for committees to study between sessions. The lieutenant governor and speaker issued charges earlier this year. Currently, the House and Senate Public Education Committees are concluding public hearings on their respective charges and are expected to make their final reports in November. The House Public Education Committee considered, among other charges, the following: ‡$UHYLHZRIWKH8QLYHUVLW\ Interscholastic League with recommended changes. ‡0RQLWRULQJLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRI the new state assessment system (STAAR), specifically the impact on students, instruction, teachers, and graduation and promotion rates. TMEA has been closely monitoring these hearings and spending significant

time with legislators and staff on the impact of these issues on fine arts programs across the state. Additionally, there have been recent discussions about possible changes to the new STAAR and End of Course assessments, some of which include legislative changes to fine arts programs and credits. For example, some staff and policymakers have discussed refining the newly implemented provisions of HB 3, including changes to the Recommended Plan for graduation. TMEA, representing all fine arts programs, has been invited to participate in these discussions and will be a significant voice in any proposed changes to such programs should they occur. Be prepared to hear a great debate over the issue of accountability and the application of the current assessment system on public education. The Senate Education Committee was given several charges that could ultimately affect fine arts, including the following: ‡6WXG\LQJHGXFDWRUDQGSULQFLSDO preparation programs through colleges of education and alternative certification.

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 17


‡([DPLQLQJVWUDWHJLHVWRLPSURYH recruitment of high-quality teachers and making recommendations accordingly.

parents, and teachers and exploring the use of education tax credits and its potential impact on state funding. The last charge has already received much attention in the press and spurred a vibrant debate about the efficacy of intro-

‡6WXG\LQJWKHLPSDFWRIVFKRROFKRLFH programs in other states on students,

Oklahoma City University

Jamie Whitmarsh BM‘11 Winner, Percussive Arts Society’s 39th annual Composition Concerto Contest

congratulates

The Bass School of Music at

www.okcu.edu/music

ducing some form of vouchers in Texas. Governor Perry and Lieutenant Governor Dewhurst, along with recently-appointed Senate Education Chair Dan Patrick and other key legislators, have already indicated their support for some form of education choice. This will likely be a highprofile education issue. School Finance Litigation Another significant factor facing policymakers will be the litany of lawsuits challenging Texas’s school finance system. Five separate suits, representing over 500 districts and 3 million Texas public school students, have been filed against the state alleging several grounds of violations of the Texas Constitution. These suits were brought by the following: ‡7H[DV6FKRRO&RDOLWLRQ UHSUHVHQWLQJ 60 property-wealthy districts) ‡7D[SD\HUDQG6WXGHQW)DLUQHVV Coalition (representing 400+ districts) ‡%LJ'LVWULFW&RDOLWLRQ UHSUHVHQWLQJ the largest school districts) ‡0H[LFDQ$PHULFDQ/HJDO'HIHQVH and Education Fund (MALDEF,

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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS

Texas Strings

String Division

Mir贸 Quartet

Eugene Gratovich, violin

Daniel Ching, violin

Brian Lewis, violin

William Fedkenheuer, violin

Sandy Yamamoto, violin

John Largess, viola

Roger Myers, viola

Joshua Gindele, cello

Bion Tsang, cello DaXun Zhang, double bass Delaine Leonard Fedson, harp Adam Holzman, guitar Laurie Scott, string project

Listening The World is

m u s i c . u t e x a s . e d u


representing a variety of districts with a high percentage of low-income/ English language learners, including Edgewood ISD) ‡7H[DQVIRU5HDO(TXLW\DQG(IILFLHQF\ in Education (TREE, representing parents and some third party organizations including the Texas Association of Business) The TREE Coalition is represented by former House Public Education Chairman Kent Grusendorf, and their principal claim is different from the other suits in that they assert that more money

“may or may not” lead to more efficient public schools. Recently, the presiding judge consolidated many of the common claims in order to expedite discovery and trial proceedings. The trial was scheduled to begin on October 22 of this year. It is widely assumed that any decision by the trial court will ultimately result in an appeal to the Texas Supreme Court. There is much discussion on when the Supreme Court would render a decision and if that decision would be made before or after the Legislature concludes

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its regular session. For example, if the Supreme Court were to rule on an appeal while the Legislature were still in regular session, then one could assume a flurry of legislative activity to address the decision made by the court. However, if the Supreme Court does not issue a decision until the regular legislative session has concluded, one or more special sessions would likely be called, keeping legislators in Austin through much of the summer— or beyond. At any rate, onlookers should prepare for a feisty, and likely long, school finance discussion. TMEA Legislative Goals TMEA leaders have been closely monitoring these legislative and regulatory activities and constructing a legislative program to position fine arts at the front of the education policy agenda. Receiving input from teachers and administrators is critical to this process as it is important to have the collective fine arts voice heard in Austin. TMEA recognizes its members’ ongoing concerns about students being removed from classes for testing remediation. TMEA will continue state and local efforts to address this challenge to the quality of programs and the threat it creates to sound educational outcomes. During the last two sessions, TMEA pursued legislation to address student pull-out. While this legislation did not ultimately pass, in each session these bills did not fail on substantive concerns but instead because of legislative time running out and on procedural grounds. TMEA will continue its efforts on this front and others and will keep its members informed on the status of its legislative agenda. Thanks go to all who have taken the time to communicate their concerns about the upcoming session. It is only through the unselfish actions of individuals that sound education policy is achieved in government. TMEA leadership truly appreciates the deep passion and concern of the professionals in its membership and remembers your commitment in all they do.  Matt Matthews is a registered lobbyist and is under contract with TMEA to assist us in our fine arts education initiatives.

20 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


T

here are many days when I am in the capitol during the legislative session that I hear beautiful music echoing from the rotunda, and I always investigate. While occasionally the sounds may come from a community or professional music group, in almost every case it is a wonderful school music ensemble performing. It always warms my heart as well as the hearts of thousands of legislators, staff members, lobbyists, and visitors who pass through the rotunda on a daily basis. There is no better advocacy tool for us than our students demonstrating the results of quality music classroom teaching. With that in mind, I’d like to continue a goal started in 2011 to have a music ensemble performing in the capitol every day of the legislative session. While the two-day Arts Education Days at the Capitol event sponsored by the Texas Coalition for Quality Arts Education (TCQAE) is certainly effective, think how effective it would be to have quality school music showcased daily for our state’s decision makers. The session begins January 8 and concludes May 27. Quite often during the first couple of months of the session, legislators are back home in their districts on Friday and Monday, so the most effective time to schedule a visit would be midweek during January and February or any weekday in March, April, or May. While having daily performances at the capitol may be a lofty goal, my guess is that more of you would showcase your students there if you knew how to go about applying. Such performances are controlled and under the jurisdiction of the Texas Preservation Board. While their policies are very structured about what you can and cannot do, they are realistic and manageable. One critical component of the application is that you must have one of the following sponsor your appearance: the governor, the lieutenant governor, the speaker, a state senator, or a state representative. Your local representative or senator would be the

LET MUSIC DELIVER OUR MESSAGE by Robert Floyd logical and most realistic choice. Most are more than willing to sponsor your ensemble. For Preservation Board contact information and to download an event application go to www.tmea.org/ smlink/capitolperform. Performing and visiting the capitol, one of our state’s treasures, can be a most memorable experience. One veteran choir director who has performed at and won major festivals throughout Texas still explains that performing at the capitol has been one of the highlights of his career. A performance can be integrated into a meaningful civics lesson as well. Most groups that visit also take a guided tour, have lunch on the beautiful capitol lawn if the weather permits, visit with their legislators who usually want to take advantage of a photo op, and in most cases get introduced from the gallery of the Senate or House chambers. The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum is two blocks away and also is worthy of consideration as an additional point of interest to visit, as is the Capitol Visitors Center on the capitol grounds. Texas music programs are successful because we believe students experience music through quality performance, so it goes without saying that any presentation at the capitol should reflect the result of rigorous teaching and learning in the classroom. The beauty of this venue is that such a performance could come from any type of ensemble at any grade level. There are no prerequisites for applying other than quality. I hope you will give every consideration to exploring this wonderful performance option.  Southwestern Musician | November 2012 21


BAND NOTES IMPORTANT DATES November—Make a convention housing reservation online. November 10–11—All-State Jazz judging. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15—Specialty instrument application postmark deadline. December 15—Dual certification deadline. December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 12, 2013—Area Band and Vocal auditions. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

22 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

It’s all about leadership B Y

R O N N I E

R I O S

A

s music educators, we are in a position of leadership every day, but do we take this responsibility of leadership as seriously as we should? If we were a CEO and our business were in the red, we would find ourselves unemployed. If we were an NFL coach leading a 1–7 season, we would be gone. As a band director, what happens if our students are not making characteristic sounds on their instruments? What if colleagues on our team have differing philosophies? What if our students don’t enjoy making music every day they have the opportunity? What happens to us? As leaders of our programs, we need to be aware of how effective we are being. Here’s the challenge: walk away from the group of people you are leading, and then turn around to see if anyone follows you. While you might have students who seem to follow you anywhere you go, the evidence of real leadership extends well beyond that. You will realize the positive influence of your leadership by observing how those you lead respect themselves and others, how they are committed to excellence and to the band program, and how they begin to act as leaders among their peers. When we see our students become leaders themselves then we can know we are changing the world. Leadership is not about being the smartest, most educated, or most experienced person, and it’s not about having a fancy title. It is about what you do for others. To be a true leader requires being a genuine servant. In our service to others, we need to be sure we are equally available to all. If we make ourselves available to one over another, we risk losing credibility with those we lead. Be consistent and fair to all—every interaction offers us an opportunity to lead by example. Leadership isn’t about being perfect in what you do; it is about offering yourself to make a more perfect world for those you serve.

Leadership isn’t about being perfect in what you do; it is about offering yourself to make a more perfect world for those you serve.


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Additional All-State Jazz Ensemble in 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2014 At its September meeting, the TMEA Executive Board voted to add a second TMEA All-State Jazz Ensemble to perform at the 2014 TMEA Clinic/ Convention. This ensemble will be the same size as the existing one, and students will be selected to it through the same audition process in the fall of 2013. More details will follow about this additional ensemble. 2013 Clinic/Convention Update If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already, take a moment to preregister onlineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the simplest way to complete your convention registration! Go to www.tmea.org/convention to preregister and for more information. While there, be sure to make your hotel reservation through the discounted TMEA housing system. Hotels fill up quickly, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait any longer! You can find the link to housing from the convention webpage. Read on to learn about some exciting highlights of this incredible event. Also, look to next monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue of the magazine for a full convention schedule preview.

Dallas Wind Symphony to Perform Be sure to purchase tickets to the 2013 Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert featuring the Dallas Wind Symphony under the direction of Jerry Junkin. This special performance will feature renowned clarinetist HĂĽkan Rosengren performing Frank Ticheliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clarinet Concerto (see page 28 for more details). Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert sold out in advance of the convention, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to purchase your tickets! You can purchase tickets when you preregister (or at any time from the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert page at www.tmea.org/convention). Katy HS Jazz Band Is Invited High School Jazz Band for 2013 Beginning with the 2013 convention, the TMEA Band Division, in cooperation with Texas Jazz Educators Association, is inviting a high school jazz band to perform at our annual convention. I am pleased to announce that Katy HS Jazz Band, under the direction of Terence Gorton, has been selected as our first invited high school jazz ensemble. Be sure to include their performance in your 2013 convention schedule.

Honor Band Performances Our 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 Honor Bands are certain to offer inspirational performances on Friday of the convention. Learn more about them here and be sure to include them in your convention schedule. 1C Honor Band Krum MS Wind Ensemble Jack Forbis, Director Krum ISD is in northwest Denton County in the city of Krum. The Krum band program began in 1991 with a partQHUVKLSEHWZHHQWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI1RUWK Texas and KISD. Roger Warner, a former 'HDQRI0XVLFDW817DQG&DURO7XUQHU D8177HDFKLQJ)HOORZVWDUWHGWKHSURgram with 50 students in grades 7 and 8. Since then, the band program has grown to over 400 students in grades 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12. The Krum HS Band has been an Honor Band finalist six times, four of them as state runner-up. The Krum MS Band has previous success in state-level competition, but this most recent Honor Band title is a first for Krum ISD. The Krum MS Wind Ensemble has enjoyed performing a varied repertoire of music from PML standards to current publications.

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 25


None of this would be possible without the amazing music staff at Krum ISD. The KMS Wind Ensemble is under the direction of Jack Forbis, Director of Bands, and Rich Bono, Krum ISD Director of Percussion. With many years of success, Carol Turner has remained Krum HS Director of Bands. Thomas Eby serves as the KHS Marching Band and Jazz Band Director and also teaches AP music theory classes. Choir Director Kaitlyn Carty also helps with various aspects of the band program. The Krum ISD band program is excited to represent the Krum students, administration, and community at the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention. 1A Honor Band Carlisle HS Band Josh King, Director The Carlisle â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indianâ&#x20AC;? Band is located in the small town of Price in northeast Texas. The Carlisle band program has approximately 250 students in grades 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12. All students take fifth-grade band in heterogeneous classes. The sixth-grade intermediate band consists of 60 students and competes in ATSSB All-Region and invitational contests throughout the year. The newly-formed middle school band is composed of 30 seventh-grade musicians DQG FRPSHWHV LQ LQYLWDWLRQDO 8,/ DQG ATSSB sponsored competitions. The Carlisle HS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indianâ&#x20AC;? Band is composed of 100 students in eighth through twelfth grades. This ensemble has a long-standing tradition of excellence under former director Scott Rhame, having won 1A TMEA Honor

Band three times previously. That standard has been maintained, with the current band competing at the state level of ATSSBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outstanding Performance Series, placing first in concert (2011, 2012) and runner-up in march (2011). In 2012, the high school ensemble was split into Concert Band, directed by Jeff Bellgardt, and Symphonic Band, directed by Josh King. The Carlisle Band received LWV WK FRQVHFXWLYH 8,/ 6ZHHSVWDNHV award this past year. Current directors for the Carlisle Band are Josh King and Amanda Smith. 3A Honor Band Fredericksburg HS Wind Ensemble John Rauschuber, Director Fredericksburg HS is a 3A school with 965 students in grades 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12. Located about one hour northwest of San Antonio, Fredericksburg is located in the heart of the Texas Hill Country. The Fredericksburg HS Band, known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Pride of the Texas Hill Country,â&#x20AC;? currently has over 140 students split between two ability-based bands. The Pride of the Texas Hill Country has marched in WKH 8,/ 6WDWH 0DUFKLQJ %DQG &RQWHVW several times, most recently in 2008 and  7KH EDQG KDV  8,/ 6ZHHSVWDNHV awards and was the TMEA Honor Band third runner-up in 2011. In the past five years, Fredericksburg HS bands have placed over 210 students in the TMEA/ATSSB All-Region Bands and 21 students in the All-State Band. In 2012, the Wind Ensemble was selected as a National Winner in the Mark of

Excellence National Wind Band Honors Project and was selected as the State Winner in the Class 3A March category of the ATSSB Outstanding Performance Series. John Rauschuber has been teaching band for twelve years, the last five for Fredericksburg ISD. The success of the FISD bands is due largely to the assistance of Dani Rauschuber, FHS Assistant Director; Brad Bryant, FHS Assistant Director/Percussion Coordinator; James Buxton, FMS Director; and Susie Jaksik, FMS Director. The key to the success of the FISD band program is the extraordinary talent of the students, their tireless dedication to excellence, and band directors working together to make exceptional music. 5A Honor Band Brazoswood HS Symphonic Band Brian Casey, Director Brazoswood HS is a 5A school located 55 miles south of Houston on the Texas gulf coast and has an enrollment of 2,500 students in grades 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12. Located in the Brazosport ISD, Brazoswood services students from Lake Jackson, Clute, and Richwood. The Brazoswood HS Band has a long tradition of musical excellence coupled with a strong emphasis on scholarship, leadership, citizenship, and a love of music. The program includes four concert bands, two jazz bands, and color guard, all of which perform at numerous competitions and community events. A large percentage of graduates continue par-

Krum MS Wind Ensemble 26 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


ticipating in music in college bands, with several having performed at a TMEA convention. The Brazoswood Band program has long fostered individual and ensemble musical achievement. Since the school opened in 1969, the band has produced

166 All-State musicians, many of whom are performing or teaching today. The %UD]RVZRRG %DQG LV D FRQVLVWHQW 8,/ Sweepstakes award winner and a consistent participant in the State Honor Band &RQWHVW DQG WKH 8,/ 6WDWH 0DUFKLQJ Competition.

The Brazoswood Symphonic Band is a select ensemble of 62 musicians. The band is conducted by Brian Casey, a gradXDWH RI 6DP +RXVWRQ 6WDWH 8QLYHUVLW\ DQG WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI 0LDPL &DVH\ LV LQ his 27th year of teaching at Brazoswood and his third as Director of Bands. 

Carlisle HS Band

Fredericksburg HS Wind Ensemble

Brazoswood HS Symphonic Band Southwestern Musician | November 2012 27


2013 TMEA Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert )HEUXDU\SPÂ&#x2021;/LOD&RFNUHOO7KHDWHUÂ&#x2021;7LFNHWV THE DALLAS WIND SYMPHONY is the leading professional civilian wind band in the United States today. Comprising 50 woodwind, brass, and percussion players, the band performs an eclectic blend of musical styles ranging from Bach to Bernstein and Sousa to Strauss. They combine the tradition of the British brass band with the musical heritage of the American town band and the pioneering spirit of the 20th century wind ensemble. Under the direction of Artistic Director Jerry Junkin, the mission of the Dallas Wind Symphony is to bring extraordinary musicians and enthusiastic audiences together to celebrate the performance, promotion, and preservation of the music and traditions of the American windband.

CLARINETIST H Ă&#x2026;KAN ROSENGREN has appeared as concerto soloist in Europe and the United States, has performed in recital throughout Europe, the U.S., Israel, and Asia, and has made numerous festival appearances around the world.

featuring HĂĽkan Rosengren

Rosengrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s repertoire includes all the traditional works for clarinet solo and chamber music, and he is a champion of new music. Composers who have written and dedicated works to Rosengren include Anders Eliasson, Poul Ruders, Jan SandstrĂśm, Henrik Strindberg, Alexander Lason, Nikola Resanovic, and Frank Ticheli. Chinese-American composer Chen Yi is writing a concerto for Rosengren to be premiered in 2014. As featured soloist for the 2013 TMEA Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert, Rosengren will be performing the Clarinet Concerto written for him by Frank Ticheli.

Purchase $15 general admission tickets when you preregister for the TMEA Clinic/Convention. Tickets will be available to pick up in the registration area at the convention. 28 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


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House Public Education Committee Member Champions the Arts Arts education is essential in fostering creativity and cognitive learning skills that will make our children more competitive and successful.

O

ffering remarks at the 2012 Texas Young Masters Ceremony hosted by the Texas Cultural Trust, Texas State Representative Ryan Guillen offered the following inspiring words about the importance of the arts. As we near another legislative session, it is certainly encouraging to read such conviction about the arts and arts education from this member of the House Public Education Committee. I’m proud to be part of this event tonight. I’d like to start out with thanking the Texas Cultural Trust and Texas Commission on the Arts for their investment in arts and arts education—from the very personal impact of these outstanding students we are recognizing tonight, to the work you do to raise awareness and increase support for arts all across our state. Every one of tonight’s Young Masters should be extremely proud of attaining this high mark of recognition. As Chairman of the House Committee on Culture, Recreation, and Tourism, and as a member of the House Public Education Committee, and as a father, I know the importance of arts in education and the important role that the arts and creative industries play in strengthening our way of life. In our public schools, the arts are vital to preparing our children to be successful in the workforce of the 21st century. We see it firsthand across our most dynamic industries. Business is changing faster than ever, and Texas needs talented people trained not just in the creative industries but with a skill set that includes strategic thinking, problem solving, and leadership. The Young Masters program helps us highlight the importance of the arts in our children’s education. Statistics show that the arts are a process that has a powerful cognitive impact on our youth from their earliest years. Arts education is essential in fostering creativity and cognitive learning skills that will make our children be more competitive and successful. The U.S. Department of Education and major high-tech companies, including Dell, Apple, and Microsoft, came together in 2002 to form the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. They identified the following learning skills as essential to preparing our children for the future: creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, communication, innovation, and problem solving. The arts teach all these skills. Support of the arts helps stimulate economic development in

30 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

Representative Ryan Guillen our state. The availability of cultural resources and opportunities helps attract business to Texas. Additionally, the arts play a role in attracting tourists to Texas, making tourism a $60.6 billion industry in 2008, the state’s third largest industry. The fact that our state is currently facing economic hardship is even more reason why it’s so critical that we continue to invest in the arts in Texas and protect entities, such as the Commission on the Arts and Texas Cultural Trust. The arts improve academic achievement in our youth— enhancing test scores, attitudes, and social skills. Most of all, the arts enhance the lives of both young and old, and provide the means for every student to learn. The arts supply us with creative outlets to express what we believe, what we feel, what we admire or detest, what we hope for, what we want to change, and what we want from the future and admire from the past. It’s an indispensable facet of society we must continue to promote. Thank you for inviting me to be here with you all tonight. The Young Masters is a joint program of the Texas Cultural Trust and the Texas Commission on the Arts benefitting students who might otherwise not have the opportunity to expand their unique talents in dance, literary arts, media arts/film, music, theatre, musical theatre, and visual arts. The program is available to outstanding students in grades 8 through 11, awarding scholarships of $2,500 per year to successful applicants. “The Young Master program was created as a way to recognize and support young people pursuing the dream of becoming prominent Texan artists of the next generation,” said TCA Executive Director Gary Gibbs. 


D E PA RT M E N T O F M U S I C

UT ARLINGTON ADMISSION AND SCHOLARSHIP

AUDITIONS UNDERGRADUATE Saturday, February 23, 2013 Q  Saturday, March 2, 2013 Q

Voice only Saturday, April 20, 2013 (non-scholarship)

GRADUATE

Master of Music in Performance CertiďŹ cate in Keyboard Performance Q

Saturday, February 23, 2013

Alternate dates by appointment

For applications and more information, visit

www.uta.edu/music


ORCHESTRA NOTES IMPORTANT DATES November—Make a convention housing reservation online. November 10–11—Area CD judging. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15—Specialty instrument application postmark deadline. December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

Pay it forward B Y

L I S A

M C C U T C H A N

A

s some of you know, my identical twin, Michelle, moved to San Antonio this July. During her time getting situated with a new house and job, David and I helped out with her youngest daughter, Ali. One of my assignments was to take Ali to the Reagan HS Prep days. Those of you who have high school age students know that this can be much more complicated than it sounds. Ali and I faced some challenges. Ali wasn’t in the school database, so we were directed to another line for students without schedules—a much longer line. Luckily, one of my son’s former football coaches recognized me and led us a back way directly to the counseling office. Within minutes, Ali had her schedule in hand. We thanked the coach for his kindness and returned to a much shorter line. The next task was for Ali to take her school yearbook picture. New to the process, this also became a challenge because we found ourselves without the form required for the pictures. After overhearing me explain this to my sister over the phone, a woman sitting next to me offered an extra form she happened to have. Challenge three then suddenly arose—I could not pay for the pictures with a debit or credit card. Once again, I phoned my sister to explain the dilemma we were in. Being new to the city and school, Ali did not want me to leave her there to go get cash. Saving us a second time, the same woman who

We function based on a bell schedule, a rehearsal schedule, and a competition schedule so much that we can get blindsided by the simple things. 32 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


A Member of The Texas A&M University System

2013 Admissions & Scholarship Auditions

February 23rd March 9th March 23rd (Additional dates upon request) Auditions are required of all entering and transferring music majors

Degrees Offered Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degrees in Performance & Music Education Master of Music in Performance, Conducting & Music Education

Full time Graduate Students Graduate Assistantships are available. Assistantships include a $4000/semester stipend and may include full tuition.

Summer Cohort Program 8 hours of course work are offered each summer at the A&M-Commerce Mesquite Metroplex Center. The 30-hour Master of Music degree in Music Education with emphasis in secondary choral and elementary can be earned in 4 summers.

The Texas A&M University-Commerce Chorale and Wind Ensemble in performance in New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carnegie Hall

WWW.TAMUC.EDU/MUSIC


handed me the form then handed me $40 cash. I asked her to write her name and address down for me to repay her, but she refused. She simply said, “Pay it forward.” I was in shock that a perfect stranger was

willing to help me out. I doubt I’ll ever see this woman again, but I will never forget her beautiful face and her beautiful spirit. This was one of those life-changing moments for me.

Oklahoma City University

'@MM@GĮ,HKKDQĮ+DEÜDQĮBM‘09 Winner, National Flute Association 2012 Orchestral Audition Competition and Master Class

congratulates

The Bass School of Music at

www.okcu.edu/music

Flute student of Professor Parthena Owens, powens@okcu.edu

We often get consumed by our busy lives—we function based on a bell schedule, a rehearsal schedule, and a competition schedule so much that we can get blindsided by the simple things in life. There are so many ways we can be a blessing to someone, and those ways don’t have to be about giving away money. It can start in our work environment by showing a struggling teacher that you care. It can be in a grocery store by simply telling someone that they look great that day. Another way we can make a difference is telling custodians about the great job they are doing cleaning our classrooms. Tell the school secretary how awesome he or she is. Make a plan to visit a new teacher on campus to make sure things are moving along smoothly, and choose to be less critical of your own departments. However you can, pay it forward! Clinic/Convention Update As our annual convention nears, I hope you have taken the opportunity to preregister and to make your hotel reservations. Go to www.tmea.org/convention for details and look to the December issue of SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN for a full preview of the convention schedule. I am pleased to present information about three of our four Honor Orchestras that will be in performance during the convention. The HS String Honor Orchestra will be featured in the January issue. MS/JH Honor String Orchestra Canyon Vista MS Advanced Orchestra Beth Frederick, Director Canyon Vista MS, a National School of Excellence, is located in northwest Austin in the Round Rock ISD. With over 1,250 students in grades six through eight, Canyon Vista is a 29-year-old school with an outstanding academic reputation. Canyon Vista MS is a very ethnically diverse school. More than 20 different languages are spoken by Canyon Vista students and their families. Canyon Vista is also noted for its successful music programs. The orchestra, band, and choral groups consistently perform well in concerts and competitions. The orchestra program, with an enrollment of 160 students, offers six classes of orchestra daily and three levels of string instruction. Strong parental support,

34 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


From Here, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Possible.

2013 Audition Dates Saturday, February 9 Saturday, February 23

806.742.2270 ext. 233 www.music.ttu.edu Lubbock, Texas


excellent private teachers, and student dedication and enthusiasm contribute to the success of the orchestras. In 1995, Elizabeth Frederick took over the direction of the Canyon Vista Orchestra program and has continued the tradition of excellence established by Jerome Brillhart, who started the program in 1983. The Canyon Vista Advanced Orchestra was named TMEA State Honor String Orchestra in 1999 and 2009, and in 2010 Canyon Vista was named the TMEA State Honor Full Orchestra.

MS/JH Honor Full Orchestra Fowler MS Symphony Orchestra Karina Lindsey and David Dunham, Directors Located in Plano, Fowler MS (2C) opened in 2007 and is part of the Frisco ISD. Orchestra Director Karina Lindsey and Band Director David Dunham proudly serve the largest music programs in Frisco ISD with 185 students enrolled in orchestra and 280 students enrolled in band. Both music programs have achieved consecutive Sweepstakes awards at UIL Concert and Sightreading con-

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test and have the highest number of AllRegion members since the school opened. In addition, these music programs placed in the TMEA Honor MS Band finals (2008, 2009, 2011) and TMEA Honor MS Orchestra (2011). The Fowler Symphony was created in 2009–2010 and is composed of the top band and orchestra students. In the summer of 2010, the Fowler Symphony placed seventh for the TMEA Full Honor Orchestra. In 2011– 2012, Fowler Symphony performed three school concerts and was named best-inclass and most outstanding group at Peak Music Festival. These numerous achievements would not have been possible without the support of the administrators, parents, Frisco community, and private teachers. Many thanks go to Assistant Orchestra Directors Marina Glava and Yumiko Schlaffer, and Assistant Band Directors Jenny Denis, Donald Bruce, and Robert Houpe. The band and orchestra programs join together every other year to form the Fowler Symphony.

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HS Honor Full Orchestra Clear Lake HS Symphony Orchestra Bryan Buffaloe and Kevin Black, Directors Clear Lake HS is part of the Clear Creek ISD located in the southeast Houston area and is the home of the Johnson Space Center (NASA). The orchestra program at Clear Lake consists of an enrollment of over 200 students in grades 9–12 divided into six performing ensembles in addition to the full symphony orchestra. Under the direction of Bryan Buffaloe and Kevin Black, the orchestras have

received consistent UIL Sweepstakes awards and have continuously placed in the finals of the TMEA Honor Orchestra competition in both string and full orchestras. In addition, the orchestras have earned top honors in many festivals. They have performed in Carnegie Hall and Symphony Hall and received Grand Champion Ensemble Honors at Festival Disney. Each year, 75–95 students in the orchestra program earn places in AllRegion orchestras, and numerous students continue to All-State ensembles.

This year marks Clear Lake’s third time to perform as a TMEA Honor Full orchestra. Previously they performed in 1991, under the direction of James Kidwell and in 2011 under the current direction of Bryan Buffaloe and Kevin Black. The full orchestra at Clear Lake is a cooperative effort between the orchestra and band departments and is supported by band directors Joe Munoz and John Pearce. In addition, the program excels partly as a result from the outstanding private lesson teachers and middle school feeder programs and their directors. 

Canyon Vista MS Advanced Orchestra

Fowler MS Symphony Orchestra

Clear Lake HS Symphony Orchestra Southwestern Musician | November 2012 37


Keynote Speakers Will Educate and Inspire First General Session

Second General Session

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I

n addition to a myriad of clinic and concert opportunities from Wednesday through Saturday afternoon at the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention, this convention will also feature intelligent and inspiring keynote speakers during the First and Second General Sessions. While attending a meeting might not normally be at the top of your convention to-do list, TMEA General Sessions are far from any typical meeting. With inspiring live performances and speeches that have been known to alter the way our members deliver music education, you should always plan to attend. With no clinics scheduled during our General Sessions, it will be simple to fit them in! The TMEA Executive Board is thrilled to welcome this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Session speakers, Karl Paulnack of Boston Conservatory and David Pogue of The New York Times, and it is certain their addresses will offer you just the inspiration youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need as you return home after this incredible event.

Karl Paulnack Hailed by the Boston Globe as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a firecracker of a pianistâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;master of his instrument,â&#x20AC;? Karl Paulnack has partnered with vocal and instrumental soloists, chamber groups, orchestras, conductors, and opera companies in nearly a thousand concerts throughout the world. His regular recital partners include violinist Jorja Fleezanis, soprano Lucy Shelton, and numerous chamber ensembles. Paulnack has appeared as a featured guest on such public radio programs as â&#x20AC;&#x153;St. Paul Sunday,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance Today,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Morning Pro Musica,â&#x20AC;? as well as on Minnesota Public Radio and BBC television. Recordings of his performances may be found on the Koch, Seamus, Innova, and Capstone Labels. Committed to a diverse, comprehensive practice of collaborative musicianship as an artist/teacher for more than two decades,

Friday, February 15, 9 A.M.Â&#x2021;/LOD&RFNUHOO7KHDWHU

Paulnack has served as Director of the Boston Conservatoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music Division since 2002. He also serves as music director and conductor of the Contemporary Opera Lab of Winnipeg, and chef de chant of the Orchestre de Picardie in Amiens, France. Before moving to Boston, he co-chaired the highly acclaimed accompanying and coaching department of the University of Minnesota, and served on the faculties of the Tanglewood Music Center, University of Southern California, Roundtop Festival, Ithaca College, and Music Academy of the West As an advocate for music and the arts, Paulnack is increasingly in demand as a keynote speaker and lecturer. His thoughts on music have been translated into six languages and appeared on well over 100,000 websites, in print publications such as the Christian Science Monitor, and in the program books of dozens of symphony orchestras and concert series around the world. Last spring, Linda Ronstadt read from his writings during her official testimony to the United States Congress on behalf of funding for the arts. Paulnack was also published in the January 2012 issue of SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN. The article was extracted from a speech he gave to parents of incoming Boston Conservatory freshmen. The following is an excerpt from that article. (The full article is available in the SOUTHWESTERN MUSICIAN archives at www.tmea.org/magazine.) On September 11, 2001, I was a resident of Manhattan. Later that day I reached a new understanding of my art. Given the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events, the idea of playing the piano seemed absurd, disrespectful, and pointless. Amid ambulances, firefighters, and fighter jets, I heard an inner voice ask, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why am I here? What place has a musician in this moment?â&#x20AC;? Then I saw how we survived. The first group activity in my neighborhood that night was singing. People sang. They sang around firehouses. They sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Shall Overcome,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;America the Beautiful,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Star Spangled Banner.â&#x20AC;? They sang songs learned in elementary school, which some hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sung since then. Within days, we gathered at Lincoln Center for the Brahms Requiem. Along with firefighters and fighter jets, artists were first responders in this disaster, too. The military secured our airspace, but musicians led the recovery. In measuring the revival of New York, the return of Broadwayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;another art formâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;was as significant a milestone as the reopening of the stock markets. Southwestern Musician | November 2012 39


Music is not part of “arts and entertainment.” It’s not a luxury, something we fund from budget leftovers. Music is a basic need of human survival. Music is one of the ways we make sense of things, a way to express feelings when we have no words, a way to understand things with our hearts when we cannot grasp them with our minds. Music is the language we choose when we are speechless. David Pogue David Pogue grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, where he was a music/theatre geek from Day 1, starring in, composing, playing piano for, or conducting musicals and choirs from elementary school through high school. He was also a language jock, winning the Ohio Spelling Bee in 1977, and a magician, performing over 400 magic shows during his teen years. He studied music, English,

40 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

and computer science at Yale. He graduated summa cum laude in 1985, with Distinction in Music, having continued to write and conduct musicals each year. (In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music from the Shenandoah Conservatory.) After college, Pogue moved to New York City, with aspirations to compose Broadway shows. For ten years, he worked as conductor, synthesizer programmer, arranger, or assistant on Broadway shows and a few Off-Broadway. In the interests of hedging his bets, he also founded and taught, for several years, the beginning magic courses at the New School for Social Research and New York’s Learning Annex. He also codesigned and wrote the manuals for music software programs like Finale, from Coda Music Technology. While there was little demand for new Broadway composers, Pogue’s computer teaching skills turned out to be in high demand. So he started teaching the Broadway community how to use their computers—with composers such as Stephen Sondheim, John Kander, Jerry Bock, David Shire, and Cy Coleman, and then later Hollywood and literary celebrities, including Mia Farrow, Gary Oldman, Natasha Richardson and Harry Connick, Jr. He began writing for Macworld magazine in 1988. His tripleaward-winning column, “The Desktop Critic,” appeared on the back page until November 2000, when he joined The New York Times. In November 2000, Pogue became the personal-technology columnist for The New York Times. (His Times column, “State of the Art,” appears every Thursday on the front page of the Business section.) Soon thereafter, he began writing his daily Times blog, “Pogue’s Posts,” authoring a weekly email Times newsletter, “From the Desk of David Pogue,” and shooting his Webby-awardwinning, very silly Times Web videos. From 2007 until 2011, those videos aired on CNBC. Pogue appears frequently on radio and TV. For several years, he was a regular technology guest on Martha Stewart’s TV show, NPR’s “Morning Edition,” and CNBC’s “Power Lunch” and “On the Money.” Today, he writes and hosts about six segments yearly for “CBS News Sunday Morning” (work that won him an Emmy in 2004). But he may be best known these days for his work on NOVA, the long-running PBS science show. His “Making Stuff,” a 2011 four-part miniseries, won NOVA its highest ratings in six years—ratings surpassed only by Pogue’s second Nova show, “Hunting the Elements” in 2012. Earlier this year, he was also named the new host for the spinoff series “NOVA ScienceNow,” which premiered October 10, 2012. 


University of Nebraska–Lincoln School of Music in the Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

UNDERGRADUATE

IN MUSIC & DANCE

STUDIES in Music & Dance Auditions for Admission & Scholarships 2013-14 Academic Year

Auditions!

If you are pursuing a career in music or dance, please contact us. The opportunities we offer are perfectly “in tune” with your goals. We cordially invite and welcome all aspiring music and dance majors to audition for admission and scholarship consideration in the UNL School of Music. Whether your ambitions involve professional performance, teaching high school music, or opening your own dance studio, an education from the UNL School of Music will prepare you very well for a career in music or dance. Please remember that Nebraska residents (“in-state” students) must submit completed applications to the University of Nebraska–Lincoln by January 15, 2013 to be eligible for academic scholarship awards. All prospective students are encouraged to apply for UNL admission as soon as possible.

Don’t wait! Start the application/audition process now at our web site at music.unl.edu January 18, 2013 Admission & Scholarship Brass, Composition, Percussion, Voice & Winds

January 19, 2013 Admission & Scholarship Dance, Keyboard, Strings (including Guitar) & Voice

February 22, 2013 Admission & Scholarship Dance, Keyboard, Strings (no Guitar) & Voice

GRADUATE

February 23, 2013 Admission & Scholarship Brass, Composition, Guitar, Percussion, Voice & Winds

For details, go to our website: music.unl.edu

We can help you reach your goals! Preferred Graduate Audition Days – February 15-16, 2013 Conducting & Jazz Performance auditions on Feb 15, 2013 All other area auditions on Feb 16, 2013

STUDIES in Music Annual compensation: up to $28,631 for non-resident and $16,775 for resident. (This includes a stipend of up to $8,500, health benefits, and tuition for up to 24 credit hours.) Application portfolio must be completed by Feb. 1 to meet Feb. 15 priority application due date.

Fellowships & Financial Aid

Assistantships will be awarded beginning April 1.

For information visit our web site at music.unl.edu

• Internationally recognized faculty Graduate Assistantships Accompanying Bands Chamber Music Choral Music Classroom Teaching Jazz Keyboard Skills

• Superb facilities Kimball Hall Support Music Education Music History Music Theory Opera Orchestra Studio Teaching Technology

Fellowships and financial aid are available to qualified students through the UNL Office of Graduate Studies (www.unl.edu/ gradstudies). Professional performance opportunities are available.

• Innovative curricula Degree Programs Master of Music: Composition Conducting Jazz Studies Music Education Music History Music Theory Performance Piano Pedagogy Woodwind Specialties

• Generous student support Doctor of Musical Arts: Composition Conducting Jazz Studies Performance Ph.D. in Music: Emphasis in Music Education

® ®

music.unl.edu The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC


The perfect program B Y

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ne of our biggest challenges as choir directors is selecting the right music for each of our ensembles. Choosing the right pieces for UIL Concert and Sightreading Contest can be an especially stressful undertaking. The following are some points to consider in your selection process. Know and understand the capabilities of each of your choirs as you start to think about the parameters of your UIL selections. Consider the following aspects of the literature and how they apply to your choirs: Â&#x2021;$SSURSULDWHUDQJHV QRWWRRKLJKIRUVRSUDQRVRUWHQRUVQRWWRRORZIRU your altos and basses)

VOCAL NOTES

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You also need to consider challenging and stretching the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; abilities as ZHOO,I\RXSOD\LWWRRVDIHLQ\RXUVHOHFWLRQVWKHQWKHUHZLOOEHQRRSSRUWXQLW\ IRUJURZWK$WWKHVDPHWLPHGRQ¡WJRRYHUERDUGÂłIRUH[DPSOHGRQ¡WDWWHPSW WKUHHDFDSSHOODSLHFHVIURPWKH*UDGHOLVWLI\RXUVWXGHQWVKDYHWURXEOHWXQLQJ unaccompanied pieces. Keep a running list of possible selections; jot down titles you hear at other FRQFHUWVRURQ&'V,I\RXKDYHDVPDUWSKRQHXVHWKH1RWHVDSSIRUOLVWLQJ titles. Go through the PML and mark selections you would like to consider for your choirs. Look at programs from past UIL contests for additional ideas. &KHFNRXW<RX7XEHIRUSHUIRUPDQFHVRISLHFHV\RXDUHFRQVLGHULQJ7KHQVWDUW building potential programs for each group. :KHQ FKRRVLQJ WKH ILQDO SURJUDP IRU \RXU 8,/ JURXSV FRQVLGHU WKDW WKH SURJUDPVKRXOGUHIOHFWDYDULHW\RIWHPSLGRQ¡WVHOHFWWKUHHVORZSLHFHVRUWKUHH IDVWSLHFHVSDUWLFXODUO\LIWKHWHPSRVHWWLQJVDUHVLPLODU7U\WRYDU\WKHVW\OH periods; use this opportunity to introduce your students to the music of the PDVWHUV$OWKRXJKLWPD\EHGLIILFXOWWRILQGDSSURSULDWHUHSHUWRLUHEHIRUH HVSHFLDOO\ZKHQ\RXDUHVHOHFWLQJIURP*UDGHRUOLVWVH[SDQG\RXURIIWKH OLVW VHDUFK LQWR WKH UHDOPV RI %DURTXH &ODVVLFDO RU 5RPDQWLF OLWHUDWXUH 7U\

IMPORTANT DATES Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Make a convention housing reservation online. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Dual certification deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 12, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Area Vocal and Band auditions. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

Set up your program with a strong opening piece, a contrasting second piece, and an octavo that can serve as a closer. Southwestern Musician | November 2012 43


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44 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

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is under the direction of Cliff Carbone ZKR KDV VHUYHG DV FKRUDO GLUHFWRU VLQFH the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening. Under his direc WLRQ :DOQXW *URYH·V FKRLUV KDYH HDUQHG consistent UIL Sweepstakes awards for WKH SDVW VL[ \HDUV DQG KDYH DGGLWLRQDOO\ HDUQHG 2YHUDOO 2XWVWDQGLQJ VKRZ FKRLU UHFRJQLWLRQV DW 6DQG\ /DNH )HVWLYDOV DQG 'LUHFWRU·V &KRLFH 6DQ $QWRQLR FRPSHWL WLRQV&DUERQHKDVVHUYHGDV065HJLRQ &KDLUIRU5HJLRQ;;+HJUDGXDWHGIURP 6RXWKZHVWHUQ2NODKRPD6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\ ZLWK D EDFKHORU·V GHJUHH LQ YRFDO PXVLF education. Rice MS A Cappella Treble Choir Jennifer Alarcon, Director 5LFH06LVORFDWHGLQ1RUWKZHVW3ODQR VHUYLQJ DSSUR[LPDWHO\  VWXGHQWV LQ JUDGHV²506KDVDORQJWUDGLWLRQRI H[FHOOHQFH LQ DFDGHPLFV LQFOXGLQJ ILQH DUWV506FKRLUEDQGDQGRUFKHVWUDKDYH EHHQ UHFRJQL]HG DV RXWVWDQGLQJ PXVLF HQVHPEOHVDWWKHVWDWHDQGQDWLRQDOOHYHOV VLQFHWKHVFKRRO·VRSHQLQJLQ 7KH 506 $ &DSSHOOD 7UHEOH &KRLU LV DQ DXGLWLRQHG HQVHPEOH RI VHYHQWK DQG HLJKWKJUDGH VWXGHQWV 7KHVH \RXQJ ZRPHQDUHLQYROYHGLQQXPHURXVVFKRRO


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UHPDLQV DFWLYHO\ LQYROYHG ZLWK KHU DOPD PDWHU VHUYLQJ DV WKH DVVLVWDQW GLUHFWRU IRUWKH817$OO6WDWH&KRLU&DPSDQG assistant director and section leader for WKH81706-++RQRU&KRLU&DPS Robinson MS A Cappella Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir Kimberley Ahrens, Director 5RELQVRQ 06 KRXVHV RYHU  VWX GHQWV LQ JUDGHV ² 6LQFH RSHQLQJ LQ  5RELQVRQ KDV EHHQ NQRZQ IRU LWV H [FHOOHQFH LQ PXVLF 6WXGHQWV HQWHULQJ VL[WK JUDGH KDYH H[SHULHQFHG DQ RXW standing music education in the Plano HOHPHQWDU\VFKRROVRYHURIWKHVWX GHQWERG\UHPDLQVLQYROYHGLQPXVLF7KH EDQG FKRLU DQG RUFKHVWUD GHSDUWPHQWV collaborate to create a unified team; they consistently earn Sweepstakes awards at UIL competitions.

SOMETHING TO ABOUT

sing

7KH 5RELQVRQ FKRUDO GHSDUWPHQW KDV RYHU  VWXGHQWV LQ QLQH SHUIRUP LQJHQVHPEOHV7KH$&DSSHOOD:RPHQ·V &KRLULVDQDXGLWLRQHGJURXSRIVHYHQWK DQGHLJKWKJUDGHVWXGHQWVZKRDOVRSDU WLFLSDWHLQPDQ\H[WUDFXUULFXODUDFWLYLWLHV $OOVWXGHQWVLQWKLVHQVHPEOHWDNHSULYDWH OHVVRQV SDUWLFLSDWH LQ 6ROR  (QVHPEOH DQG PDQ\ DUH PHPEHUV RI $OO5HJLRQ Choir. The members of this ensemble are SURXG WR UHSUHVHQW WKH 5RELQVRQ FKRUDO GHSDUWPHQW DQG 3ODQR ,6' DW WKH  70($FRQYHQWLRQ .LPEHUOH\$KUHQVLVLQKHUHLJKWK\HDU RI WHDFKLQJ WKH ODVW VL[ DV KHDG GLUHFWRU DW 5RELQVRQ $KUHQV UHFHLYHG KHU EDFK elorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in music education from 7H[DV &KULVWLDQ 8QLYHUVLW\ LQ  DQG LQUHFHLYHGWKH'LVWLQJXLVKHG<RXQJ 'LUHFWRU$ZDUGIURP7&'$+HUFKRLUV KDYH FRQVLVWHQWO\ EHHQ VXFFHVVIXO DW 8,/

Craig Hella Johnson, internationally acclaimed conductor and artistic director of Conspirare, joins our distinguished faculty of artist-teachers. As artist-in-residence, Dr. Johnson brings additional depth to our schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vibrant culture of singing, which helps young musicians master skills for professional success and artistic enrichment.

Texas State offers: % Six choral ensembles % Graduate assistantships and scholarships % Master of Music Education % Master of Music in Choral Conducting

Learn more: www.txstatechoirs.org

From left to right: Jonathan Babcock Associate Director of Choral Activities Craig Hella Johnson Artist-in-Residence in Choral Conducting Artistic Director â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Conspirare Joey M. Martin Director of Choral Activities National ACDA R&S Chair â&#x20AC;&#x201C; College and University Choirs Lynn Brinckmeyer Director of Choral Music Education Past President of NAfME (formerly MENC)

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 45


University of North Texas

College of Music

Auditions Regional Auditions (live percussion auditions offered on campus only)

Saturday, January 19, 2013 (Chicago) Saturday, January 19, 2013 (Los Angeles)

University of North Texas Campus Saturday, January 26, 2013 Friday, February 1, 2013 (Graduate Percussion, Piano, Voice, and String Auditions ONLY)

Saturday, February 2, 2013 Saturday, February 23, 2013


and other competitions. In addition to EHLQJDQDFWLYHFOLQLFLDQDQGDGMXGLFDWRU $KUHQV VHUYHV DV WKH &KLOGUHQ¡V &KRLU 'LUHFWRU DW 7UDQVILJXUDWLRQ (SLVFRSDO &KXUFKLQ'DOODV Lovejoy HS Varsity Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir Bethany Green and Chris Mason, Directors /RFDWHG QRUWKHDVW RI 'DOODV /RYHMR\ ,6'KDVEHHQUDWHGDQ([HPSODU\'LVWULFW E\ WKH 7($ /RYHMR\ +6 RSHQHG VHYHQ \HDUVDJRZLWKDFRPPLWPHQWWRGHYHORS LQJZHOOURXQGHGLQWHOOHFWXDOO\HTXLSSHG KHDOWK\VHUYLFHRULHQWHGVWXGHQWV1RZD WZRWLPH ZLQQHU RI WKH 8,/ /RQH 6WDU &XS /RYHMR\ +6 VHUYHV  VWXGHQWV DQGWKHLUIDPLOLHV,QLWVRSHQLQJ\HDUWKH /+6FKRUDOSURJUDPKDGWKLUWHHQHQWKX VLDVWLF VLQJHUV 7KLV \HDU WKH /RYHMR\ &KRLUIDPLO\KDVJURZQWRVLQJHUV RI ZKRP PDNH XS WKH 9DUVLW\ :RPHQ¡V Choir. These women also belong to the PL[HGFKRLURQHRIVL[SHUIRUPLQJRUJD QL]DWLRQV LQ WKH FKRUDO SURJUDP 7KH /+6FKRLUVFRQVLVWHQWO\HDUQ6ZHHSVWDNHV awards at UIL Contest and grand cham SLRQ DZDUGV DW IHVWLYDOV DFURVV WKH VWDWH and the country. +HDGGLUHFWRU%HWKDQ\*UHHQKDVFRQ GXFWHGIRUVHYHQ\HDUVDW/RYHMR\+6DQG KDV GHJUHHV IURP 7H[DV 7HFK 8QLYHUVLW\ DQG WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI ,OOLQRLV $VVRFLDWH 'LUHFWRU &KULV 0DVRQ LV D JUDGXDWH RI 6RXWKHUQ 0HWKRGLVW 8QLYHUVLW\ +DYLQJ WDXJKW WKH ILYH SUHYLRXV \HDUV LQ 3ODQR ,6'WKLVLVKLVLQDXJXUDO\HDUDW/+6 Creekview HS A Cappella Choir Tara Sikon and Brian Murray, Directors &UHHNYLHZ+6LVD$FDPSXVORFDWHG LQ &DUUROOWRQ D QRUWKHUQ VXEXUE RI 'DOODV &UHHNYLHZ VHUYHV DSSUR[LPDWHO\ VWXGHQWVLQJUDGHV²,WLVD7($ 5HFRJQL]HG VFKRRO DQG ERDVWV $&7 DQG 6$7VFRUHVFRQVLVWHQWO\H[FHHGLQJWKHVWDWH DYHUDJH(DFK\HDU&UHHNYLHZSHUIRUPLQJ HQVHPEOHVDUHUHFRJQL]HGDWWKHVWDWHDQG QDWLRQDO OHYHOV $GGLWLRQDOO\ &DUUROOWRQ )DUPHUV %UDQFK ,6' KDV EHHQ UHSHDW HGO\OLVWHGE\WKH1$$0)RXQGDWLRQDV RQHRIWKH´%HVW&RPPXQLWLHVIRU0XVLF Education.â&#x20AC;? 7KH &UHHNYLHZ FKRUDO GHSDUWPHQW KDV D ULFK WUDGLWLRQ RI H[FHOOHQFH DQG KLJK DFKLHYHPHQW ,W ERDVWV ILYH HQVHP EOHV ZLWK D WRWDO HQUROOPHQW RI DSSUR[L PDWHO\  VWXGHQWV (DFK JURXS SHU IRUPV IDOO ZLQWHU DQG VSULQJ FRQFHUWV

and participates in UIL Concert and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direction of head director Tara Sikon and DVVRFLDWHGLUHFWRU%ULDQ0XUUD\6LNRQLV D JUDGXDWH RI /RXLVLDQD 6WDWH 8QLYHUVLW\ DQGKDVEHHQWHDFKLQJIRUQLQH\HDUVWKH ODVWVL[DW&UHHNYLHZ+6

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 1. Publication Title

2. Publication Number

Southwestern Musician

0

8

_

3. Filing Date

3

October 17, 2012

4 0

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

Monthly from August to May (excluding March)

6. Annual Subscription Price

Nine (9)

$20.00

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and

ZIP+4 ÂŽ)

Contact Person

Kay Vanlandingham

P.O. Box 140465 Austin, TX 78714-0465

Telephone (Include area code)

512-452-0710 x 103

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

Same as above 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Robert Floyd, P.O. Box 140465, Austin, TX 78714-0465 Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Same as publisher Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Karen Kneten, P.O. Box 140465, Austin, TX 78714-0465 10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Complete Mailing Address Full Name

Texas Music Educators Association

P.O. Box 140465, Austin, TX 78714-0465

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none, check box None Full Name

Complete Mailing Address

12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) PS Form 3526, August 2012 (Page 1 of 3 (Instructions Page 3)) PSN: 7530-01-000-9931

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

13. Publication Title

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

Southwestern Musician

October 2012

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

(1)

Moores School Concert Chorale Betsy Cook Weber, Director The Moores School Concert Chorale LV WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI +RXVWRQ¡V SUHPLHUH large choral ensemble. The group has EHHQ XQGHU WKH GLUHFWLRQ RI %HWV\ &RRN :HEHU VLQFH  8QGHU KHU GLUHF WLRQ WKH HQVHPEOH KDV ULVHQ WR LQWHUQD WLRQDO SURPLQHQFH SHUIRUPLQJ IRU WZR 70($ FRQYHQWLRQV    DQG WKH QDWLRQDO $PHULFDQ &KRUDO 'LUHFWRUV $VVRFLDWLRQFRQYHQWLRQLQ0LDPL   ChoralNet GHVFULEHG WKH JURXS¡V $&'$ performances as â&#x20AC;&#x153;simply outstanding.â&#x20AC;?

5

4. Issue Frequency

Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof copies, and exchange copies)

12,948

12,175

12,663

11,903

none

none

none

none

b. Paid Circulation (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof copies, and exchange copies) (By Mail and Outside Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, (3) the Mail) Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPSÂŽ

(4)

Paid Distribution Class MailÂŽ)

by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-

c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4))

none

none

12,663

11,903

none

none

none

none

none

none

none

none

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS (3) Outside (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail) (4)

e.

16.

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

f.

Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

g.

Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h.

Total (Sum of 15f and g)

i.

Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

none

none

12,663

11,903

285

272

12,948

12,175

100%

100%

Total circulation includes electronic copies. Report circulation on PS Form 3526-X worksheet.

17. Publication of Statement of Ownership If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Publication not required.

November 2012 issue of this publication. in the ________________________ 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

Robert Floyd, Editor

Ocbober 17, 2012

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). PS Form 3526, August 2012 (Page 2 of 3)

ALL-STATE CHOIR CLINIC Saturday, December 15, 2012 9:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 p.m. Sectionals and large choir rehearsals will be offered to aid students in preparing for the final All-State audition. Area finalists and alternates are welcome. Rehearsals will be led by Dr. John Silantien and Dr. Gary Mabry. Pre-registration fee (postmarked by December 7) ................................$60 Registration fee at the door â&#x20AC;Ś.........................................................$75 For further information and pre-registration materials, go to http://music.utsa.edu and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camps and Workshopsâ&#x20AC;? or contact: DR. JOHN SILANTIEN Department of Music, The University of Texas at San Antonio San Antonio, Texas 78249 (210) 458-5328 john.silantien@utsa.edu Southwestern Musician | November 2012 47


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category. Judges comments included VWDWHPHQWV VXFK DV ´GHOX[H VLQJLQJ HOLFLW LQJ DGPLUDWLRQ DQG JUDWLWXGHµ ´ZRQGHU IXOO\ HOHJDQW DQG KXPRURXVµ ´VRSKLVWL FDWHG FKRLU³H[SHUWO\ SUHSDUHG DQG ZLWK D ILQHO\WXQHG FRUSRUDWH HDUµ ,Q  WKH &KRUDOH FRPSHWHG LQ WKH SUHVWLJLRXV )UHQFK IHVWLYDO WKH )ORULOqJH 9RFDO GX 7RXUV ZLQQLQJ VHFRQG SUL]H LQ WKH 0L[HG &KRUXV FDWHJRU\ DQG D ILUVW SUL]H IRU WKHLU SHUIRUPDQFH RI D ZRUOG

SUHPLHUH I Cannot Live With You by 0RRUHV 6FKRRO RI 0XVLF GLUHFWRU 'DYLG $VKOH\ :KLWH /RFDOO\ &RQFHUW &KRUDOH KDV VXQJ ZLWK SURIHVVLRQDO HDUO\ PXVLF JURXSV $UV /\ULFD DQG 0HUFXU\ %DURTXH DQG VDQJ LQ WKH LQWHUQDWLRQDOO\ WHOHYLVHG /DWLQ *UDPP\V WKH URDG VKRZ Star Wars LQ &RQFHUW DQG WKH 1%& VKRZ Clash of the Choirs. 

Moores School Concert Chorale

Walnut Grove MS Varsity Tenor/Bass Choir 48 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


SPRING 2013

music scholarship auditions

Saturday, March 2, 2013

TEXAS WOMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S UNIVERSITY A Coeducational, Public Institution

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC & DRAMA Undergraduate Degrees Music Education, Music Therapy, Performance, Liberal Arts

Graduate Degrees Music Education, Music Therapy, Pedagogy, Performance

For more information: Department of Music & Drama P.O. Box 425768, Denton, TX 76204 940-898-2500, music@twu.edu www.twu.edu/music/


Rice MS A Cappella Treble Choir

Robinson MS A Cappella Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir

50 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


Lovejoy HS Varsity Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir

Creekview HS A Cappella Choir

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 51


by Barbara Freedman

hile it is impossible to fully cover the myriad options and techniques for recording sound in a single article, the following is intended to offer some essential information to help you begin recording or improve your current methods for recording individual students and ensembles. Teachers and students should be encouraged to use as many of these techniques as is practical. One can learn many things by using different devices in different situations. The most important thing is to listen critically to the sound that is coming from the source and the sound that comes out of the device. Are the two sounds similar? Is the recorded sound clear? Is there a lot of background noise that interferes with the main sound? Did the recording overload, and is there now distortion on the recording? 52 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


Below are some ideas to keep in mind when recording. Some specific products are suggested, as these are well known or considered industry standard. Listing them, however, is not an endorsement of the products. Anyone who decides to record will need to research which products best meet their needs and fit within their budget. Mic Placement The closer the mic is to the sound source, the less background noise will be captured. Sometimes, recording the ambient sound—the sound in the room, as opposed to what is coming directly from the source—is desired. Recording a band or chorus concert with one or two mics closer to the middle of the room will capture more of what the audience hears instead of what comes directly out of the instruments or singers close up. Record the best sound possible. If it isn’t good going into the device, it isn’t going to be good coming out. Avoid thinking that you can fix it electronically later.

What to Buy While we should always record with the best equipment available, most schools will not need to purchase a $3,000 microphone to meet their needs. However, it is a good idea to spend a little more money to ensure you are working with high-quality equipment. For example, purchase one decent microphone rather than several of lesser quality. It’s important to know what will work best in different situations. A good dynamic microphone such as the Shure SM58, the Sennheiser E835, or the Rode M1 will work great for students recording in the classroom at their desks. Another alternative is a large condenser microphone, like the AKG C3000B, the Audio Technica AT4040, or the Rode NT1000. When you use any of these depends on the circumstance and purpose. In my classroom, we have a tabletop recording booth in an alcove and it has plenty of sound insulation from the rest of the room noise. Here, I like to use two AKG C3000 mics. When students are recording right at their desks, we use Shure Beta58s with a Blue Icicle

USB interface. A dynamic mic like the Shure requires students to get very close to it, and because it is not as sensitive as a condenser mic, it won’t pick up as much background classroom noise. With a foam pop filter on the mic ball and coats or blankets over their heads, several students could record in the room simultaneously. For field recording, a good handheld audio or video recorder will work. These do not need to cost more than $200, and many are available on the market for less. Sometimes the microphone on a cell phone or iPad will be sufficient to capture sounds as a field recording device. Filter Use For vocals close to the microphone, use a pop filter. Spoken or sung words that contain the consonants p, k, t, and d are called plosives. Speaking these consonants creates a burst of air afterward that “explodes” into the microphone, creating a popping effect. Hold your hand close to your lips and say the word “plosive.” You will feel the air hit your hand on the p. This is what goes into a microphone. A

JA Z Z AT LIN CO LN CE NTE R J O I N E S S E N T I A L LY E L L I N G T O N A N D G O D I G ITA L WITH D U KE ! For the first time ever, members have the option to download charts & other resource materials immediately upon registering. free membership benefits for your high school jazz band include: → Six new transcriptions of the music of Duke Ellington → Access to a revolutionary interactive video player featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra rehearsing each chart, courtesy of Tutti Dynamics → Online resources like EE recordings, videos, and teaching guides → Non-competitive EE Regional Festivals across the country → The option to submit a recording for the EE Competition & Festival ENTER OUR FIRST-E VER BIG BAND ARR ANGING / COMPOSITION CONTEST!

J A LC . O R G / E S S E N T I A L LY E L L I N G T O N E E @J A L C .O R G / 212-258-9810

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 53


Recording into a Computer If you are recording directly into the computer, you’ll need an audio interface. This can be as simple as a USB microphone such as the Blue Snowball, Snowflake, or Yeti or the Samson Meteor Mic. You could also plug most microphones into a USB microphone converter such as the Blue Icicle, Alesis MicLink, Shure X2U, or MXL MicMate Pro. A multichannel audio interface may be needed to use more than one microphone concurrently. These can be a simple two-channel interface such as the Apogee Duet, the

PreSonus Audio Box or FireStudio, and the M-Audio Fast Track Pro. When adding a USB microphone or audio interface to your computer, check the settings in your system preferences and in the software to make sure that the device is engaged. Most of these settings are under sound or audio preferences in the system settings and the software preferences. Check your user manual for more details. Check the input levels before you record. As with any type of track, you want to make sure that the recording does not overload in the track, creating distortion. Once you have a recording with distortion, you can’t get it out. Set the input volume levels to avoid the loudest sound overloading along the signal chain, from the mic, down the cable, to the audio interface to the computer, into

J O I N U S F O R T H E 6TH A N N U A L

Texas Lutheran University

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Youth Choir Festival Choir directors and their treble singers (grades 4–12) are invited to a clinic with internationally recognized choral director and composer

Bob Chilcott Saturday, January 26, 2013 9:30 a.m.– 5 p.m. | Jackson Auditorium

For more information or to register, visit www.tlumtscma.com, or contact Laurie Jenschke at ljenschke@tlu.edu. 1000 W. Court Street | Seguin, Texas 78155 54 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN BELLARS

simple pop filter, either a foam windscreen or mesh filter, will resolve this. A quick Internet search will yield many sites that offer instructions on how to build your own pop filter—this can be a great class project!

the software, and so on. One way to help avoid overloading is to use a compressor. This device or software plug-in will help keep the signal within a certain range. More on compression can be found in the resources listed in the bibliography of the book from which this article is excerpted. Recording and processing audio uses a great deal of computer memory. Before you record, process audio, or bounce tracks (“Send Song to iTunes” or turn the file into one that can be burned onto a CD or put on an iPod), restart your computer. This clears the RAM and will help your computer’s processing efficiency. Most computers today have 2–4 gigabytes (GB) of memory. If you are going to process a lot of audio, get as much computer memory as possible. With today’s processors, 2 GB might work, but 4–8 GB is not expensive and is a good thing. Ask your school’s IT experts for help and advice before purchasing memory. Back up your work and make copies. Most of today’s software processes audio in what is known as a “nondestructive” manner. In other words, when you drag in the end of an audio region or cut a region, you don’t actually destroy the recording. The material is still there but hidden. However, there are some functions that are destructive, so it’s a good idea to work with a copy of your original audio files so that you have a backup of the original, just in case. Once you are finished with your piece, back it up as well. Capturing the ideal recording takes practice but with these few tips, you can record your students and ensembles and even have students make recordings themselves.  The content of this article is based on a chapter in Teaching Music Through Composition: A Curriculum Using Technology (forthcoming January 2013), by Barbara Freedman. It is reprinted with permission from Oxford University Press. © 2013 Oxford University Press. Barbara Freedman has been teaching Electronic Music and Audio Engineering at Greenwich HS in Connecticut since 2001. She will be presenting several sessions on technology in music education at the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention, including at the TI:ME music technology preconference on Wednesday, February 13.


WANDA L. BASS SCHOOL OF MUSIC

0 1 9 r e b m e v 9 No 8 y r a u r b e F 9 8 h c r a M TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION:

www.okcu.edu/music ocumauditions@okcu.edu

405.208.5980


ELEMENTARY NOTES IMPORTANT DATES Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Make a convention housing reservation online. November 15â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 24, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

I love the Web! B Y

M I C H E L E

H O B I Z A L

I

would love for you to think that I create all the resources I write about. But as you know, after a full day of teaching, there just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much time leftâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is why I love the Internet! The Internet is full of helpful resources, but the challenging part is determining what you specifically need and sorting through the rest. This is one of the main reasons why I am so passionate about using Edmodo as a designated space for Texas music teachers to offer our tried and true resources. Edmodo can be a one-stop shop for all music education resources or at least a â&#x20AC;&#x153;check here firstâ&#x20AC;? spot. Having Edmodo certainly should not stop you from branching out into the world to see what others have created. Aside from Edmodo, Pinterest is my favorite resource (think online pin board where you can electronically pin something you find interesting). Using Pinterest can certainly be addictive, but I am having so much fun seeing all the resources my favorite teachers have collected then repinning them on my boards. Numerous resources and ideas were pinned on boards with substitute teacher activities so I have created a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sub-Tubâ&#x20AC;? using all those Pinterest ideas (thanks to H-E-B teachers for the name). I have collected quite a few YouTube videos that were produced using Movie Maker that show unique groups performing along with unusual instruments. I repinned a video of Artie Almeida with her class demonstrating â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Syncopated Clockâ&#x20AC;? using scarvesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; fantastic! Pinterest has also turned me on to several blogs for elementary music teachers that are incredible. I have more resources for the SMARTboard,

7RVWRSWKHĂ RZRIPXVLFZRXOGEHOLNHWKHVWRSSLQJ RIWLPHLWVHOILQFUHGLEOHDQGLQFRQFHLYDEOH Âł$DURQ&RSODQG 56 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


classroom organization, listening maps, bulletin boards, and so much more! My goal now is to incorporate what I am finding into my teaching instead of simply collecting more and more resources that never see the inside of a classroom. Thanks go to all the music teachers who I am following! Where else do you think I found the cookie sheet staff I mentioned in October? Have fun finding interesting and fun activities for your students to try with all the holidays and celebrations in November and December. Don’t be surprised to find me following you on Pinterest! What Does TMEA Have to Offer Me? Answer #3 Last month I challenged you to find another organization with all that TMEA has to offer that charges only $50 dues. Let’s make that an even harder challenge for you! 1. If you need more motivation to attend the convention, go to the convention webpage, www.tmea.org/ convention. You will now see a short testimony from a TMEA member or

administrator speaking on the value of the convention. You could share this video with your administrator as you work to gain their approval. 2. I have also included a trifold pamphlet file on Edmodo about the importance of music education in your school. This trifold can be adapted to fit your campus. 3. Along with the pamphlet, I am also posting a PowerPoint presentation in Edmodo that you can show to your parents before the PTA program. The presentation will give your audience information about the arts. Insert pictures of your students rehearsing in the blank slides to keep their attention focused. Our TMEA staff continuously works to provide you a variety of materials to help you get support for attending the convention. They also provide numerous advocacy videos and materials to help you educate your school community about the importance of music education. Come Join the Gang on Edmodo! This is a site all TMEA elementary

music teachers can join. Follow these simple steps as I will continue to highlight offerings available to you on Edmodo throughout the year: 1. Go to www.edmodo.com. 2. Click “I’m a Teacher” to set up your account (it’s free!). 3. When you have created your account, find the word “Groups” on the leftside tab. 4. Click on Join. 5. The code of TMEA Elementary Music Teachers is 98LVK0. 6. That’s it! Now you can check out everything in the library. 2013 Clinic/Convention Update As many of you did last year, remember to take a moment to preregister online if you haven’t already. It’s the simplest way to complete your convention registration. Go to www.tmea.org/convention for more information and to preregister. While there, also be sure to make your hotel reservation through the discounted TMEA housing system. Hotels fill up quickly, so don’t wait any longer!

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 57


In addition to the clinic opportunities that will abound for elementary music teachers, we will enjoy and be inspired by several outstanding performing ensembles and choirs. Learn more about our invited groups here and be sure to include their performances on your convention schedule (the full convention preview will be included in next month’s issue). More of our performing groups will be featured in the January issue. Houston ISD Honor Choir Sabrina Nguyen, Director The Houston ISD Elementary Honor Choir, directed by Sabrina Nguyen, was established in 2008 and was created to provide an additional high-level choral experience for musically talented fourthand fifth-grade students. Nineteen elementary schools were represented in the 2011–2012 Honor Choir. Over the years, the quality of the choir has grown tremendously. Teachers and students have the opportunity to learn from each other. The teaching and learning that occurs through this collaborative effort helps elevate and enrich the knowledge and skills of the teachers and students. This in turn aids in the development and improvement of individual choirs and more meaningful choral experiences for our students. Nguyen is Director of Music for St. Michael Catholic Church in Houston and is the Community Liaison for the Department of Strategic Partnerships in Houston ISD. Smith Elementary Children’s Choir Juan Saldana, Director Smith Elementary School is a prekindergarten through fifth-grade campus

in the East Learning Community of the Victoria ISD. The Smith Elementary Children’s Choir was created in the 2010–2011 school year and consists of 45 students in grades 3–5. Students audition at the beginning of the school year and make a commitment to the program. The Children’s Choir practices once a week for 45 minutes throughout the year. In the spring of 2011, they received a Superior Rating at the Industrial ISD Cobra Music Festival. Juan Saldana is the founding director of the Smith Elementary Children’s Choir. He is a graduate of the Texas State University School of Music. Saldana also currently serves as TMEA Region 14 Elementary Chair and South Texas Representative of the Kodály Educators of Texas. Stephens Stompin’ Hooves Pay-Sung Chew, Director The Stompin’ Hooves of Ursula Stephens Elementary in Katy ISD are honored to be an Invited Ensemble at the TMEA convention. Formed at the opening of the school in 2007, this is the group’s sixth year under the direction of founder, Pay-Sung Chew. The group consists of 24–30 students each year. Throughout the school year, this fifth-grade instrumental ensemble holds two 50-minute rehearsals before school each week. Their extensive repertoire includes Indonesian gamelan music, African marimba, European classical, Asian, and American folk, pop, and jazz music. Included among the multiple percussion instruments played by the students are Orff barred instruments, recorders, drums, miscellaneous percussion instruments, and body percussion. The Stompin’ Hooves have partici-

pated in the Gulf Coast Orff Association Orff Festival and have performed in a variety of venues, including school and PTA events, the University of Houston, retirement communities, the Katy district High School Performing Arts Center, and local shopping malls. The Stompin’ Hooves are excited to be the first instrumental ensemble from Katy ISD to perform at a TMEA convention. The Rice School Honors Choir Holly Holt-Cabrera, Director TEA Recognized, The Rice School/ La Escuela Rice is located in the heart of Houston, with a population of approximately 1,200 students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The Rice School Honors Choir meets once weekly and consists of about 70 auditioned singers in fourth and fifth grades who demonstrate musical ability and leadership skills. The choir has been invited to perform in and around the city of Houston, representing The Rice School at such venues as the Hear the Future 2006 and 2011 concerts with the Houston Chamber Chorus, the State-of-the-City Address with Mayor Annise Parker, and as a TMEA Invited Choir in 2007. In addition to participating in regional and local choir festivals, the choir performs concerts for the community and for residents of local retirement homes. The choir is under the direction of Holly Holt-Cabrera, who has been the music teacher and elementary choral director at The Rice School/La Escuela Rice since 1996, where she was voted Teacher of the Year in 2004 and 2012. The Rice School Honors Choir is honored to be invited to perform at the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention. 

Houston ISD Honor Choir 58 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


Stephens Stompin’ Hooves

Smith Elementary Children’s Choir

The Rice School Honors Choir Southwestern Musician | November 2012 59


Teaching Masterworks Through Known Songs

A

by Georgia A. Newlin

s music educators, one of our many common goals is to teach our students great masterworks in order to create an understanding and appreciation of the western classical tradition. With limited teaching time (combined with the desire to achieve many other goals in music literacy, vocal and instrumental production, improvisation, world music, creative movement, quality performance, and more) one way to help students of any grade level begin to listen to masterworks is through songs they already know.

FIRST GRADERS For example, first graders can sing and play games to these traditional children’s songs: “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep,” “The Farmer in the Dell,” “Little Bo Peep,” “London Bridge,” “Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?,” “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” and James Pierpont’s “Jingle Bells.” Once they can each be performed by the students without teacher help have the class devise one specific motion representing each song. Over a number of days, play different sections of Harl McDonald’s Children’s Symphony on familiar tunes 1 and instruct the children that as they are listening they should make the specific motion for each song when it is heard in the recording. Over the course of time the class can create a road map for the entire piece by using icons for each song (black sheep, farmer, Bo Peep, bridge, Johnny, star, jingle bells), allowing you to discuss form in an elemental way. SECOND GRADERS Teach the beautiful tune “The Little Birch Tree” 2 to second graders until they can sing the song independently. They can even be challenged to sing in canon or learn the Russian text. Next, play Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4, Op. 36, IV and have students move to the music differentiating between the known parts (“The Little Birch Tree” melody) and unfamiliar parts. During the beginning of the introduction have students show the beat as they wish but have them stay in one place. Very soon, one complete playing of the tune occurs and students can move around the room with the rhythm of the melody in their feet. Next comes about 90 seconds of intense musical build up—again 60 Southwestern Musician | November 2012


A U D I T I O N D AT E S S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

December 1, 2012

January 19, 2013

February 9, 2013

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

February 1, 2013

March 2, 2013

( VO I C E A N D K E Y B O A R D O N LY )

F R I D AY

January 18, 2013

( V O I C E O N LY )

( V O I C E O N LY )

Auditions are required of all entering and transferring music majors. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Baylor University School of Music /NE"EAR0LACEs7ACO 48  www.baylor.edu/music and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;For Prospective Studentsâ&#x20AC;? s-USIC?!DMIT BAYLOREDU


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO

DEPARTMENT OF

OPPORTUNITY

EXPERIENCE EXCELLENCE

SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS )HEUXDU\WK WK

086,&87(3('8

Dr. Lowell E. Graham, Chair 500 W. University Ave. El Paso, TX 79968 915.747.5606


the students can show the beat in various ways but must be stationary. Four playings of “The Little Birch Tree” melody occur in succession beginning with the flutes and working its way down through the orchestra to the very low brass. Students are instructed to tiptoe with the light, high instruments and change the way they move their feet as the melody gets lower and heavier. With repeated hearings and guidance from you, students actually figure out ways to convey four different weights (rather than just tiptoe and stomping). Once they know it well, the students can move and sing along with each playing of the folk song melody. THIRD GRADERS Third graders can sing the song “Bought Me a Cat” along with the book Cat Goes Fiddle-I-Fee, humorously illustrated by Paul Galdone. Once they know the song well, listen to Copland’s Old American Songs, No. 5, I Bought Me a Cat and have the children describe the differences between the ways in which they sing the song versus the more formal arrangement by Copland. In particular, draw their attention to the use of instrumental timbre for each animal sound. Connecting this activity to teaching the instruments of the orchestra creates a tie between orchestral instruments and the human voice. Although commonplace for mature musicians, it can be students’ first association among the two seemingly separate entities. FOURTH GRADERS Using Aaron Copland’s Billy the Kid with fourth graders gives them a chance to sing the following folk songs: “Git Along, Little Dogies” (Street in a Frontier Town), “Goodbye, Old Paint”

(Mexican Dance and Finale), and “Great-Granddad” (Street in a Frontier Town). Follow each listening session with discussions such as how Copland transformed the tunes rhythmically or melodically, and why the students believe the composer chose certain instruments to play each folk song. FIFTH GRADERS Fifth-grade students can use the tune “Frere Jacques” to consciously learn to move between major and minor. First, students sing “Frere Jacques” and then read the solfège (s, d r mf s l) from the staff in F major. By adding three more flats to the key signature (A-flat major), students then sing it in minor (m, l td r mf) from the same staff but now in F minor. Play Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, III “Feierlich und Gemessen, Ohne Zu Schleppen,” and ask students to count how many times the tune occurs in canon (11). While easy at first, this activity rapidly becomes challenging because the entrances progressively get closer together. Once the students have heard Mahler’s version of “Frere Jacques” in minor, they can be led to identify that his tune has rhythmic and melodic modifications from their minor version: l t dt l | l t dt l | d r m | d r m | mf mr dt l | mf mr dt l | m m, l | m m, l ||. Once they derive the tune, divide the class into eleven equal parts allowing each group to sing in solfège showing hand signs. MIDDLE SCHOOL A fascinating long-term activity for middle school students is to compare a known song across multiple settings. For example, God Save the Queen (America), has been used in about 140 different masterworks, 3 six of which are: Variations on “God Save the

RBC MUSIC COMPANY INCORPORATED

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 63


We Are Serious About Singing In the photo - Combined UTSA Choirs and Orchestra join together to perform Handel’s Messiah, featuring student soloists, in the UTSA Recital Hall during the department’s annual “Winterlude” performance. This annual event provides an opportunity for some 200 singers and instrumentalists to collaborate in the performance of a major work. This year’s “Winterlude” features all of the UTSA bands, choirs, and orchestras, on the Main Campus November 29th through December 2nd. Visit http://music.usta.edu/events for more information.

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King” (Beethoven), Wellington’s Victory (Beethoven), Symphony No. 3 (Clementi), Preludes, Book 2, No. 9: “Pickwick” (Debussy), Variations on America (Ives), and Variations on “God Save the King” (Paganini) as well as being masterfully performed by Queen on their album A Night at the Opera. Begin by singing multiple verses of America and God Save the Queen and then work on reading it in solfège and rhythm names to establish a baseline of musical understanding. The students can compare and contrast the slight rhythmic variations created by the differences in texts as well as learn about the historical significances of each text setting. Then, during each class period, the students concentrate on one of the masterworks by listening to the recording and comparing each variation or setting of the tune with their knowledge of the solfège and rhythm of the melody (thus increasing their music literacy skills). While students do not always use musical terms in their descriptions, they often find creative ways to explain what they are hearing. It’s exciting for the class when you identify the proper music terminology for their imaginative explanations. Be sure to lead students to discuss many facets of music such as form, texture (monophonic, polyphonic, homophonic), rhythm, melody, harmony, timbre (tone color of voices and instruments), meter, dynamics, tonality (major, minor, modal, atonal), and tempo. Students could keep a chart on each masterwork that includes the title, composer, and information on the particular recording you play as well as their notes from the class discussions. After exploring the variations and settings within each piece, compare the pieces to each other. One of the most clearly defined ways to begin is with large form. Ask questions such as, “How does Beethoven use the tune differently in Variations on ‘God Save the King’ versus Wellington’s Victory?” (The first is theme and variations and the second is used in a programmatic way.) And, “How do Beethoven, Ives, and Paganini create different variations on the same tune?” (This can lead to a discussion of style period and availability of different instruments to each composer.) Or, “Why does Debussy use a brief introduction of the tune in his Prelude compared to its use late in the fourth movement of Clementi’s Great National Symphony?” (The Debussy prelude is an homage to the Samuel Pickwick character from The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens.4 Clementi’s work is a rousing tribute to his adopted homeland, England.5) Ending this unit by playing Queen’s version of God Save the Queen (or other rock adaptations)6 can lead to an understanding of the timelessness of the anthem and its musical role in the relationship between the British Isles and the United States. Each of the pieces discussed here uses preexisting music as its basis for the masterwork or it is integrated into it. Asking students about the composers’ choices in using the songs, or questioning whether using known songs makes a composition original,

can lead to productive discussions about the contributions of each composer. Understanding how composers use, alter, extend, and mix known tunes in their works can lead students to make similar connections with popular music that, in many of the same ways, uses sampling, is remixed or restyled, or is performed as a cover. Using known songs to lead students to learn and love masterworks expands their musical knowledge by encouraging them to think about what the music demands of them as listeners and what is offered to them by way of culture, history, and meaning.  REFERENCES 1. McDonald, H.: Children’s Symphony/Brand, M.: The Wonderful One-Hoss-Shay (Harl McDonald, Ormandy) (1950). Not available in the United States on CD due to possible copyright restrictions. Exclusively available for streaming and download on Naxos.com. 2. Boshkoff, R. & Sorensen, K. Multicultural Songs, Games, and Dances. OAKE Publications at www.oake.org 3. http://en.wik ipedia.org /wik i /God_ Save_the_ Queen (retrieved August 23, 2012). 4. ibid. 5. ibid. 6. ibid. Georgia A. Newlin is an assistant professor at Adelphi University and is an Elementary Division Featured Clinician presenting at the 2013 TMEA Clinic/Convention.

TMEA CLINIC/CONVENTION February 13–16 ‡ San Antonio www.tmea.org/convention

The Bass School of Music at

Oklahoma City

Dane Romano BM’11, MM ‘13 Honorable Mention, 2012 Southern California Marimba Competition, Collegiate Duo Competition

University

congratulates

Joseph Craven BM ‘14

www.okcu.edu/music

Percussion students of Dr. David Steffens, dsteffens@okcu.edu Southwestern Musician | November 2012 65


TCU Director of Chorale Studies, Dennis Shrock conducts the TCU Concert Chorale in Fort Worthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Stephen Presbyterian Church

PerformCreate


How well do we know the students we teach? B Y

K E I T H

I

D Y E

t is not news to anyone that life, and particularly the way we communicate with each other and consume music, has changed radically over the past 30 years. There is also nothing to indicate that this evolution in communication will not continue. This cycle of change has only become swifter as new devices and applications are introduced and become commonplace in our everyday lives. Perhaps lost on some of us more seasoned educators at times is that much of what we perceive as new technology has been a part of our students’ lives for as long as they can remember. We would be foolish to assume that this state does not affect our students’ learning and therefore should also be considered in our teaching decisions and actions. Specifically, communication technology should be of interest to educators. It goes without saying that great teaching is dependent on successful communication. Our understanding of how our current and future students most effectively communicate can only serve to enhance our efforts to educate. Perhaps this topic is best explored with a brief snapshot of a typical college student in recent history. To help focus these images, I’m going to refer to data compiled within the past 12 months by the Gallup and Nielson polling services. Baby Boomers It is probably most appropriate to begin with Baby Boomers—those postWWII children who enrolled in colleges in the late ’60s and ’70s. My guess is that many current senior faculty members on our campuses are in this group. As college students, the landline telephone we leased from AT&T was the center of our personal communications. Some may remember not even having their own phone line and having to use a hallway or lobby pay phone for calls. I definitely remember having some shockingly high long distance phone bills from time to time. We were exposed to new trends and developments through radio and

COLLEGE NOTES IMPORTANT DATES November—Make a convention housing reservation online. November 15—TMEA scholarship application deadline. December 31—TMEA convention mail/fax preregistration deadline. January 14, 2013—Leadership Summit registration deadline. January 19, 2013—CTME Leadership Summit at Dallas Baptist University. January 24, 2013—TMEA convention online preregistration deadline. February 13–16, 2013—TMEA Clinic/ Convention in San Antonio.

We owe it to our students and ourselves to attempt to respect, master, and employ the new technologies we can to meet them at a midpoint in our mutual pursuits. Southwestern Musician | November 2012 67


television, but we often listened to AM radio and enjoyed a choice of two or three television channels, possibly only in black & white. We Boomers wrote lettersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the kind sent in envelopes that require stamps and took multiple days for delivery. We also had close encounters with the leading information storage platforms of the time: microfiche and microfilm. If an assignment had to be typed, we became familiar with the smell and peculiarities of correction strips and whiteout, the futility of attempting hand erasures, and with changing typewriter ribbons. We enjoyed our music on LPs and 45s, and if it needed to be portable we took our transistor radio with the single earphone, or if we were really on the cutting edge, an eight-track player in our vehicle. Generation X If you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a Boomer, you are likely age 30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;46, or in Generation X. Like your predecessors, you were initially dependent on a landline phone, but you likely owned it and it might have been cordless. By college age you regularly worked with a computer instead of a typewriter. You took the growth of cable TVâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with its dozens of

Do you have students interested in music business? Since 1990, the Texas Music Office in the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has provided Texans of all ages with accurate, unbiased information about our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music industry. The TMOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, EnjoyTexasMusic.com, lists more than 18,000 Texas music business contacts, as well as many helpful teaching aids and a complete descirption of the 145 Texas colleges offering music and music business degrees. The TMO: Your resource for teaching the business behind the notes.

Texas Music Office, Office of the Governor P.O. Box 13246, Austin, TX 78711 (512) 463-6666 music@governor.state.tx.us EnjoyTexasMusic.com 68 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

optionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in stride, and if the program was in black and white you knew it was a rerun of a show produced before you were born, definitely not an entertainment product of your lifetime. You were likely aware of the tools we Boomers had depended on, but you quickly snatched up the more efficient replacements like cassette tapes, boom boxes, and of course the Sony Walkman. You may have even known someone whose parents had a mobile phone (though the size of a brick and the cost of a dependable used car). Gen-Xers have always successfully adapted to what is new; however, you may have recently begun feeling overwhelmed by just how much and how fast new communication products have appeared and why so many things you thought were great began to disappear.

They probably do not remember or have not known life without cell phones and iPods. They probably now have in their possession a smartphone that easily is capable of performing more sophisticated tasks than the computers their predecessors used in high school and perhaps college. They might look at a keyboard and mouse as a nuisance, preferring either a touch screen or even spoken commands. They find nothing foreign about their expectations to communicate and consume within their own personal time frames: anything and everything can be recorded, archived, and consumed when more convenient. For the large number of students in these two generations, the life they know verges on having almost anything that can be digitized at their fingertips.

Adult Millennials Adult Millennials comprise the next age grouping, those currently 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;29, our current undergraduate and graduate populations. While these students may remember not having a cell phone, that memory is distant. They probably see no real need to pay for a landline. They also think a cell phone without an Internet capability is of little value. These students see their predecessorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reliance on email as cumbersome and would rather text or post to share their thoughts. On average, they send almost 2,000 texts per month compared with approximately 700 for GenXers and fewer than 100 sent by Baby Boomers. At almost every turn they elect to communicate with digitized messaging instead of with their voices. Because they have not known life without the Internet, Adult Millennials and those younger are almost universally foreign to what their predecessors considered commonplace in terms of communication. They view anything not in a digital format the way Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers used to look at horse drawn buggies and outhouses.

How Do We Respond? For many, this information can be overwhelming, even when it barely scratches the surface of the changes that have occurred in our lifetimes. It leads us back to the primary question, How well do we know the students we teach? and forward to the follow-up query, How well do we know the students we will be teaching? These questions can be answered only by each individual. For me, I consider the following as points of reference and clarity:

Teen Millennials and iGeners Note how the age range of each successive classification of generations has gotten progressively smaller. This trend is fueled by the pace of technological development and continues with our future college students; the Teen Millennials, currently ages 13â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17 and the iGeners, those under age 12. For the sake of efficiency letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s examine these two groups together.

Â&#x2021;7KHVHIDFWRUVDIIHFWZKDWZHGRDV educators (especially those of use who are educating teachers) and they cannot or should not be completely ignored.

Â&#x2021;:HQHHGWRDFNQRZOHGJHWKDWPDQ\ present and future students communicate, work, and think somewhat differently than we do. Â&#x2021;:HVKRXOGDOZD\VUHPDLQFRQVFLRXVO\ aware of these differences and continually reconsider when it is appropriate and not appropriate to modify our practices to suit their ultimate needs. Â&#x2021;2XUFXUUHQWVWXGHQWVDUHRIDQROGHU generation than their future students will be, and this inherent generational teacher-to-student technology divide could be a greater issue to them than it has been for present teachers.

Â&#x2021;,IZHDUHRIDQROGHUJHQHUDWLRQZH will more than likely not keep up, master, and comfortably employ every new technology, but we can and


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Contact Us acu.edu/music 325-674-2199 music@acu.edu


should embrace those that can serve our instructional purposes.

in these fields as TMEA welcomes the Technology Institute for Music Educators (TI:ME) as part of our convention. While you should include technology sessions in your Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday schedule, also consider registering to attend the full-day technology preconference on Wednesday, February 13. You can register to attend when you preregister for the TMEA Clinic/Convention. More information will be available in the December convention preview issue.

Â&#x2021;,IZHDUHRIDQROGHUJHQHUDWLRQZH owe it to our students and ourselves to attempt to respect, master, and employ the new technologies we can to meet them at a midpoint in our mutual pursuits. Â&#x2021;6WXGHQWVPRUHWKDQHYHUQHHGWREH made aware through our educational and professional practices to respect personal responsibility, commitment, ethics, and privacy.

College Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Important Notices

Â&#x2021;)OXLGLW\DQGDFFHVVRIGLJLWDOLQIRUmation holds the promise to be the greatest equalizer of opportunity for all students that the world has ever seen. It is our obligation to help discover and harness the unseen possibilities. Â&#x2021;)LQDOO\DQGSHUKDSVPRVWLPSRUtantly, we, as music educators are more important than ever. The component of the human condition we teach and practice may be more valuable to our students than ever before. In our efforts to enhance individual and group musical expression and communication, we have the opportunity to enable our students to develop timeless skills and understandings that they would likely not otherwise refine. This February we all have the opportunity to engage with those pioneering

Â&#x2021;:KHWKHU\RXDUHLQWHUHVWHGLQSUHVLGing over division sessions or helping with registration, the always-willing volunteer force guarantees our convention remains a world-class event. Find the College Division volunteer form online under the College Division menu. Â&#x2021;,QDGGLWLRQWRWKHUHJXODUEXVLness meeting at the convention in February, there will be a special meeting of CTME officers and advisors to help formalize CTME chapter activities into a more cohesive and enhanced experience for all members. We hope that at least one student officer and the faculty sponsor from each school will attend. Faculty members and students from institutions without active chapters are also encouraged to attend! Check the full convention preview in the December

Oklahoma City University

Ryan Beach BMâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 Winner, 2012 Ellsworth Smith Solo Trumpet Competition Winner, 2011 International Trumpet Guild Solo and Orchestral Excerpts Competitions

www.okcu.edu/music

Trumpet student of Professor Michael Anderson, manderson@okcu.edu 70 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

congratulates

The Bass School of Music at

issue for the time and location. Â&#x2021;7KH70($HVVD\FRQWHVWGHDGOLQH is December 15. Help make your deserving students aware of this important financial opportunity. Â&#x2021;7KDQN\RXIRUDOOWKHLQSXWDQG fellowship shared at the October College Division Fall Conference. A summary of the conference will appear here in the January issue. CTME Notes by Christina Tannert, Director of Internal Operations and Finance Greetings from the Collegiate Texas Music Educators! I would like to invite any interested collegiate members to run for a CTME office at the TMEA convention in February. For more information about the responsibilities of each position and how to nominate yourself, go to ctmeweb.org. The deadline for nomination is January 31. Membership in professional organizations like TMEA is very important for college students. It provides us with an invaluable network to rely on for support and opportunities and resources for preprofessional development that are critical in our journeys as educators. It enables us to gain knowledge of professional roles and responsibilities before we enter the working world. Becoming an officer for an organization like this is a wonderful learning experience and a great way to get introduced to the professional world. Whether on your campus, in your community, or at the state level, I encourage all future music educators to consider taking on leadership roles in a professional organization at some point in their college years. Finally, make plans to come to CTME Leadership Summit this year! It will be hosted by Dallas Baptist University on January 19. Leadership Summit will provide student leaders the opportunity to come together in an exchange of ideas to further develop leadership potential, strengthen music education, and establish networking contacts. Through the Leadership Summit, we strive to foster and nurture the development of the finest future music educators in the nation. For more information on the Leadership Summit, go to ctmeweb.org. 


Thank You, Scholarship Donors: Aug. 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sept. 15 Ruben Adame Derek Adams Jay Adkins Ryan Agard Jennifer Agbu Joseph G. Akers Josue Alanis Chad Allen Chris Allen Daniel Allen Dr. Sarah Allen Rita M. Almond Marcos Altamirano Ricky L. Altman Nelsalee Amy Alejos Anaya Travis Ancelet Bryan M. Anders Justin Anderson Tracy Anita Anderson Charlotte Angel Jo Ann Antinone Patrick M. Antinone Damon Archer Ed N. Arguelles Jennifer L. Arisco Carlos Xavier Arredondo Alicia Arruda Jonathan Wesley Arvin Jerelyn Atchison Mary Helen Atkins Scott M. Baldwin James Bradley Ballard John R. Bankston, Jr. Ryan Barker Andrew Barnett Deborah Barrick Mark J. Barton Karen E. Baucum Ryan Lynn Baxter Bruce J. Beach Don Beadles Stephen Beall James E. Beeson Kaleb Benda Cathy Bennett Corliss Bennett Julie Bennett Dr. Rodney D. Bennett Carolyn Filipp Beseda David Beussman Mack Flynt Bibb Nancy Ellen Bickley, DMA Dr. Jerome M. Bierschenk Stephanie Biffle Billie Lu Billett Joy Birk Richard Bjella Alex Blair Virginia R. Blasczyk Joe Blatchford Lexa Blocker Suzanne Bloodworth Libby Bogart Elizabeth Ann Silvestre Bongat Gilles Bonneau Brad Bouley Joel Bourdier Sheree L. Bower Terri Jan Bradford Stacey M. Brandenberger Nancy Lynn Bransom

John Brennan Dr. Cynthia L. Bridges Ellen Briggs Dr. Lynn M. Brinckmeyer Beth Bronk Cynthia Leona Broughton Chris Brown Christie Brown Greg Brown Dr. Kathryn R. Brown Mike Brown Robert Vern Browne Reagan Allan Brumley Kim Byron Bryce IV Mike Brymer Kenneth D. Buck James Buckner Chad Burchett Natalie Burns Cristalina Burse Carolyn Butterworth Charles Cabrera, Jr. Mary Ann Calderon-Gonzalez Heston Brice Campbell Larry R. Campbell Scott Campbell Ericalynn Cannon Chris Cansler Carroll G. Cantrell Ernest Cantu Julie E. Cantu Michelle Capdau Clinton Capshaw Vernon Carey Steve Carr Cory Carter Nora Cason Linda Colleen Cassidy Casidy Castillo-Wilson Leopoldo Castorena, Jr. Maria Teresa Castro Margaret Carolyn Cates Michael R. Chandler Kevin Chapman Raul Chavira, Jr. Dianne Chrestopoulos Sarah Cieslik Andre Robert Clark Grace Bernadette Clark Russell Eugene Clark Marie Clarkson Damia Cleaver Richard Paul Clem Byron Clements Milagros M. Coffee Brian Kyle Collins Tracy Hevron Collins Emily Ann Coltharp Brent T. Colwell Bobby L. Compton Trent Eugene Cooper Gena Corley Michael Corman Patricia Brock Cormier Ricardo Cortez Cynthia J. Costello Dr. Kara Cowart Chelsea Coyne Dr. Stephen J. Crawford Cherisa Cromer Dr. Sue Cruse Karla K. Cruz

Ricardo Cruz Dr. Giovanna Laura Cruz Pifano Kathleen A. Cuddihee Rosemary Cummings Gene Cumpian Valerie Lynn Curry Carolyn J. Davis Kyle Davis Nancy Davis Joseph Gerard Davisson Randy C. Dawson Perry Dean James T. Decker Dallas Michael Dees Dimas E. Delgado Chad Dempsey Dale Dempsey Robin L. Dent Missy Suzanne DeSpain Beverly Joyce Diano Dr. John H. Dickson Patrick J. Dietz Jason Dimiceli Joseph R. Dittfurth Ashley Witherspoon Dittman Chris Dobbins Carrie Dodson Amy E. Doron Jefferson Rice Doughten Tricia R. Douglas Mary Koehl Dowdy Robert Wilson Draper Amanda Kaye Drinkwater Adam C. Duc Jason Edwards Duck Muriel R. Duncan Adria Avis Dunn Dr. Jay Bret Dunnahoo Karla C. Dunning Irina Duran Paul Duston Karen M. Dyre John Easterling Kristen Eck David L. Edge Jim Egger Matthew Ehlers Brian Eisemann Jeff Eldridge Nicole Elias Jacqueline Elliott Mike Ellis Marc Emmick, Sr. Jocelyn Epley Joe B. Estala Demetrius Deon Ethley Craig Evers Terry Everts Eldon R. Ewing George Fahlund Steven Thomas Farrell Carrie Faulkner Brock Alan Feller Todd Felty Paula Fishman Lisa K. Fitts Steven Fitts Laura Ann Flanagan Diana H. Flores Richard D. Flores Vidal Flores Dr. Debra D. Flournoy-Buford

Michael Fogg Evan Fontenot Catherine Ann Forbes Carrie L. Forehand David Clayton Fortenberry Zachary Foster Kayla Price Fowler Ron Franklin Therese M. Franks Richard C. Frazier, Jr. Patti S. Freeman Dr. Eric Fried Cindy Fu Bryce Jason Gage Janis C. Garcia Jennifer M. Garcia-Hettinger James Robert Garen Pamela Kaye Garmon Randy M. Garmon Gilbert A. Garza Sylvia N. Garza Kendrix Rashad Gavin Brad Gearhart Katherine Geeseman Crystal Gerrard-Hervey Eric L. Gibbons Brian Gibbs Anthony Gibson Carren Gibson Dana Jennings Gibson Joshua A. Gibson Kari B. Gilbertson Sandi Gillette Diana Lynn Goad Horacio Gomez Marco A. Gonzales Marcus T. Goodlow Dr. Kathlene J. Goodrich DeeAnn Gorham Melissa Graham Grace Elisabeth Granata Cameron Green Craig E. Griffith Michael F. Grinnell Sharon Word Gross Caitlyn Rose Grygier David Bryan Gunn Melissa Felicitas Gurrola Julia Gutierrez Monica M. Gutierrez Benjamin Haeuser Yvonne B. Haines Christina L. Hallwachs James D. Hamilton Sandy Hamilton Fred Handley Gordon Haney James Hannah Bill A. Harden, Jr. Jared M. Hardy Keith E. Harris Scott Harris Beverly Harrison Gina Karen Harston Laura Harston Gordon Hart Judy Hart Rob Hartman Linda S. Hartzog Judy Harvel Christina Harvey Alison Haygood

Ivy Haynes Brian Hecimovich Aaron Hedenstrom Vicky Duran Hemme Dolores L. Hernandez Sarah Cronin Hernandez Guillermo Hernandez-Ching Chelsea Herring Rusten T. Hess Adam J. Hightower Deborah Adair Hightower Brian E. Hildreth Bethany Dagen Hill Elizabeth Margaret Hilsabeck Eric V. Hindman Susan Hinrichs Ron Blane Hinton Bethany Rose Hirota-Mabry Deborah J. Hirsch David Hiser Cynthia Hodge Martha Jean Hoehn Thomas Jay Hoffman II Reed Hoke Linda Patricia Holkup Mary Kathryn Hollier Jordan Holmes Nathanael Holmes Ruth J. Holmes, Ph.D. Michael Holt Scott A. Houston Austin Howle Amber Hrynczyszyn Melody Hubbs Lanny B. Huddleston Margaret Hudnall Dr. Ron Hufstader Bradley Allan Hughes David Wade Hull Donnie G. Hull Greg L. Hull John Thomas Humphreys Marcus A. Hunley David M. Hunter Dr. Steve Innis Ritone Ivaska Gordon G. Ivers Calvin Jackson Dorothea Annette Jackson Samuel E. Jackson, Sr. Suzanne C. Jackson Yvonne Marie Jaggard Jeff Jahnke Michelle Maya Jain Sybil James Jeffrey Jenkins II David M. Jennison Jason Jerger Jennifer Jernigan Hillen Dustin Richard Jessop YingChing Chang Jeter Dr. Yuli Jiang Kyle Johnson Mark Jeffrey Johnson Michael Wayne Johnson Rebecca Johnson Sara Johnson Cindy Elizabeth Johnston April Lynn Jones Dr. Douglas Loyd Jones Kendall Jones Michael Keene Jones

Southwestern Musician | November 2012 71


Moira Jones Robert C. Jones Tommy Juarez Linda Keefer Theresa J. Kendall Dr. Bradley N. Kent James Edward Kerr Denis Kidwell Josh R. King Robert King Judy Kline Damon Ray Knight Paula B. Knight Georgia Blevins Kornegay Brian Kosior, Jr. Cathy Koziatek John Franklin Krystyniak Laura Kuhfahl Dr. Cloyce Kuhnert Elizabeth M. Kulbeth David B. Langford Ray Franklin Lashaway Amy Lauffer Ray Lavan Andrea Lavu Kathy D. Lawler Mary Alice Lawler Larry Lawless Michael Leach Matthew Wayne LeBlanc Michael T. Lehew Jay Lester Holly A. Lewallen Karen Mabry Lewis Megan Li Kristin Likos Nick J. Likos Dr. Rita A. Linard Barbara-Anne M. Lindorm Karina Flores Lindsey Winona Lindsey Michael Ralph Link Gregory Scott Little Albert Lo Patrick R. Lollis Eli O. Lopez Roxan Lotspeich Slaton Joshua Taylor Lott Rob Lovett Tonya N. Lovorn Carla Lowery Cyndie K. Lowry Daniel H. Lugo Kristine Lytle Dr. Gary L. Mabry Joe N. Mack Sharon L. Macon Diane E. Magier Marla Maletic Jillian Malone Matthew Mancillas Richard Sean Mann Jon Marcum Julie Marczak Sarah Elizabeth Marquez Gina Martin Mark S. Marty Rodney D. Mason Jolene Masone Michael Robert Mata Rebecca A. Mata Brent Mathesen Kerri Mauney Stephen Maus Nina R. Mavrinac Sara May Meredith Wade McAlmon

Holly Wynn McCauley Lacy McCoy Laurette N. McDonald Dr. Richard Frederic McDonald Scott McDonald Joyce Allen McGlaun Clyde McGuire Dudley Duncan McMahan Julie A. McNeill Oscar Gabriel Medina Alex Medlock Darla Meek Robert Meinecke Gloria Ysela Mendoza Christopher Meredith Alyssa Meyer Helen K. Miers Priscilla Jean Mika Carrie Miller Sherry Miller Connie Miserak Celene M. Mitchell Chase Allen Mixon Jennifer Moffett Greg Montgomery Martin Montoya Matthew S. Moody Lester N. Moore Rachel A. Moore Ashton Michael Moreau Matthew James Moreno Ralph William Morgan Carlton R. Morris Heather Erin Mueller John S. Muir Melissa Mullins Dr. Vivian Carole Munn Joseph A. Munoz Janette L. Munsch-Hayhurst Jeanette Alyssa Murphy Jeff Murphy Brian Clark Murray Chalon Stegall Murray Alicia Music Catherine Myers Brandon M. Nase Daniel A. Natividad Bill A. Nave Gaylynn Neas Patrick M. Neault Steven L. Nelms Barbara Nelsen Brett Torger Nelsen Dr. Peter Neubert Cristina A. Newton Michael Wayne Newton Teresa Rollo Nguyen Grady Niblo Carisa Niemeyer Jason K. Nitsch Christopher Noel Kyle R. Norman David Allen Norris Neil Novoa Joe Nunez Marta O. Ocampo Dr. Sigurd Melvaer Oegaard Mike Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Glee Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hern Paula Olsen Darin Olson Larry Ordener Jeff Owen Bliss Burdett Pak Alex Parker Jessica Jeanette Parker Misha Parker

72 Southwestern Musician | November 2012

Brigette Parsons John Parsons Kathleen Parsons Kevin Pearce Dr. Kristen Pellegrino Sho-mei Pelletier Beth Pempsell John Perrin J. B. Perry Sondra Kay Perry Robert V. Phillips, Jr. Mary Jo Pickett Morgan Alyse Pier Preston Pierce Joseph Pinson Valeria Donna Pittman William Pitts Jason David Plata Ronald Lee Poarch Brian Patrick Pollard Dr. David J. Polley Eugene Edward Polnick Daniel R. Ponce Mary Ann Powers Cecilia Prado Helen Christine Price Ryan Joseph Pride Ricky C. Pringle John N. Pritchett Sara O. Proodian Susan Pugh Kyle Ross Pullen Hilary Pyott Lora Rae Quezada Todd Joseph Quinlan Robert Lazaro Quintanilla Gloria Ramirez John Randolph Kevin Rank Nathan Rawls Janie G. Ray Judy Ray Suzanne Ray Theresa A. Reagan Dr. Keith Redpath Hallie Reed Kymberly Lynne Reeves Michelle C. Reinhardt Mark James Richard Darren Richardson Juliana Riecss Kevin R. Riehle Shari Riley Timothy Charles Riley Kasey Ristow Susan E. Robbins James David Robertson Paul Robertson Cynthia L. Robicheaux Amanda Robison Susie Rockett Adrian O. Rodriguez Alejandra G. Rodriguez Javier Rodriguez Raul Rodriguez Stephanie D. Rodriguez Kathryn Roe Crystal Rogers Valerie Janiece Rogers Rodney R. Rooker Paulino Rosales III Paul Pierre Rousse, Jr. Jeffrey S. Rudy Joshua Rumbaugh Michael Rybiski Marcia Sadberry Eva Delgado Saenz

Frederick G. Sampson IV Katelann Sandifer Marcus Sandifer Deig Aaron Sandoval Roland Sandoval Clinton G. Schaefer Anna C. Schermerhorn Stephanie E. Schmidt Raymond A. Schneider William Karel Scholten Louise Marie Schuppener Dr. Julie K. Scott Dr. Laurie Scott Richard A. Scott David K. Scott-Rhone Walter D. Semon Michael D. Senter Lisa Harper Serna Cynthia R. Settles Kendall Grant Seuser Scott Shanks Stephanie Kathleen Shaurette William Alan Shelly Georgeann Shockley Dr. Jennifer Sholtis Jesse Lee Showalter Maximo N. Sierra Janice K. Sikes John Sikon, Jr. Roxan Silva Dr. Kenneth Sipley Mary Sipley Kathy Skinner Jennifer Hodge Smith Linda Orene Smith Michael Lee Smith Rametria Nickerson Smith Tracie Smith Wayne Smith, Sr. Stephen David Smoot Ryan Snodgrass Amy Solberg Allison Sozansky Robbie L. Sparkman Debbie Darlene Springfield Raymond Bernard Staniszewski, Jr. Susan Imm Steber Lynn M. Steiniger Gloria J. Stephens Jordan Stern Jeffrey L. Stevens Ginger D. Storey James J. Strahan Sandra A. Strickhouser Loy Studer Gilbert Stulting-Flores Vicky Suarez Donald A. Summersgill Shane Swenn Veronica Lea Tagle Debbie Talley Leslie Tanner Sergio Tarin, Jr. Chad Taylor Jake C. Taylor James K. Taylor Kathy Taylor Kerry Taylor Nathan Taylor Neena S. Taylor Samuel Scott Teal Dr. Anthony Tedeschi Dr. Nathan R. Templeton Catherine Elaine Terrel Jeffrey Thames Dr. Eliza Thomason Karen Thomasy

Siobhan Thompson Ashley Thornton John C. Thornton, Jr. Julie Threatte Trevin Kenneth Thurman Daniel Timmerman Neal H. Tipton Lindsey Titus Mary Eleanora S. Tolliver Mark Tombosky Thomas E. Tomczuk Alberto Basilio Torres Erin Tovar Robert H. Towell, Jr. Ellen E. Townley George A. Trevino Frank Troyka Andrew Tucker Heather D. Turk Ken Dale Turner Peggy Colleen Turner Stephen Turner Mark A. Twehues Claudia Isabel Valenzuela Eladio Valenzuela III Carl Van Valkenburg Susanne VanDyke Henry R. Vega John A. Vela Robert S. Vetter Jonathan Vogan Sara Levy Wainstein Dr. William K. Wakefield Bridget Walker Sandra R. Walker Erin Michele Walter Randall Dean Walters Andrew Walton John T. Ware Mitchell B. Washington Henry Watts Stacy Elaine Weatherston Joan May Weber Kelly Marie Weddington Jonathan E. Weeks Klaus Dietrich Weinelt Judy Lee Welch Michael James Werst Clay West Jennifer West Theresa Whatley Dr. Dan White Joan Elaine White Karen Kay Whitfield James Whitis Rosemary Whittle Melanie Wiggen Thomas Benjamin Williams Christopher G. Wilson Jolette M. Wine Donna J. Wisdom Bonnie K. Wolfe Jason Keith Womack Ken C. Wood Joseph Ray Woodson Joe David Woolsey Jerry M. Wright Chris J. Wurtz Sara G. Yancey Annie Yandell Kirsten Yon Rolando Zapata Roderick Richard Zeman Penny Zent Feng Zhao, DMA


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November 2012 | Southwestern Musician