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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

OCTOBER 2018

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26 | January 2018

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Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Chad Smith • (701) 764-6277

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

Director: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

2nd Vice Chairman: Stephen Head • (979) 549-5270

Director: Chris Herron • (909) 721-7577

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck60@gmail.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Ken Morris

John Parmley

Tom Matott

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

Vacant

Chad Smith

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Nelson Hearn

Kevin Rooker

Brian Varner

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

(701) 764-6277 smithlonghorns@hotmail.com

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

(785) 224-1005 longhorncreek@yahoo.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Tom Smith

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Aaron Adkins

(704) 490-9208 doublealonghorns@gmail.com

Sandi Nordhausen

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

Kenny Richardson

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Terry King

Stephen Head

(970) 352-3054 krichardson21@aol.com

Alex Dees

(850) 299-6875 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

2 | October 2018

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller* 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2018 | 27


COVER STORIES

16Grass or Grain Finished Beef? Longhorn Lean & Healthy Beacon Still Shines!

Statistics still show that even when fed or finished grain, 100% Texas Longhorn still comes out a healthier choice. By Myra Basham

OCTOBER 2018 Vol. 30 • No. 7

DEPARTMENTS

24 27

Pregnancy Check With A Blood Test A reliable early detection option that also allows for other testing. By Heather Smith Thomas

Ways to Improve Herd Health Through Cattle and Pasture Management Sanitation, stress management and other areas to address for improving the health of your cattle. By Heather Smith Thomas

2 Board Of Directors

6 Editor’s Note

12 Meet Our Members

FEATURES

30 TLBT Page

35

10 22

Procedures To Nominate Division A Directors

Free Can Come At A Price Why free email is not always your best choice. By Derick Schaefer

News On The Trail

40 Affiliate News

43 In The Pen

23

Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest

36

Butler Sale and Futurity Results

47 Index/Just For Grins

48 Calendar

38

Struthoff Ranch Deep In The Heart of Texas Sale Results

About the Cover: Fall colors are the only thing that can compare to the variety and pattern of the Texas Longhorn. Cover art by Gary Davis, Atomic Effect Studios. The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

4 | October 2018

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January 2018 | 27


EDITOR’S NOTES “DIFFERENT” DOESN’T MEAN “BAD”

If you have children, then you’ve heard the phrase “That’s not how you usually make it. I don’t like it.” It is very difficult to serve children a new version of a favorite dish using healthier ingredients. Many of them are very sensitive to taste and texture changes. I am sorry to say the same often holds true for adults. The American public has become accustomed to grain-fed beef and many are resistant to any other flavor. Yes, there are grass-fed aficionados and those who eat game which, of course, is naturally forage fed. But the market you are trying to sell your Longhorn beef to consists of many who are reluctant to experiences new flavors when eating beef. Does that mean that the beef is bad? No, it simply means that a whole different range of flavors is available when cattle are totally forage fed and naturally leaner. The very fatty acids that are better for us actually lend the different flavor to grass fed Longhorn beef. As I tell my children, don’t compare it to what you are used to, but taste it on it’s own merit as a new food. There is already many beef lovers out there that attest to the desirability of the natural beef flavor to encourage you to not let a few naysayers stop you from continuing to present your product to the public. I hope you can find some helpful information to your Longhorn beef endeavors starting on pg. 16. I want to apologize for the recent lateness of your Trails Magazine reaching your mailbox. It brings to bear the importance of deadlines. We are an association that strives to accommodate our members, and when consignment, event and magazine deadlines are not met we often offer some grace in getting materials turned in. Unfortunately, that grace can lead to a snowball effect that causes everything to run behind schedule. Once the magazine gets off schedule it is difficult to push it back where it needs to be. That is what we will attempt to do with the November issue and all future issues, push it back to where you receive your issue by the first of the month it is for. Don’t forget Region A, it’s time to vote for directors. If you want to see how the process works, see page 10. Remember, it is up to you, the members, to get your nominations in if you want someone on the ballot. There must be five nominations received from active members in good standing. The new or re-elected directors will be seated at the January board meeting and then the board will nominate and elect the executive committee for the coming year. There will be a general membership meeting as well, where you can voice questions or concerns to the board. We look forward to seeing you all in Fort Worth in January 2019!

DEADLINE: December 2018 Issue:

Blessings,

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

October 26th

Editor-in-Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Karen Price • (254) 223-4470 karen@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Trace Neal • Ext. 103 trace@tlbaa.org

Registrations/Office Manager Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Membership/Registrations Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant/DNA Specialist: Amelia Gritta • Ext. 100 amelia@tlbaa.org Special Events Pam Robison • Ext. 106 pam@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. Member

Horn Showcase Wrap-up 6 | October 2018

(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

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January 2018 | 27


Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com (210) 232-1818

Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Karen Price: (254) 223-4470 or Karen@tlbaa.org


Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com

McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net

Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 westfarmsinc@gmail.com

This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Karen Price: (254) 223-4470 or Karen@tlbaa.org

Butler Breeder’s Futurity James K. Turner (936) 689-1914 the5tcorp@yahoo.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com


Membership

Procedures To Nominate Division A Directors Please Note: To be placed on the voting ballot, an active TLBAA member in good standing must receive 5 nominations from active TLBAA members in good standing. If you are interested in becoming a director, please make sure your membership is active and your account is current. TLBAA will be seeking nominations soon for all Division A directors, two At-Large positions and directors to represent Regions 1-6. Nomination forms will be mailed 90 days prior to the TLBAA Annual Membership Meeting in Fort Worth, TX, January 18, 2019. 1. Nomination Ballots will be mailed out to Division A Members October 18, 2018. 2. Nomination Ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than November 19, 2018. 3. In order for an individual to be placed on the final ballot, they must receive at least 5 nominations from Active or Lifetime members of the TLBAA. 4. The final ballots will be mailed out December 4, 2018. 5. Final ballots must be returned to the CPA postmarked no later than December 28, 2018. 6. Newly elected Directors will be announced January 18, 2019 at the General Membership Meeting during Longhorn Weekend in Fort Worth, TX. The TLBAA By-Laws, Section 2-D, Membership, state: “At least ninety (90) days prior to the annual Membership Meeting, the TLBAA office shall mail to the Active and Lifetime members a request for nomination of individual or individuals for Director in the member’s representational region. Such member nominations shall be received in the Association’s office no later than sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. In order that any member nominee be eligible to be placed on the election ballot, he must receive write-in nominations from five (5) members who are Active or Lifetime members. Should there be no members nominated by the membership for a particular region, or should a nominee decline to have his name placed on the election ballot, the Board of Directors will appoint an Active or Lifetime member in good standing domiciled within the division to fill the vacant position at the same meeting as the election of TLBAA officers.

Division A Highlighted in Yellow No less than forty-five (45) days prior to the annual meeting of the membership, the TLBAA Office or designated CPA firm shall mail official printed ballots to each qualified Active and Lifetime Member in good standing of that region and division. This ballot shall contain the names of the candidates, if any, who were properly nominated by members. All written ballots must be returned by U.S. mail to the CPA with a postmark not less than twenty-one days prior to the Annual Meeting in order to be validated and counted. All ballots received will be validated and counted by an independent CPA firm or other organization experienced in voting tabulation as designated by the Executive Committee. The nominees receiving the most valid votes shall be elected. All newly elected Directors shall be installed at the Board of Directors meeting prior to the general membership meeting. A tie vote will be broken by the Chairman of the Board drawing one of the names by lot.” Division A TLBAA members, watch for your nomination form in the mail. For a complete set of TLBAA By-Laws, including all sections regarding the election of Directors, visit www.tlbaa.org/tlbaa/official-handbook/

We look forward to seeing everyone at the general membership meeting January 18, 2019 in Fort Worth, TX. For more information about Longhorn Weekend and the Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale see pgs. 13-15. 10 | October 2018

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21st Annual

Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale

Extends A Special Thanks to our Consignors & Buyers

Sale Host, Michael McLeod; Seller of High Selling Lot – Matilda BR3 - Kim & Robert Richey of Triple R Ranch; Volume Buyer and Buyer of High Selling Lot – Robert & Trina King of El Rincon Del Rey; Sale Host, Kaso Kety

CONSIGNORS:

Christa Cattle Company Dalgood Longhorns McKenna Donovan DuBose Bar-D Ranch El Rincon Del Rey Harrell Ranch Hooks Longhorn Ranch IM Rockin I Jack Mountain Ranch Kety/McLeod/Doyle Partnership Kety/Sellers Partnership Lazy B Ranch Little Ace Cattle Co. Longhorn Cattle Co. Tony Mangold McLeod Ranch Rafter H Longhorns Rio Vista Ranch Rocking G Ranch Rocking P Longhorns S&D Longhorns Sand Hills Ranch Shamrock Land & Cattle LTD Shamrock Land & Cattle LTD/McKenna Donovan Partnership Sidewinder Cattle Co. Stanley Cattle Co. Thate Cattle Co. Triple R Ranch WestFarms, Inc. WestFarms/Sidewinder Cattle Co. Partnership

BUYERS James & Helen Cloakey – Cleveland, TX • Jeff & Kristi Ging - Palacios, TX Bill & Molly Crozier – Woodville, TX • Crozier/Johnson Partnership – Woodville, TX James Turner – Conroe, TX • Mark Christenson – Myakka City, FL Stanley & Sandi Tidwell – Midlothian, TX • Kip Dove – Three Rivers, TX Michael Bennett – Allen, TX • Rebecca Gilbert – Somerset, TX June Westmoreland – Franklinton, LA • Michael Powell – Edna, TX Clint Beach – Bristow, OK • Charles Sibole – Rockdale, TX Ben & Phyllis Termin – Weatherford, TX • Shannon Larson – Beaumont, TX Matt Brooks – Schulenburg, TX • Louis & Jason Christa – Stockdale, TX Malcolm & Connie Goodman – Houston, TX • Keith & Tina DuBose – Ben Wheeler, TX Robert & Trina King – Canyon Lake, TX • Russell & Felicia Hooks – McGregor, TX Hal & Betty Meyer – Wimberley, TX • Kety/McLeod/Doyle Partnership – Folsom, LA Kety/Sellers Partnership – Folsom, LA • Kaso & Lisa Kety – Folsom, LA Michael & Jackie McLeod – Edna, TX • Elmer & Susan Rosenberger – Austin, TX Dayami Griffin – Beaumont, TX • Brennan & Michele Potts – Emory, TX Scott & Denita Young – Emory, TX • Dora Thompson – Mansfield, LA John & Jane Thate – Fairmont, MN • Robert & Kim Richey – San Angelo, TX Matt & Dale Westmoreland – Franklinton, LA • Brad Jalas – Granville, IA David & Sharon Roberts – Comanche, TX • Johnny & Melissa Hicks – Dowling, MI Dale & Gina Francisco – Miami, OK TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

January 2016 | 11


Meet Our Members

Billy Stickley Stickley Cattle Company • Marion, VA 1. How did you get started in the Texas Longhorn business? My family has had a small beef cattle operation since I was a kid, and my Dad grew up on the family farm in Strasburg, VA. Once I graduated college, I started running stocker steer cattle on my family’s place along with a few places we leased from spring to fall. I wanted a more profitable operation and was looking to go back to a small cow-calf operation like we had when I was in middle school and high school. So, having smaller herd numbers I wanted something unique, good temperament, low maintenance, and that I could get the most profit. No matter how good I took care of my commercial cattle I get the same price per pound as everyone else. I noticed a farmer that lived below me had about 30 non-registered Longhorns that he calved every year. He said that with his large commercial herd that Longhorns were just for fun and they were very low maintenance. So, I started researching Longhorns in Virginia and I found G&G Longhorns. I sent Bear Davidson an email requesting more information. Next, I headed to the farm in Culpepper, VA to meet with Bear at G&G to see the their Longhorns and ask my 500 questions. We rode around the farm looking at their beautiful Longhorns and Bear was answering all my questions. I was looking to start with 4 bred registered Longhorn cows. I calved those 4 cows in the spring and continued to grow my herd. That was two years ago.  2. What are a few highlights of your current Texas Longhorn program?  I’m currently calving around twelve cows. I’ve rebuilt our working pens from our previous cattle to accommodate the horned cattle. I started with a Longhorn chute that I built to get started and I’ve now upgraded to a P&C Longhorn chute. I’ve had school field trips and many other visitors wanting information about our operation. I now have a retail Longhorn beef business that is doing very well. Everyone loves the taste of the Longhorn beef. My starting goal was to process eight Longhorn beefs a year just to give me a profitable out with my bull calves. The eight Longhorn beef a year is not going to come close to the demand or love by the locals for this beef! I currently provide beef to a catering service, my local farm pick-up customers, and looking to add a small local diner as well.  I have also recruited some new local breeders that are interested in the Longhorn operation. Currently we are Hired Hand website customers, so you can check out our animals at www.stickleycattle.com.     3. What are your future goals for your Texas Longhorn program? My future goal for my operation is to calve 20 cows a year. My first priority is to continue to push my herd genetics to provide a premium registered Longhorn breeding stock for other Longhorn breeders. Second, I’m going to continue to support the retail Longhorn beef and let it continue to grow. I want to find some local (within 4 hours) Longhorn breeders that are wanting to sell some bull calves for our operation to use for our retail Longhorn beef business. Moving forward we hope to have our Longhorn beef analyzed for nutritional information to have the facts to support the health benefits of Longhorn beef. I want to continue increase my marketing for my Longhorns whether its for the registered market or the beef.

12 | October 2018

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JANUARY 19, 2019 • 11 A.M. WILL ROGERS WEST ARENA FORT WORTH, TEXAS presented by Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

Consignment Deadline October 19, 2018

Name of TLBAA Member: _____________________________________________________ Membership # _______________ Name of Animal: ____________________________________________________________________ TLBAA # _______________ Email _________________________________________Heifer _____ Consignment fees due at time of consignment

$350 per head + 7% commission

Pair _____ OCV VACCINATED Yes _____ No _____

Pens of 2 or 3 heifers may be offered for consignment fee of $350 for the first animal plus$100 each additional animal. All are subject to 7% commission.

PAYMENT INFORMATION Credit Card: r Visa r Master Card r Discover

or

r Check Attached

Name on Card:______________________________________________________________ CID#(3-digit code on back) ______________ Card Number _______________________________________________________________ Exp. Date ______________________ PICTURE OF ANIMAL Email to pam@tlbaa.org BREEDING INFORMATION Cow Exposed to ___________________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________

Bull’s Name

Cow Exposed to ___________________________________________________ From ______________ To ________________

Bull’s Name

Calf at Side: Sex _______ Date Calved _____________ Sired by _______________________________________________ COMMENTS ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WAIVER/CONSENT FORM

(This form must be signed and returned in order to complete your consignment.)

The TLBAA Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic (EWCC) assumes no responsibility or liability for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. EWCC or the Will Rogers Complex is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with all the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agree that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless EWCC, sale employees, the Will Rogers Complex, and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or are in any way related to The TLBAA Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not EWCC or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment.

_________________________________________________________________

Owner of Animal/Consignor’s Signature

_______________________________________ Date

MAIL CONSIGNMENT FORM, ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE, COMPLETED TRANSFER FORM, CONSIGNMENT FEE AND EMAIL PICTURE TO PAM @ TLBAA.ORG. ENTRY DEADLINE IS OCTOBER 19, 2018. P.O. Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 817-625-6241• www.tlbaa.org

Pam Robison, TLBAA Sales & Events - 817-625-6241 - pam@tlbaa.org Keith DuBose, Sale Co-Chairman - 979-277-2161 - kwdubose@gmail.com Russell Fairchild, Sale Co-Chairman -254-485-3434-fairchildranch@yahoo.com


Longhorn Beef

GRASS OR GRAIN FINISHED BEEF? Longhorn Lean & Healthy Beacon Still Shines!

FEAR NOT, BEEF LOVERS!

While the rest of the beef industry strives to reduce fat content and increase their stake in the grass fed and grass finished market, Texas Longhorn cattle continue to con2.2 pounds of browned Texas Longhorn beef. The amount of fat visible in the pan is actual fat content. The skillet was not drained prior to taking photo. Courtesy of Stickley Cattle Company. vert all types of feed and forage into healthy lean beef. ways in the same location. Perhaps an overlooked facIn the beef world at-large, it is generally an accepted tor in that study is that they were all finished on high fact that grain fed beef is fatter and 100% grass fed is energy grain diets as they would be in a feedlot. In that naturally leaner. So, it would stand to reason that grain study, Longhorns were shown to have graded similar fed Longhorns are not as healthy, right? Actually, Texas to or higher in grade quality than the crosses and HereLonghorn genetics have made them develop fat slower fords, while coming in with lower saturated and higher and deposit it in different areas than other breeds of unsaturated (healthy) fat levels. cattle. Not only is there less total and saturated fat, there Fast forward to today. Breeders working to market is more of the healthy unsaturated fats present. Looktheir Longhorn beef are feeling the pressure of coming at our recent Longhorn beef samples as well as beef petition from other beef breeds that are increasing industry numbers, the nutritional stats of grain suppleavailability of leaner and of all-natural grass fed (even mented or finished Longhorns still comes in lower than finished) product both on store shelves and in farmers regular beef numbers, and often top even the grass fed markets and local food co-ops. While it was once easy nutrition stats of other beef breeds. to simply show that your Longhorn grind is far healthThe often referenced large, controlled feeding study ier than available beef, both in content and in method done on Longhorns in 1986 by Texas A&M is important raised, there are now many producers from all breeds because it is an apples to apples approach to looking offering grass fed, grass finished, all-natural and even at Longhorns, Longhorn crosses and Herefords and the organic beef products. Consumers are overwhelmed. beef they produce when housed and fed in identical 16 | October 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Myra Basham Health conscious consumers have probably done enough homework to know that lean beef is a healthy diet choice. There is now ample press extolling red meat for being a good source of Vitamins B3, B12 (not found in plants), B6, zinc and selenium. It has also been touted for having a form of iron that is readily absorbed, unlike forms found in plants. The public is increasingly aware that grass fed, especially grass finished beef has additional health benefits due to an increase in certain fatty acids and antioxidants that are good for your heart. They are searching for ways to eat what they want and maintain their healthy lifestyle. Presenting a low saturated fat number, even coupled with “raised naturally”, at people is no longer enough to make them decide to buy Longhorn beef. It is important to note that ground beef was what the recent beef study tested and the other examples are the same. The 1986 beef study numbers were from the longissimus muscle which is where the loin and rib-eye cuts come from. Also to be considered is the fact that many Longhorn breeders grind the entire carcass, including choice cuts, or the balance of the carcass after keeping the tenderloin. Regular, store-bought ground beef is what is left over after all other marketable cuts are removed, or meat from animals who did not make the grade. There are exceptions when looking at beef marketed as lean or extra lean. Another interesting variance comes from looking at

the charts. Sometimes a sample will be better in one nutritional area and worse in another, even between Longhorn samples. It cannot be emphasized enough that one or two samples do not portray the whole market. There are too many variables from farm to farm and animal to animal, especially in naturally raised product, to say these are industry average numbers. To compete in any market with Longhorn beef you have to know what you are trying to sell and how it differs from the competition. Educate yourself and then be prepared to address preconceived ideas and ingrained habits in the area you choose to offer your products. It is not enough to say that Longhorn beef is low in fat. Nutrition labels are being studied by consumers more today than in the past. Can they find cuts and ground beef with saturated fat content similar to yours? Most likely yes. Farm-raised, natural, grass finished product is likely being offered to your customer base as well. There are still benefits to Longhorn beef beyond what others beef producers are promoting.

Nature Knows Best While most cattle breeds are the result of man trying to create a uniform source of beef that gains fast and has the fat and marbling that the US market craves, nature created the Texas Longhorn. The genetic programming develop by nature over the years has created a breed that can efficiently reproduce and grow without creating ex-

**Editor’s Note: The charts below are general information for comparison only and may not be equivalent sample sizes or quality.**

RECENT NUTRITIONAL DATA FROM VARIOUS SOURCES OF GROUND BEEF Meat

Calories

3.5 - 4 oz uncooked

Total Fat Saturated Fat

Trans Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Protein Cholesterol

kcal/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g mg/100g

Grass/Grain Fed Longhorn1 182 Grass Fed Longhorn

11.48 3.82

132 4.92 1.43

1

.81 .74

6.3 21.84 70

.15

1.34 22.53 42

.1

Grass/Grain Fed Longhorn1 181 11.27 3.65 .57 .28 3.72 19.67 79 80/20 Ground Beef2 254 20 7.581 1.18 .522 8.848 17.14 71 Grassfed Ground Beef3 192 12.7 5.3 .8 .2 .1 19.4 62 3 Laura’s 96% Lean Natural Beef 140 4.5 2 N/A N/A N/A 24 60 3 Angus Grass Fed 93/7 160 8 3.5 0 N/A N/A 23 55 Sources: 12017 TLBAA Beef Committee Sample Analysis 2USDA Ground Beef Calculator 3Commercial package nutrition labels

RECENT NUTRITIONAL DATA FOR VARIOUS GROUND MEATS Sample uncooked

Calories

Total Fat Saturated Fat

Trans Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Protein Cholesterol

kcal/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g g/100g mg/100g

Ground Turkey, 93/7 Ground Chicken Bison, ground, grass-fed2 Ground Pork, 96/4

150 8.34 2.17 .112 2.537 143 8.10 2.301 0.065 1.508 146 7.21 2.917 N/A .336 121 4 1.42 .032 .660

2.843 18.73 74 3.611 17.44 86 2.753 20.23 55 1.890 21.10 59

Source: USDA.gov Nutrient Finder

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October 2018 | 17


Longhorn Beef cessive fat stores. Noticeably there is not excessive “back fat”, the type on the outside of the carcass that is costly to have trimmed off during processing or further down the line at the butcher. While there is internal marbling, it is less than other breeds. It was naturally lean long before the desire for healthy lean beef became the rage. When allowed to mature before butchering they can increase in total fat, but the saturated fats still tend to remain low. Grass fed Texas Longhorns bring in the best nutritional scores for low saturated and trans fat and high unsaturated fats. They also have increased levels of CLA and Omega-3. (Note: The difference in flavors in grass fed beef are primarily due to the increase in healthy fatty acids) Even producers who feed grain regularly to their Longhorns normally have them out on pasture as well. They are predominantly grass fed, but may be grain supplemented or finished. The good news from recent test samples, even grain fed or finished Longhorns with higher total fat content have very reasonable levels of saturated fat. In addition, they actually have higher lev-

KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER - Don’t focus on having a big beef program. Start small. Process a Longhorn for yourself and family and friends. If you don’t like it, it’s going to be difficult to invest your time in selling it. - Start local. Because the primary market is customers who want locally grown, naturally raised product focus on your community first and then grow it out from there. When you are ready to expand, go closer to an urban area with a population eager to buy locally sourced and/or healthy foods. - Grain finished does not mean unhealthy if you have 100% Longhorn beef. - Taste is subjective. Do not tell people what they should like. Give them samples and let them decide for themselves. - Be transparent about the product you offer. It’s certainly not a product to be ashamed of. If you have fed grain don’t say 100% grass finished. But know your facts. If at all possible do nutritional testing on your own beef. - If you crossbreed, you very likely will lose part of the health benefits. The ability to turn feed into lean beef is heritable within the Longhorn breed. However, document studies with Longhorn crosses suggests that the lean characteristics do not get passed on. - Tests and studies have many variables. When looking at beef nutritional facts realize there are many variables in how testing was done, what cuts were used, serving size considered and whether results are in percentages or parts/per. 18 | October 2018

els of monounsaturated fat than grass fed only counterparts. Grain feeding actually increase monounsaturated fat levels, but in other breeds leads to excessive amounts of bad fats as well. For example, look at the chart on pg. 13 and see the difference in the grain fed Longhorn total fat and the grass fed Angus. The Angus sample is lower in total fat, but still on par with grain fed Longhorns for saturated fat. Unfortunately the Angus label did not include Poly and Mono fats. Protein levels are also comparable between Angus lean and Longhorn grain fed. This brings us to the importance of genetics. Studies done involving cross breeding with Longhorns have shown that when crossed with other breeds the health benefits are not passed along to any great degree. If your intent is to sell the leanest beef you can raise, then you need registered Texas Longhorns to ensure you maximize the ability to raise naturally lean beef, even when adding grain to the diet. That ability to be naturally lean is apparently recessive, but it is inheritable. So, if you decide to develop a beef program, be leery of trying to introduce other beef genetics into the mix if you want to maintain that natural genetic trait of lower total and saturated fat and higher unsaturated fats. Can you add grain and still be all-natural? Yes, the key is to stick to non-gmo products. There are plenty of grain based feed without GMO’s or any other additives that would make your beef undesirable to a marketplace desiring naturally raised beef. Why feed grain at all? That is often a decision based on the market demands, quality of forage and seasonal changes in your region. If the demand is for 100% grass fed and finished beef then no grain is allowed. If someone just wants a healthier, naturally raised beef, the pure Texas Longhorn raised on grass and supplemented with appropriate grains is still going to be a healthy nutritional choice. Several breeders that sell by the side or whole animal will allow people to choose whether or not the animal is grain-finished before processing. Much of the decision is based simply on personal taste preferences – probably the biggest topic affecting the ease with which you can grow your Longhorn beef program.

The Flavor Battle There is no correct answer when discussing how Longhorn beef tastes. Gather a group of people together and give them all a taste of the same beef. The exact same cut, cooked and seasoned identically and out of the same animal can elicit feedback from individuals in the group as varied as “ugh, that’s gamey” to “this is what beef is supposed to taste like.” Fine-tuning the flavor of your beef to fit the desires of a customer base is challenging. So many variables play into what lies on the plate for them to sample. What type of diet, age of the animal at processing, breed of animal, aging process and time, how it is processed, and even the time of year all influence that final piece of beef. Experimentation is key to learning what gets your beef flavor to the point that it is marketable in your

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


area. Start with your finished? Then finish one out own taste preference. and learn ways to cook it that If you cannot stand the brings out the best in it and taste of the product you get those cooked samples out are selling you are at a there for people to try. disadvantage from the There is no denying that start. Work with your properly finished and proprocessor on fine-tuncessed Longhorn beef is full ing the aging process of flavor. The challenge is getand how cuts and grind ting people to try it, realizing are handled. With your that naturally raised beef and personal beef try differstore-shelf beef are going to ent cuts and different have different flavors and arocooking methods. Don’t ma. Some people don’t care for write off a cut just bethe differences while others cause you don’t care for embrace it. But if they’ve never it. Let others try it. tasted Longhorn beef how will Even thickness can they know if they prefer it or be adjusted to get denot? sired results. In one instance a producer varProve It! ied the thickness of his You’ve been eating your steaks until he arrived own Longhorn beef and you’re at the cut that cooked ready to offer it to the public. the way he wanted it You’ve have some signs made to while maintaining and have samples to give out. it’s juiciness and tenYou are going to a farmers derness. Thicker cuts market. Be ready for the skepPhotos courtesy of Stickley proved to be what he tics and naysayers. Cattle Company (top and The best way to be preneeded. middle) and Gentz Cattle pared is to have a nutritional One beef provider Company (bottom) analysis done on your own admitted that he loves beef. You don’t have to have the ground and roasts a nutritional label made, but but just doesn’t care for have the facts handy. While the T-Bones. His wife, on the other hand, loves the steaks. Other providers said this is a costly step, depending on the lab and the extent they and their customers would never eat regular steak of the tests, it is invaluable to building trust and knowing again. It is all about giving samples out, teaching people your product. It allows you to show, if you include grain how it is different and letting them taste and make their in your Longhorns diet, that the fat content is still low, own judgement. Listen to their feedback and, if you even if it doesn’t match the old study numbers. It will also allow you to extoll the other healthy qualities of the choose, adjust your offerings accordingly. Another producer grass finishes on request, but his beef that is in front of your customer who is convinced own processing is on Longhorns that have had grain in that only buying $10 a pound super lean 100% grass fed their diet, mainly because it is what he prefers. He had and finished beef is the only healthy choice. If you don’t want the expense of testing your own, a strong market until a 100% grass fed producer took part of his customer base. He is totally transparent when do this test recommended by a beef producer. Cook asked if his beef is 100% grass fed. Trust is very impor- some extra lean ground beef from the grocery store and tant in growing a customer base and being honest with some of your Longhorn ground. Both may have very how your beef was fed and raised is crucial in develop- little grease in the pan. Put both in the refrigerator until ing a market for your Longhorn beef. Just be ready to let chilled and then check them. Odds are the store bought them know that your beef is still lower in saturated fat lean beef is coated in white fat. The Longhorn should than most and that the grain is to suit the taste prefer- not be, or at least to a much lesser degree. Take a photo to have to show people. Or simply take a photo of the ence of your customers. If you are in an area that grass finished beef doesn’t pan you brown the meat in with the meat still sitting in sell, then try grain finishing one beef and see how cus- it like the one on pg. 12. Be prepared for the marbling comparisons if you sell tomers respond. The nutritional strengths of Longhorn beef are still there and if the modified flavor draws people cuts and not just ground product. Take photos of your to the product it’s a win-win. Will they only buy grass- steaks or roasts so it can be seen that there is marbling,

Learning to cook with Longhorn beef’s lower fat content and sharing recipes and tips with potential customers is essential to being able to market the product.

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October 2018 | 19


just to a lesser degree than in fatlead to a regular outlet for part of tier beef – plenty to impart flavor. your beef while letting the public It cannot be emphasized learn it really is a desirable source enough that you have to get samof healthy nutrition. ples of the cooked beef to people. Don’t discount the impact of Be creative. A farmers market or word-of-mouth. Invite friends public venue where you are aland co-workers over for a tastlowed to cook on-site is perfect. ing party and have several reciIf not allowed to cook on-site, pes prepared with your beef. Let then bring the prepared food in them give their feedback on what coolers. This sounds overly simthey do and don’t like about each ple, but use it in covered dishes one and keep the winning dishes at potlucks. Volunteer to serve it in your collection of how to preat a fundraiser or for a civic club pare Longhorn beef. If they like meeting. Just get it out there for the beef they will tell others. Don’t folks. If you must give out sample get stuck thinking that a Farmer’s packages of uncooked meat give Market is the only choice for getcooking instructions with it or a ting potential customer’s to samrecipe that you know works well ple your product. with Longhorn beef. If you are in an area unfamiliar with or biThe End Game ased against Longhorn beef you There are many reasons to will have to let go of quite a bit of process your Longhorns, but the product free to convince people it bottom line is not every animal is really is delicious as well as nutri- A freezer full of Longhorn beef at $4.50 and up per going to be desirable to keep as pound is a great way to add income to your bottom tious. breeding stock. Once you put a Find a chef. Whether it is a ca- line. Photo courtesy of Stickley Cattle Company. bull in with those cows, the herd terer, at a restaurant or a company grows quickly. Marketing your that cooks and delivers home-cooked meals to homes Longhorn beef is not only helping cull your herd, it is in your area, offer to let them use some Longhorn beef giving you a better source of income than the local sale to offer something healthy and new while getting a taste barn while providing and valuable source of safe, farmtest for your product. Chefs love natural raised food and raised nutrition for your family and community. would enjoy working with a nutritious lean beef. It could

COOKING WITH LONGHORN BEEF CULINARY ADVANTAGES • Texas Longhorn beef cooks quickly due to its low fat content. Fat acts as an insulator. Heat must penetrate the fat before it begins to cook the meat. Lower fat means a faster cook time. • There is little shrinkage in Longhorn beef. • Longhorn beef does not require additional fat for cooking. The natural fat is enough to cook your meat to perfection.

COOKING TIPS • To broil, position the meat 3-4 inches from the heat. Watch it closely while cooking to achieve desired doneness. Broiling slightly frozen steaks keeps them juicier. • A medium-hot fire works best in grilling. Add damp mesquite or cherry wood chips to the fire for extra flavor. Remember, the meat cooks quickly so watch it carefully. • Longhorn beef roasts should be cooked at 275 degrees F. • A meat thermometer is recommended to monitor desired temperature. Ground beef should have an internal temperature of 160 degrees F.

20 | October 2018

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RECIPES BAKED SWISS STEAK Traci Moore – Triple T Longhorns

½ lb boneless round steak (longhorn steaks) 2 Tall-purpose flour, divided ½ tsp salt 2 T vegetable oil 1 (14.5oz) can stewed tomatoes ½ cup chopped carrot ¼ cup chopped celery 1 T chopped onion ¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce 2 T sharp cheddar cheese Cut meat into two portions; pound to 1/4” thickness. Combine flour & salt; coat meat on both sides. In a skillet, brown meat in oil. Transfer meat to a greased shallow 2 qt. baking dish; set aside. To pan drippings, add tomatoes, carrot, celery, onion, Worcestershire sauce & remaining flour. Bring to a boil over medium heat; cook & stir for about 2 minutes. Pour over meat. Cover & bake at 350 degrees F for 1 ½ hours or until the meat is tender. Sprinkle with cheese, return to oven until cheese is melted.

KICK ASS CHILI

Kim Richey – Triple R Ranch 3 T bacon drippings 2 large red onions 4 lbs coarsely ground longhorn beef chuck 3 minced garlic cloves 3 dried red chilies, roasted a minute over high heat and minced 3 T ground cumin 2 T brown sugar 2 t dried oregano 1 16 oz can tomato sauce 1 3/4 cup water 1 1/2 T salt 1 cup corn flour (masa harina) 1 16 oz can kidney beans, if desired Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft. Combine the beef with the garlic, minced chili, cumin, brown sugar and oregano. Add meat and spice mixture to the pot with the onions. Break up the lumps with a fork and cook. Add tomato sauce, water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for an hour. Stir in the corn flour to desired consistency. Cook 15 minutes longer while stirring.

THE BEST IN THE WEST LONGHORN LEAN MEATLOAF Velna Jackson – Stonewall Valley Ranch

Serves 4 to 8: Mix the following together in a large bowl: 3 pounds of ground Longhorn Lean beef ½ cup chopped celery ½ cup chopped .green onions or Texas sweet onions 8 to 12 soda crackers crushed and crumbled 2 eggs, beaten ¼ cup milk 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 Tablespoon soy sauce 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon pepper Form meat loaf in a glass baking dish Top meat loaf with catsup and sliced green peppers Meat loaf may also be topped with 2 or 3 slices of bacon Bake 325 degree for 1 ½ to 2 hours Juice may be poured off before serving. Serve with garlic mashed potatoes and lots of catsup on the side

LONGHORN LEAN BEEF STEW

Lana Hightower – G & L Cattle Company 1 lb Longhorn Lean hamburger 1 Small onion 1 Clove garlic - minced 1 ½ C cubed potatoes- I leave the skin on 11/2 Sliced carrots 1 C Celery - chopped 1 C Chicken Broth 1 28 oz can of diced tomatoes or Tomato Sauce ¼ C Kikkoman soy sauce 1 T Chili Powder ½ Tsp Cumin Salt & Pepper to taste Sauté the onions, add the beef and brown. Season the meat and add the soy sauce and garlic. Add the liquids and vegetables and simmer on medium low heat until the vegetables are tender. About an hour. You can double and triple this recipe and serve hungry cowboys. Add some sourdough cheese bread and you have a hearty meal. It’s even better the next day.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2018 | 21


Marketing

By Derick Schaefer

Free Can Come At A Price

T

raditionally, marketing efforts have converted via one or more communications channels. In the good old days this could range from order forms mailed via the postal service to placing an order with a human over the phone. In fact the popularity of phone based transactions eventually drove marketers to use concepts like vanity phone numbers to attach branding to a number. In fact, phone numbers became so important to business owners that Federal laws changed allowing them to take their phone number with them when they changed phone services. In the digital era, though phones are still really important, the emphasis has switched to email addresses, websites, and even social media. However, not all email addresses are created equal and some can flat out put your marketing efforts at risk.

it, you are stuck with the email service they provide you. Common gotchas are experienced when people change Internet providers (ISP) or employment. Since their email address is tied to the ISP or employer domain name, they lose access to it during the change. To avoid this, many procure free accounts from Google, Microsoft, or Yahoo. Though a better strategy, there are still risks. First, there is no guarantee these large providers will continue to offer those services. Second, the features of the service might not meet your needs and you are stuck with it. Last, the branding of myranch@hotmail.com just leaves a bit to be desired. The good news is it is fairly easy and inexpensive to take your email address to the next level. If you own a website for your longhorn operation, most likely you own the domain for it. If that is the case, getting email setup is easy. First, you can sign-up for email not all email addresses are created equal and some service through a quality provider like Google or Microsoft’s Outlook can flat out put your marketing efforts at risk 365. Once you sign-up, they will give you a set of mail exchange In a recent review of the membership of a TLBAA (MX) records. You will simply need to add these to your regional affiliate, only 6% of the membership had an domain name service (DNS) and you are ready to go. email address linked to their own private ranch themed If you don’t know how to access your DNS, it is likely domain. More alarming is that 8% were using the email the company hosting your website. Start off by giving address of their current employer for communications. them a call. The remaining 86% were using free email addresses If you don’t have a website, you can still buy a dotied to their telephone provider or generic online promain name for around $10 and use it just for email usviders. Beyond the lost branding opportunity, this type ing the same process described above. of strategy can put your marketing efforts at risk. BeOnce you setup dedicated, full service email, not fore examining these risks, let’s make sure we are all only will your email address look professional but you’ll talking the same lingo. have access to a new level of features. For example, if Email addresses consist of two parts. The first is you sell semen straws from your herd sire, you can setthe email service account address. This part could be up an email forward like tsunami@grunranch.com that someone’s name like ‘myra’ or a subject like ‘info’. The sends copies of inquiries to you and all other partners second part of the address is referred to as a Fully Qualiin the bull. With a good provider you’ll also get great fied Domain Name (FQDN). A FQDN consist of a secSPAM protection, your email will sync across your deondary-level domain like ‘tlbaa’ and a top-level domain vices, and you’ll likely get a calendaring service as well. (TLD) like ‘org’. If you put all of these together, you get Most importantly, you will now have an email address an email address like myra@tlbaa.org. Like a telephone that no one can change, cancel, or take away from you. number, the owner of a domain can configure their If you make the move to your own email address, setup to use any email provider they chose. However, you’ll either need to forward your freebie email account when you don’t own the Fully Qualified Domain Name or monitor it for a period of time until everyone gets is when things can get risky. your new one in their contact list. Still, that’s easy to do If your email address is an @hotmail.com, @yahoo. you can leave the freebie account open forever guarancom, @telephone-co-op.net, or myemployer.com then teeing you never miss an email. you don’t own the domain name. Since you don’t own

.

22 | October 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Affiliates

Affiliate Relations Committee Invites You To Enter The

Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest In the Texas Longhorn industry there are events that look at two out of three aspects of the breed, conformation and horn, but never has there been an event that features the uniqueness of colors so evident in the breed. This year the Affiliate Relations Committee will be offering TLBAA members the “Rodger Damrow Colorful Calf Contest” respectfully titled after longtime Nebraska Texas Longhorn Association President, Rodger Damrow, who was Rodger Damrow very fond of colorful calves. Here’s how the contest will work: • A colorful photo of an active TLBAA member’s most colorful calf born in 2018, will be submitted to the TLBAA office. The picture must be high quality. Preferred format is digital file from a camera, saved and sent at maximum file size. If using a cell phone, please do not use zoom. Get close to the calf. If sending a print to be scanned it must be at least 8 x 10 inches and printed out as a photo (Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Office Stores). • A $20 entry fee made payable to the TLBAA is to be included with the photo. • Members can enter more than one animal, but each entry must have a TLBAA registration number. • Contest will be open until December 31st, 2018. • Winners will be decided by an independent judge not involved in the contest. • Winners will be announced during the Longhorn weekend in January. • The winning entry will be featured on the front cover of TRAILS. (If possible, think vertical when snapping the photo) The additional finalists will be featured elsewhere in the magazine. Entries must be e-mailed or mailed to the TLBAA office by December 31st. Get involved, check your 2018 calves and pick your entries for this new contest. For questions or concerns, email Tina DuBose (tinadubose10@gmail.com), Deb Lesyk (halters.buckets@yahoo.com), or Myra Basham at the TLBAA office (myra@tlbaa.org). Let’s see if we can have entries from every state and country that has TLBAA members. Make it fun and encourage other members to send entries.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2018 | 23


Breeding

Pregnancy Check with a Blood Test There have been several tests developed using hormone measurements in blood and milk, to confirm pregnancy. The one most commonly used today is a blood test developed by Dr. Garth Sasser at University of Idaho. He discovered a protein produced by the placenta of ruminant animals, detectable in their blood, and founded a company called BioTracking. His blood test called BioPRYN (Pregnant Ruminant Yes/No) for cattle, sheep, goats, and other ruminants became commercially available in 2002 and there are now 25 labs around the world that handle the blood samples.

One of those labs is run by Tanya Madden (Eagle Talon Enterprises) in Laramie, Wyoming. When she attended a meeting of bovine practitioners a few years ago, she was pleased that most of them didn’t consider her to be in competition with them for pregnancy testing, but simply offering another option for some of their clients. “The veterinarians at the conference were very accepting. Most of them could see a place for the blood test, especially since my lab can also do the BVD and Johnes tests from the same blood samples if a customer wants this. I can also take any samples over to the state veterinary lab for Bangs testing or any other tests if needed. The customer only has to make one shipment and get it all,” she says. “Some of the older vets especially appreciate the blood test option. One of them told me that even 24 | October 2018

though they like their clients to think they are perfect and their accuracy is perfect, they might be accurate for the first 50 head but by then they are getting tired. Then accuracy goes down, but no one wants to admit it. But there are diplomatic ways to tell the client that you are not 100% sure on a certain cow--and to ensure accuracy they can take a blood sample on that one. I have some customers who demand this and their vets are not happy about it, but other vets are willing to work with them on this.” She has clients from Wyoming and several other states including Arkansas, Oklahoma and South Dakota. “Some of them do mainly AI breeding and others breed their cattle many different ways. They have various reasons for wanting to use the blood test,” says Madden. One of her customers is Buttons York, who has a ranch near Piedmont, Wyoming and started using the blood test 10 years ago. “We were sending some of our heifers to Kazakhstan and they needed those heifers in August. We don’t calve very early, so this rushes us to make sure they are pregnant,” explains York. “We AI the heifers and 10 days later we turn our cleanup bulls in. We check them as soon as possible for pregnancy. We’ve had the vet ultrasound them. Even though the vet might be pretty sure those heifers are bred, he can’t always be 100% sure at that short time. That’s how we started using the blood tests, and have used them ever since. Always before, we had the vet palpate them. Then we went to ultrasound because with that, we could tell exactly which ones were the AI calves and which heifers were bred a little later by the cleanup bulls. We use the blood test in combination with ultrasound, because it can pick up a pregnancy the ultrasound might not,” explains York. Another thing it’s handy for is testing for BVD and Johnes. “This is a big deal for us, as seedstock breeders. During the drought we had our replacement heifers in other pastures than we normally do, possibly exposing them to other cattle. So as a safety measure we tested all replacement heifers,” she says. Many people had to move cattle around during that drought, to find enough pasture. “The cattle may have run with or been in fence-line contact with other cattle and you don’t know the disease history or vaccinations those other cattle might have. You don’t know if the

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Heather Smith Thomas

Detecting Pregnancy Earlier Can Be A Benefit to Producers neighbors have PI cattle, and they may not know if they Being able to check them that quickly was a huge adhave PI cattle. So as registered purebred breeders we vantage,” she says. just took preventative measures and had ours tested af“On dry years, we can wean calves early and preg ter we brought them home,” says York. check all the cows early. The blood test can detect pregShe and her youngest daughter, Odessa take the blood nancy as early as 28 to 30 days of gestation,” she says. samples themselves. “At first we were not very good at it, and sometimes we had trouble hitting the tail vein and used the jugular. Our neighbor, Barb Keizer, who is a federal veterinarian, came over and gave us a demonstration on how to do it. She gave us girls a crash course on taking blood samples, and we did it. It just takes a little practice.” There are advantages in being able to draw the samples yourself, at your own convenience. “It’s hard to get a vet out here at our place to preg check in the fall. Our region is now down to one vet and he is really busy that time of year. Getting the blood samples is something we can do ourselves,” says York. The blood test can detect pregnancy earlier than palpation or ultrasound. “That first year we did it, on 56 of the registered heifers we had to retest 2 of them after the vet checked them with ultrasound. We needed them to fill the order for Kazakhstan and some were barely 45 days pregnant. The bull hadn’t been out of the herd quite 30 days, and we only had to retest 2 of those heifers—and they were both pregnant. We took the blood samples on those heifers 10 days after we did the ultrasound. At the first check the vet said he would have to call Call or click for official entry applications, premium them open, but there was some fluENTRY DEADLINE: lists, rodeo tickets and other information. id there and he couldn’t tell whether 817.877.2400 • FWSSR.COM they had just ovulated or were in RODEO X BEST OF THE WEST early pregnancy. The blood test was COWBOYS OF COLOR EXTREME TEAM COMPETITION INVITATIONAL RODEO RANCH RODEO a great way to check them because SO7:30 JAN. 24, 7:30 pm LD Opm JAN. 21, 2 pm JAN. 18 7:30 pm & 19, UT presented by we didn’t have to put them through A part of Ranching Heritage Weekend presented by Schaefer ® Outfitter ® presented by Western Horseman ® State Farm & Telemundo 39 the ultrasound process again. We WORLD’S ORIGINAL BULLS’ NIGHT OUT BEST OF MEXICO didn’t have to have the vet come out INDOOR RODEO PRCA E XTREME BULL RIDING CELEBRACIÓN PRCA Rodeo T and pay mileage again.” JAN. 22 & 23, 7:30 pm SOLD OU JAN. 20, 7:30 pm JAN. 25 - FEB. 9, presented by PlainsCapital Bank® presented by It was also handy to check their 10 am, 2 pm & 7:30 pm State Farm® & Telemundo 39 commercial heifers early in pregnancy. “With the drought we were short on grass and wanted to get the WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL CENTER • FORT WORTH, TEXAS • FWSSR.COM open ones sold as soon as possible.

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January 2018 | 27


Herd Health

By Heather Smith Thomas

Ways to Improve Herd Health Through Cattle and Pasture Management

A dry, clean area for newborns is a must.

Photo courtesy of Jill Havens

How you manage the cattle and their environment is one of the keys to good health. Management strategies include proper stocking rate, low-stress cattle handling methods and good pasture management.

SANITATION

There are large numbers of these pathogens in the feces of affected scouring calves. If you isolate sick animals and keep feeding areas and water sources clean, cattle won’t ingest transmissible fecal pathogens that cause disease.

HERD MANAGEMENT A clean environment is important in the battle to reSome problems can be readily prevented by conduce the risk for disease and parasitism. Internal parscientious cattle management. Separate your heifers asites are spread via fecal matter, and several types of from older cows for winter feeding. The heifers are still flies (including horn flies) breed in manure. Stable flies growing and need a higher level of protein for optibreed in rotting organic matter such as old barn bedmum health, growth, breeding, or to produce adequate ding or the wasted hay around big bale feeders. Keepcolostrum if they’re pregnant with their first calves. ing things clean can help reduce a lot of problems. They may need some alfalfa mixed with grass hay, for With many diseases, young animals have had less instance, or a protein supplement. Feeding them sepachance to develop good immunity and are more at risk rately also makes sure they get their share of the feed. than adults. Calves in a contaminated environment are Always provide adequate sources of clean water. more likely to become sick. Frequent removal of manure Dirty water may spread disease. If cattle are short on and old bedding in pens or barns, disinfecting conwater they suffer from dehydration or impaction, and taminated barns, stalls, calf shelters or other buildings steers may develop urinary stones in some instances if where there have been sick animals, is a way to break they don’t drink enough during cold weather, if their a disease cycle and prevent future outbreaks. If a sick urine becomes too concentrated. animal has been confined for treatment, the stall walls, Provide protection to minimize environmental floors or calf hutch should be thoroughly scrubbed after stresses. In a hot climate, utilize pastures with shade, or the animal is removed. It won’t do much good to use disinfectant on dirty walls or a barn floor, since organic matter such as straw and manure inactivates many disinfectant products and also gives The easy way to work Longhorn cattle! pathogens a place to hide. Once the • Can be shipped by common carrier anywhere in dirty surfaces have been cleaned, a the U.S. chemical disinfectant will then be • Galvanized pipe and steel sheeting much more effective. • Grease inserts for easy maintenance & operation Areas where cattle are fed, or • Vaccinate or deworm cattle where cows give birth, must be • Palpation gates clean and uncontaminated with fe• Measure horns W e’ve got dw!hat ces. Many diseases harmful to calves • A.I. cows you nee are spread via contaminated manure. Some of these diseases are caused by bacteria such as E. coli or Clostridia (C. perfingens type A, The Official Chute of the C and D) while others are caused by END OF TRAIL RANCH viruses (rotavirus and corona virus), www.endoftrailranch.com • mbowman@wildblue.net TLBAA Horn Showcase and others are caused by protozoa Wichita Fence Co., Inc. • 1-800-626-3752 • wichitafence-dab@sbcglobal.net (coccidiosis and cryptosporidiosis).

WORKING CATTLE OR CATTLE THAT WILL WORK!

li ne v ideo of the n o r u o t u o k ec h C n our websi te! chute in action o

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

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Herd Health create shade roofs tall enough to allow good air movement above the cattle. Winter pastures need windbreaks—either a grove of trees, or man-made wind fences. Minimizing heat stress or cold stress during seasonal weather extremes can help keep animals healthy. Bring in any sick animal from the herd, to treat in a separate place. If you isolate the animal at first sign of illness, you may prevent spread of disease through the herd—whether scours in baby calves, respiratory illness in a group of weanlings, or foot rot in a herd of cows.

Fescue pastures can be harmful, if the plants are infected with an endophyte fungus. The toxic effect of the fungus hinders blood circulation. In summer this can lead to heat stress in cattle; in cold weather it may cause loss of ears, tails or feet due to poor circulation. This problem can be minimized by never allowing these grasses to go to seed (seedheads contain higher levels of the toxin)—either by keeping them grazed short or mowing the pasture if it gets tall. Adding more protein to the diet can also help.

PASTURE MANAGEMENT

AVOIDING STRESS

Avoid using certain pastures at times of year they may be risky. Pastures containing poisonous plants should not be grazed until you can eradicate those plants, or use the pasture during the season when those particular plants are less toxic. Some types of forages such as sorghum and johnsongrass may contain high levels of hydrocyanic acid under certain conditions and may be very toxic to livestock. Similarly, cereal grasses may cause nitrate poisoning under certain conditions. Be aware of the situations that may cause trouble, and manage the grazing accordingly. In early spring, fast-growing cereal grains or certain grasses may also cause grass tetany (especially in lactating cows) if cows consume too much. When growing rapidly, these lush plants may be low in magnesium or high in protein, nitrogen and potassium (which can interfere with absorption and utilization of magnesium in the body). To avoid this problem, use these pastures with weanlings or dry cows during risky times of year, or make sure every animal gets an adequate magnesium supplement. Some legumes, especially alfalfa, can cause bloat. Avoid grazing those legumes when the plants are young and lush. If those pastures must be grazed, use electric fencing to hold the herd in a small portion and mow that area a few hours ahead of turning them in—so the plants are starting to wilt and dry before being eaten. Then mow the next day’s portion and let it dry before moving the fence to allow cattle access. Another way to reduce bloat risk is to wait until plants are more mature—with a higher ratio of stems to leaves. In the fall, wait until several hard frosts wilt and dry the alfalfa plants.

Stress contributes to higher incidence of disease or severity of disease, due to its effects on the immune system. Stressed cattle do not eat well, so stress also interferes with proper weight gain, reproduction performance and disease resistance. If susceptible animals are highly stressed at the same time they are exposed to disease challenge, they generally become rapidly and severely sick. Many things can stress cattle physically, including bad weather and inadequate nutrition. Psychological stress occurs when cattle are overcrowded, weaned, disrupted in their normal social interactions, or suffer fear and anxiety during improper handling. Stressed animals produce more cortisol, a hormone that helps them cope with short-term stress by changing body metabolism to help it function better under duress. Blood glucose is temporarily increased, for instance, which can be used as an energy source when the animal is unable to eat. But over a longer period of time the extra production of cortisol has negative effects on the immune system, hindering creation of antibodies and white blood cells. The lungs are especially vulnerable to effects of stress, since some of the pathogens that cause respiratory disease are always present, residing in the respiratory tract, waiting for an opportunity to invade the tissues. A very common stress is human handling—moving, sorting, vaccinating, branding, dehorning, tagging, castrating, weaning, transporting, etc. Don’t double up stresses. Don’t dehorn, castrate and brand calves at the same time you wean them, for instance. It’s best to do some of these procedures when the calves are small, when it’s a lot easier on them. Your herd will be less stressed if you develop a quiet and conscientious way of handling cattle. If they are handled gently and with patience (giving them time to figure things out and see the gates or to go their own speed) rather than running them around, yelling, chasing with dogs, beating on them if they won’t go down the chute, they learn that coming into the corral is not frightening; they will more willingly come in the next time—with less stress.

28 | October 2018

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Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

Presidents

Message

Hello TLBAA Members! What a summer. October is here and man am I happy! You’ll see a few pictures below of the TLBT officers hard at work at our Leadership Camp. We attended this camp at Glen Rose and we had a blast!   The officers also had some really cool ideas that we will be putting to action this year. We chose our fundraisers and service project for the year. This year we will be collecting items for the children at St. Jude’s Hospital. Us officers care about helping others and we want you to join us!   I’m sure you all love this month. October is a month FULL of shows! I mean I have always loved October. Usually, I miss just about every Friday at school in October. Why not though? It’s perfect weather and we have some pretty awesome shows. October 4-6th we have the Horn Showcase in Lawton, OK. October 5-7th is The State Fair of Texas. This is definitely a fun show if you’re looking for a yummy corn dog or a fried Oreo. After that, we have the Nile Stock Show and Rodeo in Billings, MT on October 17th. Then, here in Texas we have one of the many STLA shows in Llano October 19-21st.  Ending the month, we will have the Ark-La-Tex show in Lufkin, TX the 26-28th!  I can’t wait to see all of you at these shows! Good luck to all of the exhibitors. I will see you at State Fair! 

Gabby Curtis

[

FUN FACT

]

Chris Lindsey has a true passion for taking vets and disabled children on hunts to share the love of the outdoors with them.

TLBT OFFICERS FUN IN THE SUN

30 | October 2018

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TLBT MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: 1.)How old are you? 13 2.)What grade are you in? I am in the 7th grade. 3.)How long have you been showing Longhorns? I have been showing Longhorns for about four years now. 4.) What is your favorite Longhorns name and what is your favorite thing about her/him? My favorite Longhorn is Boot Scootin’ Buzzin. My favorite thing about him is that he is very calm for me when he walks into the show ring and walks into place. 5.) What is your favorite Longhorn show?  My favorite longhorn show is Houston Stock Show and Rodeo. 6.)What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a veterinarian for both large and small animals. 7.) What do you think is the most important trait in a Longhorn and why? The most important trait is their conformation.

OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

8.) Who is your role model? My role model is my dad. 9.) What is your favorite thing to compete in at shows? My favorite thing to compete in at shows is the steer class. 10.) What do you do outside of showing Longhorns? Outside of showing Longhorns I participate in Girl Scouts and community events. 11.) Why did you join the TLBT? I joined the TLBT because I wanted to show Longhorns and my parents thought it would be a good experience for me. 12.) What is your favorite thing about the Longhorn show circuit?  My favorite thing is that I meet new people, make new friends, and everyone is nice and they help out. Also, showing Longhorns. 13.) What was your most memorable show?  My most memorable show was Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo because I earned my very first belt buckle in showmanship.

RYLEE YARBOUROUGH

TLBT Office: Teen Director Age: 13 1.) Why did you join the TLBT? Because I wanted to be an officer. 2.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? My favorite longhorn show is Autobahn because it’s fun and I get to show my longhorns there. 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and pattern? Gruella and then brindle. 4.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? My first show and it was a 6th place ribbon. 5.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? The car ride on the ride to the TLBT Camp. 6.) What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? Dodging the horns so I don’t get hit in the head. 7.) What is your favorite movie? Grown Ups 2  8.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns? Why? Yes, because I get to hang out with amazing people. 9.) What person has influenced you the most? Tracey Krueger 10.) If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be?  Bigfoot  11.) What is your favorite season? Why? Fall because it’s really pretty and it feels good. 12.) What do you want to be when you grow up? A Doctor or a vet. 13.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? Hanging out with the other TLBT Members. 14.) What is favorite quote? “Nothing is better than going home to family and eating good and relaxing” – Irina Shayk

EVELYN SABIO

15.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? It’s fun and do your officers spot.

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SHOW RESULTS Haltered Bull Grand Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY

DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

August 4, 2018 FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. J5 FRECKLES, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR 2. K-T JELLY BEAN, Rocking K Bar T Ranch, EVANS, WA CLASS 5: 1. J5 SECRET, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR 2. J5 COCO, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR Free Female Junior Champion: J5 SECRET, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: J5 FRECKLES, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR CLASS 9: 1. J5 SPICEY HOT, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR 2. SRL SCARLETT, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR CLASS 10: 1. SRL COCOA TUFF, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR 2. K-T SWEET PEA, Rocking K Bar T Ranch, EVANS, WA CLASS 11: 1. K-T STRAWBERRY CREAM, Rocking K Bar T Ranch, EVANS, WA Free Female Senior Champion: SRL COCOA TUFF, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: J5 SPICEY HOT, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR Free Female Grand Champion: SRL COCOA TUFF, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: J5 SECRET, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR CLASS 16: 1. SRL SPICE GIRL, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR 2. K-T SKITTLES, Rocking K Bar T Ranch, EVANS, WA CLASS 17: 1. K - T RACHEL, Rocking K Bar T Ranch, EVANS, WA 2. J5 BOO BOO, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR CLASS 19: 1. 7-11 DEMANDS LEGACY, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR 2. ST MOON N STARS, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR Free Mature Female Champion: SRL SPICE GIRL, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: 7-11 DEMANDS LEGACY, Mark & Renee Scott, HINES, OR

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. K-T JELLY BEAN, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA Youth Female Junior Champion: K-T JELLY BEAN, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA CLASS 9: 1. SRL CINAMON LACE, Braeden Cushing, HINES, OR 2. SRL SCARLETT, Jacie Kelley, Primeville, OR CLASS 10: 1. SRL COCOA TUFF, Kelcie Rae Kelley, Primeville, OR 2. K-T SWEET PEA, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA CLASS 11: 1. K-T STRAWBERRY CREAM, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA Youth Female Senior Champion: SRL COCOA TUFF, Kelcie Rae Kelley, Primeville, OR Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: K-T SWEET PEA, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA Youth Female Grand Champion: SRL COCOA TUFF, Kelcie Rae Kelley, Primeville, OR Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: K-T SWEET PEA, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. K-T KING OF HEARTS, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA Youth Bull Grand Champion: K-T KING OF HEARTS, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA

CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT ANNIKA BUDDY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. PT WILLOW, Paul & Taylor Schlecht, SCRIBNER, NE CLASS 5: 1. BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion: WINDY POINT ANNIKA BUDDY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 8: 1. WINDY POINT DEMI BORIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. ETTA 71, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY 2. PT MISS MAGNOLIA, Paul & Taylor Schlecht, SCRIBNER, NE CLASS 10: 1. DV GALATEA, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 11: 1. FULL MOON 68, Susie Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY 2. RICE CRISPY, Daniel Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY Free Female Senior Champion: FULL MOON 68, Susie Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: RICE CRISPY, Daniel Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY Free Female Grand Champion: FULL MOON 68, Susie Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: RICE CRISPY, Daniel Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY CLASS 16: 1. BRIDIE, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY 2. DIAMOND DOLLAR, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 17: 1. DV BURGUNDY RED, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 18: 1. 5 CLAIRA MAE, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 19: 1. SALTILLO CLARABEL 629, Eric and Allison Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE 2. SALTILLO CLARE 910, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Mature Female Champion: DV BURGUNDY RED, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE 2. OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Junior Champion: SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 10: 1. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE 2. SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE CLASS 11: 1. WYO SILVER, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: WYO SILVER, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO HONEY OIL 811, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE

Youth Steer Grand Champion: K-T JACK FROST, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA

Youth Bull Grand Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. K-T JACK FROST, Chance Kearney, EVANS, WA

CLASS 32: 1. THE PIANO MAN, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 2: 1. J5 Z’S SAINT PAT, J5 Longhorns, MOLALLA, OR

Youth Steer Grand Champion: THE PIANO MAN, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

WYOMING STATE FAIR

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

August 17, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION CLASS 4: 1. DARLENE 81, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY 2. OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Female Junior Champion: DARLENE 81, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 10: 1. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Damrow Haltered Female Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 17: 1. AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Mature Female Champion: AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 1: 1. THE PIANO MAN, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 2: 1. DV JET STREAM, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. ROSCO J GO, John Nachtman, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 5: 1. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. RR RIVER RANGER, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 6: 1. FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY Steer Senior Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Senior Champion Reserve: FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY Steer Grand Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY

CENTRAL STATES FAIR August 19, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. ANDERS ALIA, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: ANDERS ALIA, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 8: 1. IRISH THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 9: 1. ANDERS PEACHES TOO, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 10: 1. OBRYANS THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD 2. OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 11: 1. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD

Haltered Bull Junior Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

Haltered Female Senior Champion: OBRYANS THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD

CLASS 23: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

CLASS 28: 1. GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Haltered Bull Senior Champion: GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY

32 | October 2018

Haltered Female Grand Champion: OBRYANS THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


CLASS 17: 1. AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Mature Female Champion: AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

RAY BOHY TEXAS LONGHORN SHOW August 25, 2018

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 23: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. ANDERS CASH’S COWBOY, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Junior Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: ANDERS CASH’S COWBOY, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 28: 1. GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 29: 1. ANDERS WIZARD OF OZ, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Senior Champion: GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS WIZARD OF OZ, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Grand Champion: GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS WIZARD OF OZ, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. DARLENE 81, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 5: 1. BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: DARLENE 81, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 10: 1. HCR BARONESS, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD 2. HCR TOP CHOICE, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD 2. WYO SILVER, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Senior Champion: HCR BARONESS, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: HCR TOP CHOICE, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD Free Female Grand Champion: HCR BARONESS, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD CLASS 11: 1. FULL MOON 68, Susie Tadewald, VAN TASSELL, WY Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: HCR TOP CHOICE, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD CLASS 16: 1. DIAMOND DOLLAR, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. NETTIEMAE, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 17: 1. MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 18: 1. 5 CLAIRA MAE, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Free Mature Female Champion: DIAMOND DOLLAR, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. ANDERS ALIA, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. OLD FAITHFUL, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Junior Champion: ANDERS ALIA, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY

Haltered Female Grand Champion

OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. DARLENE 81, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 5: 1. CUTTIEPIESCHOCOLATECHIP, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE 2. MAZY RAIN, Leslie Lautenschlager, PALMER, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion: CUTTIEPIESCHOCOLATECHIP, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 8: 1. LCL FROSTED CRAZY FLOWER, Little Creek Longhorns, ARLINGTON, NE CLASS 9: 1. LCL DUSTYS FRECKLED GIRL, Little Creek Longhorns, ARLINGTON, NE 2. STAR LIGHT 617, Leslie Lautenschlager, PALMER, NE CLASS 10: 1. CS TIN’S CUTE-ZEE, Conner Scheer, ARLINGTON, NE 2. LCL WINWIN’S HEART-THROB, Little Creek Longhorns, ARLINGTON, NE CLASS 11: 1. ZELLA MAE, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE 2. WF ZIGGY’S MELODY, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO Haltered Female Senior Champion: LCL FROSTED CRAZY FLOWER, Little Creek Longhorns, ARLINGTON, NE Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: CS TIN’S CUTE-ZEE, Conner Scheer, ARLINGTON, NE Haltered Female Grand Champion: LCL FROSTED CRAZY FLOWER, Little Creek Longhorns, ARLINGTON, NE Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: CUTTIEPIESCHOCOLATECHIP, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE CLASS 17: 1. AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. LJL TABASCO TUCSON, Leslie Lautenschlager, PALMER, NE Haltered Mature Female Champion: AUNT JEMIMA 012, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: LJL TABASCO TUCSON, Leslie Lautenschlager, PALMER, NE

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 8: 1. IRISH THRILL, Harlie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD CLASS 9: 1. ANDERS PEACHES TOO, Rope Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. ANDERS MAPLE WINDS, CASH ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 10: 1. OBRYANS THRILL, Harlie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD 2. OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Jimmie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD CLASS 11: 1. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, TY ANDERS, BELVIDERE, SD 2. WYO SILVER, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 23: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

Youth Female Senior Champion: OBRYANS THRILL, Harlie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, TY ANDERS, BELVIDERE, SD

CLASS 28: 1. GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY 2. WF CABALLERO BLANCO, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 29: 1. MR FORD REMASTERED, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE 2. MRMAXIMUMFREEZE, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE

Youth Female Grand Champion: OBRYANS THRILL, Harlie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, TY ANDERS, BELVIDERE, SD

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY 2. ANDERS CASH’S COWBOY, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS CASH’S COWBOY, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 32: 1. ANDERS CASSONOVA CHEX, ROPE ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE 2. THE PIANO MAN, RYAN JOHNSON, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 33: 1. ANDERS SILVER DOLLAR, DALLI ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Steer Grand Champion: ANDERS SILVER DOLLAR, DALLI ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS CASSONOVA CHEX, ROPE ANDERS, CRAWFORD, NE

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. HCR TANK, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD 2. HCR BLAZE, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD Steer Junior Champion: HCR TANK, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD Steer Junior Champion Reserve: HCR BLAZE, Gordon & Connie Howie, RAPID CITY, SD CLASS 5: 1. ANDERS CLINKER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 6: 1. FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY Steer Grand Champion: FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS CLINKER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Steer Senior Champion: FLAT IRON, Amanda Collins, TORRINGTON, WY Steer Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS CLINKER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

Haltered Bull Junior Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

Haltered Bull Senior Champion: MR FORD REMASTERED, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: GENERAL LEE HOTSTUFF, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Haltered Bull Grand Champion: MR FORD REMASTERED, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: JOHNNY REB 88, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY PRODUCE OF DAM CLASS 35: 1. SALTILLO SANDDOLLAR AGIE, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. CL LIL TEJA’S CHEX, Cully & Lita Sila, MADISON, NE 2. PT WILLOW, Paul & Taylor Schlecht, SCRIBNER, NE CLASS 5: 1. BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. DV BABY MOON, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE Free Female Junior Champion: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: DV BABY MOON, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE CLASS 8: 1. WINDY POINT DEMI BORIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. PT MISS MAGNOLIA, Paul & Taylor Schlecht, SCRIBNER, NE 2. CL CONCEALED STAR, Cully & Lita Sila, MADISON, NE CLASS 10: 1. JUST ANNIE, Harvey and DonnaThiessen, DANNEBROG, NE 2. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 11: 1. WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. REDS RUBY 68, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY Free Female Senior Champion: PT MISS MAGNOLIA, Paul & Taylor Schlecht, SCRIBNER, NE Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion: BEWITCHED 81, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: DV BABY MOON, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE

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October 2018 | 33


SHOW RESULTS CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. SALTILLO OUTBACKHONEY505, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 17: 1. DV BURGUNDY RED, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. CC’S RIO’S TEJAS STAR, Cully & Lita Sila, MADISON, NE CLASS 18: 1. 5 CLAIRA MAE, Tammy Delyea, DOUGLAS, WY 2. SH LONE FREEWAY 47/1, Clark & Carmen Belina, HOWELLS, NE CLASS 19: 1. SALTILLO CLARABEL 629, Eric and Allison Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE 2. SALTILLO CLARE 910, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Mature Female Champion: WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: DV BURGUNDY RED, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE

Steer Junior Champion Reserve: MR SALT CINNAMON SUGAR, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE CLASS 5: 1. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO STRAWBERY TUFF1, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 6: 1. BM SPOTTED CASH, Betty Mc Cutchan, NELSON, NE 2. BM BLACK LICORICE, Betty Mc Cutchan, NELSON, NE Steer Senior Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Senior Champion Reserve: BM SPOTTED CASH, Betty Mc Cutchan, NELSON, NE Steer Grand Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: DV JET STREAM, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. DARLENE 81, EMMA GRACE VELAZAQUEZ, DOUGLAS, WY CLASS 5: 1. SAN PUMPKIN, LILLY LAUTENSCHLAGER, PALMER, NE 2. CUTTIEPIESCHOCOLATECHIP, BELLA MCCUTCHAN, NELSON, NE Youth Female Junior Champion: SAN PUMPKIN, LILLY LAUTENSCHLAGER, PALMER, NE Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 8: 1. BABY BELLE 929, LUCIE LAUTENSCHLAGER, PALMER, NE CLASS 10: 1. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE 2. SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE CLASS 11: 1. ZELLA MAE, BELLA MCCUTCHAN, NELSON, NE Youth Female Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO IRISH COWGAL 72, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: SAN PUMPKIN, LILLY LAUTENSCHLAGER, PALMER, NE

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 32: 1. THE PIANO MAN, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Bull Grand Champion: JOHNNY REB 88, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO SANDBUR 803, Dylaney Georges, ROCA, NE

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. DV RED JET, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. CL VICKI’S REVENGE, Cully & Lita Sila, MADISON, NE CLASS 2: 1. DV JET STREAM, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE 2. MR SALT CINNAMON SUGAR, William McCutchan, NELSON, NE

Attention Show Chairs! Results are published once official results are received and verified as correct in the HORNS show management system. Please submit your official results to the TLBAA office as soon as possible to avoid a delay in being published in Trails Magazine and to ensure points are kept current. Please feel free to submit champion/Reserve Champion photos as well. Candids may be submitted to myra@tlbaa.org and may be used based on space available.

Steer Junior Champion: DV JET STREAM, Del Vic Farms, SCRIBNER, NE

Attire Reminder From the TLBAA Affiliate Committee: It has been noted by many recently that show attire is not being followed in some of the TLBAA shows. Page 45 in the Handbook speaks to attire and the responsibility of the show chair committee. Running shoes, t-shirts, ball caps, short sleeved shirts are not part of ring attire. If you are proud of the breed, take pride in your appearance. With the increase of social media, shows are being seen by more people and show attire can reflect badly on the overall show presence. You can find a copy of the TLBAA Handbook at www.tlbaa.org. Click the TLBAA tab and the handbook link is in the list on the bottom right side of the page.

34 | October 2018

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NEWS On the Trail...

Madison County 2018 Farm Tour Visits Moriah Farms By Trace Neal With rain in the forecast all day, the Madison County 2018 Farm Tour Bus pulled up to the entrance to Moriah Farms with bright blue skies above. Every September, the group takes a trip to an interesting agricultural places all over the US. This year they decided to come to the Fort Worth Stockyards. Mary Kearns, Madison County Farm Tour President, wanted to schedule a tour of a ranch so the group could see some Longhorns up close and personal. Upon utilizing good ol’ Google, she came across Moriah Farms owned by Bernard Lankford. Upon Madison County Farm tour group. being contacted, Bernard happily obliged and the visit was set in motion. Upon their arrival, Bernard stepped aboard the bus full of beef cattle raisers and agricultural enthusiasts to give a brief summary of the history of Texas Longhorn and discussed a few key points about his own herd. After fielding a few questions, Bernard led the way off the bus so everyone could see these long anticipated Longhorns up close. Everyone immediately began pulling out their cameras and cell phones to get all the photos they could. Throughout the entire visit, people often gathered around Bernard to ask questions and hear more about our unique breed of cattle. The group gathered in front of Bernard’s ranch entrance for a photo to remember the trip by. They made sure to give Bernard a hat from the Blue Grass Stockyards of Richmond as part of their appreciation for him hosting the group.

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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2018 | 35


Sale Results

21ST BUTLER BREEDER’S INVITATIONAL SALE RESULTS September 1, 2018 • Lockhart, TX Auctioneer: Joel Lemley Sale Commentator: Kaso Kety Results submitted by Butler Breeders Photos by Butler Breeders

For 21 consecutive years, Labor Day has been synonymous with fun and good times at the Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale in Lockhart – and even with the drought in Texas, this year was no exception. On Saturday, September 1, some of the best Butler cattle ever offered went through the ring, with something for everyone from young heifers to  mature proven breeders, bulls, steers, semen, clones and clonal tissue.  Buyers and consignors came, not only from Texas, but Oregon, California, Minnesota, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Maryland, Florida and Mississippi to enjoy the cattle, shared camaraderie, Texas BBQ, homemade baked goods, and traditions that the Butler Sale is known for. For the second year, Cattle in Motion expanded our audience with a live WebCast to accommodate online sales.  To all of the buyers, both local and online, we would like to say thank you for your participation and support.  To our consignors and volunteers who work so diligently to make this sale possible every year, we extend a special thanks for all of your efforts to help  preserve purebred Butler cattle.  To Joel Lemley and Lemley Auction Services, our heartfelt gratitude and appreciation for providing the sale with excellent auctioneering and administrative support for the past 10 years.

BBI’s 21st Annual Sale Lemley Auction Services Celebrates 10 years w/ BBI

James Turner, Recipient of the BBI Appreciation Award

Tammy Tiner & Kenn Harding

HIGHLIGHTS Top 10 Average: $4,576.92 per head

Volume Buyers:

Molly & Billy Crozier

Michael & Jackie McLeod

Robert & Trina King – Canyon Lake, TX Crozier/Johnson Partnership – Woodville, TX John & Jane Thate – Fairmont, MN Stanley & Sandi Tidwell – Midlothian, TX

HIGH SELLING LOT: $ 11,000

LOT 16 – MATILDA BR3 Consignor: Triple R Ranch • Buyer: Robert & Trina King

Helen & James Cloakey

Brennan, Kennedy, Michele & Weston Potts with Michael Bennett

OTHER HIGH SELLING LOTS: $10,500 - Lot 13 – Magdalena BR3 – Consignor: Triple R Ranch - Buyer: John & Jane Thate $10,000 - Lot 59 - Maradi BR3 – Consignor: Triple R Ranch Buyer: Crozier/Johnson Partnership $6,000 - Lot 66 - Emanuella BR3 – Consignor: Triple R Ranch – Buyer: Stanley & Sandi Tidwell $4,200 - Lot 53 - Flame Blower 21/0 – Consignor: Tony Mangold – Buyer: Johnny & Melissa Hicks $3,400 - Lot 60 - Coal Star 30/0 – Consignor: Sidewinder Cattle Co. – Buyer: Kety/Sellers Partnership $3,000 - Lot 5 - Westfarms 501 – Consignor: Westfarms, Inc Buyer: Kety/McLeod/Doyle Partnership $2,600 - Lot 58 - Walkers Amy Dode – Consignor: El Rincon Del Rey – Buyer: Dayami Griffin 36 | October 2018

Makayla & Mike McLeod with Phyllis Termin

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Paul & Judi Sellers

McKenna Donovan & Wyatt Huffman

Keith DuBose


Futurity Results

BUTLER BREEDER’S ONLINE FUTURITY RESULTS The first online futurity ever was held by the Butler Breeders in the Spring of 2018. The brainchild of James Turner of 5T Longhorns, this futurity accepted entries in 2 bull classes and 7 heifer classes with the highest point bull and heifer named as Grand Champions.  Photos and videos of some of the breed’s best young animals were submitted online and then judged by Julie Pack, Kaso Kety, Janice Webb, John Randolph and Lonnie Shan.  The Class Winners and Runner-ups were presented with awards at the 21st Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale held over Labor Day weekend.  For details on the next Butler Breeder’s Online Futurity, contact James Turner at 936-689-1914 or email The5TCorp@yahoo.com.

Grand Champion Bull & Class B1 Winner Royal Desperado ML 66 McLeod Ranch Accepted by Michael McLeod

Class B2 Winner Dalgood’s Rocky II Dalgood Longhorns Accepted by Connie Goodman

Class H1 Winner Sweet Marlene C3 Christa Cattle Co. Accepted by Jason Christa

Class H2 Winner Jackie Lynn 4218 McLeod Ranch Accepted by Michael McLeod

Class H3 Winner RVR Katrina Rose Rio Vista Ranch Accepted by Elmer Rosenberger

Grand Champion Heifer & Class H4 Winner RVR Maddie Rose Rio Vista Ranch Accepted by Susan Rosenberger

Class H5 Winner HR Casino Belle Harrell Ranch Accepted by Kyle Mathis

James Turner Butler Futurity Founder

Class H6 Winner Holly Lee BMP Rocking P Longhorns Accepted by Michele Potts

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Class H7 Winner Jackie Lynn 4135 McLeod Ranch Accepted by Makayla McLeod

October 2018 | 37


Sale Results

STRUTHOFF RANCH DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS SALE RESULTS September 7-8, 2018 • San Antonio, TX Sale Hosts: Lynn & Josie Struthoff Auctioneer: Joel Lemley Sale Commentator: Troy Robinett Mike Beijl, MB Longhorns with Ty Wehring, JT Wehring Family Ranch

Results submitted by Lemley Auction Services Photos by Hired Hand Software

Despite some rainy weather, the inaugural Struthoff Ranch Deep In The Heart of Texas Longhorn Consignment Sale drew a big crowd and a good time was had by all. Friday night was the heifer sale followed by some great barbecue and the music of country music legend Johnny Rodriguez. The sale continued after breakfast burritos and Starbuck’s coffee Saturday morning. Many who attended commented on the outstanding facilities and the amazing hospitality of the sale hosts. “We would like to thank the consignors and extend our appreciation to all participants! See you all next year!” — Lynn & Josie Struthoff, Struthoff Ranch

HIGHLIGHTS

Sale Hosts Josie Becker & Lynn Struthoff.

Great turnout for the inaugural sale

Average on Sold Lots: $2,590

Nichole Leigh and daughter with Rockin I Longhorns

Volume Buyers: Dawn & Darin Divinia – Red Oak, TX Bill & Elizabeth Hudson – Corydon, IN Kent & Sandy Harrell – Tulsa, OK

HIGH SELLING LOT: $ 11,000 LOT 76 – JTW SUGAR COOKIE 28

OTHER HIGH SELLING LOTS:

Tessa Millsap, Millsap Ranch with Phil Norwood, r3 Hiltop Ranch

Fred Bryant, Elah Valley Longhorns with Ronnie Mullinax, Brazos Rose Ranch and brother Ralph

$8,250 - Lot 104 – JTW Oh My 24 $8,000 - Lot 34 - RJF Rio Net Worth $8,000 - Lot 43 - JTW Moon’s Cowgirl 72 $6,000 - Lot 5 - Sugar Baby Star SS $4,500 - Lot 32 - HR Reba $4,000 - Lot 38 - JTW Red Bandana $3,700 - Lot 75 - HC Working Kjenny Lea $3,600 - Lot 107 - M Arrow Coco Leigh $3,600 - Lot 116 - CWR Beverly Hillbilly

Sandy and Eitan Barhum

38 | October 2018

Stever Azinger, Lazy A Ranch and Kathy Pallidini, Double K Longhorns

Randall and Cindy Traywick, El Dorado Ranch

Laura Standley and Dan Tisdale, Crossed T’s Longhorns

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Charlene and Mark Gililland, Gilliland Ranch

Mikeal Beck and Brandi Shukers, Holy Cow Longhorns with Johnny Rodriguez


Brett and Teresa Krause, Circle K Ranch and John Randolph and Dylan Skarpa, Lonesome Pines Ranch

Dale Metz, FHR Longhorns and Phil Norwood, r3 Hiltop Ranch

Dara and Scott Simmons, SS Backwards Ranch with Johnny Rodriguez

Chase Vasut, Rockin AF Longhorns and David Mills, Legend Valley Ranch

Felicita, Felix and Della Serna, El Coyote Ranch

Justin Rombeck, JBR Longhorns; Richard Philip, Bentwood Ranch; Nick Mills, Pecan Creek Longhorns

Mark & Christina Hays, 6h Longhorns and Mike Perry, Canyon Trail Longhorns

Dawn and Darin Divinia, Diamond D Ranch

Bill Hudson, Hudson Longhorns; Kurt Twining, Silver T Ranch and Wes Clark

The Taylor Family, 4T Longhorns

Edwin & Debra Stojanik, Lone Star Longhorns with grandson Connor

Martin and Donna Robeson, Robeson Ranch

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AFFILIATE NEWS

AFFILIATE UPDATES Entries have closed for the Canadian Western Agribition and it looks like it will be an exciting national show in Regina, Saskatchewan on November 19th. Thank you to members supporting the show and to our sponsors, we couldn’t do any of our events without you. DEB LESYK CTLA members will be supporting Ron Walker’s Fall Select Sale on PRESIDENT November 10th at Oyen, Alberta. His catalogue looks great and he’s offering a 306-867-9427 very good set of cattle. Look forward to seeing you there. Last event of this year will be the CTLA sale at the national show in Regina. Check out the CTLA website for updated information and the sale catalogue should be uploaded to the site around the 25th of October. Good Luck to our entries and their owners in TLBAA Affiliate Prince and Princess competition.

CANADIAN TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

East Texas Longhorn Association held its General Membership Meeting on 8/18/18. The meeting was held at Blossom Ridge Ranch in Athens, TX, hosted by Troy Calhoun and Jacob and Amy Weatherholtz. with approximately 50 members and guest present. PRESIDENT The amazing BBQ meal was catered by Pap’s BBQ KEITH DUBOSE EASTTEXASLONGHORNASSOCIATION@GMAIL.COM - owner/chefs Jesse & Diane Rivera. After the meeting a hayride pasture tour was given and the Sweet Trust Partnership (Blossom Ridge Ranch, KC Longhorns and Rocking M Longhorns) showcased Sweet Chex 783. Officer Elections were held and the 2018-2019 officers are; President - Keith DuBose, Vice President - Doug Burkham, Secretary - Amy Weatherholtz, and Treasurer - Lana Hightower. Three board of directors positions were filled with Barbara Marquess, Joel Norris, and Paula Rozelli. Youth advisors elected are Jacob Weatherholtz - lead, Kristi Chambliss, Deb Burkham and Janea Oliver. The ETLA recognized their scholarship winners this year as Cheyenne Joslyn and Skylar Vasil, both of Mansfield. The ETLA will be hosting the upcoming shows at the East Texas State Fair, and the Kaufman Police Association show. We have several sponsors for belt buckles but are accepting more. Also, look out for yellow or purple ETLA T-shirts on our members - you can purchase at the shows. If you would like to contact the ETLA, please contact through Facebook or Amy at blossomridgeranch@gmail. com; 903-681-0353.

EAST TEXAS LONGHORN BREEDER ASSOCIATION

ETLA General Membership Meeting Group Photo

ETLA Members Enjoying Blossom Ridge Ranch Longhorns

The two world qualifying shows at the Colorado State Fair concluded today, September 3rd. We were greeted with wonderful weather with temperatures in the 70’s. This is the third leg of the Mountains to the Plains Texas Longhorn Show Circuit. The final one will be at the  New Mexico State Fair. The first show, on Sunday was judged by Lana KENNY RICHARDSON Hightower of Van, Texas. As always Lana did a superb job of  analyzing PRESIDENT KRICHARDSON21@AOL.COM and explaining her placements. On Monday Gary Don Taylor of Ardmore, Oklahoma was the judge. He was very informative in his explanations of his choice in of his cattle. As in the past we had support from longhorn breeders from our region. With entries from Nebraska, Wyoming and New Mexico. We truly do appreciate there support. Hopefully, next year some of you can come and enjoythis circuit with us.

MOUNTAINS & PLAINS TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

40 | October 2018

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The NTLA will hold their Spring Sale in Beatrice, Nebraska just 25 miles north of the Kansas border. We are pleased to announce this Spring 2019 sale will be the Associations PRESIDENT 38th annual sale. We will again allow PAUL SCHLECHT 402-719-7317 Futurity Heifers in the catalog and commercial in the non catalog sale. The consignment deadline is January 15, 2019.  Any early consignments will be given additional advertising.   We just finished the 8th year at the Nebraska State Fair since it moved to Grand Island, NE August 24-26, 2018. Our location on the fair grounds has improved each year with the first year being located outside far away from the rest of the fair (no one could find us). We’ve gone to the Big Red Barn, the Swine Barn, the Sheep Barn and now we are finally housed in the “Cattle Barn”! The facilities are awesome, just ask what our first time exhibitors from Colorado and Wyoming thought about it.       The Nebraska State Fair is now part of a “Show Circuit” for the 2019 world show season. This includes the following shows: Wyoming State Fair, Colorado State Fair, September 2 & 3, and the New Mexico State Fair, September 15-16, 2018. Cash Prizes are awarded after the New Mexico on a point system. It will surely continue next year. Don’t miss being a part of it. You do not have to show in all shows to be a part of this fun circuit! Hope to see you at the upcoming shows and sales.

NEBRASKA TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

SAVE THE DATE: Time is creeping up on us with our new Llano show October 19-21. The Show Team has been working hard to make this inaugural Llano Western Weekend Longhorn show an event to remember. The whole week-end is loaded with events to enjoy and for all ages to participate. The show will take place at the John L. Kuykendall Event Center and Arena JEREMY JOHNSON located at 2200 Ranch Road 152, Llano, TX 78643. Lots of meetings have PRESIDENT gone into the planning with the Llano Chamber and the PCRA Extreme Bulls DOSNINOSRANCH@GMAIL.COM Representatives to make this a show and weekend to remember. Friday night we will begin with a points only Youth Show at 6 PM. There is a cookie contest going on Saturday morning. Deliver 6 of your favorite homemade cookie on a paper plate with your name taped on the bottom of the plate Saturday morning to the designated table in the arena. First prize wins $100. The three top cookies choices will be announced at noon along with the top three mask winners. Beginning at 10 am, we will have an Open Haltered Show, and Non Haltered Show, and a Non Haltered Trophy Steer Show, and the Mini Longhorn Show. During the noon break for lunch all kids and adults that want to enter the “Halloween Mask Contest” meet in the arena with the mask you purchased or made to compete for prizes. First prize is $100. Saturday there will be a parade down main street, he Extreme Bull Buckout begins at 7 PM Saturday evening in the arena. There are some fun games planned in the arena during the intermission of the bull riding. Anyone want to try their hand at boot scramble or cow pattie toss??? There will be a live band and a dance until 11 PM courtesy of the Extreme Bulls Event for all of us to enjoy. There is a huge event center and Llano has invited many different businesses to set up their kiosk for the public to shop Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Many handcrafted wares will be offered for sale. There will also be an exhibit from Art Trappings all weekend. This takes place in a large climate controlled event center. Maybe you can find some Christmas gifts! The concession stand will be open all weekend starting at about 4 pm Friday. Lots to do and see. There won’t be a lack for entertainment. Sunday we will have Youth Show B beginning at 9 am after Cowboy Church in the bleachers. The judges for the weekend are Lana Hightower, Points only Show A Friday evening, David Wars Saturday for the Open haltered, Non haltered and the Mini Shows with prizes and premium payouts, and Russel Hooks, Show B Sunday morning with prizes and premium pay outs. We will have a Showmanship Class Friday with Youth Show A, and another Sunday with Youth Show B. Samuel Faske will be on-site to provide hoof trimming services. Lots of activities are planned throughout the weekend. We look forward to seeing you October 19, 20 and 21 for Llano Western Weekend. If you have any questions contact Bubba Bollier at 325-247-6249. Everybody should mark their calendars December 8-10 for the 2018 Winter Fest Weekend to be held in Edna, TX at the awesome Brackenridge Main Event Center.  As always, there will be a points only, youth show, open haltered show, non haltered show . A futurity will wrap up the weekend’s  festivities headed up by Jeremy Johnson. Questions concerning the show can be emailed to Merrilou Russell at crose@cactusroselonghorns.com or to 361781-4221.  Merrilou says she can’t guarantee snow this year, but she can promise a great, laid back  show in a great facility.

SOUTH TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

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October 2018 | 41


Picabo Phantom

We LOVE To Give Promotional Memberships!

1998-2018

On behalf of our members, the TLBAA offers a 90-day promotional membership to new Longhorn owners that also includes the Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine. When our members sell to new buyers, we send the new buyers a welcome packet with literature that will help them get started as a Longhorn Breeder. When offering a promotional membership, please let the new buyer know that we need these three things to accompany the transfers or registration applications. Submitted by Deb Lesyk The Double D Arena at Outlook, Saskatchewan recently lost Picabo Phantom, the dam of Saltgrass well known to many TLBAA members. Picabo was born in 1998 and was shown successfully for many years. She had 17 calves for the Double D but was best known for her success with her bull calves. Her last calf born in 2016 is currently a successful herd sire for TLBAA membe, Gus Joyes in northern Alberta. Easy to be around and always willing to do anything for a pail of grain, she will be missed by Deb and Dwight, and the pasture seems empty without her grazing peacefully in the coulee.  Thank you Picabo Phantom for representing everything that Texas Longhorns are known for especially longevity, reproductive efficiency, docility and true uniqueness.

42 | October 2018

1. NEW MEMBER’S NAME OR RANCH NAME (This will be the name printed on the Certificate of Registration). If it is a husband and wife, we need both names. Accurate spelling of names or ranch name is needed as many new members contact us to correct the spelling of their name. 2. Accurate address, telephone & email information. 3. Payment must accompany the applications for Registrations & Transfers. At the end of the 90-day promotional membership period, an invitation will be sent to encourage the new breeder to join the TLBAA. Thanks to our great members, the TLBAA membership continues to grow! For questions or suggestions, please contact Dana at (817) 625-6241 or dana@tlbaa.org.

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IN THE

PEN

We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office. 1. Stacy & Andy Martinez - Grandview, TX • 2. Carrie Grace - Fort Worth, TX • 3. John Juarez - Sanger, TX 4. Toni Cumbie - Weatherford, TX

1

2

3

4

The next time you visit Fort Worth, Texas, be sure to check out the historic Fort Worth Stockyards District. While you’re here, stop by 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210. The TLBAA staff always enjoys seeing members!

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For the Latest in Longhorn Happenings, Sign Up For E-Trails at www.tlbaa.org

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October 2018 | 43


ALABAMA

ARKANSAS

COLORADO

KANSAS

FLORIDA

LOUISIANA CALIFORNIA

INDIANA

MISSOURI

44 | October 2018

IOWA

MONTANA

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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2018 | 45


Classifieds Auctioneers

Cattle For Sale BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS - Est. 1995. Conformation, color, disposition, pedigree and HORNS.  Reasonable prices.  Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK.  580 765-9961 (calls only) or email cmuchmor@ poncacity.net. www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

This Fall Will Be Filled With Excitement at Both Flying D Locations!

At the ranch, excellent show prospects are ready to begin prepping for the new show season. Great selection! Meanwhile, be assured the same big, gentle trophy steers, bulls, cows and heifers will be available at both ranches.

For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call: Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380. 46 | October 2018

Vaccination Schedule PRE-WEANING VACCINATIONS • Vaccinate all calves at approximately 2-4 months of age with two vaccinations • Vaccinate for Blackleg and Malignant Edema by using a 7-way Clostridium Chauvoei-Septicum-Novyi-Sordellii-Perfringens Types C & D Bacterin-Toxoid • Vaccinate for Leptospirosis by using a 5-way Leptospira Canicola-Grippotyphosa-Hardjo-Icterohaemorrhagiae-Pomona Bacterin • 2. Vaccinate all calves to be retained past weaning (replacement heifers, bull calves, steers) at approximately 2-4 weeks prior to weaning with the following vaccinations: • Provide a Blackleg booster by revaccinating using a 7-way Clostridium Chauvoei-Septicum-Novyi-Sordellii-Perfringens Types C & D Bacterin-Toxoid • Protection against respiratory diseases and a booster for Leptospirosis can be provided by vaccinating with an IBR-BVD-PI3-BRSV (KILLED)-Lepto5 Vaccine. Make sure that the vaccine is recommended for nursing calves. • A Pasteurella haemolytica toxoid vaccination is also recommended. AT WEANING OF CALVES FROM DAMS (6-8 MONTHS OF AGE) • Vaccinate all calves retained past weaning (replacement heifers, bull calves, steers) with the following vaccinations: • Provide an additional Blackleg booster by revaccinating using a 7-way Clostridium Chauvoei-Septicum-Novyi-Sordellii-Perfringens Types C & D Bacterin-Toxoid • Booster protection against respiratory diseases and an additional booster for Leptospirosis can be provided by vaccinating with an IBR-BVD-PI3BRSV (Modified Live Virus)-Lepto5 Vaccine. Make sure that the vaccine is recommended for non-nursing calves. • A Pasteurella haemolytica toxoid booster vaccination should be provided. • Calfhood vaccination of replacement heifers with strain 51 Brucella abortus vaccine. AT ONE YEAR OF AGE • Vaccinate all one year old cattle (replacement heifers, bull calves, steers) with the following vaccinations: • Provide an additional Blackleg booster by revaccinating using a 7-way Clostridium Chauvoei-Septicum-Novyi-Sordellii-Perfringens Types C & D Bacterin-Toxoid • Booster protection against respiratory diseases and an additional booster for Leptospirosis can be provided by vaccinating with an IBR-BVD-PI3BRSV (Modified Live Virus) Vaccine using Lepto 5 Vaccine as a diluent. • If cattle are moved in and out of the herd on a frequent basis and bulls are used that are non-virgin bulls, it is recommended that the yearling heifers and yearling bull calves be vaccinated for Vibriosis by using a Campylobacter Fetus vaccine. Vibrio and Lepto-5 can be purchased as one vaccine. Vibrio vaccine should be administered at least 30 days prior to the breeding season because of potential abortion problems. COWHERD AND HERD BULLS • Vaccinate all cows and herd bulls annually with the following vaccinations: • Vaccinate for Leptospirosis by using a 5-way Leptospira Canicola-Grippotyphosa-Hardjo-Icterohaemorrhagiae-Pomona Bacterin • If cows are moved in and out of the herd on a frequent basis and bulls are used that are non-virgin bulls, it is recommended that the cowherd be vaccinated for Vibriosis by using a Campylobacter Fetus vaccine. Vibrio and Lepto-5 can be purchased as one vaccine, but must be administered after calving and before breeding because of potential abortion problems.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Advertising Index —A—

—J—

AA Longhorns............................................. 44

J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................45

A & S Land & Cattle.....................................45

—K—

American Livestock.....................................34

King, Terry & Tammy.................................. 44

Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...........................9

Kourtis Family Farms LLC...........................45

Arch Acres.................................................... 44

—L—

Astera Meadows..........................................45

Lemley Auction Services................... IFC, 39

—B—

Lightning Longhorns..................................45

Bar H Ranch................................................. 44

Little Ace Cattle Co................................. 8, 9

Beadle Land & Cattle............................. 9, 44

Lodge Creek Longhorns........................... 44

Big Valley Longhorns................................. 44

Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................45

BPT Longhorns..............................................9

Longhorn Sale Pen......................................35

Bright Futures Scholarship........................26

Lucas Ranch................................................ 44

Britt & Beckett Land & Cattle Co........... IFC

— M—

Broken Spur Ranch.................................... 44

McLeod Ranch...............................................9

Buckhorn Cattle Co............................... 3, 45 Bull Creek Ranch........................................... 7 Butler Listings.................................................9

—R— R 3 Hilltop Ranch.........................................43 Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9

Champion Genetics....................................43 Christa Cattle Co...........................................9

Rockin Hil Longhorns................................ 44 Rockin I Longhorns.....................................45 Rocking P Longhorns...................................9 Rocky Mountain Longhorns.................... 44

—D—

Rolling D Ranch.......................................... 44

Dalgood Longhorns......................................9

Running Arrow Longhorns........................35

DCCI Equipment.........................................42

—S—

Diamond Q Longhorns..............................45 Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC

Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 6030 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

Northbrook Cattle Company....................45

Caballo Bravo Longhorns......................... 44 CedarView Ranch....................................... 44

HAVE A CUTE PIC?

Send us your photo with a funny caption included!

— N—

—C— Callicrate Banders.......................................35

JUST FOR GRINS

“Wanta play with me?” Thanks to Dr. Gene Berry, Baton Rouge, LA, for the submission.

Safari B Ranch..............................................45 Sand Dollar Ranch...................................... 28

—W —

Sand Hills Ranch......................................... 44

Walker, Ron...................................................45

Singing Coyote Ranch...............................45

Westfarms Inc................................................9

—E—

SS Longhorns...............................................45

WI Longhorns & Leather............................45

Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale..... 14-15

Star Creek Ranch.................................... 5, 45

Wichita Fence Company...........................27

El Coyote Ranch............................................ 1

Struthoff Ranch........................................7, 45

—F—

—T—

Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo.............25

Thate Cattle Co.............................................9

Four Color Press..........................................43

TLBAA Longhorn Weekend....................... 13

Flying Diamond Ranch.............................. 44

Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9

—H—

Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................45

Helm Cattle Co............................................45

TS Adcock Longhorns................................45

Hickman Longhorns...................................45

—V —

Husky Branding Irons.................................42

Varner Farms, LLC...................................... 44

DK Longhorn Ranch.................................. 44 Double A Longhorns................................. 44

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

UPCOMING ISSUES: November: Longhorn Chutes December: TLBAA Horn Showcase January: Cash Cows October 2018 | 47


SAVE THE DATE OCTOBER 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN

Coming Events

FEBRUARY 2019

OCTOBER 4-6 • TLBAA Horn Showcase, Lawton, OK. Pam Robison (817) 625-6241 x106 or pam@tlbaa.org.

• October 4 - Measuring, Seminars, Bull Alley

FEBRUARY 15-17 • San Angelo Stock Show, San Angelo Fairgrounds, San Angelo, TX. Entry Deeadline January 10, 2019. Dennis Urbantke (325) 656-9321 or dennis @ thlonghorns.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth, Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers.

MARCH 2019

• October 5 - Futurity, Seminars, Bred & Owned Heifer Sale, Awards Banquet • October 6- TLBAA Horn Showcase Sale OCTOBER 17 • The “Nile” Stock Show & Rodeo, Billings, MT. Entry Deadline Sept. 5th. Contact Toby Johnson at 307-674-4691. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Youth. OCTOBER 19-21 • Llano Western Weekend, Llano, TX. Entry Deadline Oct. 9. Sandi Nordhausen 512-750-1350 / sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 / bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Youth. Trophy Steers, Miniatures. OCTOBER 26-28 • Ark-La-Tex Annual Fall Show, George H. Henderson Jr. Exposition Center, Lufkin ,TX. Entry Deadline Oct. 8th. Contact Jessica Wade, 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Miniatures.

NOVEMBER 2018 NOVEMBER 2-4 • Heart of Texas Fall Show & Sale, Circle T Resort & Arena, Hamilton, TX. Entry deadline October 12th. Contact Cori Garcia at rafter-mranch@hughes.net or 479-381-8331. Qualifying Haltered, & Youth. Trophy Steers. Miniatures. Go For The Purple Show Sale, Nov. 2 at 5 pm. For more info go to www.heartoftexaslonghorns.com NOVEMBER 10 • Texas Longhorn Fall Select Production, Consignment & Ranch Horse Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, AB. Ron Walker, 403-548-6684, Cell 403528-0200, walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com, www.walkerslonghorns.com NOVEMBER 10-11 • State Fair of Louisiana, Fairgrounds, Shreveport, LA. Entry deadline TBA. Contact Jessica Wade at 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo. com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Trophy Steers. NOVEMBER 16-18 • Kaufman Police Association Longhorn Show, Henderson County Fairgrounds, Athens, TX. Entry Deadline Novemeber 2, 2018. Joel Norris (972) 533-4945 or joel1983@embarqmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Trophy Steers. Miniatures.

DECEMBER 2018 DECEMBER 7-9 • Edna Winterfest Weekend & Futurity, Breckenridge Event Center, Edna, TX. Merrilou Russell 361-781-4221 or crose@cactusroselonghorns. com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, and Youth. Trophy Steers. Miniatures. DECEMBER 14-16 • NTLBA Holiday Longhorn Extravaganza, Wise County Fair Grounds, Decator, TX. Entry Deadline November 26, 2018. Dr. Justin Sabio 940902-3244 or drjustinsabio@gmail.com. Youth Points Only, Haltered & Youth.

MARCH 8-10 • Sulphur Spring “Premium” Spring Show, Hopkins County Civic Center, Sulpjur Springs, TX. John & Brenda Oliver, 972-268-0083, joliver210@ yahoo.com or brenda@olivermfg.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers. MARCH 16 • STLA Rodeo Austin, Austin, TX. Entry Deadline February 1, 2019. Kathy Bruner 512-689-8624 or kathy@therockingbranch.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, Trophy Steers & Miniatures. MARCH 22-24 • OTLA Spring Shoot-Out, Payne County Expo Center, Stillwater, OK. Entry Deadline March 8, 2019. Submit entries to Mary Fowler, 345328 E. 1070 Rd., Meeker, OK 74855.. Contact David Edwards at 918-557-0364 or dledwards. texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Trophy Steers, & Youth. MARCH 28-31 • Texoma Spring Classic,Red River Sale Barn, Overbrook, OK. Sale hosts: Bob & Pam Loomis, Dale Hunt & Sherrill Caddell, and Chris & Christina Clark. Contact: Dale Hunt 402-214-4851 or Chase Vasut 512-917-8654.

APRIL 2019 APRIL 12-14 • Heart Of Texas Dash For Cash Spring Show, Circle T Resort & Arena, Hamilton, TX. Entry Deadline March 29th. Send entries to Cori Garcia 12439 County Rd. 209, Hico, TX, 76457. Contact Cori Garcia at rafter-m-ranch@ hughes.net or 479-381-8331. Qualifying Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures. APRIL 27 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com

MAY 2019 MAY 3-5 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Entry Deadline April 23, 2019. Stephen Head 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures. MAY 18 • Nebraska Texas Longhorn Association Sale, Beatrice, NE. Contacts: Pres. Paul Schlecht 402-719-7317 / Justin Georges 402-580-0209. Consignments: brdamrow6@aol.com MAY 24-27 • Blue Grass Classic Sale & Futurity, Lexington, Kentucky. Bruce McCarty Promotions, www.brucemccarty.com

SEPTEMBER 2019 SEPTEMBER 20-21 • Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction, Fort Worth, TX. Contact Lorinda Valentine, panthercreekranch@att.net or 270-996-7046.

JANUARY 2019 JANUARY 18-22 • TLBAA Longhorn Weekend, Fort Worth, TX. Pam Robison (817) 625-6241 x 106 or pam@tlbaa.org. www.tlbaa.org • January 18 - Affiliate Meeting, TLBAA General Membership Meeting, TLBAA Board Meeting & Election of Officers, TLBF Hall of Fame & TLBAA Year-End Awards Banquet • January 19 - Eddie Wood Cowtown Classic Sale • January 20 - TLBT Meeting • January 21 - Fort Worth Stock Show Youth Show • January 22 - Fort Worth Stock Show Open Longhorn Show JANUARY 25-26 • National Western Stock Show, Stock Show Complex, Denver, CO. Kenny Richardson 970-352-3054 or krichardson@aol.com.Qualifying Free, Haltered and Youth.

48 | October 2018

Affiliates: Please submit a completed show application to pam@tlbaa.org in order to have your TLBAA World Qualifying show listed. All other events, sales, field days or other activities may email your information directly to myra@tlbaa.org.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

October 2018 | 29


Tuxedo

Semen $35 BULLS ARE BIG! The selection of a great natural or AI sire is the biggest decision any Texas Longhorn producer makes. Often the decision to acquire a good bull is a major bad decision, when the opportunity to acquire a great bull is available. The extra effort; extra cost of a great bull may be the most rewarding act of the year. At DCC it is hard to create great bulls -- but it happens. Young great bull prospects are listed on line 24 hours a day with prices, photos, weights, pedigrees, and photos of ancestors up to 14 generations.

Real Jam Every bull hand-selected for a sire at DCC has been halter trained, disposition scored, scrotal measured, weighed and horns measured two or more times annually, to guarantee every buyer knows what they are getting. Select on line or come walk around the DCC pastures and select your next young bull. It is a supermarket of excellent choices. Semen from all DCC sires is guaranteed. Semen is available from 86 sires, all pictured on line with full data. More one-owner semen available from DCC than any source.

DICKINSON CATTLE CO LLC 35000 Muskrat tt Barnesville, Ohio 43713 740 758 5050

information@texaslonghorn.com www.texaslonghorn.com

DCC — where every semen sire, donor cow, and registered purchase has a DNA PV guarantee — and has for 27 years. TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS January 2018 | 27

Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

October 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

October 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America