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Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Keith DuBose • (303) 500-9465

Secretary: Chad Smith • (701) 764-6277

Executive Vice Chairman: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Jim Rombeck • (785) 562-6665

Parliamentarian/Director: David Wars • (936) 404-2116

2nd Vice Chairman: Stephen Head • (979) 549-5270

Director: Kevin Rooker • (817) 692-7843

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck60@gmail.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Tom Smith

John Parmley

Tom Matott

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Deb Lesyk

David Wars

Chad Smith

(306) 867-9427 halters.buckets@yahoo.com

(936) 404-2116 w5longhorns@yahoo.com

(701) 764-6277 smithlonghorns@hotmail.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Todd Spaid

Kevin Rooker

Brian Varner

(304) 963-0699 jeremyspaid73@gmail.com

(785) 224-1005 longhorncreek@yahoo.com

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Johnny Hicks

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(269) 721-3473 hicksamericanbulldogs@yahoo.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Matt Durkin

(512) 923-9015 mattdurkin1073@aol.com

Sandi Nordhausen

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

Kenny Richardson

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Reid Tolar

Stephen Head

(970) 352-3054 krichardson21@aol.com

Alex Dees

(334) 412-8400 rgtolar@yahoo.com

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Dora Thompson

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(318) 872-6329 echoofambush@aol.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

2 | May 2019

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller* 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016 Tom Matott 2016-2019

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


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April 2018 | 27


COVER STORIES BROOD COW EDITION

12 Extolling The Virtues Of Longhorn Cows

There’s a reason

APRIL 2019

cattlemen and those new to livestock are both drawn to these

Vol. 31 • No. 2

special Mommas. By Myra Basham

DEPARTMENTS 2

TLBAA Directors

6

Editor’s Note

20 What To Expect When Your Cow Is Expecting: Stages Of Pregnancy

Information regarding stages of development, nutritional needs and calving dates. By Heather Smith Thomas

40 Understanding Johne’s Laboratory Tests and Establishing The Value Added Herd Continuation of discussion begun in April 2019 Trails regarding Johne’s testing and management. By Mark Gilliland, MD

FEATURES 28

Fit Sells

Body condition matters when trying to market your Longhorns.

By Myra Basham

38 44 48

The Benefits of the Beef Producer List Why it is worth it to have your name listed on tlbaa.org as a Registered Texas Longhorn Beef Producer

An Explanation For Unmanageable Animals From the World Show Steering Committee

10

Chairman’s Message

45

Rules of the Road… to World Show

46 TLBT Page

49

News On The Trail

50

Registration Matters

52

Affiliate News

54

In Memoriam

55

In The Pen

56

Texoma Spring Classic Longhorn Sale Results.

Show Results

63

Index/Just For Grins

About the Cover: Behind every cute, healthy Longhorn calf stands an ever vigilant Longhorn cow. Photo Courtesy of Tina DuBose

64

Calendar

The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

4 | May 2019

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EDITOR’S NOTES MORE THAN PRETTY Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but productivity puts dollars in your pocket. Many are drawn to Longhorns by their color, their horns and their personalities. Those experienced with cattle, however, are equally attracted to the outstanding productivity and economy of the Texas Longhorn female. For this Brood Cow edition I decided to reach out to three cattle producers who own both Longhorns and commercial cattle breeds. It was interesting to learn how other breeds are improving in the areas that Longhorns have long been known for such as calving ease. Heed should be taken of the potential decline of production qualities resulting from a lack of desire to cull. Read the story starting on pg. 12. If you’ve wondered what is happening all those months before a calf enters this world, turn to pg. 20 for a look at what to expect when your cow is expecting. There’s a lot going on in that growing belly. Turn through the pages to find all types of events to participate in from cattle sales to shows and horn measuring competitions. Our next major TLBAA event will be the World Expo in Belton, TX, held June 2629th. Not only will there be show ring competition for youth and adults, but a Futurity and a General Membership Meeting as well. You can find the Texas Gold Futurity entry form on pg. 18. The futurity is open to anyone who wants to participate. There are lots of nonqualifying events such as Gold Merit and a photography contest. Visit www.tlbbaa.org to learn more. The next “big thing” is the TLBAA Horn Showcase in Lawton, OK, October 3-5. A horn measuring contest, futurity, bull alley and sale draws in a great group of breeders as well as the media. Go ahead and make plans to join us there. If that is not possible, then look on pg. 36 to find a satellite measuring near you. Both the World Expo and the Horn Showcase depend on sponsorships to make them the successful events people have come to love. Take advantage of the marketing opportunity to promote your program and to support these events. You can find the World Show Sponsor Packages on pg. 19 and the Horn Showcase/Bull Alley sponsorships on pgs. 30 and 32. If you’re trying to make advertising decisions in the coming months, don’t forget that the TLBAA Membership Directory is back as a part of the September issue of Trails. This edition has a two-year shelf life and is referenced regularly by our members. Many people actually order extra to have one in the barn, the truck or anywhere they may need a member number or contact information. If you are a lifetime member and have not checked your information on file with us lately, please look at your profile in HORNS or call the office and verify that we have your correct contact information. What is in HORNS is what will be pulled for publication. We hope you choose to participate in at least one, if not all, of these upcoming opportunities.

DEADLINE: July 2019 Issue:

May 25th Health/Nutrition

6 | May 2019

Blessings,

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

Editor-in-Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Karen Price • (254) 223-4470 karen@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Trace Neal • Ext. 103 trace@tlbaa.org

Registrations/Office Manager Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Membership/Registrations Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant/DNA Specialist: Amelia Gritta • Ext. 100 amelia@tlbaa.org Special Events Pam Robison • Ext. 106 pam@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. Member


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Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com

Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com

BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com

Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com (210) 232-1818

Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com

Hicks Texas Longhorns Johnny & Missy Hicks 1518 E. Britol Rd. • Dowling, MI 49050 (269) 721-3473 hicksamericanbulldogs@yahoo.com www.michiganmafialonghorns.com/Hicks

Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467

Butler Longhorn Museum (281) 332-1393 info@butlerlonghornmuseum.com www.butlerlonghornmuseum.com


Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com

McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155

Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net

Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 Cell: (512) 422-8336 elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com

Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com

Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 Cell: (985) 515-3172 westfarmsinc@gmail.com

This space is available for your ranch listing! Call Karen Price: (254) 223-4470 or Karen@tlbaa.org

Butler Breeder’s Futurity James K. Turner (936) 689-1914 the5tcorp@yahoo.com www.butlerbreedersfuturity.com


Association News

Chairman’s Message Greetings, Well, spring has sprung in lots of the country, green is starting to pop up and people are working their herds and getting fertilizer out in hopes of good grass and fat cattle. Calves are hitting the ground and it’s like finding Easter eggs when you get the first glimpse of them. Great time of the year. This month is the Brood Cow edition in the Trails with lots of information on your momma cows and calves. There are good articles and help in this edition. Myra and the Trails gang have worked hard to get some great information out in front of the members on this subject. The TLBAA is doing great financially and the office is busy with the last shows of the year coming up and getting ready for the World Expo. The Horn Showcase is busy getting ready for the event coming up quickly in October, getting entry forms, consignment forms for the sale and advertisements out in hopes of making it the best one yet. These two are the largest events that the TLBAA puts on and your support is needed and will be greatly appreciated in making these happen. Sponsorship packages are available for both and you can contact Pam Robison at the office, or any of the committee members if you choose to support them. The DNA committee is in place and is working on three options for the membership to look at on how everyone would like to move forward with this. The committee members are as follows: Jim O’Connor, Chairman: hopecreekattle@gmail.com or (573) 619-5988 Brent Bolen: brent@tcmmasonry.com or (602) 769-0900 Ryan Culpepper: culpepper.ryan@gmail.com or (940) 577-1753 Ross Ohlendorf: rockingolonghorns@gmail.com or (512) 791-7118 Christy Randolph: lpinesranch@aol.com or (713) 703-8458 Felix Serna: fserna@elcoyote.com or (361) 522-0807 Jeremy Johnson, Alternate: dosninosranch@gmail.com Dora Thompson, TLBAA BOD: echoofambush@aol.com or (318) 872-6329 Russell Fairchild, TLBAA BOD Liaison: fairchildranch@yahoo.com or (254) 485-3434

Please feel free to contact Jim, or any of the committee members with your questions or your comments on this. They will be wanting to hear what membership has to say. Thank you to all who returned your ballots for The Board Reduction Vote. This is your association and your voice is important. We appreciate the time you took responding and the extra input on the comments section. Again, I reiterate, the office staff are there to help members with everything. They are at your service to help members with registrations, transfers, Trails ads and DNA questions. Don’t hesitate to call on them for help. I am also at your beck and call, as well. Thank you for your continuing faith in the TLBAA. I believe we are headed for great things in this organization for our cattle, our members and our youth, our Longhorn family. Thank You,

Keith DuBose, Chairman of the Board Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

10 | May 2019

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Feature

Extolling the Virtues of

LONGHORN COWS Photo courtesy of Tina DuBose

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By Myra Basham

Let’s do a little word association. Momma – Cow. Cow – Calf. Calf – Money. Money – More Cows. That pretty much sums up the cattle business, doesn’t it? The Longhorn world is no exception to the cow-calfcow cycle of business. The ability of a female to conceive, carry a calf to term, to raise a healthy calf with desirable traits and breed back quickly is what builds a program in the most economical manner. If, in conjunction with those basic necessities, she also throws a lot of horn when paired with the right bull, then you have an elite producer. Interestingly enough, Texas Longhorn females and their positive characteristics have drawn seasoned cattlemen into the Registered Texas Longhorn industry just as effectively as they have enticed first time livestock owners. Lets go beyond the factors of striking horn and a kaleidoscope of colors, and take a closer look at what makes the Longhorn female the cow of choice for many.

Personality Plus

The one trait that Longhorn owners from every type of breeding program seem to agree on is temperament. The ease with which Longhorns accept people into their pasture is a huge draw. While all cattle can be calm and even somewhat friendly with daily handling, the Texas Longhorn seems to actually enjoy attention and seek out ear scratches and hand-fed While the Longhorn treats, especially when exheifers in this field posed to people daily. gathererd around us Mark Hubbell of Hubbell Longhorns has been around the recips moved commercial cattle his whole away quickly if life and got into Longhorns over 27 years ago. One of approached the major differences he noted in commercial versus Longhorn cattle is their reactions to being worked. “The black cattle, mostly Angus, will get high headed or spooky quicker than the Longhorns. The Longhorns are smarter.” Expounding on smarter, he illustrated with moving cattle. His commercial cattle tend to work better when they are not given a lot of time to assess a situation. This doesn’t mean rushing them, but a loud voice and an arm wave elicits a reaction. The Longhorns tend to think before they move, to assess the situation more. Facebook is full of video of how quickly Longhorns come running when they learn that good things are in store for them. Those with large acreage often sound a bell, siren or truck horn to draw them in to be fed and have attested to Longhorns appearing in sight quickly out of nowhere at the sound of their truck. Even a person calling out to them can bring them in for a treat or head scratch.

The differences in nature of commercial vs. Longhorn cattle were noted by Joel Lemley of Lonesome Pine Ranch as well. “Longhorn females, in most cases are less spooky than the Limousine females that we are currently using. The Limousine are somewhat more stand offish and have really less of the curiosity nature of the Longhorn female.” Lemley currently maintains a registered Limousine herd as well as registered Texas Longhorns, which he has been involved with for 26 years. While they can, and often do become almost petlike in regards to human interaction, another trait that Longhorn females are valued for is their protectiveness of their offspring and willingness to take on potential predators such as coyotes, wild dogs and mountain lions. Unfortunately humans can land on that list if the momma feels like they are a threat to the calf. Lemley cautions, “The really big difference in Longhorn mothers compared to other breeds of cattle is their defense mechanism. Obviously horned cattle can and will be more aggressive when it comes to protecting their young. An angry momma cow is going to be aggressive, but one with horns can do serious damage to a coyote,

Photo by Myra Basham

wild dogs, mountain lions, or humans. These animals are herding animals that work really hard in raising their young and they need to be respected as such.” Rhonda Poe of 3P Longhorn Ranch has owned cattle for 20 years, but when she became a Longhorn owner in 2007, the Angus herd was disperesed and the operation became 100% Longhorn. Now they also have Angus and Charlois recip cows for their Longhorn embryos. She also touts the protective nature of Longhorn females, “We don’t worry near as much about predators getting our calves with Longhorns as we did with our commercial cattle. Even our commercial recip mamas aren’t quite as attentive to their calf, but the longhorn cows are amazing at babysitting, so they pick up the slack.” Poe expands on mothering instinct, “Longhorn mama cows win this hands down. I have experienced many commercial first time heifers will walk off from

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Feature their newborn calf and reject it. I have raised many bottle babies this way. This is one of the reasons I started raising Longhorns!”

Productivity

Longhorn cattle are more disease, drought, and heat resistant than other commercial breeds. We find them laying in the sun on a hot summer day, rather than hanging out in the ponds or shade trees. – Rhonda Poe The stuff legends are made of, the Texas Longhorn not only survived in a wide variety of landscapes and environments, they thrived. The very genetics that make them survivors are what passes along the calving ease and strong mothering instinct that they are treasured for. It also resulted in a leaner body that can survive on forages other cattle breeds can’t while still successfully raising a calf.

Photo courtesy of Lee & Linda Blackwell.

In a day and age when few people raising cattle can have eyes on them all the time, that ability to fend for themselves, calve with few problems and their hardiness is a plus to any producer. While horns and splashy color can be a hindrance at a regular sale barn, many commercial cattle operations have taken advantage of the Longhorn female’s ability to provide a marketable commercial calf when crossed with a polled breed. People not only prize the Longhorns for their role as “good mommas”, but the greater number of productive years. While it is possible for commercial cattle breeds to produce calves and re-breed successfully into their teens, it is far less common. Longhorns are regularly reported to successfully re-breed and calve into their late teens and sometimes early 20’s. Actual number of reproductive years can be affected by breeding focused on one trait in any breed. Poe explains, “I feel breeding more horn into our Longhorn 14 | May 2019

cows is causing fertility issues, so production can be reduced. Our 70” cows breed every year, sometimes calving 2 times within the same year. In commercial breeds, they have bred so much for carcass, I have seen many problems with arthritis developing early on in mama cows, ultimately reducing their production years. Some of the beef breed have 4-5 years of production at most. Their philosophy is, most will be slaughtered or have replacement heifers on the ground before that happens. I sure hope we don’t do this to the Longhorn breed.” Strip away value added for horn length or potential show ring victories, and the real base value of any cow is how much it costs to keep her versus the potential value of her offspring. In considering the cost to keep her, one must factor in feed consumed, vet bills and any missed breedings or failed pregnancies. “It takes less to feed a longhorn cow when doing supplemental feeding, like in the winter months” says Lemley. “The Limousine as well as other developed breeds are Longhorn made to take in more Mamas are feed to convert to a higher body condition. attentive and Longhorns will definiteprotective, and ly take the feed given to them, but you won’t are often seen see the weight gains on Longhorn females as keeping an eye you would on European type cattle.” on multiple Body condition and calves, not just feed is an area that some differ on. Those who their own. prefer cattle that are fat and slick may find that it takes more and higher quality feed to do so. Longhorns naturally tend to be leaner than their commercial counterparts and even when on adequate feed may tend to look less conditioned than commercial breeds. There are some genetic lines that tend to flesh out easier than others. Some breeders tend to choose the larger bodied, fleshier females that raise a bigger calf, while others prefer the rangier, more traditional body type. Many strive for an average between the two. Poe likes the economy of the Longhorn females, stating “The cost to feed Longhorns vs. commercial cattle is much less. Longhorn cattle are one of the most efficient foragers in the bovine breeds.” She also sees a bit of savings on the birthing end, stating that overall calving ease in Longhorn cattle leads to reduced mortality during birth, as well as fewer c-sections and less calf pulling than in many commercial breeds. Pasture breeding Longhorns results in many testimonies of cows that produce a calf every year and breed

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continued on pg. 16


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May 2018 | 27


Feature – continued from pg. 14 back quickly. This quality can diminish over time if culling is not in place to remove problem breeders. It is an issue noted by those who run both commercial cattle and Longhorns. The difference is in the approach of each industry. Many Longhorn breeders LOVE their cattle. They are valued for their appearance and also for their personalities. The result is cows who are open being kept and given a chance. The issue with this is the fact that some fertility issues can be passed to offspring. Over time, as the trait you’re holding out for may improve, you find it harder and harder to get females bred. This can cause it to become very economically difficult to maintain your program.

The one area breeders have mentioned as a challenging one is the success rate of artificial insemination (A.I.). In an attempt to gain access to better genetics, A.I. is used extensively in the Longhorn world. However, based on discussions with individuals and services regarding the process in Longhorns, the overwhelming response was that Longhorns were more challenging to get pregnant via A.I. than other breeds. It is not necessarily a fertility issue, as many have said a female that didn’t get take an a.i. pregnancy conceived easily natural service. For those striving to achieve genetic crosses not available to them via natural service or willing to take on the demands of bull ownership, the challenge may be worth it.

Building A Strong Foundation The strong affections formed with Longhorn cattle often make it more difficult to make culling decision based on performance. Photo courtesy of Rhonda Poe

Hubbell, who runs a commercial cattle herd in addition to a registered Longhorn herd, notes the difference with the commercial side of things. “The commercial industry culls aggressively. If a female is open or isn’t a good milk producer, she’s gone. That culling improves those traits in a breed quickly and dramatically. While as Longhorn breeders we do want those traits, we love our cattle and we don’t give up on a cow easily. We’re more likely to hold on to her and give her a chance, especially if she has the ability to produce the type of horn or color we’re looking for, she’s worth it.”

No matter what type of breeding program you are building, those inherit traits of productiveness gifted by nature to the Longhorn female are a valuable commodity. When you pair those productive traits with the traits desired by the market you’re trying to reach, you truly have a special animal. If you purchase private treaty from a breeder, visit the pasture and look at any generations/members of the family line available. Look for attentive mommas with healthy calves and good udder structure and producing milk. Ask about calving records for the female and if she is a heifer inquire about her dam and granddam, or a full sister. While you may be willing to compromise on these to gain a specific coat color or horn potential, remember that building a herd with all the characteristics Longhorn females are famous for may take more time, but the foundation will be strong. Market demands may change, for better or worse, but a good producer with desirable traits is always in demand. Lemley sums it up well, “Longhorns are really a great animal to ranch with, regardless if you are straight breeding, cross breeding, showing cattle, or just looking at them in the pasture. The history and heritage of these animals allows every Longhorn Breeder, large or small to enjoy what these animals bring.”

Photo courtesy of Mark Hubbell

16 | May 2019

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A $100 entry fee is required. $100 will be split in a 75% cash payout. Payout schedule will be determined by size of class. Class structures will follow the age divisions of the Longhorn Expo resulting in 9 female classes and 8 bull classes. Animals will enter the ring from youngest to oldest. There will be a five judge panel equipped with DOB’s of all animals. Judges decisions will be final. Owner will be responsible for water tub, feed and shavings. Class winners will receive a banner, grand and reserve champions will receive buckles along with payouts.

FEMALES

Class 1 Born September-December 2018 Class 2 Born July-August 2018 Class 3 Born May-June 2018 Class 4 Born March-April 2018 Class 5 Born January-February 2018 Class 6 Born September-December 2017 Class 7 Born May-August 2017 Class 8 Born January-April 2017 RULES: All cattle must be TLBAA or ITLA registered. All entries must be paid Class 9 Born in 2016 in full ($100 per entry) by May 15, 2019. No change or substitutes of cattle Class 10 Grand Champion Female past due date. No late entries accepted. Judges decision will be final. Class 11 Reserve Grand Champion Female

BULLS

Class 12 Born September-December 2018 Class 13 Born July-August 2018 Class 14 Born May-June 2018 Class 15 Born March-April 2018 Class 16 Born January-February 2018 Class 17 Born September-December 2017 Class 18 Born May-August 2017 Class 19 Born January-April 2017 Class 20 Grand Champion Bull Class 21 Reserve Grand Champion Bull

HELD DURING THE LONGHORN EXPO - June 27, 2019

All Texas Gold Futurity entries must be postmarked by May 15, 2019 and paid in full. No late entries will be accepted. No change or substitutions after due date. Please send entry and payment to the TLBAA office.


BECOME A 2019 WORLD EXPO

SPONSOR JUNE 27-29 BELTON, TX TOP HAND - $1,000 • 2 Full page ads in Show Program • 8 Banquet tickets • 2 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena • 1 Custom E-blast

CHAIRMAN - $750 • 1 Full page ad in Show Program • 6 Banquet tickets • 1 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena

BREEDER - $500 • 2 Half page ads in Show Program • 6 Banquet tickets • 1 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena

All sponsorships over $500 have the opportunity to include a promotional item in the Exhibitor’s Welcome bag! Note: Sponsor must provide a minimum of 500 items.

EXHIBITOR - $300 • 1/2 page ad in Show Program • 4 Banquet tickets • 1 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena

YOUTH - $200 • 1/4 page ads in Show Program • 2 Banquet tickets • 1 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena

ARENA BANNER DISPLAY - $125 • 1 - 4’x6’ BYOB banners displayed in Arena

CLASS SPONSORS • Overall Champion $100 • Division Champion $75 • Division Reserve Champion $50 • Class Sponsor $30 Each class sponsor will be in the program, announced and listed at the beginning of the livestream for that class.

PROGRAM ADVERTISING • Full page ad $200 • 1/2 page ad $120 • 1/4 page ad $60

All sponsors participating at the $150 level and higher have the opportunity to include their brand/logo on the official 2019 World Show T-Shirt. Deadline is May 15, 2019.

CONTACT 817-625-6241 salesandevents@tlbaa.org


Breeding

By Heather Smith Thomas

What to Expect When Your Cow is Expecting: The Stages of Pregnancy

Photo courtesy of Eitan Barhum

After the cow or heifer is bred and settled, her pregnancy will last roughly 9 months and a week--give or take a few days. As a general rule, gestation takes about 283 days in cattle, but this is just an average. Gestation length will vary somewhat with different breeds (the Longhorn breed average is 281 days) and also varies with different individuals. Length of pregnancy, however, is a heritable factor, and you can select for cattle with longer or shorter gestation. Some breeds are known for having long gestation and larger calves at birth (which can lead to difficult deliveries) while others are known for ease of calving due to smaller calves at birth, but there are also individual differences within breeds Some bulls in every breed sire calves with shorter (or longer) gestation. Size of the calf is greatly determined by gestation length, since the fetus grows the fastest toward the end of gestation. A pregnancy that lasts longer than average usually results in a bigger calf. If you want easy-calving cows, select cows and bulls that produce low birthweight calves, which generally means shorter gestation lengths. Shorter gestation is also an advantage in getting cows rebred on time. The cow with a longer gestation length, giving birth to a larger calf, doesn’t have as many days to recover from pregnancy and start cycling again before the next breeding season. And the larger calf may also be a factor in her recovery time; if it was a difficult birth because of the extra-large calf, it may take her reproductive tract longer to recover from that delivery.

THE EMBRYO (12-45 DAYS) After fertilization, the egg begins to divide as it moves down the oviduct. By the time it reaches the 20 | May 2019

AGE-OLD METHODS FOR DETERMINING WHETHER A COW IS PREGNANT Seeing a cow in heat generally means she’s not pregnant, but a few cows have heat cycles after becoming pregnant. Many stockmen say you can feel the fetus by about the 5th or 6th month by putting your hand against the cow’s lower flank and making a quick upward and inward push, keeping your hand against her flank. If she’s pregnant the fetus (that was pushed away) should bounce back against your hand. Another method sometimes used was to milk a little from the cow just after you wean her calf, putting a drop of milk into a glass of water. Proponents of this method claimed that if the drop goes all the way to the bottom without spreading out, the cow is pregnant, whereas if the milk droplet spreads out, she’s open. One thing noticed by many stockmen is that after you wean calves, many of the open cows that weren’t cycling during lactation will come into heat shortly after you pull their calves off. Another tip-off regarding pregnancy status: at weaning time, the cows that are most reluctant to leave their calves (staying by the fence bawling for several days, rather than going off to graze, or going through fences to try to get back to their calves) are generally the ones that are open. The pregnant cows tend to wean easier and are less worried about where their calves are.

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Breeding – continued from pg. 20 uterine horn 3 to 4 days later it has divided several times and contains 16 to 32 cells. For a while it floats in the uterus, nourished by uterine “milk”—a special fluid secreted by glands in the uterine lining. At about 12 days of age it becomes an embryo and attaches to the uterine lining. During the embryonic period – from about day 12 until about 45 days of gestation – all of the major tissues, organs and systems of the body are being formed. By the end of this time, the tiny embryo is readily recognized as a calf (as opposed to a foal, lamb, piglet, puppy, or some other animal.) It is about this stage of life that the eyelids develop. By 22 days of gestation, the tiny heart has formed and is beating and by 25 days the “buds” that will become front legs have appeared, and development of the eyes and brain are well advanced. It is during this early embryonic stage (12 to 45 days of gestation) that many of the more severe birth defects or developmental abnormalities occur. Many factors influence embryonic and fetal development; vulnerability of the developing conceptus to certain problems varies at different stages of pregnancy. During the pre-attachment stage, when the embryo is traveling down the fallopian tube into the uterus, it is resistant to harmful influences. When it reaches the uterus, however, it is more exposed to external influences and very susceptible to problems because it is growing so rapidly with swift cell division and differentiation of various tissues and body systems.

HOW BIG IS IT?

ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENTS - Some congenital defects in calves are due to accidents in development caused by teratogens. This term refers to any factor/ agent that may cause abnormality in a developing embryo/fetus. The teratonic agent might not kill the developing calf but may produce defects or abnormalities that make it impossible for it to survive after birth. Teratogens may be drugs, hormones, chemicals, viruses, plant poisons (alkaloids in lupine, for instance), high temperature, etc. These factors generally have the most effect during the embryonic stages (first 45 days of gestation). Only the late-developing organs and body systems (such as the cerebellum of the brain, parts of the heart and circulatory system and the urinary/genital tract, and the palate in the roof of the mouth) are affected later in gestation. It is during the early embryonic period (first 45 days) that many pregnancies are lost. The tiny embryo may die and be expelled unnoticed during the cow’s next heat period, or it may disintegrate and be absorbed by the cow’s body, with no external signs.

THE FETUS (45 DAYS UNTIL BIRTH)

The embryo becomes a fetus at about 45 days. The various organs, tissues and systems continue to differentiate and become more recognizable. By 70 days the little calf has all its organs and body systems working; there are no radical changes from that point on--just continued growth and maturation of the fetus. Increase in size and weight is a geometric curve, increasing very rapidly in the last 2 to 3 months of gestation. From 210 days to 270 days the increase in weight is equal to 3 LENGTH OF GESTATION

DESCRIPTION OF FETUS

2 months 3 months 4 months 5 months 6 months 7 months 8 months 9 months

Size of a mouse Size of a rat Size of a small cat Size of a large cat Size of small dog, hair around eyes, tail, Fine hair on body and legs Hair coat complete, teeth slightly erupted Incisor teeth erupted

times the increase that took place from the time of fertilization up until that 210-day point. The uterus distends and drops farther in the cow’s abdomen as the fetus grows. The increasing weight draws it forward and downward, and after about the fourth or fifth month of gestation it rests on the floor of the abdomen, beneath the intestines. In cows the uterus is usually located on the right side, because the left side contains the large rumen. By the fifth month you can often see movement and wiggling on the cow’s right side, as the fetus kicks and squirms. If you press your hand on the cow’s right flank you may feel the bulge and push of the calf’s foot shoving against you. During the first half of gestation the small fetus can be in any position in the uterus and it may move around a lot. In late gestation, however, it runs out of room to turn around. In early gestation about half of all calves are facing forward or backward, but by late gestation about 95% are facing the pelvis, in proper position for birth. Sometime between 5 and 6 months, body length of the fetus exceeds the width of the amnion sac and at this stage the final position (frontward or backward) is determined. By the last month of gestation the fetus may be so large that its length exceeds the distance from the cow’s diaphragm to her pelvis, in which case the front legs and nose may push the uterine wall into the pelvis a little bit, extending backward over the cervix.

WHEN WILL SHE CALVE? An experienced bovine veterinarian can check your cow for pregnancy with ultrasound or by rectal palpation, to determine the stage of pregnancy. In most cases, this can give you a clue about when she will calve. Rectal palpation is the traditional method. Clues that the cow is pregnant can be detected as early as 30 days continued on pg. 24

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Breeding – continued from pg. 22 TAKING CARE OF THE PREGNANT COW Nutrition is important during pregnancy, but the cow doesn’t need much extra nutrition (above maintenance requirements) in the early stages as long as she has a balanced diet that includes the necessary protein, vitamins and minerals. Her greatest need for additional nutrients is during the last trimester, when the fetus is growing the fastest. Any pregnant cow that is lactating, however (still with this year’s calf at side) needs extra nutrients for lactation. Producing milk takes more nutrition than the requirements of pregnancy. It is usually safe to vaccinate or deworm a cow while she’s pregnant, and certain vaccines are often given to pregnant cows a few weeks ahead of calving to make sure their colostrum will contain the necessary antibodies to protect their calves from disease in the first weeks of life. Just follow label directions on any vaccines or dewormers, and when in doubt about safety during pregnancy, ask your veterinarian. If a pregnant cow gets sick, most antibiotics or medications will be safe, but again, read labels. There are a few drugs that are not safe for pregnant cows. One example; do not give steroids like dexamethasone (often given in certain situations or injuries to reduce pain/swelling/inflammation) because these can trigger labor and cause the cow to abort.

and definitely by 45 days of gestation, feeling the uterus, ovaries, and uterine arteries through the rectal wall. Position of the ovaries changes as pregnancy advances; increasing weight of the uterus pulls them deeper into the abdominal cavity. After the 5th month, the weight and size of fetus and uterus cause it to sink down and rest on the abdominal floor. Experienced veterinarians can estimate stage of pregnancy (and approximately when the cow will calve)

with fair accuracy between 30 and 100 days and again after 7 months. Mid-stages of pregnancy are harder to date, after the uterus drops out of reach. Ultrasound can detect pregnancy earlier than palpation, sometimes as early as 13 days after breeding (but more commonly after 21 days). You can diagnose pregnancy earlier, and also take measurements--such as trunk measurements and crown to rump length--to estimate stage of pregnancy. Using ultrasound is generally more expensive than palpation, requiring necessary equipment and a source of electricity though some technicians utilize a generator or a battery pack. It can provide more information than palpation, such as incidence of twins and the sex of the fetus. This may be desired by some producers, especially in a purebred herd. Since ultrasound enables the operator to visualize the fetus, sex can be determined, but most easily between 55 and 90 days’ gestation. You can also check for pregnancy with a simple blood test. There have been several tests developed using hormone measurements in blood and milk, to confirm pregnancy. The most useful at this point is a blood test developed by Dr. Garth Sasser at University of Idaho. He discovered a protein produced by the placenta of ruminant animals, detectable in their blood. His blood test called BioPRYN (Pregnant Ruminant Yes/No) for cattle, sheep, goats, and other ruminants became commercially available in 2002 and today there are 50 labs in North America that process blood samples. The blood test is cheaper than ultrasound and more accurate than rectal palpation. It can be done quicker and easier, taking the sample from a vein under the tail. This is much less invasive, less traumatic, and safer for the animal and you can do more animals in shorter time, taking blood samples. Ranchers can do this themselves. Blood testing has advantages, particularly for herds that are far from a veterinary service. If the veterinarian has to drive a long ways to get there, it will cost more for the farm call. For some herds, it’s more cost-effective to just draw the blood samples yourself and send them to the lab. Samples are labeled with the cows’ names or

Photo courtesy of Lynette Haltom

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Breeding – continued from pg. 24 umbers and shipped to a lab, with results sent back by phone, fax or e-mail. For the blood test, all you need is a syringe and needle. The best determination of “due date”, however, is good breeding records. If you know when the cow was actually bred, you know how far along she is (if she did, indeed, become pregnant), and when to expect her to calve.

The best determination of “due date”, is good breeding records. This due date is just an average target date, however, since some pregnancies will be shorter and some longer. Also, the sex of the calf can make a difference; a heifer calf is often born a few days ahead of the “due date” whereas a bull calf may be born a few days later than the due date. The best way to be sure that your cow or heifer is pregnant is to have her checked for pregnancy by a veterinarian, or with a blood test. There are some clues that can give a careful observer indications that the cow or heifer is pregnant, however. An increase in belly size

during late gestation is a clue, but not always. Some cows or heifers will not look very pregnant and can fool you. Changes in the udder can also give a clue, especially in heifers. The teats will begin to enlarge about the fourth month of gestation in many individuals, and from the sixth month, on the udder begins to develop and enlarge. This swelling is progressive, and many heifers will have a large udder for at least a month before calving. They may also develop swelling along the belly just ahead of the udder. A few will fool you, however, and not make much udder development until the very end of gestation. Generally there will also be relaxation of the tissues around the vulva, starting a few weeks ahead of calving. The muscles on either side of the tail head soften and relax. Usually in the last few hours before calving, the teats fill and enlarge; even if the udder was full and large for several days or weeks, the teats generally do not become enlarged and distended until a few hours before calving. If you need help keeping track of exposure dates and heat cycles to help determine due dates, there are still 2019 TLBAA Calendars available with Next Heat and Due Dates pre-printed on it.

HIGH TICKET SELLER WILL WIN A CALF

Meet Chaparral Night Star, DOB 1/27/19. This little cutie has the pedigree to be a fine producer when her show career is over. What a great start or addition to some youth’s herd! She will be given to the TLBT member selling the most raffle tickets. Don’t give up! There’s still time to sell before the World Show! 26 | May 2019

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Marketing

By Myra Basham

“Fit” Sells Longhorns are known to be rangier than other cattle breeds, with more prominent hip bones and a leaner overall appearance than commercial cattle breeds. The difference in their body type, however, does not excuse under conditioned animals being presented for sale or in the futurity ring. While the definition of fit can vary greatly, for the purpose of marketing it would be a Longhorn with a smooth overall body appearance. Not necessarily heavy, but not looking “sunk in” around their hips with a prominent backbone. They should have a neat Photo courtesy of Sandy Stotts coat, whether it is longer for winter or short for summer. Patchy, shaggy hair can indicate issues with worms, nutriWhile an extreme example, the cow tion or health issues. and calf at top is in healthy, fit condition While overhead is a major concern while the animal at left shows signs of when considering the bottom line, a under conditioning even though on lush little investment is necessary. Even pasture which could indicate potential grassfed programs have to occasionalhealth issues. ly add mineral or protein supplements to compensate for shortcoming in the © Kenneth Keifer | Dreamstime.com pasture and to keep cattle in proper photo of your animals in the fall right before they hair shape. If you are not focused on grass-fed only, then up. If you decide to sell in a spring sale or to advertise, add feed when needed to keep adequate weight on. It they will want you to submit photos during the winter not only makes the animals look more presentable, but months for spring sales. You can always put a “date takincreases the female’s ability to provide for a calf and en” caveat with the picture if it has changed a bit since rebreed on time. it was taken. You could even consider two photos, one Don’t take the easy-keeping idea to extremes. Many slick and one showing the animal as they are at that breeders are restricted on space which can increase moment. health issues and increase the need for a worming proWhen people are choosing to invest money is a sigtocol. Shaggy animals that look too thin even when fed, nificant purchase, it’s the little details that can influence are a good sign that worming may be in order. their decision between similar offers. Look at it from The money it costs to keep your herd on a regular your own perspective. If you looked at two cows with health protocol for worming and vaccinations, as well similar pedigrees, color and horn but one had a shaggy, as a bit of extra feed/forage when needed is a wise indull appearance with a caved in appearance around vestment. All of that care is reflected in an animal that the hips and the other one was slicked off and filled out looks good in photos and in person when potential with a healthy glow which one would you choose? buyers look your way. If you are in an area that has harsh winters, take a

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TLBAA horn Showcase

Bred & Owned select sale October 5 • Lawton, OK consignment deadline 6/14

Member Number _________________ Consignors Name _________________________________________________________ Phone ____________________________ EMAIL ____________________________________________________________ Animal NaMe ______________________________________________________________ REG No. _____________________ Consignment Fee: $350 includes one measurement, please specify

r TTT

r TH

r TWISTY

ADDITIONAL OPTIONS

r Additional Measurement $100 each rTTT rTH rTWISTY r Sponsorship Package $___________ CATALOG ADS: r FULL $400 r HALF $250 r Expanded Lot (up to 4 reference photos) $100 PAYMENT r Visa, Mastercard, Discover r CC on File r Check Attached TOTAL:__________________ Name on Card________________________________________________CID(3-digit code on back)_____________ Card Number_____________________________________________________ Exp. Date_______________

COMMISSION 7% requirements 1. Payment in full 2. Completed consignment form 3. Original TLBAA certificate or dual registration certificate 4. Completed transfer application 5. Digital photo sent to salesandevents@tlbaa.org Selection: Notifications will be sent the week of 6/17/19 confirming accepted consignments Breeding information Cow Exposed To _________________________________________ From___________ to_______________ Cow Exposed To _________________________________________ From___________ to_______________ Confirmed Bred___________ Calf At Side Information: sex_____________ Date Calved________________ OCV Vaccinated rYes

rNo

Calf Sired by _____________________________________________

COMMENTS_________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Comments will be published in sale catalog. Changes for pedigree reader must be submitted in writing to management no later than 24 hours before sale start.

WAIVER/CONSENT FORM The Horn Showcase Sale (HSS) assumes no responsibility for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. HSS is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agrees that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless HSS, sale employees and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or in any way relate to the Horn Showcase Sale. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not HSS or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment. Health Requirements: All animals 12 months of age and over are required to have a negative tuberculosis test not more that 30 DAYS prior to the sale. All female cattle 18 months of age and over must be tested negative for Brucellosis not more than 30 DAYS prior to the sale. Each health certificate should have the animal clearly identified by lot number, name, and private herd number. Please make certain that all breeding age animals are palpated by a licensed Veterinarian. Pregnancy status is a requirement of the sale and must be noted on the health certificate.

Consignor Signature______________________________________________________

Date__________________

PO BOX 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 • 817.625.6241 • salesandevents@tlbaa.org


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2019 Bull & Embryo Alley Friday October 4th • Lawton, OK

1. Each Bull/Cow receives spotlighted arena time. 2. All bulls must be TLBAA AI Certified to enter. 3. All cows must be TLBAA Registered. 4. Each owner may bring tank with semen or have semen sent to Champion Genetics. Must have 100 straws minimum available. 5. If less than 100 straws available, seller assumes responsibility for shipping costs. 6. All Living Bulls/Cows must be present at the HSC. 7. Bulls and Cows will be measured onsite. 8. No minimum straw purchases allowed. 9. Send photo to salesandevents@tlbaa.org.

Exhibitor Name: ___________________________________________ Email: _____________________________________________ Exhibitor Phone: ___________________________________________ Exhibitor TLBAA NO: ____________________________ Animal Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Animal Date of Birth: __________ Animal’s TLBAA NO: ____________ AI Certification NO: ___________________________ q Bull/Embryo Alley $250 - Includes one measurent, indicate below. Additional measurement $100 each. q Tip-To-Tip

q Total Horn

q Twisty

q Composite (Additional $200)

q 20’X10’ additional $100 (limited number available) Normal Price of Semen/Embryo _____________________ Horn Showcase Price of Semen/Embryo ______________________ Honors & Awards _______________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Notable Offspring ______________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Measurement History _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Song Clip of Choice for Entrance (25 seconds): _____________________________________________________________________ If not marked, song will be selected for you. Total Payment $______ FORM OF PAYMENT:

CASH

CHECK

CREDIT CARD

CREDIT CARD ON FILE

Credit Card # ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME ON CARD _______________________________ VISA MASTERCARD DISCOVER

Exp. Date ______ CID # ______

ENTRY DEADLINE: AUGUST 16, 5PM WITH PAYMENT IN FULL CONTACT MATT BACA • mattbaca32@gmail.com • (719) 406-2513 TLBAA • PO Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 • salesandevents@tlbaa.org • (817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 Fax

Terms: Champion Genetics will be onsite for semen transfers, shipping and handling at buyers expense. Awards will be presented at the event. Winners not in attendance will be responsible for actual award shipping cost.


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2019 Horn Showcase RULES AND INFORMATION GET OF SIRE AND PRODUCE OF DAM SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Thursday, October 3

Saturday, October 5

Cattle Check In 9:00 am - 9:00 p.m.

Futurity 8:00 am - 2:00 pm Breakfast 8:00 am Seminar 10:30 am Cocktails/Banquet, Fairgrounds Annex 5:00 pm Bred & Owned Sale 7:00 pm

Friday, October 4 Measuring Classes 7:00 am Breakfast 8:00 am Seminar 10:30 am Seminar 1 pm Bull Alley Reception 6:00 pm Bull Alley 6:30 pm

Sunday, October 4 All Cattle Must Be Removed By 2:00 pm

*NEW* EXHIBITOR’S CHOICE

• Awarded to the owner who has the most animals entered and officially measured for the Horn Showcase. • There will be one point awarded for each animal entered in a measuring class. • Animals can be measured in Lawton or at satellite locations. • Animals must be listed with the same ownership name. Ownerships listed in a single name or two names associated with a ranch name will be considered as the same ownership. • Partnerships will be considered a separate ownership. • In the event of a tie, all winning owners will be declared as winners and receive award. Examples: John Smith, Ann Smith, John & Ann Smith, or Smith Longhorns will all be considered as the same ownership. (John or Ann) Smith/Brown Partnership will be considered a separate ownership.

• Get of Sire and Produce of Dam will each offer a Junior Division and a Senior Division. • Each Division is based on the age of the offspring of the animal entered. The Junior Division consists of offspring between the ages of two and five years of age. The Senior Division consists of offspring six years and older. • Sires must have three offspring in any (Jr. or Sr.) Division to compete in that Division. All offspring must be measured in TTT, TH & Composite. • Dams must have two offspring in any (Jr. or Sr.) Division to compete in that Division. All offspring must be measured in TTT, TH & Composite. • Both living and deceased bulls and cows can be entered since entries are based on measurements of offspring. • Scoring for each animal will be computed by adding the values of TTT, TH and Composite of all three offspring for a bull or both offspring for a cow. The bull or cow with the highest value of the total added measurements amongst offspring will be the winner. • Animals do not need to be present to compete in this class – can be measured at a satellite or in Lawton. • Only breeding animals (Bulls or Cows) can compete as offspring. • Offspring may be produced by natural breeding, artificial insemination or embryo transfer.

HORN SHOWCASE SUPERIOR AWARD

• One bull and one female will be chosen based on popular vote. • Animals must be present in Lawton to be eligible. • Ballots will be available at the TLBAA desk during the event for voting.

This innovative award showcases our most elite animals that possess the total package we all strive for. To achieve the Superior Award, animals are required to compete in the horn measurement contest, as well as be judged on conformation in the Horn Showcase Futurity. • To win the Superior Award, you must receive the smallest number in the points system. 1st is granted 1 point. 2nd granted 2 points, and so on. This will be the same for the Futurity as well as horn measurement. • In the Futurity, you must place in the top three in your class to be eligible to compete for the Superior Award, as well as placing in the top 3 in any measurement class (Tip to Tip, Total Horn, or Twist for females) or (Tip to Tip or Total Horn for bulls) to be eligible. • Example of how Superior animal is awarded: Animal with the lowest number of points wins “Superior.” If there is a tie for Superior, then both animals will be awarded.

HORN SHOWCASE FUTURITY

BULL ALLEY

ULTIMATE COW & BULL AWARD

The TLBAA HSC Futurity is set up by age divisions to allow breeders the opportunity to exhibit the total package animals that represent their breeding operation. • There is a 75% cash payout based on the class size. Payout will go to the top 20% of the class. • Animals must be entered in at least one horn measurement contest. • Animals will enter the ring based on age. Youngest to oldest. When the animal being exhibited walks into the ring, the 5 judge panel will be given the animals DOB, and a horn measurement taken from the previous day. It will be a TTT, TH, Twist for the females, and a TTT, or TH for the males in the contest. • With the 5 judge panel, the high score and the low score will be thrown out and the remaining three judges will be added together for the final score. In the event of a tie there will be a tie breaker judge selected in advance. That judge’s score will be the tie breaker in the event of a tie. • Animals must measure in at least one measurement class to participate in Futurity as well as be eligible for a Superior Award.

For More Information/Contact

• Bulls must be TLBAA A.I. certified and have an A.I. certified number to sell semen and participate in most straws sold. • Bulls that are living must be present in Lawton, OK; deceased bulls may be entered for semen sales only. (Deceased bulls may have their offspring on site to represent them) • Each owner should bring a semen tank with semen for sale or have semen sent to Champion Genetics. Must have 100 straws minimum available. If less than 100 straws available, seller must pay shipping to buyer. • No minimum straw purchases allowed. • Bulls must be entered in a measurement class. • Syndicated A.I. Sires may participate.

EMBRYO ALLEY

• Donors or their offspring must be present. • Embryos do not have to be present. • Owners can sell frozen embryos or embryo pregnancies. • Animals will be highlighted in the same manner as Bull Alley

817-625-6241 • salesandevents@tlbaa.org • www.TLBAA.org 26 | May 2019

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2019 HORN SHOWCASE MEASURING CLASSES FEMALES

BULLS

STEERS

Class 1 Females October 2018 (TTT only) Class 2 Females September 2018 (TTT only) Class 3 Females August 2018 (TTT only) Class 4 Females July 2018 (TTT only) Class 5 Females June 2018 (TTT only) Class 6 Females May 2018 (TTT only) Class 7 Females April 2018 Class 8 Females March 2018 Class 9 Females February 2018 Class 10 Females January 2018 Class 11 Females December 2017 Class 12 Females November 2017 Class 13 Females September-October 2017 Class 14 Females July-August 2017 Class 15 Females May-June 2017 Class 16 Females March-April 2017 Class 17 Females January-February 2017 Class 18 Females There is stillOctober-December time to become2016 Class 19 Females July-September 2016 a satellite measuring location. Class 20 Females April-June 2016 Please contact pam@tlbaa.org Class 21 Females January-March 2016 if you are interested. Class 22 Females September-December 2015 Class 23 Females May-August 2015 Class 24 Females January-April 2015 Class 25 Females July-December 2014 Class 26 Females January-June 2014 Class 27 Females 2013 Class 28 Females 2012-2011 Class 29 Females 2010-2008 Class 30 Females 2007-2004 Class 31 Females 2003 and older

Class 32 Bulls October 2018 (TTT only) Class 33 Bulls September 2018 (TTT only) Class 34 Bulls August 2018 (TTT only) Class 35 Bulls July 2018 (TTT only) Class 36 Bulls June 2018 (TTT only) Class 37 Bulls May 2018 (TTT only) Class 38 Bulls April 2018 Class 39 Bulls March 2018 Class 40 Bulls February 2018 Class 41 Bulls January 2018 Class 42 Bulls December 2017 Class 43 Bulls November 2017 Class 44 Bulls September-October 2017 Class 45 Bulls July-August 2017 Class 46 Bulls May-June 2017 Class 47 Bulls March-April 2017 Class 48 Bulls January-February 2017 Class 49 Bulls October-December 2016 Class 50 Bulls July-September 2016 Class 51 Bulls April-June 2016 Class 52 Bulls January-March 2016 Class 53 Bulls July-December 2015 Class 54 Bulls January-June 2015 Class 55 Bulls 2014 Class 56 Bulls 2013-2012 Class 57 Bulls 2011-2009 Class 58 Bulls 2008 and older

Class 62 Steers Oct. 2017-Jan. 2015 Class 63 Steers 2014-2012 Class 64 Steers 2011 and older

TWISTY Class 59 Females Twisty Horn Oct. 2017-Jan. 2015 Class 60 Females Twisty Horn 2014-2012 Class 61 Females Twisty Horn 2011 and older

FUTURITY CLASSES FEMALES Class 1 September - October 2018 Class 2 July - August 2018 Class 3 May - June 2018  Class 4 March - April 2018 Class 5 January - February 2018  Class 6 September - December 2017 Class 7 May - August 2017 Class 8 January - April 2017 Class 9 Born 2016 - 2015 Class 10 Born 2014 & Before

BULLS Class 1 September - October 2018 Class 2 July - August 2018 Class 3 May - June 2018  Class 4 March - April 2018 Class 5 January - February 2018  Class 6 September - December 2017 Class 7 May - August 2017 Class 8 January - April 2017

Visit tlbaa.org for Fillable Entry Forms, Due August 16 For More Information/Contact 817-625-6241 • salesandevents@tlbaa.org • www.TLBAA.org There is still time to become a satellite measuring location. Please contact pam@tlbaa.org if you are interested.

2019 Horn SHowcase Sattelite Locations Montgomery, AL: Neal Maraman/Terry King Sanger, CA: Warren Dorathy, Caballo Bravo Longhorns 9/28/19 Yoder, CO: Russell Freeman Greenleaf, KS: Joe Sedlacek, Lazy J Longhorns 9/29/19, 1:00 pm Longhorn chili and drinks Pittsburg, KS: Todd McKnight, Cedarview Ranch Saint John, KS: Patrick Gleason, Big Valley Longhorns Big Timber, MT: Dave Hodges Killdeer, ND: Chad Smith, Smith Longhorns Barnesville, OH: Darol Dickinson, Dickinson Cattle Co. 9/28/19, 2:00 pm - Customer Appreciation Day all day Overbrook, OK: Bob & Pam Loomis Rapid City, SD: Gordon Howie 9/28/19, 10:00 am - followed by lunch

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Fayetteville, TX: Richard Filip, Bentwood Ranch Lufkin, TX: Brent & Cindy Bolen, Bolen Longhorn Ranch Somerville, TX: Darlene Aldridge, Star Creek Ranch Taft, TX: Chris Clark, Circle Double C Ranch Kingsville, TX: Felix Serna, El Coyote Ranch Llano, TX: John Marshall, Blue Ridge Ranch Taylor, TX: Keith Hagler, Hagler Ranch Whitewright, TX: Rhonda Poe Rosebud, TX: Jay Mullinax, Brazos Rose Ranch 9/28/19, Lunch and ranch tours Sugar Land, TX: Todd Taylor, Taylor Cattle Company Saint George, UT: Doug Hunt Falling Waters, WV: Justin Henry, Double H Ranch

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


HSC ENTRY FORM Exhibitor Name: _____________________________________________ Exhibitor Member No. ________________________________________ Exhibitor Phone No. __________________________________________ Exhibitor E-mail Address: _____________________________________

OCTOBER 3-5, 2019

Animal TLBAA No. ___________________________________________

LAWTON, OK

Animal Name: _______________________________________________

ENTRY DEADLINE AUGUST 16, 2019 - 5PM

FUTURITY

MEASUREMENT

Animal Date of Birth: ________________________________________ Measuring Class Entered ________________ q $100 Tip-to-Tip q $100 Total Horn q $300 Composite (TTT & TH Included) Twisty Horn Class Entered ________________ q $100 Twisty Horn (Measuring along horn lines wrapping around horn) q Animal will be in Lawton, OK - 10’X10’ Stall included

q 20’X10’ Stall $100 (limited number available)

SATELLITE LOCATION __________________________________________________________________________________ q $225 Futurity - Class Entered __________________ Class winners have the option to sell with no consignment fee during the Bred & Owned Sale *Animal must be in Lawton, OK. Includes ONE measuring class. Please mark measuring class above.

GROUP CLASSES

GET OF SIRE OR PRODUCE OF DAM - Recognizing genetic production through verified measuring data of offspring. Breeding offspring only, steers not eligible. Offspring must be entered on separate entry forms for the required measuring classes. Competing sires and dams do not have to measured. q $100 Senior Division Get of Sire 6yrs+ q $100 Senior Division Produce of Dam 6yrs+

q $100 Junior Division Get of Sire 2-5yrs q $100 Junior Division Produce of Dam 2-5yrs

ELIGIBLE OFFSPRING MUST BE MEASURED 3 WAYS - TTT, TH, COMP. TWO ANIMALS FOR DAMS, THREE FOR BULLS 1. _____________________________________________________________ Animal’s TLBAA NO. _______________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________ Animal’s TLBAA NO. _______________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________ Animal’s TLBAA NO. _______________________________

TOTAL $__________________

FORM OF PAYMENT: CASH

CHECK

CREDIT CARD

CREDIT CARD ON FILE

CC# ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME ON CARD _______________________________________ VISA MASTERCARD DISCOVER EXP. _______ CID # _______

ENTRY DEADLINE AUGUST 16, 5PM WITH PAYMENT DUE IN FULL - SALESANDEVENTS@TLBAA.ORG CONTACT HSC Chairman Matt Baca P (719) 406-2513 • mattbaca32@gmail.com TLBAA • PO Box 4430 Fort Worth, TX 76164 • www.tlbaa.org • P (817) 625-6421 • F (817) 625-1388 TERMS: Awards will be presented at the event, winners not in attendance are responsible for actual award shipping cost. Photos are required for winners gallery in Trails Magazine, send to salesandevents@tlbaa.org. No refunds after entry deadline.


Longhorn Beef

By Myra Basham

The Benefits of the Beef Producer List The TLBAA Beef Producer list on www.tlbaa.org serves many purposes that are advantageous to our members who sell Longhorn beef. 1. It is a way for those seeking the product to find you. Sounds simplistic, but I have had restaurant owners tell me that when they learned about Longhorn beef they found their supplier on the Beef Producer list because a search for Longhorn beef brought them to the TLBAA website. 2. It lends credibility to your program. Having an affiliation with a larger group gives people more confidence in your business. It also assures them that your product is genuine. 3. It will drive traffic to your website. If you have invested in a website, then you want as many people to visit there as you can attract. Even if you have no online presence, you can still generate calls from interested parties. 4. It allows other breeders who may want to buy or sell Longhorns for beef production to finder those participating in the beef market. 5. Campaigns are running on Facebook to drive traffic to the Beef Producer page. Anyone interested enough to click the link is highly likely to view the Producer list to see who sells Longhorn beef near them. 6. All advertising done outside of our industry will refer people to the list.

38 | May 2019

7. When people contact the TLBAA office to find a provider of Longhorn beef we direct them to the list on the website. 8. When people investigate Longhorn beef, the more producers they see on the list the more they believe in it as a product and as a market. Joining the list is easy and in addition to exposure, the $75 Beef Producer fee also provides you with 150 free beef producer brochures to help with your marketing efforts. If you need more than 150 brochures during the membership period (one year from date of joining), you can purchase them at a discount rate of 12 cents each. For more information about the revamped program and it’s goals and requirements, see ad on page 43. If you don’t feel like you are ready to join the TLBAA Beef Producer Program and be listed on the website, as an active TLBAA member you may still purchase beef brochures for 25 cents each plus shipping. If you would like to discuss the Longhorn beef program you may contact committee co-chairs Freddy Galvan (325) 574-0800 or Charlene Semkin (520) 9073088. Visit www.tlbaa.org for forms to join or call the office at 817-625-6241 to request brochures.

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May 2019 | 39


Herd Health

Understanding Johne’s Laboratory Tests The April 2019 Trails Magazine article, “Johne’s Disease: What Longhorn Breeders Need To Know”, furnished background information leading to this exploration of testing and value-added herds. This month we look at the Johne’s tests available, their limitations and recommendations for dealing with this disease in the Texas Longhorn industry. It also introduces the idea of establishing a Johne’s free value-added herd.

large numbers of cattle quickly with results back in a few days. It is relatively inexpensive ($5.50/animal) and requires 3 cc of blood to test for the MAP antibody. The higher the test result, the more likely the cow is infected. Results are reported as sample to positive ratios (S/P ratio). The typical cut off S/P values are: less than 0.45 is negative; between 0.45 and 0.55 is suspect; greater than 0.55 is positive. There are other blood tests, but the ELISA is the predominant screening test. (2) FECAL: There are two types of fecal tests - the culture and the PCR. A THE PROBLEM culture takes several weeks and typically costs $35.00/ Most Longhorn breeders have a herd health plan sample. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) costs about that includes testing for Johne’s Disease. The breeder the same and looks for genetic material from MAP inmaintains a Johne’s free herd and screens all new purstead of the living organism. Most labs provide a PCR chases. One day he purchases a cow at a sale, but beresult in less than a week. fore he turns her out in the The sensitivity of the culherd he checks a blood test ture and PCR are generally to protect his Johne’s free comparable but the breedstatus. It comes back posier gets the answer much tive. What should he do? faster with PCR. Repeat the test and hope it’s How accurate are these negative? Take the cow to tests? Not very as it turns the sale barn? Return her to out. A good screening test the seller? Quarantine and is sensitive with a high screen her with more tests probability of detecting the later? What if she is pregdisease and specific in that nant and soon to calve? Is there is a high probability the calf infected or is it salthat those without the disvageable? Well… it depends Concerns have been raised over the possibility of TB tests poease will screen negative. on multiple factors as you tentially causing false positives for Johne’s due to the genetic The ELISA blood test will see. closeness of the two disease-causing bacteriums. has many false negative reTo complicate things, sults (the cow has the disease but it is not detected) due one requirement before a Longhorn sale is the Bovine to delayed antibody production— especially in young, TB test within 30 days of the sale. This skin test is reasymptomatic cows. Michael Collins, DVM, PhD is one garded as the definitive indicator of infection by the of the recognized Johne’s experts in the world. He bacterium that causes bovine tuberculosis in cattle studied over 400 asymptomatic cows with positive Mycobacterium bovis (MB). Unfortunately, MycobacteMAP fecal cultures and found the commercial ELISA rium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) — the Johne’s bactests were positive in only 28-45% - a low sensitivity. teria — is a close genetic relative to MB. The blood test The specificity was much higher — 97-99%. In other for MAP can cross react with the TB test giving a false words, a positive test was overwhelmingly valid when positive. It is a paradox that it is a requirement to test for it occurred. False positive ELISA tests (the cow does not MB when 99.999% of US herds were not affected from have the disease, but the test says it does) also occur. 2003-2017. Even my 65-year-old veterinarian has yet There are about 140 different species of mycobacteria to find a positive TB test despite thousands done since that are present in the environment which can cause vet school. Alternatively, 10% of U.S. beef herds and 68% skin or soft tissue infections— abscesses, ulcers, etc. of dairy herds contain at least one animal infected with These can cross react with the MAP ELISA test. Examithe MAP bacteria. Johne’s is 10,000 times more comnation for these infections will alert you to the potential mon than bovine tuberculosis in beef cattle, yet it is not of a false positive. mandated to test for it. The Johne’s fecal culture and PCR tests also have limitations with sensitivity in asymptomatic infected JOHNE’S LABORATORY TESTS cattle. However, there are virtually no false positives (1) BLOOD: The ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunolike in the blood tests. The gold standard for the indusSorbant Assay) blood test is designed for screening 40 | May 2019

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Mark Gilliland, MD

And Establishing The Value Added Herd try has been the fecal culture, but the results can take several weeks. Studies have revealed the PCR test can detect up to 95 - 100% in heavy shedding herds. For light shedders, it’s effectiveness is 40-75% depending on the study. A negative result does not necessarily indicate that the cow is not infected or not shedding. It is the intermittent shedding of the MAP bacteria in feces that creates diagnostic difficulties. CROSS REACTION BETWEEN BOVINE TB AND JOHNE’S As mentioned earlier, a common problem in the Longhorn industry is screening new cattle purchases to maintain a Johne’s free herd. There is a close biological relationship between MAP (Johne’s) and MB (bovine tuberculosis). If an animal is MB tested 30 days before a sale, a cross-reactivity between MAP antibodies and MB antigens may create a false positive. We decided to test this in our herd. We studied 12 Longhorn heifers 18-22 months of age. Each had a TB skin test on 10/22/18 and MAP ELISA blood tests drawn on 10/22/18 (day 0), 11/26/18 (day 35) and 1/17/19 (day 87) to see if the effect on S/P ratio. The results (see Table I) revealed that all heifers were negative on the day of the TB skin test. At 35 days post TB test, one sample was suspicious but none turned positive. However, the average S/P ratio had tripled. All 12 S/P ratios returned to normal at 87 days. Susan Moore, PhD at K-State Veterinary Laboratory informed me that the S/P ratios were negative values on 1/17/19 because the negative control was

high. She assured me the results were valid. There are 2 other studies in the veterinary literature. Aideen examined the impact of a single TB skin test on serum MAP ELISA tests afterwards. Prior to the TB skin test, 8% had positive MAP ELISA. 14 days after the TB test,the positive ELISA jumped to 39% and remained positive for 71 days. In another study by Varges, 60 animals from a Johne’s free herd were given a TB skin test with ELISA blood samples collected at 0, 30, 60 and 90 days. 8% turned positive. This suggests the TB test can create false positive results. This has led to the recommendation that there should be a 90 day waiting period before ELISA testing. Although there is an obvious cross reaction, it is not overwhelming (Aiden 8%-39%; Vargas 0-8%; Gilliland 0-0% but titers tripled) and future follow up is recommended. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UNBORN CALF What about the ELISA positive pregnant cow? A 2017 article from the USDA estimates that up to 25 percent of calves are infected in utero if the cow is in Stage III of the disease. Another study revealed the prevalence of in utero fetal infection in cattle as 9% of fetuses from MAP subclinically infected cows and 39% from clinically affected cows. That incidence rises when calves become infected by exposure to contaminated manure any time in the first year of life. Adaska and Whitlock estimated the overall in utero transmission rate as approximately 2–4.3% in fecal culture positive and ELISA positive cows. That means a genetically superior calf could be weaned at birth, get colostrum, be raised by another disease free cow and have a high chance of being Johne’s free. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE LONGHORN INDUSTRY There are varying opinions on Johne’s because of the cost and imperfection of the tests. There is also an element of denial. The profit margins can be modest in this industry and additional overhead needs to be justified. No Longhorn breeder makes a profit selling $1500 heifers. It is that infrequent $50,000 cow or bull sale that pays the overhead. The problem is who would pay $50,000 for an untested animal that has a 3-5% chance of having asymptomatic Johne’s? Not many. We need to try to protect all buyers, and especially new breeders, to get longterm growth in this industry. Each new breeder has to buy from multiple herds to establish his own. These purchased

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May 2019 | 41


Herd Health animals must be Johne’s free to the best of the seller’s knowledge. As registered breeders, we are not trying to reduce Johne’s in an infected commercial herd. We are trying to prevent it 100% in an elite registered Longhorn herd. There was a previous effort to establish fecal testing for Johne’s as a pre-sale requirement for consignors at the 2018 Hudson Valentine Ft. Worth fall sale. The intention was to instill buyer confidence in purchasing a great Longhorn cow verified to be Johne’s free. The presale requirement was rescinded due to the confusion with TB tests creating false positives. This is probably a good idea for all sales. If the seller got a blood ($5.50)and/ or fecal test ($35.00) before any sale, the buyer would have more confidence. This still does not guarantee a Johne’s free animal, but it is the best we have available at this time. These laboratory tests are imperfect at best. The ELISA test can miss 50% and the PCR can miss 25%. However, if both are negative multiple times and a regular monitoring program is in place, the buyer should have more confidence in his purchase. Ignoring the problem will only exacerbate it in the future and we should address it as an industry. ESTABLISHING THE VALUE ADDED HERD Every Longhorn breeder has a decision to make regarding Johne’s and herd health The following options all have an effect on the market value of your herd. (1) No testing…. If you choose not to test, that virtually guarantees your herd will be infected over time if you are buying and selling cows each year. Serious breeders will lose confidence. (2) Annual/Semi-annual herd testing —You establish a bovine medical record with multiple negative tests. Hired Hand websites have a column for the medical record — put it there and market it. An ELISA blood test with 50% accuracy performed multiple times over several years greatly enhances the probably of having an MAP free animal. You can combine it with fecal testing on selected cows

- either randomly, for those that have a lower body condition, or for those that are unexpectedly open. (3) New Purchase Quarantine/Testing —A 90 day quarantine is necessary for ELISA testing to avoid confusion with TB testing. Fecal testing could be implemented after the sale. Both have false negative results but are very specific. Pre-sale testing by the seller makes it easy for the buyer to confidently buy your animal. Be sure to have the auctioneer announce the negative Johne’s testing at the sale. It is under-appreciated and frequently unannounced at public auction. This is far easier than a buyer having to quarantine the animal for 90 days before an ELISA and/or FECAL are proven to be Johne’s negative. (4) Establish a Johne’s free herd and buy only from Johne’s free herds - According to the USDA, the lowest risk possible for maintaining a Johne’s free herd is regular blood and fecal testing within your herd and purchasing only from negative tested herds. CONCLUSIONS A Johne’s free herd has added value. Horn length means nothing if a newly purchased, untested animal is silently infecting your herd. Every Longhorn breeder should have an ongoing monitoring program testing all adult animals over 2 years of age. Annual or semi-annual screening of cattle can be carried out using blood tests combined with fecal tests to clarify the infection status. Although an individual test can miss the infection, multiple negative results over years creates a medical record of wellness and has value. Animals with any positive test results should be treated as a potential source of infection for calves and managed to prevent transmission. False positive and false negative occur with frequency, especially after TB testing. As more is learned about the issue, the Texas Longhorn industry would be wellserved by establishing industry standards .

REFERENCES (1) Source NASS Agricultural Statistics “Tuberculosis Infected Cattle detected at slaughter and number of affected herds in United States, 2003 – 2017. (2) Aideen E. Kennedy AE, Da Silva AT, Byrne N et al. The Single Intradermal Cervical Comparative Test Interferes with Johne’s Disease ELISA Diagnostics. Front Immunol. 2014; 5: 564. (3) Aideen E. Kennedy AE ,O’Mahony, J et al. Is TB Testing Associated With Increased Blood Interferon-Gamma Levels? Front Vet Sci. 2017; 4: 176. (4) Varges R, Marassi CD, Oelemann W et al Interference of intradermal tuberculin tests on the serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis in cattle. Res Vet Sci (2009) 86(3):371–2. (5) Kennedy AE, Byrne N, O’Mahony J et al Investigations and implications of associations between mycobacterial purified protein derivative hypersensitivity and MAP-antibody ELISA in Irish dairy cows. Res Vet Sci. 2017 Dec;115:13-16 (6) Animal Health & Welfare NI. Johne’s Disease Bulletin. Testing For Johne’s Disease May 2017 (7) Scott HM, Fosgate GT, Libal MC at al. Field testing of an enhanced direct-fecal polymerase chain reaction procedure, bacterial culture of feces, and a serum enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis infection in adult dairy cattle. Am J Vet Res. 2007 Mar;68(3):236-45 (8) Alinovi CA, Ward MP, Lin TL et al. Real-time PCR, compared to liquid and solid culture media and ELISA, for the detection of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis. Vet Microbiol. 2009 Apr 14;136(1-2):177-9. (9) Clark DL Jr, Koziczkowski JJ, Radcliff et al Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: comparing fecal culture versus serum enzymelinked immunosorbent assay and direct fecal polymerase chain reaction. J Dairy Sci. 2008 Jul;91(7):2620-7. (10) Whittington RJ1, Windsor PA.In utero infection of cattle with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a critical review and meta-analysis. Vet J. 2009 Jan;179(1):60-9. Epub 2007 Oct 24. (11) Adaska JM1, Whitlock RH. Low rate of detectable in utero transmission of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in a dairy herd with a low prevalence of Johne’s disease.J Vet Diagn Invest. 2012 Jan;24(1):153-5. doi: 10.1177/1040638711425947. Epub 2011 Dec 6.

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30 | April 2019

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Shows

From The World Show Steering Committee – An Explanation for Unmanageable Animals From page 43 in The TLBAA Handbook: Unmanageable Animals “All show entries are expected to be manageable. Should an animal become unmanageable, the show management shall have the right and responsibility to remove such animal from competition, and all entry and stalling fees shall be forfeited.”

Safety of exhibitors, ring stewards and Judges, as well as other animals is a top priority. Unmanageable animals seem to have become a frequent problem at shows. Unmanageable animals are those that continually break loose from their exhibitors, or do not behave in a manner that allows them to be judged properly. No ribbon, buckle, plaque or other award is worth putting fellow exhibitors or spectators at risk for injury. Calves that are not well controlled are also at risk of injuring themselves and the other calves in the show ring. Show calves can be quite spirited, especially those that have recently been halter broke. For safety reasons, it is important that exhibitors are physically able to control their calves. While an occasional loose calf is expected, what is not acceptable are calves that continually get away from their exhibitor, or those that show aggressive behavior toward other animals or exhibitors. This becomes a safety hazard not only to that particular exhibitor, but to every person in the ring, including other exhibitors, ring stewards and judges. Loose animals are also at risk for escaping the show ring and causing injury to spectators. Ring stewards are in the ring to assist and keep exhibitors safe, it is not their duty to show an animal that an exhibitor cannot control. Show management, which includes show chairs, ring stewards and judges have the authority and responsibility to dismiss unmanageable animals from the show ring. It is very difficult if not impossible for a judge to evaluate an animal that cannot be controlled.

44 | May 2019

Unmanageable animals are often placed lower in class than they otherwise might be for this reason. It is to your benefit to have a calf that is well controlled and therefor well exhibited. Working with your animals on a daily basis will help them to trust you and become more manageable. There are suggestions for halter breaking techniques in the TLBAA Handbook, beginning on page 60. We would also encourage you to read the Halter Breaking 101 article by Jimmie Gee in the March 2019 edition of the Texas Longhorn Trails. If an animal continually gets loose from its exhibitor, it may be time to consider a different more experienced exhibitor, or perhaps removing the animal from the show circuit altogether. Continually breaking away from an exhibitor can become a learned habit. The more an animal is allowed to behave in an inappropriate manner, the more difficult it becomes to train them properly. If they cannot be properly halter broke, they should not be shown. As always, let’s all play by the rules and keep the competition fair. Remember, this is what we do for fun! Download your own copy of the TLBAA Handbook by going to the TLBAA webpage (www.TLBAA.org), click on the TLBAA tab, then click on the TLBAA Official Handbook link toward the bottom right of the page. Or you can type the following URL into your browser: http://www.tlbaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/ TLBAA-Handbook-Jan-2015.pdf

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TLBAA World Show Committee

The Road To World Show

World Show Qualification

From page 43 and 72 in The TLBAA Handbook: Qualifiers Per Class: Only two (2) animals per class may qualify at a given show. The First and Second Place animals in their respective class are automatically qualifying for the World Show. If the Qualifying Show has both halter and free classes for females, two (2) animals from each class in each division may qualify. In the event, the First and/or Second Place animals have already qualified at a previous show, then the Third and/or Fourth Place animals are qualified, etc. In the TLBT section, Qualifiers per Class: Only two (2) animals per class may qualify at a given show. The First and Second Place animals in their respective class are automatically qualified for the National Show. In the event, the First and/or Second Place animals had already qualified at a previous show, then the Third and/or Fourth Place animals are qualified, etc. To be eligible to enter an animal in The World Show, that animal must have “qualified” at a World Qualifying show earlier in the show season. As described above, the 1st and 2nd place animal in each class will qualify, if they have already qualified, then the 3rd and 4th place will qualify, if 3rd and 4th have qualified, then 5th and 6th will qualify, and so on. You can check in HORNS to see if your animal has qualified, or feel free to contact the TLBAA office. If your animal has qualified, you will receive a qualifying letter with the invitation to enter your animal in The World Show, usually in April or May. From page 69 in The TLBAA Handbook: 1. Any member in good standing of the TLBT may show in TLBT shows including current year National, through High School Graduation. 2. Longhorn calves must be registered with the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America. However, they are not required to be registered in the name of the youth. A copy of said registration must accompany all entry forms for verification of age and registration — no pending registrations will be accepted. To be sure you and your animal are eligible to be shown at The National Youth Show, be sure your TLBT membership is current and you have your animal registered, remember that pending registrations are not accepted. As always, lets all play by the rules and keep the competition fair. And remember, this is what we do for fun! A copy of the TLBAA Handbook is available to everyone. On The TLBAA website, click on the TLBAA tab, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the TLBAA Official Handbook, then click on “Download the TLBAA Handbook” or type: http://www.tlbaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/TLBAA-Handbook-Jan-2015.pdf into your browser to get your free copy.

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Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

Presidents

Message

Hello TLBAA Members! I hope you are all having a spectacular spring. Isn’t the weather lovely? Green grass, bluebonnets...... just the way my cows and I like it! Coming up this week here in Texas we have the TLBGCA spring show held in Brenham. This is a wonderful show put on by some wonderful people. I have attended this show for three years and it has always found its way at the top of my show list. Nothing beats the barbecue put on that Saturday night after the youth show or the beautiful location! Other than there being the TLBGCA show, there is also going to be the Red McCombs Fiesta Sale held on May 3-4 in Johnson City, Texas. On May 10th, we will have the Millenium Futurity in Glen Rose, Texas. After that we have the NTLA Sale on May 18th and the Blue Grass Classic Sale and Futurity on May 24th. I am so excited for the TLBGCA show and I wish all of the show exhibitors the best of luck and safe travels!  It being May, it means that we only have a month and a half until the TLBAA Annual World Show. At this show, we will recognize our TLBT graduating seniors. These are youth who have put in hours and hours of their own time their last and final year of high school to raise the most beautiful breed of cattle. TLBT seniors, we will miss you so much! Thank you for being a part of this family. It has been truly a blessing to have you in our lives!

Gabby Curtis

TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT: TLBT Officer Position: Parliamentarian Age: 14 1.) Why did you join the TLBT? My parents made me. 2.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? Fort Worth Stock Show, it’s close to home. 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and pattern? Roan or black and white. 4.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? 2012 NTLBA Spring Show in Glen Rose, Junior Showmanship 5.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? When Caden was dancing in the show ring because he placed first. 5.) What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? Deciding which one for showmanship 6.) What is your favorite movie? Jurassic Park

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JACKSON GRACE 7.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns? Why? Yes, because I love animals and the people are great. 8.) What person has influenced you the most? Jimmie Lynn Quinatata, she taught me most of what I know about showing. 9.) If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be? A manticore 10.) What is your favorite season? Why? Fall, football season and state fairs. 11.) What is your favorite quote? Why? “Dear me, I believe I am becoming a god. An emperor ought to at least die on his feet.” - Titus Flavian Vespasianus 12.) What do you want to be when you grow up? I am still uncertain what my future career choice will be. 13.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? The people. 14.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? Meet as many people as you can, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


TLBT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT: TLBT Officer Position: Intermediate Director Age: 12 1.) Why did you join the TLBT? To show Longhorns & to get to know kids my age within the group. 2.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? The State fair because it is so busy with a lot of people looking at the animals. 3.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and pattern? Purple Roan because it is so rare and unique. 4.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? My first award was most likely the first time I won showmanship. 5.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? When we did the meeting at the World Show last year & did wheel barrel races. 5.) What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? Not getting distracted in the ring. 6.) What is your favorite movie? San Andreas

MADI MORELAND 7.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns? Why? Yes! I love doing this because of the community & the bonds I’ve made. 8.) What person has influenced you the most? My grandfather, Rodney Mahaffey. 9.) If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be? A unicorn 10.) What is your favorite season? Why? Spring because it’s not too hot and not too cold. 11.) What is your favorite quote? Why? “Treat people the way you want to be treated”. If you are always kind, other people should be kind back. 12.) What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a Cardiovascular Surgeon. 13.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? I get to see a lot of my close friends when we go to shows. 14.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? It’s ok to be shy. The TLBT is a welcoming group and will lend a helping hand anytime you need it.

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Sale Results

2019 TEXOMA SPRING CLASSIC LONGHORN SALE RESULTS March 30, 2019 • Overbrook, OK Auctioneer: Bruce McCarty Sale Hosts: Bob & Pam Loomis, Dale Hunt & Sherrill Caddel and Chris & Christina Clark Results Furnished by Bruce McCarty Promotions Photos by Hired Hand Software

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HIGHLIGHTS 71 Lots sold Sale Average: $4,125

HIGH SELLING COW:

100,000

$

4

3

LOT 25 - BL MONIKA TUFF Consigned by: Bob & Pam Loomis Purchased by: Chris & Christina Clark and Brent & Cindy Bolen

HIGH SELLING HEIFER:

15,000

$

5

6

LOT 10 - TRUE ENUFF BCB Consigned by: Brent & Cindy Bolen Purchased by: Bob & Pam Loomis 8

7

12

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10

13

14

11

1. Recipient of the Bob Loomis Award, Chris Clark, Circle Double C Ranch with Bob Loomis. 2. Mark Gilliland, Gilliland Ranch and Cheryl and Fred Bryant, Elah Valley Longhorns. 3. Brett Krause, Circle K Longhorns; Pam Loomis, Loomis Longhorns; Rhonda Poe, 3P Longhorns; and Mikeal Beck, Holy Cow Longhorns. 4. Brent Bolen, Bolen Longhorns and David Slakey. 5. Melissia and Monte Bierschenk, MonMel Longhorns. 6. Vance Farner and Lori McElroy, Oakhill Longhorns. 7. Great turnout for the sale. 8. Mike Beijl, MB Longhorns; Blake Fanning, 4F Longhorns and Micheal Owen. 9. Sandy and Kent Harrell, Harrell Ranch. 10. (l-r) Donnie Taylor, 4T Longhorns with Dan Tisdale, Jimmy Jones and Wes Clark. 11. Jim O’Connor, Hope Creek Longhorns; Steve Hollywood, HB Longhorns. 12. Blake and Elyse Fanning, 4F Longhorns. 13. Joe Sedlacek, Lazy J Longhorns with Ethan Loos. 14. John and Chrity Randolph, Dylan Skarpa and Miranda LaCaze, Lonesome Pines Ranch.

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NEWS On the Trail...

Australia Trails West 2019 Sale Results The dust has settled on the annual Trails West sale in Roma Queensland and it was pleasing to report that interest in Quality Registered Texas Longhorn cattle remained very strong despite the dry conditions that many parts of Australia had been experiencing. 37 head out of 49 head sold with a 75% clearance. Cattle were sold into several states including Tasmania. The top price was $5750 and averaged $1687 with stock coming from Queensland vendors D 7 Spur Texas Longhorns, Tambo, Brigalow Texas Longhorns Marmor, and Horseshoe B Longhorns Charters Towers. (Top L-R) Allie Offord, Annalise Brouwer, Chelsea Michael and Lynda Bethel from Charters Towers topped the sale Davidson, Kelly Davidson. and sold Full Blood heifer “Lonesome Miss” who was in calf to Sam (Bottom L-R) Wes Offord, Hayley Offord, Desley Chex 708 to Barb Cormack, Guluguba. Wes and Hayley Offord of Davidson, Gordon Davidson, Lynda Bethel, Brigalow Longhorns Marmor were not only selling but also bought Michael Bethel, Mark Wemyss. the second top price Full Blood heifer D 7 Spur Martina 1668 from Gordon and Desley Davidson, D 7 Spur Texas Longhorns “Cheshire” Tambo for $4500, as well as the 3rd top price HBL Deltona form Michael and Lynda Bethel for $4250. John and Megan Hoare Volume buyers John and Megan Hoare “Yennel Longhorns” Tasmania, with Gordon and Desley Davidson, from “Yennel Longhorns” Michael and Lynda Bethel and Wes and Hayley Offord. Tasmania bought up big at the sale to take home 11 head, averaging $1765 a head. John and Megan Hoare were very happy to purchase 2 heifers from Brigalow Longhorns that are confirmed bred to Sam Chex 708, a very good American bull. Most other buyers came from Queensland but Marie Klante from Girilambone, NSW, picked up four head. Tim and Judy MacFarlane from Chelsea Davidson in the ring with D7Spur steer. Mataranka, NT, purchased one steer. Gordon and Desley Davidson from D 7 Spur Texas Longhorns donated Lot 37, a trophy steer to the QCWA public crisis fund to assist fellow producers and businesses in North West Queensland for $1500. The response that the Trails West team received from the Australian Texas Longhorn community and our Longhorns friends in America and Canada has been amazing. Their support in turning up on sale day, the phone calls and messages of support was overwhelming and proved that the market for quality registered Texas Longhorns is alive and well. Barb Cormack, Michael and Lynda Bethel with “HBL The Trails West team would like to thank everyone that came out Lonesome Miss”. on sale day and purchased stock, online purchasers, all the bidders and underbidders. Special thanks to our volume buyers John and Megan Hoare “Yennel Longhorns” Tasmania, Barb Cormack, Guluguba Queensland who purchased the top priced heifer. Thanks also to Elite Livestock Auctions and finally the professional and helpful team at Landmark Roma. We look forward to doing it all again at Roma in 2020. News on The Trail welcomes your submissions of any Longhorn-related news. It can include media coverage, ranch tours, presentations or achievements… anything involving Longhorns and our members.

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Annalise Brouwer in the ring with Brigalow Longhorn Heifers.

May 2019 | 49


Registration Matters

Rick’s Registration Ramblings With more and more new, first time Longhorn owners becoming “instant” members in TLBAA through our 3 Month Free Promotional Membership Program and not experienced with our association rules and regulations, staff felt it time to re-list many of our basic rules of membership, registrations and transfers.

3 MONTH FREE PROMOTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS Given to first time Longhorn buyers that have never been a TLBAA member before. Cannot be given to “Junior” or TLBT individuals. Cannot be used for “Partnerships”. Great way for you to introduce our wonderful breed and the association to young, first time buyers by continuing to mentor them, even after the sale. Promotional Members receive full benefits for free, for 3 months, Trails Magazine, HORNS Registration System, eTrails and more! It is their responsibility to re-new their membership after it expires in order for TLBAA to continue to do work for them.

HOLDING BRAND AND PRIVATE HERD NUMBERS YES, all Longhorns MUST be branded with the ranch Holding Brand and Private Herd number before it can be registered. You would be surprised how many phone inquiries come into TLBAA on this one subject alone of having to brand their newly acquired animals. Most say that they were not aware that they had to brand their animals. This is something that the seller of the animal could help them with. You may choose between 3 branding methods: Fire, Freeze or Acid. TLBAA does not accept ear tags or tattoos (except for European countries who are not allowed to brand their animals)! Sample brand (left) and private herd number (right)

REGISTERING ANIMALS ITLA REGISTRATION NUMBERS NO! Our registry will not take ITLA registration numbers. The sire or dam must either be “dual” registered into our registry, given a TLBAA registration number and certificate….or “ghosted” into our system so that we can register their offspring. When we “ghost” an ITLA animal into our system we are only entering the basic information: their name, ITLA registration number, private herd number and the animals in their back pedigree (sire, dam, grand and great-grand parents, etc.)…..no other information on the animal is recorded such as type of birth, color, 50 | May 2019

date of birth, breeder or owner. In order for TLBAA to “ghost” the animal into our registry we need a copy of the front of the ITLA certificate. In order to “dual” register an ITLA registered animal we need a copy of the front AND back (showing previous ownership if any) of the certificate and you as current owner of the animal on the front. If you are not listed as current owner then we need a signed transfer application from the owner selling you the ITLA registered animal.

NAMING When naming an animal to be registered please remember that the paper form and the on-line HORNS registry system only allows or has 24 spaces in which to put the letters of the name… including spaces between names. It is requested that “symbols” not be used. Please do not try and register/name an animal with more as the system cannot be over-ridden and you will be contacted to re-name or down-size the name. COLOR DESCRIPTIONS The space for the color description is also somewhat limited on number of words. When describing the color of an animal it is always easier to start the description with the overall body color, then a general description of any patterns or colors, such as: White body with red spots and red ears. KEEP THE COLOR DESCRIPTION SHORT AND SIMPLE. WE DO NOT NEED TO KNOW HOW MANY RED SPOTS ARE ON THE LEFT LEG….ETC!

TYPE OF BIRTH When listing the type of birth, please be aware that AI (artificial insemination) and ET (embryo transfer) requires addition paper work in the form of the AI Breeding and Embryo Transfer Certificate (both on one form) to be filled out and signed by the vet or person doing the insemination or transfer and sent to the registration department before the animal can be registered. It is also important to know that sires for both AI and Embryo Transfers must be enrolled in and certified as an AI/Embryo Certified Herd Sire. If you are attempting to register an animal out of the “In-Herd” AI or Embryo process (meaning you own (in our registry) both the sire and dam at time of service) you do not need these forms. All of these forms are on our web site under the Forms button, and the AI Embryo Certificate is “fillable” and will come directly to the registration department, or you can print out a copy and send it to the office. When registering the AI or Embryo Transfer animal in HORNS, the Horns system will automatically send you a message in RED PRINT on the top of and bottom of the subject registration application that is telling you the office must have these forms before the registration can be completed. You CAN complete the registration work and “Close and Invoice” the work. It will not keep you from finalizing your registration work. We will not

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By Rick Fritsche, Registrar

To Find Forms online, Visit www.tlbaa.org and click on the forms tabs as shown below

and cannot finish your AI or Embryo work WITHOUT these forms so it is to your benefit to get us the forms as quickly as you can!

BRANDS Registrations cannot be final without the brand being indicated on the registration form. TLBAA does not “regulate” brands thus the probability of your brand looking like, or at least looking close to another breeder’s brand is likely. We do highly recommend that once you decide on your brand design that you get it recorded with your local/county/state brand authority. Some of these agencies in some states will not allow for duplication of brand designs in their areas. Once you have decided on your brand design, please make sure that an image is sent to the TLBAA Registration department so that it can be added to your membership profile and will print out on your registration certificates when you register an animal. Our registry system is capable of only recording ONE (1) brand design for each individual member profile.

TRANSFERS Transfers can be accomplished by submitting to TLBAA the original certificate of registration

(the one with the gold seal in lower right) and a filled out and signed Transfer application, to include exposure and calf at side information, if any. We print the new owner’s information on the back of the original certificate and mail it to them. If you use this manual paper method, and do not send the original certificate we have to charge $15.00 for a duplicate certificate or you have to mail us the certificate, which slows the transfer process. If you use the electronic HORNS method to transfer an animal, we print out a duplicate certificate at no charge to you, one of the perks of using HORNS!

REMEMBER, the more efficient and complete your registration and transfer submissions are, the faster and more efficient staff can get them completed and returned to you or to the person you sold the animal to. The TLBAA staff loves to assist and help you with your registrations and transfers. Contact us! MY DADDY’S WISDOM AND SOUND ADVICE TO OUR MEMBERS: “Remember Rick,” he said when I was but a wee child, “there are a lot more horse’s patooties out there than horses!”

Don’t forget! All memberships expire on June 30, 2019. Be sure to renew and update information so the September Membership Directory will be as current as possible.

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May 2019 | 51


AFFILIATE NEWS

AFFILIATE UPDATES It’s nice to see some warmer weather, and calves on the ground. Green grass always makes the world a happier place! The GPTLA has been a labor of love by Longhorn enthusiasts who are passionate about promoting the breed and helping other producers. A few dedicated people can make a very big difference! The GPTLA is an Affiliate organization for the states GORDON HOWIE of South Dakota, North Dakota and Montana, but we welcome (and encourage) PRESIDENT GKHOWIE@YAHOO.COM membership from people in other states who want to participate! Here is a note sent by our Secretary, Jodie OBryan: We are all getting ready for spring and are up and running. We are excited about our horn measurement competition at the Central States Fair in Rapid City SD on August 16. Also we are thinking about our world qualifying Open and Youth show that Sunday August 18 at the Central States Fair. We have a lot of things we are planning in the near future. We ask anyone in the 5 state area in the Midwest to get your memberships bought. It takes a village to have a successful organization and we have worked for a long time to get an affiliate in the Midwest. Let’s get motivated and become members and join in on some of the great things to happen with the longhorns. United we stand, divided we fall. We have needed a market for our longhorns in the Midwest and are planning on attending the Top Hand Invitational Longhorn Sale at the Central States Fair on August 17. For more information and consignment forms contact Scot OBryan 605 344 2263 or Gordon Howie 605 381 3998. This is going to be a huge asset to the longhorn breeders and another venue for the Midwest longhorn breeders. We are encouraging all longhorn breeders to join in to make it an elite and successful sale. My dad always said, take the best of your best to the sale and they will come back the next year to buy. Let’s support the Top Hand Invitational Longhorn Sale committee and rally for an elite sale. Some new things we are thinking about is getting a marketing brochure together for longhorn beef. This will take some doing but we are a motivated bunch and are excited about other venues for our longhorns. Success once again will be if we can rally members and keep this affiliate going…Lets do this. Annual membership fees $ 25.00 for Active $ 5.00 for Jr. $ 15.00 for Associate Lifetime membership $250.00 Please send a check for your membership, along with your name, address, phone and email address to Great Plains Texas Longhorn Association, 15372 Antelope Creek Rd, Rapid City, SD, 57703 We continue to meet NEW people in the Upper Midwest who are excited about Texas Longhorn cattle. Many of them have not been very active in the industry because of the long distance from the Southern “Longhorn Belt”. It’s just been hard for them to be involved. That is changing. The GPTLA is dedicated to developing a market in the Upper Midwest. We believe that will bring new producers into the business and open new opportunities for Longhorn enthusiasts everywhere. You are invited to join us in this effort!

GREAT PLAINS TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

NEBRASKA TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION PAUL SCHLECHT PRESIDENT 402-719-7317

The NTLA Spring Sale is the 38th consecutive sale and will be held on Saturday May 18, 2019 at 10 a.m. in Beatrice, Nebraska, just 25 miles north of the Kansas border on Hwy 77.   If you are unable to attend the sale please consider bidding online on the hiredhandlive.com website. Haulers will be available for your transportation needs.  You will find the catalog on nebraskatla.com and consignments on hiredhandlive.com. Catalogs mailed out per your request. This will be the 2nd year to allow Futurity Heifers in this sale. Following will be a noncatalog sale.Sale contacts: President-Paul Schlecht (402)719-7317, Vice-President-Justin Georges

(402)580-0209. The Nebraska State Fair World Qualifying Show will be held the weekend of August 23-25. The NTLA offers incentives to anyone exhibiting a steer at the Trophy Steer show. Please consider bringing your trophy steer this year.    Contact Delwin Smeal (402)568-2407.We hope to see you at the Nebraska State Fair this year. If you are able to exhibit at any of these World Qualifying Shows in 2019 you can partake in the “From the Mountains to the Plains Show Circuit”.  World Qualifying shows part of this circuit are in Douglas, WY, Grand Island, NE, Pueblo, CO and Albuquerque, NM. Exhibitors at these shows are eligible to earn points which could earn you dollars back into your checkbook at the end of the 2019 show season.  Contact Justin Georges for more information - (402)580-0209. Hope to see you at the upcoming shows and sales. 52 | May 2019

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The Southeastern Texas Longhorn Association would like to invite everyone who has not already made plans for Memorial Day weekend to join us at the Southeastern Winchester Futurity in Lexington , Kentucky. The Futurity will be held on Friday, May 24 and it will start at 9:00 A.M. It will be held in conjunction with the Hudson-Valentine Bluegrass Sale that NEAL MARAMAN will begin Friday PRESIDENT with the heifer NSMARAMAN@GMAIL.COM sale and continue Saturday, May 25th with the Hudson-Valentine Bluegrass Sale. Many of the Southeastern Texas Longhorn Association members will be helping out that weekend and we would be delighted to get to visit with everyone who can make plans to attend! In addition to the news about the Futurity and Sale, the Dr. Austin Patton and his wife, Dr. Betty Patton with two of their Registered Texas Longhorn heifers. Southeastern Texas Longhorn Association has some exciting announcements to make about a few of it’s members! First, we would like to congratulate one of our newest board members, Dr. Austin Patten, and his wife, Dr. Betty Patten, on their recent marriage! Dr. Austin Patton and his wife, Dr. Betty Patton on their wedding day! The beautiful couple got married earlier this year and are excited to be new breeders in the Registered Texas Longhorn industry. Austin is an Associate Veterinarian at East University Veterinary Hospital and Betty is the Director of the EAGLES Program (an inclusive higher education program for students with intellectual disabilities) at Auburn University! They reside in Auburn, Alabama. We are also super excited to announce that one of our long-time members, Nancy Dunn, recently became a grandmother! Nancy’s son, Neal and Stann Maraman’s handsome Coleman, and his wife Ashley, welcomed their beautiful daughter, Parker grandson, Bodhi James Robinson, Jane Dunn, into their family on October 6, 2018. Coleman and Ashley with his first Texas Longhorn! decided that Nancy’s “grandmother name” would be “Moo-Nanny” so make sure that the next time you see Nancy to greet her with her appropriate new name!! And finally, Nancy is not the only member of our affiliate to become new grandparents! Neal Nancy Dunn’s beautiful granddaughter, Parker Jane Dunn! Maraman, our affiliate President, and his wife, Stann, recently became grandparents as well! They welcomed their handsome grandson, Bodhi James Robinson, into their family on March 13, 2019 and as you can see in the picture, Bohdi already owns his first Longhorn!!

SOUTHEASTERN TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

CANADIAN TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION DEB LESYK PRESIDENT 306-867-9427

Planning continues for our Annual Spring Select Sale June 1st at Saskatoon Livestock Sales. Catalogues should be arriving shortly and the sale can be found on the CTLA website. Starting discussion about the Canadian Western Agribition show in November and should have information about that show coming out in the next newsletter.  We also hope to work with the Wyoming Longhorn Association’s President Kris Johnson to get some interest created for the NILE in Billings, Montana during October that would entice Canadian members to show cattle stateside. Hope calving season has gone well for everyone.

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May 2019 | 53


In Memoriam

Rodney F. Lind

April 15, 1948 - March 8, 2019 Memorial Services for Rodney F. Lind were held on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 10:30 a.m. at Westmark Evangelical Free Church in rural Loomis, Nebraska with Pastor Mike Hellum officiating. A private family inurnment will be held at a later date. Rodney Floyd “Rod” Lind, 70 years of age, of rural Elm Creek, Nebraska, passed away on Friday, March 8, 2019, at his home.  Rodney was born April 15, 1948 at Kearney, Nebraska, the oldest of three children born to Floyd Clifford and Farris C. (Anderson) Lind.  Rodney received his education from Loomis Public Schools, graduating from Loomis High School with the class of 1966. Following graduation, he pursued higher education for one year at Kansas State University, taking preveterinarian courses. On January 28, 1968, he was united in marriage to Janice Kay Regelin at the Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church in Holdrege and to this union, two daughters were born; Meachelle and Lori. The family made their home north of Loomis, where Rod engaged in his lifelong passion of ranching. This marriage later ended in divorce. On January 1, 2013, he was united in marriage to Ellen Shafer at the Westmark Evangelical Free Church. The couple lived on a ranch, north of Holdrege, where he raised Texas Longhorn cattle.

Rod was a member of the Westmark Evangelical Free Church. He enjoyed spending time with his family, singing karaoke, coyote hunting, attending rodeos and attending his grandkids and great-grandkids sporting and school activities. He will be remembered for his generosity and his kindness and care for others before himself.   Rod was preceded in death by his parents. He leaves to celebrate his life; his wife, Ellen Lind of rural Elm Creek; two daughters: Meachelle Nichols and her husband, Keith of Elm Creek; and Lori Stolp and her fiancé, Richard Powell of Horseshoe Bay, Texas; three step-sons:  David Lilienthal and his wife, Melissa of Kearney, Nebraska; Dan Lilienthal of Ord, Nebraska; and Joel Lilienthal of Kearney; 12 grandchildren:  Riley, Jacob, Layne, Austin, Adrian, Kindra, Anna, Adam, Ali, Rowe, Grant and Ethan; two great-grandkids: Emersyn and Huxley; two sisters: Marilyn Rickley and her husband, Brian of Omaha, Nebraska; and Judy Borden and her husband, Brian of rural Holdrege, Nebraska; additional survivor, son-in-law, Dave Stolp; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A memorial has been established in Rod’s honor, and kindly suggested to the family for later designation. Expressions of caring and kindness can be sent to the family at www.nelsonbauerfh.com The Nelson-Bauer Funeral Home in Holdrege was in charge of the arrangements.

GET FOUND WITH OUR ONLINE BREEDER DIRECTORY YOUR RANCH

ONLINE BREEDER DIRECTORY Get found by creating an online listing for your ranch on the TLBAA website. Listings include a customizeable web page with your program highlights, videos, images, links, and maps. THE COST The member cost is $240 which includes design and proof changes. Save $50 when purchasing with a Breeders Guide ad. 54 | May 2019

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For listing samples or more information contact Myra Basham. myra@tlbaa.org 817-625-6241 tlbaa.org


In The Pen

We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office. 1. Victor Fuchs - Rio Vista, TX • 2. (l-r) Paulo Jr., Paulo Dedemo & Juca Piai - Marília, São Paulo, Brazil 3. Ron & Reida Baca - Aztec, NM • 4. Doug & Susan Bineham - San Antonio, TX 5. (l-r) Dick Lowe, Jan Epp - Horton, MI & Jim Lehrbass - Scottville, MI.

1

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3 The next time you visit Fort Worth, Texas, be sure to check out the historic Fort Worth Stockyards District. While you’re here, stop by 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210. The TLBAA staff always enjoys seeing members!

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DID YOU KNOW? • Cows can see almost 360 degrees. This near-panoramic view lets them watch for predators from all angles. However, they don’t see well straight in front of them so they will typically turn their head to look at you. • Cows have an acute sense of smell and can detect odors up to six miles away. • A cow has 32 teeth, and will chew about 40-50 times a minute. • Cows spend about 10 hours a day lying down. • The main stomach of a cow, the rumen, holds up to 50 gallons of food that has been partially digested. To put that in perspective, a bathtub can usually hold 30-50 gallons of water. • Cows have 4 digestive compartments in one stomach • Cows are very social and don’t like to be alone. Photo Courtesy of Brett Krause

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May 2019 | 55


Show Results TROPHY STEER DIVISION

SAN ANTONIO STOCK SHOW February 8, 2019 FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. SR CLOUT’S EMILY 860, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. SR PROFICIENT’S GRACE874, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 3: 1. SR CLOUT’S BRIELLE 841, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. RHL ALABASTER, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 4: 1. RHL CROWN’S CORREDORA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX 2. SR 007’S MISTY 899, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 5: 1. SR CLOUT’S ISLA 800, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Free Female Junior Champion: RHL CROWN’S CORREDORA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: SR CLOUT’S ISLA 800, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 8: 1. SR CLOUT’S ELLIE 796, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. SR 007’S GYPSY’SROSE7110, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 9: 1. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. CG’S DREAMSICLE, Trisha Pittman, CORPUS CHRISTI, TX CLASS 10: 1. SR CLOUT’S ADELE 725, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. DIAMOND Q CLORINDA, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 11: 1. JCG CHARLIE 1042, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX 2. RHL STELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Senior Champion: JCG CHARLIE 1042, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: SR CLOUT’S ELLIE 796, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX Free Female Grand Champion: RHL CROWN’S CORREDORA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: SR CLOUT’S ISLA 800, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 16: 1. SDR SPICEY, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. RO GOSSIP GIRL, Jeremy and Tina Johnson, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 17: 1. RHL BELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX 2. ECR BRIGHT CRUSH, Trisha Pittman, CORPUS CHRISTI, TX CLASS 19: 1. ECR EMPRESSARIA, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: ECR EMPRESSARIA, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Free Mature Female Champion: SDR SPICEY, Struthoff Ranch, SAN ANTONIO, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. RHL CROWN’S TIARA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 3: 1. JCG RAIN, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. DISCOVERY JADA C P, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 4: 1. BUCKY’S DOLL, Nicholas Buck, SPRING, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR INDIAN SKYE, Kennedy Box, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BRR DIXIE DELIGHT, Allison Schroeder, SPRING, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: JCG RAIN, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 8: 1. BZB SKIPPER’S MOONRAKER, Tristan Decker, AUSTIN, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR DREAM GIRL, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 9: 1. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. SKH CONCEALED SWEETNESS, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. KETTLE’S AH-CHEWA-WA, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX 2. RINGMAN’S ELLIE 752, Haylee Childress, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX 2. JCG CHARLIE 1042, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: JCG CHARLIE 1042, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: JCG CHARLIE 1042, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 17: 1. DOMINION C P, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. BZB LIL’ BILL, Johnny Angelo Greco, BOERNE, TX CLASS 18: 1. RAFTER M ROLLIN’ COAL, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. BZB THUNDER STRUCK, Marceala Gonzales, ROCKSPRINGS, TX CLASS 19: 1. D H COCHEISE, Colby McSpedden, AUBREY, TX 2. T-REX OBIWAN, Emily Daily, KEMP, TX CLASS 20: 1. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. SO MAGNUM’S HUNTSMAN, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: RAFTER M ROLLIN’ COAL, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BRR GIRVIN TRIGGER, Alexandria Staples, SPRING, TX CLASS 27: 1. TL SCATTERED BULLETS, Weston Riley Parks, HICO, TX 2. TEX OL WINOUT, Cassidy Daily, KEMP, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TL SCATTERED BULLETS, Weston Riley Parks, HICO, TX CLASS 30: 1. TEXICAN ECR, Harrison Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX 2. SPL D-MAN’S RAMBO, Hannah Smith, LIBERTY HILL, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. CROCKETT 2NR, Quinten Cherry, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 32: 1. TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. FIREBALL BCB, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 33: 1. CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Haylee Childress, HOUSTON, TX 2. JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

CLASS 1: 1. BZB ZIPPITY DO DA, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. TEXICAN ECR, Harrison Kimble, KINGSBURY, TX CLASS 2: 1. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. TEXAS TEQUILA ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Steer Junior Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: TEXAS TEQUILA ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX CLASS 5: 1. MARSHAL DILLON ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX 2. BUCKLEHEAD BCB, Marceala Gonzales, ROCKSPRINGS, TX CLASS 6: 1. DIABLO ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX 2. DEL MONTE ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Steer Senior Champion: MARSHAL DILLON ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Steer Senior Champion Reserve: DIABLO ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Steer Grand Champion: MARSHAL DILLON ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: DIABLO ECR, El Coyote Ranch, KINGSVILLE, TX

Haltered Female Grand Champion

Haltered Female Reserve Grand Champion

HOUSTON STOCK SHOW March 4, 2019 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX CLASS 2: 1. OL POLKA PLAY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. ANCHOR T ANNIE MAE, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX CLASS 3: 1. MONA LISA 11/18, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX 2. JCG RAIN, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 4: 1. HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. OLD FAITHFUL, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR DADDY’S ANGEL, John & Lauri Chase, FORT WORTH, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR CHIFFON, John & Lauri Chase, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 10: 1. STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 11: 1. 5SL MALIBU, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX 2. IVANKA 4/12, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 16: 1. TC3 DISCO DISCOVERY CP, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX 2. BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: TC3 DISCO DISCOVERY CP, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION CLASS 20: 1. TC3 OVERDISCO, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX 2. EL CHAPO TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 21: 1. DOMINION C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. SUNSET COWBOY, Kathy Lewis, CEDAR LANE, TX CLASS 22: 1. 5SL LEROY, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX 2. BZB THUNDER STRUCK, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 23: 1. STRIKIN’ R FERDINAND, Strikin’ R Longhorns, ALVORD, TX 2. DBL-K WINNIN’ HIGH, Kathy Palladini, JUNCTION, TX CLASS 24: 1. HD SAILOR, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: HD SAILOR, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 27: 1. SANDDOLLAR DUKE, John & Lauri Chase, FORT WORTH, TX 2. TC3 MONDO DISCOVERY, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX CLASS 28: 1. ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX 2. RHL ECHO’S NIGHT THUNDER, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 29: 1. WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, JUNCTION, TX 2. OL DURATOR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX

Youth Steer Senior Champion: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Haylee Childress, HOUSTON, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Haylee Childress, HOUSTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX

56 | May 2019

Haltered Bull Grand Champion

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Haltered Bull Reserve Grand Champion


Haltered Bull Senior Champion: WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, JUNCTION, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: SANDDOLLAR DUKE, John & Lauri Chase, FORT WORTH, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, JUNCTION, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: HD SAILOR, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS PRODUCE OF DAM CLASS 34: 1. WINNIN’ STREAK, Kathy Palladini, JUNCTION, TX GET OF SIRE CLASS 35: 1. OL OUTPLAY, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX

Youth Steer Junior Champion: CHAPARRAL TEQUILASUNRISE, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: TL INCENDIARY, Kagan Boggs, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 30: 1. SPL DIESEL, Kaylee Zimmermann, SWEENY, TX 2. RAFTER M JOHNNY BE GOOD, Rocio Marrufo, BRAZORIA, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BKS ROYAL COFFEE BEAN, Julia Salsbury, LEAGUE CITY, TX CLASS 32: 1. BZB ZIPPITY DO DA, Leandro Gonzales, ROCKSPRINGS, TX 2. TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 33: 1. TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Brandon Couvillon, HOUSTON, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Brandon Couvillon, HOUSTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: CVL JSC GEORGE ABBEY, Brandon Couvillon, HOUSTON, TX

Youth Female Grand Champion

Youth Female Reserve Grand Champion

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 2: 1. ANCHOR T ANNIE MAE, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. OL POLKA PLAY, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 3: 1. LV TENBAR, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX 2. MS BETTY SUE SH, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 4: 1. OL WILD SUGAR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. DISCOVERY MELODY C P, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: DISCOVERY MELODY C P, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 8: 1. OL TANGO TREAT, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. BZB SKIPPER’S MOONRAKER, Tristan Decker, AUSTIN, TX CLASS 9: 1. SKH EMERALD SPLASH, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX 2. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 10: 1. RINGMAN’S ELLIE 752, Quinten Cherry, HOUSTON, TX 2. TL MINNIE PEARL, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX 2. IVANKA 4/12, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: IVANKA 4/12, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

Trophy Steer Reserve Grand Champion

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX 2. HEART OF TEXAS C P, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 2: 1. RHL JUNCTION BOY, Kim Pavlas, BRYAN, TX 2. AUTUMN BEATS BCB, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX Steer Junior Champion: TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: RHL JUNCTION BOY, Kim Pavlas, BRYAN, TX CLASS 5: 1. FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Steer Senior Champion: FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Steer Grand Champion: TC3 STILLY’S PRAYER C P, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: FRED 3, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX

SULPHUR SPRINGS SPRING SHOW - POINTS ONLY March 8, 2019 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. DUTCHESS PEACE LILY, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. NOT GUNNA B GRACEFUL, Colton Wood, DECATUR, TX CLASS 2: 1. OL POLKA PLAY, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. REDSTAR ANGEL, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX CLASS 3: 1. JCG RAIN, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. RHL LILY, Adalyn Long, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 4: 1. OL WILD SUGAR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. HD VIOLET 68, Bailey Mann, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. HAYWIRE SUGAR BOOMBOOM, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion

Youth Bull Reserve Grand Champion

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 16: 1. TC3 OVERDISCO, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. EL CHAPO TENBAR, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX CLASS 17: 1. DOMINION C P, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. JK INDEPENDENCE, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 18: 1. BZB THUNDER STRUCK, Marceala Gonzales, ROCKSPRINGS, TX 2. 5SL LEROY, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 19: 1. ROMULUS 138, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. STRIKIN’ R FERDINAND, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 20: 1. HD SAILOR, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 21: 1. SANDDOLLAR DUKE, Sandy Schoeneberg, SWEENY, TX 2. TC3 MONDO DISCOVERY, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: ROMULUS 138, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: HD SAILOR, Tyler Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

Youth Female Junior Champion: OL WILD SUGAR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 8: 1. SSS BETSY’S BONNIE, Aaliyah Haslip, TERRELL, TX 2. HD TIFFANY, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX CLASS 9: 1. LW I CROSS MY HEART, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. 77 MARGARITAVILLE, Naomi Reese, WINNSBORO, TX CLASS 10: 1. DISCOVERY DANCER C P, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 11: 1. SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. DISCOVERY DIAMOND C P, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: DISCOVERY DANCER C P, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: DISCOVERY DANCER C P, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: OL WILD SUGAR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 16: 1. REDSTAR SIGMA CHI, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX CLASS 17: 1. OL HARD TOP, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. BK’S PAINTED BAD MAN FHR, Danalee Abel, DECATUR, TX CLASS 18: 1. EJS CEASARION, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX 2. BH WORK ZONE, Adalyn Long, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 19: 1. STRIKIN’ R FERDINAND, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. ROMULUS 138, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 21: 1. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: EJS CEASARION, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX

Youth Steer Grand Champion

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. SJ CAPTAIN HOOK, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 26: 1. HERCULES 10/18, Gracyn Morgan, BOWIE, TX 2. JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 27: 1. CHAPARRAL TEQUILASUNRISE, Levi Sosebee, RED OAK, TX 2. TL INCENDIARY, Kagan Boggs, WAXAHACHIE, TX

CLASS 25: 1. EJS GUNNER B DINNER, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 26: 1. JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX CLASS 27: 1. FL IRON SPIRIT, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. 41 HELM MASTER STAR, Adalyn Long, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: JCG KAMINARI, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

May 2019 | 57


Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: FL IRON SPIRIT, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX CLASS 30: 1. ML CURIOUS GEORGE, Adalyn Long, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. SSS GRACIE’S ROWDY, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. SR AJ, Lane Rickman Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 32: 1. WO DRAGLINE, Riley Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. LW LEGENDARY 296, Hennessy Rogers, PARADISE, TX CLASS 33: 1. REDSTAR CASH MONEY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: WO DRAGLINE, Riley Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: REDSTAR CASH MONEY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: WO DRAGLINE, Riley Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: REDSTAR CASH MONEY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX

SULPHUR SPRINGS SPRING SHOW March 9, 2019 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. NOT GUNNA B GRACEFUL, Ashley and Shawn Wood, DECATUR, TX CLASS 2: 1. LSC FERGALICIOUS, Ernest L., Peri L. or Kacey Clark, SANTA FE, NM 2. MS PRISCILLA KK, Kendall Johnson, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 3: 1. LV TENBAR, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX 2. TB LOLA THE SHOWGIRL, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 4: 1. DIAMOND Q STARLA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. OL WILD SUGAR, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 5: 1. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. DIAMOND Q CIANNA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Female Junior Champion: DIAMOND Q JEWEL, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q CIANNA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR DREAM GIRL, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. SSS BETSY’S BONNIE, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. ML BLUEBONNET, Magnolia Longhorns, SOUTHLAKE, TX CLASS 10: 1. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX 2. REDSTAR MONKEY LA LA, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX CLASS 11: 1. DIAMOND Q LILLY MAE, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q JEWEL, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 16: 1. DIAMOND Q ZOEY, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 17: 1. DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: DIAMOND Q DELILA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q ZOEY, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION CLASS 20: 1. EL CHAPO TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX 2. REDSTAR SIGMA CHI, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX CLASS 21: 1. DOMINION C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. OL HARD TOP, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 22: 1. EJS CEASARION, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX 2. DIAMOND Q WASHITA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 23: 1. TL SALADO, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX 2. TEXAS ROOSTER CP, Mark & Kim Hammack, CAMPBELL, TX CLASS 24: 1. TL TANMAN, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX 2. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX

Free Female Junior Champion: DIAMOND Q NORA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: OLD FAITHFUL, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 8: 1. HD TIFFANY, Frank Reilly, FLOWER MOUND, TX 2. BAR - GUN SLING N SANDY, Ingrid Wilson Huang, RAMONA, CA CLASS 9: 1. MS ANGELS ENVY SH, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX 2. G&L GYPSY WAGON, Jaelyn Young, TERRELL, TX CLASS 10: 1. CHAPARRAL UPTOWN GIRL, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX CLASS 11: 1. DISCOVERY DIAMOND C P, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR BELLA ANGELINA 19/6, Aaliyah Haslip, TERRELL, TX Free Female Senior Champion: HD TIFFANY, Frank Reilly, FLOWER MOUND, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: DISCOVERY DIAMOND C P, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX Free Female Grand Champion: HD TIFFANY, Frank Reilly, FLOWER MOUND, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: DISCOVERY DIAMOND C P, Grant Tinkis, COLLEYVILLE, TX CLASS 16: 1. CHAPARRAL SPARKLES, Curtis Abel, DECATUR, TX 2. CS STORMY, Cierra Suire, DALLAS, TX CLASS 17: 1. BRR BELLA 4/2, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 18: 1. HD FROSTY, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 19: 1. CO WINNING PLAY, Wyona & Vance Ballard, NORTH ZULCH, TX Free Mature Female Champion: CO WINNING PLAY, Wyona & Vance Ballard, NORTH ZULCH, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: BRR BELLA 4/2, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. DUTCHESS PEACE LILY, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. NOT GUNNA B GRACEFUL, Colton Wood, DECATUR, TX CLASS 2: 1. OL POLKA PLAY, Jestine Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. MS PRISCILLA KK, Charley Hoeflein, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 3: 1. TH REISLING BEACH, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. SHY’S UNBEARABLE KISSES, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX CLASS 4: 1. HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. OL WILD SUGAR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 5: 1. DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 8: 1. HD TIFFANY, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX 2. FHR ANGEL JOY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 10: 1. DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX CLASS 11: 1. SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX 2. DIAMOND Q LILLY MAE, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SANDDOLLAR SMOKE’N DAWN, Madilyn Moreland, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q JEWEL, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 16: 1. EL CHAPO TENBAR, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX 2. CTA LATITUDE ADJUSTMENT, Cody Abel, DECATUR, TX CLASS 17: 1. DOMINION C P, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. OL HARD TOP, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 18: 1. DIAMOND Q WASHITA, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. EJS CEASARION, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 19: 1. ROMULUS 138, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. TEXAS ROOSTER CP, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 20: 1. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 21: 1. CIRCLE B MAVERICK, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX 2. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: EL CHAPO TENBAR, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ROMULUS 138, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. EJS GUNNER B DINNER, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 26: 1. HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. TRUCKER CP, Ariel Smajstrla, WINNSBORO, TX CLASS 27: 1. FL IRON SPIRIT, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX 2. BUD TENBAR, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX

Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TL TANMAN, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX

Youth Steer Junior Champion: FL IRON SPIRIT, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: HX3 VELVET, Hailey Roberson, PARADISE, TX

CLASS 27: 1. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, TL Longhorns, CLEBURNE, TX 2. CIRCLE B MAVERICK, Blaine Moore, WINNSBORO, TX CLASS 28: 1. OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX 2. SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX

CLASS 30: 1. SSS GRACIE’S ROWDY, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX 2. HI 5’S HARLEY, Antonio Lopez, RED OAK, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. MOOFASA, Antonio Lopez, RED OAK, TX CLASS 32: 1. DG JUMA ZOOM, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX 2. RCC BEAR PAW, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX CLASS 33: 1. JP FULL METAL JACKET, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX

Haltered Bull Senior Champion: OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TL TANMAN, James & Amy Roesler, KRUM, TX

Youth Steer Senior Champion: JP FULL METAL JACKET, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX

PRODUCE OF DAM CLASS 34: 1. CHAPARRAL MASQUERADE, Rodney & Patti Mahaffey, DECATUR, TX 2. DISCO DAISY 45, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

GET OF SIRE CLASS 35: 1. TL BULLETPROOF, Tanner Longhorns, STEPHENVILLE, TX 2. TTT 38 SPECIAL, Moore/ Burkham Partnership, HICO, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. SAILOR’S MOON, Curtis Abel, DECATUR, TX CLASS 4: 1. DIAMOND Q NORA, Steve, Bodie & Chad Quary, PRAGUE, OK 2. OLD FAITHFUL, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 5: 1. BUTTERCUP TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX 2. PRL MAGGIE MAY, Leroy and Mary Beth Dunsworth, STEPHENVILLE, TX

58 | May 2019

Youth Steer Grand Champion: JP FULL METAL JACKET, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 1: 1. WO DRAGLINE, Tamra & Thomas Bush, COLLEYVILLE, TX 2. SHR IRON WILL, Dauntless Longhorns, SAN MARCOS, TX CLASS 2: 1. REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. QUICK DRAW MCGRAW, Kevin Murray, MESQUITE, TX Steer Junior Champion: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 5: 1. R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX 2. BROKEN W BLASTER, SR Longhorns, MANSFIELD, TX Steer Senior Champion: R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Senior Champion Reserve: BROKEN W BLASTER, SR Longhorns, MANSFIELD, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Steer Grand Champion: R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX

RODEO AUSTIN March 16, 2019 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX 2. RAFTER M QUEEN B, D.L. & Mary McCoy, HICO, TX CLASS 3: 1. JCG RAIN, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX 2. LV TENBAR, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SWEETHEART, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX 2. ANCHOR T REBA, David Vizza, BULVERDE, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. HD SUNNY D, Carpenter/Wilson Partnership, HOUSTON, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SWEETHEART, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: JCG RAIN, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 8: 1. SANDDOLLAR DREAM GIRL, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. CK TE KETTLE, Brett & Teresa Krause, THRALL, TX CLASS 9: 1. SKH EMERALD SPLASH, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX 2. JCG STORM, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 10: 1. RINGMAN’S ELLIE 752, Ronnie & Jackie Mullinax, ROSEBUD, TX 2. CK BUZZ N BEE HAPPY, Brett & Teresa Krause, THRALL, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX 2. PLR KEEPSAKE LEXUS, Randy & Catherine Morris, TUSCOLA, TX

CLASS 16: 1. OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 17: 1. RHL BELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX 2. DR CLEARLY A LIL SPARKLE, Doug & Cynthia Dear, BUDA, TX CLASS 19: 1. LADY ELVIRA CP, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. ASHTORETH, Doug & Cynthia Dear, BUDA, TX Free Mature Female Champion: OCEAN FIREFLY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: RHL BELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. NOT GUNNA B GRACEFUL, Colton Wood, DECATUR, TX CLASS 3: 1. LV TENBAR, Tessa Tronzano, RICHARDSON, TX 2. CF CHERYL’S FAVORITE, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 4: 1. HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. TL STEEL MY HEART, Cade Nolen, WAXAHACHIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. JCG ELEKTRA, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. HD SUNNY D, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: HD MILKSHAKE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX CLASS 8: 1. HD TIFFANY, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX 2. FHR ANGEL JOY, Jaylin Krimmel, BOYD, TX CLASS 9: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. SKH EMERALD SPLASH, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 10: 1. DISCOVERY COVER GIRL C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX 2. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX 2. BRR BELLA FIORENZA, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX

Haltered Female Senior Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: SKH EMERALD SPLASH, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX

Youth Female Grand Champion: HD VELOCITY’S GRACE, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX

Haltered Female Grand Champion: KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: SKH EMERALD SPLASH, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX

CLASS 16: 1. HD TRITON, Wyatt Reese Schaper, BRENHAM, TX 2. KC BULLGOTTI, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 17: 1. JK INDEPENDENCE, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. DOMINION C P, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX CLASS 18: 1. EJS CEASARION, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX 2. RAFTER M ROLLIN’ COAL, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 19: 1. HR JSC SPACE COWBOY, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX 2. T-REX OBIWAN, Emily Daily, KEMP, TX CLASS 20: 1. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. SO MAGNUM’S HUNTSMAN, Libby Butterfield, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 21: 1. TLS BWANA’S PRIDE, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX

CLASS 16: 1. PLR TEXAS GEMMA, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX 2. BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 17: 1. TH AWESOME’S FIRST LADY, Steven & Ruby Retzloff, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: PLR TEXAS GEMMA, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: BLACK CADILLAC, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 20: 1. HD TRITON, George and Cindy Dennis, COUPLAND, TX CLASS 21: 1. DOMINION C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. JK INDEPENDENCE, Jacob & Kathryn Juneau, GILMER, TX CLASS 22: 1. RAFTER M ROLLIN’ COAL, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX 2. LUCKY GEORGE, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX CLASS 23: 1. SUNRISE ONE SPOT 68, John T. & Betty Baker, LIBERTY HILL, TX 2. HR JSC SPACE COWBOY, Keith and Marcia Hagler, TAYLOR, TX CLASS 24: 1. TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX 2. SO MAGNUM’S HUNTSMAN, Rhonda Russo, HEMPSTEAD, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: SO MAGNUM’S HUNTSMAN, Rhonda Russo, HEMPSTEAD, TX CLASS 28: 1. ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX 2. OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: OL ADONIS, John Oliver, MALAKOFF, TX

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. TP FIRST STAR 918, Bob Coffee, AUSTIN, TX 2. TP STARLING, Bob Coffee, AUSTIN, TX CLASS 2: 1. RHL CROWN’S TIARA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX 2. TP OH JOY, Russell Coffee, AUSTIN, TX CLASS 3: 1. CL JUST A LITTLE SPICY, Payne/ Browder Partnership, SLIDELL, TX 2. ECR DIAMOND JUBILEE, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 4: 1. 4B BETTY ANN, Jeff & Nancy Bearden, SEABROOK, TX 2. RHL CROWN’S CORREDORA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 5: 1. BUTTERCUP TENBAR, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX Free Female Junior Champion: 4B BETTY ANN, Jeff & Nancy Bearden, SEABROOK, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: RHL CROWN’S CORREDORA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX CLASS 8: 1. DISCOVERY TRADITION C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. HD TIFFANY, Frank Reilly, FLOWER MOUND, TX CLASS 10: 1. TP FOX TROT, Bob Coffee, AUSTIN, TX CLASS 11: 1. RHL STELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX 2. RHL TEXANNA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

Youth Bull Grand Champion: TL SLOVAK, Lauren Sharer, WEATHERFORD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: JK INDEPENDENCE, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. KC DUDE, Hadley Zajicek, WAXAHACHIE, TX 2. SJ CAPTAIN HOOK, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 26: 1. CHAPARRAL THUNDER, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. COCO’S COWBOY, Sarah Heimeyer, LAKE JACKSON, TX CLASS 27: 1. TEX OL WINOUT, Cassidy Daily, KEMP, TX 2. BUD TENBAR, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: TEX OL WINOUT, Cassidy Daily, KEMP, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL THUNDER, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 30: 1. SKH ON POINT, Sarah Buentello, STAFFORD, TX 2. DOUBLE LB FERD, Sarah Danley, SEMINOLE, TX CLASS 31: 1. JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. BRR SOLDATO, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 32: 1. RCC BEAR PAW, Tanner Maddox, FERRIS, TX 2. PECOS STAR 2, Alexis Buentello, STAFFORD, TX CLASS 33: 1. JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. JP FULL METAL JACKET, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: JCG PRISIONER OF WAR, Jackson Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: JCG FERDINAND, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TEX OL WINOUT, Cassidy Daily, KEMP, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. BZB BRUISER, Twisted W Longhorns, LEANDER, TX 2. BRR SOLDATO, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 2: 1. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX Steer Junior Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 5: 1. R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Senior Champion: R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Grand Champion: R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX

Free Female Senior Champion: RHL STELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: RHL TEXANNA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Grand Champion: RHL STELLA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: RHL TEXANNA, Kenn Harding and Tammy Tiner, COLLEGE STATION, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

May 2019 | 59


ALABAMA

CALIFORNIA

INDIANA

MISSOURI

IOWA

MONTANA

KANSAS

NORTH CAROLINA

OKLAHOMA

COLORADO

LOUISIANA

FLORIDA

60 | May 2019

OKLAHOMA

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OKLAHOMA

PENNSYLVANIA

NORTH TEXAS

NORTH TEXAS

OREGON

GET FOUND WITH OUR ONLINE BREEDER DIRECTORY YOUR RANCH

ONLINE BREEDER DIRECTORY Get found by creating an online listing for your ranch on the TLBAA website. Listings include a customizeable web page with your program highlights, videos, images, links, and maps. THE COST The member cost is $240 which includes design and proof changes. Save $50 when purchasing with a Breeders Guide ad.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

For listing samples or more information contact Myra Basham. myra@tlbaa.org 817-625-6241 tlbaa.org May 2019 | 61


SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

WEST TEXAS

CANADA ALBERTA

Classifieds Auctioneers

Cattle For Sale

Trade & Barter

BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS - Est. 1995. Conformation, color, disposition, pedigree and HORNS.  Reasonable prices.  Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK.  580 765-9961 (calls only) or email cmuchmor@ poncacity.net. www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380.

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

Cattle For Sale

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

62 | May 2019

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net

Transportation

FMB Land & Cattle LLC Custom Hauling...Shows....Sales

Reach Texas Longhorn enthusiasts with a classified ad for just $25/month! TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

8ft wide Trailer for Longhorn Care Ron Bailey 254.534.1886 Rodney Brown 682.220.8501


Advertising Index —A—

—J—

AA Longhorns............................................. 60

Jack Mountain Ranch.................................62

A & S Land & Cattle.....................................61

J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................62

Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...................... 8, 9 Arch Acres.................................................... 60 Astera Meadows..........................................62 —B— Bar H Ranch..................................................29 Beadle Land & Cattle.............................8, 60 Big Valley Longhorns................................. 60 Bentwood Ranch.........................................62 BPT Longhorns..............................................8

—K— Kourtis Family Farms LLC...........................61 —L— Lightning Longhorns..................................62 Little Ace Cattle Co...................................... 9 Lodge Creek Longhorns........................... 60

Bull Creek Longhorns................................... 7

Mast Longhorns...........................................34

Butler Breeder’s Futurity..............................9

McLeod Ranch...............................................9

Butler Listings............................................ 8, 9 Butler Longhorn Museum...........................8

Moriah Farms...............................................61

Cedar View Ranch...................................... 60 Champion Genetics....................................55

— O— Oliver Longhorns.........................................62 —R— R 3 Hilltop Ranch......................................... 51

Crazy Cattle Co...........................................61

Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9

—D—

Rockin Hil Longhorns................................ 60

Dalgood Longhorns......................................8

Rockin I Longhorns.....................................62

Danley Enterprises, Inc............................... 15

Rocking P Longhorns...................................9

DCCI Equipment......................................... 51

Rocky Mountain Longhorns.................... 60

Diamond Q Longhorns............................. 60

Rolling D Ranch.......................................... 60

Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC

Running Arrow Longhorns....................... 44

DK Longhorn Ranch.................................. 60

—S—

Double A Longhorns................................. 60

Safari B Ranch............................................. 60

Doug Hunt Longhorns............................... 21

Sand Hills Ranch................................... 11, 60

—E—

Singing Coyote Ranch...............................62

El Coyote Ranch............................................ 1

SS Longhorns...............................................61

East Coast Longhorn Classic..................IBC

Star Creek Ranch.........................................62

—F—

Struthoff Ranch............................................62

FHR Longhorns............................................39

—T—

Flying D Ranch.............................................62

Thate Cattle Co.............................................8

Flying Diamond Ranch.............................. 60

Thurmond Longhorns................................ ??

Four Color Press..........................................55

TLBAA Beef Producers...............................43

—G—

TLBAA Horn Showcase............................ 30-37

G&G Longhorns................................ IFC, IBC

TLBAA Texas Gold Futurity.............................18

—H—

TLBAA World Expo...........................................19

Helm Cattle Co..................................... 34, 61

Top Hand Invitational Longhorn Sale......... 38

Hickman Longhorns...................................62

Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9

Hubbell Longorns.......................................34

Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................61

Hicks Longhorns...........................................8

TS Adcock Longhorns................................62

HV Auctions Bluegrass Longhorn Sale.........3

—V — Varner Farms, LLC...................................... 60

Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 6030 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

— N— Northbrook Cattle Company....................61

Christa Cattle Co...........................................8

Husky Branding Irons.................................45

Send us your photo with a funny caption included!

Lucas Ranch................................................ 60 — M—

—C—

HAVE A CUTE PIC?

Lone Wolf Ranch........................................ 60

Buckhorn Cattle Co.................................. 60

Caballo Bravo Longhorns......................... 60

JUST FOR GRINS

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

“And I Love You So!” Thanks to Matt & Annette Johnson of Newark, AR for the submission.

—W — Walker, Ron...................................................62 WB Longhorns.............................................61 Westfarms Inc................................................9 WI Longhorns & Leather............................61 Wichita Fence Company...........................45

UPCOMING ISSUES: June: Facilities/Pasture July: Health/Nutrition August: World Show Wrap-Up

May 2019 | 63


SAVE THE DATE MAY 2019

TEXAS LONGHORN

Coming Events

SEPTEMBER 2019

MAY 3-4 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. Alan & Teresa Sparger 210-445-8798 or dodgeram52@yahoo.com. www.redmccombslonghorns.com MAY 3-5 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Entry Deadline April 23, 2019. Stephen Head 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures.

SEPTEMBER 2-3 • Colorado State Fair, Peublo, CO. Entry deadline August 10. Monday show - Kenny Richardson 970-352-3054 or krichardson21@aol. com. Tuesday show - Lana Pearson 719-740-0741 or lana14338@gmail.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth. SEPTEMBER 6-8 • West Texas Fair & Rodeo, Abilene, TX. Catherine Morris 325829-9219 or morriscatran@taylortel.net. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth & Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers.

MAY 10-11 • Millennium Futurity, Glen Rose, TX. Entry forms available at www.millenniumfuturity.com. Christy Randolph 713-703-8458 or lpinesranch@aol.com

SEPTEMBER 7 • Struthoff Deep In The Heart Of Texas Sale, San Antonio, TX. Lynn Struthoff 219-473-7768 or Joel Lemley 325-668-3552.

MAY 18 • Nebraska Texas Longhorn Association Sale, Beatrice, NE. Contacts: Pres. Paul Schlecht 402-719-7317 / Justin Georges 402-580-0209. Consignments: brdamrow6@aol.com

SEPTEMBER 14-15 • New Mexico State Fair Longhorn Show, Expo New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. Entry dedline 8/1/19. Dustin Brewer (505) 660-3061 or dustinandcandi@gmail.com. exponm.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Trophy Steers.

MAY 24-27 • Bluegrass Classic Sale & Futurity, Lexington, Kentucky. Bruce McCarty Promotions, www.brucemccarty.com

SEPTEMBER 20-21 • Fort Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction, Fort Worth, TX. Contact Lorinda Valentine, panthercreekranch@att.net or 270-996-7046.

JUNE 2019 JUNE 1 • CTLA Spring Select Sale & Meeting, Saskatoon Livestock Sales Ltd., Saskatoon, SK. Contact CTLA Office at 403-575-0114 or office@ctlalonghorns.com. June 8 • Futurity of the West and Fey Longhorns Consignment Sale, Yamhill, OR. Futurity 9:30 a.m., Sale 3 p.m. Daniel & Angelina Fey - 503.349.7866 or daniel@ feylonghorns.com.

SEPTEMBER 27-29 • East Texas State Fair, Tyler, TX. Entry Deadline Aug. 27th. Enter online at etstatefair.com. John & Brenda Oliver 972-268-0083 or joliver210@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free & Youth, Trophy Steers. SEPTEMBER 28 • 41st B&C Fall Sale, Grand River Livestock Barn, Tina, MO. Sale auctioneers: Shawn & Bill Sayre. Contact: Shawn 660-734-8782. SEPTEMBER 28 • TLBAA Satellite Horn Measurement sponsored by GPTLA, Gordon Howie Ranch, Rapid City, SD. Lunch & GPTLA meeting to follow. Scot O’Bryan (605)344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605)381-3998.

June 21-22 • Great Northern Longhorn Classic III Sale, Montello, WI. Dan Huntington 715-853-7608. June 26-30 • TLBAA World Expo, National TLBT Youth Show & Texas Gold Futurity, Bell County Expo Center, Belton, TX. Pam Robison 817-625-6241 or pam@tlbaa.org. Haltered, Free, Youth, Trophy Steers, Miniatures, Futurity, Banquet

AUGUST 2019 AUGUST 16 • Regional Horn Measurement Competition, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605)344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605)381-3998. AUGUST 17 • Top Hand Invitationa Longhorn Sale, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605)344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605)381-3998. AUGUST 18 • 4th Annual World Qualifying Longhorn Show, Central States Fair, Rapid City, SD. Scot O’Bryan (605)344-2263 or Gordon Howie (605)381-3998. AUGUST 31 • 22nd Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale, Lockhart, TX. Kaso Kety 985-674-6492 or Michael McLeod 361-771-5355.

Affiliates: Please submit a completed show application to pam@tlbaa.org in order to have your TLBAA World Qualifying show listed.

OCTOBER 2019 OCTOBER 3-5 • TLBAA Horn Showcase, Lawton, OK. Pam Robison 817-625-6241 or pam@tlbaa.org OCTOBER 18-20 • STLA Llano Longhorn Show, Llano, TX. Entry Deadline Oct. 9. Sandi Nordhausen 512-750-1350 / sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com or Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 / bollier7572@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, & Youth. Trophy Steers, Miniatures. OCTOBER 25-27 • Ark-La-Tex Annual Fall Show, George H. Henderson Jr. Exposition Center, Lufkin ,TX. Contact Jessica Wade, 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo.com. Qualifying Haltered, Free, Youth, and Miniatures.

NOVEMBER 2019 November 1-3 • Heart of Texas Buckles & Banners Show, Circle T Resort & Arena, Hamilton, TX. Contact Carolyn Wilton at wilton@asterameadows.net or 512-8562230. Qualifying Haltered, Trophy Steers, Youth & Miniatures. NOVEMBER 9 • Texas Longhorn & Ranch Horse Fall Select Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, AB. Ron Walker, 403-548-6684, Cell 403-528-0200, walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com, www.walkerslonghorns.com.

All other events, sales, field days or other activities may email your information directly to myra@tlbaa.org.

64 | May 2019

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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

April 2018 | 27


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Profile for Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine

May 2019 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication Of The Texas Longhorn Breeders Association Of America

May 2019 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication Of The Texas Longhorn Breeders Association Of America