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Alaska

17 13 18

2 3

16

14 15 NORTH WEST

Hawaii

9

8

CENTRAL

EAST

12

6

5

7

10

SOUTH

4

11

SOUTHEAST

TLBAA Regions

DIVISION A ~ REGIONS 1-6

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

1

Canada, New Zealand, Australia

Chairman of the Board: Tom Matott • (303) 500-9465

Secretary/Parliamentarian: Chad Smith • (701) 764-6277

Executive Vice Chairman: Ken Morris • (704) 361-6035

Treasurer: Mark Hubbell • (269) 838-3083

1st Vice Chairman: Tony Mangold • (830) 237-5024

Director: Alex Dees • (805) 300-4617

2nd Vice Chairman: Stephen Head • (979) 549-5270

Director: Chris Herron • (909) 721-7577

DIVISION B ~ REGIONS 7-12

DIVISION C ~ REGIONS 13-18

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Mark Hubbell

Keith DuBose

Jim Rombeck

(269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com

(979) 277-2161 kwdubose@gmail.com

(785) 562-6665 jl.rombeck@outlook.com

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

At-Large Director

Ken Morris

John Parmley

Tom Matott

(704) 361-6035 khaoslonghorns@gmail.com

(281) 541-1201 john@jspservicesinc.com

(303) 500-9465 tom@rockymountainlonghorns.com

Region 1 - Director

Region 7 - Director

Region 13 - Director

Jeff Jespersen

Cody Himmelreich (303) 775-2034 hi5longhorns@att.net

Chad Smith

(701) 764-6277 smithlonghorns@hotmail.com

Region 2 - Director

Region 8 - Director

Region 14 - Director

Nelson Hearn

Kevin Rooker

Brian Varner

(780) 966-3320 jeffj91@hotmail.com

(484) 638-0228 nel_tam_hearn@yahoo.com

(817) 692-7843 krooker@centurylink.net

(620) 704-3493 tmck7@ckt.net

Region 3 - Director

Region 9 - Director

Region 15 Director

Tom Smith

Russell Fairchild

David Edwards

(616) 293-0977 tom@widespreadranch.com

(254) 485-3434 fairchildranch@yahoo.com

(918) 557-0364 dledwards.texaslonghorncattle@gmail.com

Region 4 - Director

Region 10 - Director

Region 16 - Director

Aaron Adkins

(704) 490-9208 doublealonghorns@gmail.com

Sandi Nordhausen

(512) 750-1350 sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com

Kenny Richardson

Region 5 - Director

Region 11 - Director

Region 17 - Director

Terry King

Stephen Head

(970) 412-2859 krichardson21@aol.com

Alex Dees

(850) 299-6875 tklonghorns@centurylink.net

(979) 549-5270 headshorns@hotmail.com

(805) 300-4617 atdees@aol.com

Region 6 - Director

Region 12 - Director

Region 18 - Director

Kathy Kittler

Tony Mangold

Chris Herron

(501) 690-0771 k.kittler@hotmail.com Charles Schreiner III* 1964-1967 Walter G. Riedel, Jr.* 1967-1969 J.G. Phillips, Jr.* 1969-1971 Walter B. Scott* 1971-1973 James Warren 1973-1975 J.W. Isaacs* 1975-1977 J.T. “Happy” Shahan* 1977-1978 John R. Ball* 1979-1980

2 | April 2018

Bill Anthony* 1981-1982 Dr. L.V. Baker 1982-1984 Dr. W.D. “Bill” Clark 1984-1986 Richard D. Carlson 1986-1988 John T. Baker 1988-1990 Riemer Calhoun, Jr. 1990-1992

(830) 237-5024 tmangold@sbcglobal.net

Glen W. Lewis 1992-1995 Tim Miller* 1995-1998 Sherman Boyles 1998-2003 Bob Moore* 2003-2005 Joel Lemley 2006-2007 Ben Gravett* 2007

Dr. Fritz Moeller 2007-2009 Maurice Ladnier 2009-2010 Robert Richey 2010 Steven Zunker 2010-2011 Brent Bolen 2011-2012 Bernard Lankford 2012-2013 Todd McKnight 2013-2016

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(909) 721-7577 chris@herronconstructioninc.com

TLBAA EDUCATIONAL/RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Matt McGuire - (405) 742-4351 semkinlonghorns@mindspring.com Mark Hubbell – (269) 838-3083 hubbelllonghorns@aol.com Dr. David Hillis – (512) 789-6659 doublehelix@att.net Felix Serna – (361) 294-5331 fserna@elcoyote.com John T. Baker – (512) 515-6730 jtb2@earthlink.net Russell Hooks – (409) 381-0616 russellh@longhornroundup.com


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January 2018 | 27


COVER STORIES

12Selling Longhorn Beef

Advice for getting started marketing your Longhorn beef from breeders who have established programs of their own.

28A Planned Calving Season May Benefit Your Program Having a planned

calving season can save you time and strengthen your bottom line. By Myra Basham

APRIL 2018 Vol. 30 • No. 1

DEPARTMENTS 6 Editor’s Note

8 Meet Our Members

38 Affiliate News

35Animals Have Excellent Memories

Insight into how cattle form memories can help in their handling. By Dr. Temple Grandin.

FEATURES

43 In The Pen

44 TLBT Letter

26 points of Longhorns sell no matter what they will be used for. By

Market What Mother Nature Provided The positive

45 Show Results

Myra Basham

Nutrition For Cows After Calving Body condition can 32 influence the ability to breed back. By Heather Smith Thomas

36 Cattle Baron’s Winchester Futurity and Sale Results

51 Herd Management

55 Index/Just For Grins

56

About the Cover: Spring has sprung, the flowers are blooming and Texas

Calendar

Longhorn calves are coloring up pastures everywhere. Photo by Jill Havens, TL3 Longhorns. The Texas Longhorn Trails (ISSN-10988432, USPS 016469) is published monthly by the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Periodical Postage Paid at Fort Worth, TX. Subscription rates: $105 per year; foreign per year $180. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Texas Longhorn Trails, 221 W. Exchange, Ste. 210, Fort Worth, TX 76164. Phone (817)  625-6241. Fax (817) 625-1388. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed and also assume responsibility for any claims arising from such advertisements made against the publisher. Publisher reserves exclusive rights to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication in the Texas Longhorn Trails magazine. Articles and photos from this publication may be reprinted only with permission of the publisher.

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EDITOR’S NOTES THE MORE THINGS CHANGE…

As I put together Trails this month I realized that we are entering our 30th year of publication. I have been a part of that journey in various capacities, from contract graphic artist to editor, for roughly 20 years. It takes me back to a high school writing assignment to respond to the prompt “the more things change the more they stay the same.” As a teenager I thought that was the most contradictory and ridiculous statement I had ever heard. I have a whole new appreciation of the concept now. The heart of the matter is, no matter how the Longhorn industry has advanced over the years the core of it’s existence is unchanging. The love of an animal that God created to be unique in a world of look-alike cattle. While other breeds have been bred by man to be as uniform as possible, the Texas Longhorn still surprises owners every time they go to the pasture to see a newborn calf. What color will it be this time? Even with some predictability in quality, one quickly learns that even when breeding the same two animals together multiple times, the results can vary greatly in color, size, horn shapes, and horn length. That’s part of the excitement of the breed. The people who fall in love with these animals are as varied as the creatures themselves. Longhorn breeders come from all walks of life to learn more about these magnificent animals and then they fall in love. No matter what the people want to achieve with Longhorn ownership, no matter what size their program is, the enthusiasm for the breed is based on their common traits of docility, mothering ability, reproductive success, hardiness, adaptability and, of course, unique appearance. This is the core that remains unchanged no matter the direction the industry moves in. Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine hopes to do the same. We move into our 30th year with expectations to create new material and present it in a new way while keeping the core ideals of educating the public and reporting industry news as we have done from the first issue. There are many things that can improve and grow over the next 30 years, but as we improve we will stay true to being a publication that draws in those who do not yet own Longhorns, and to educate those who step into ownership. We want to enable breeders to share their knowledge with each other and the world about the desirability of the Texas Longhorn breed. Want a chance to share in that fellowship? Simply turn to the calendar of events on page 56 to find shows, sales and futurities coming up. Within these events you see the whole theme repeated…events that have remained on our calendar year after year and some new ones appearing. A positive sign that we can continue the tradition while creating new opportunities within the industry. Blessings,

DEADLINE:

June 2018 Issue:

April 26th

Myra Basham Myra Basham Editor-in-Chief

Setting Up Facilities

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(817) 625-6241 • (817) 625-1388 (FAX) P.O. Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 trails@tlbaa.org • www.tlbaa.org

Editor in Chief: Myra Basham Ext. 104 • myra@tlbaa.org trailseditor@tlbaa.org Advertising: Karen Price • (254) 223-4470 karen@tlbaa.org Graphic Design & Production: Trace Neal • Ext. 103 trace@tlbaa.org Administrative Assistant: Raborn Sprabary • Ext. 100 raborn@tlbaa.org

Registrations Rick Fritsche • Ext. 101 rick@tlbaa.org Dana Coomer • Ext. 102 dana@tlbaa.org Special Events/Marketing Lindsay Maher • Ext. 106 lindsay@tlbaa.org Accounting Theresa Jorgenson • Ext. 105 theresa@tlbaa.org

Printed in the U.S.A. Member

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January 2018 | 27


Meet Our Members

Steve & Dionne Swink SDS Ranch • Shelbyville, TN 1. How did you get started in the Texas Longhorn business? We are Steve and Dionne Swink. We live about 40 miles from Nashville, TN. A few years ago we decided to move out to the country. I wanted to get a couple of Longhorns just for lawn art, as some people call it. After doing so I caught a contagious bug called longhornitis. My family has been raising beef cattle for well over 100 years in Texas. I always thought that Longhorns were gorgeous animals, but trying to talk my family into getting one you could already hear them say “You can’t make any money off a Longhorn, they’re nothing but a bag of horns and bones”. If my granddad were to hear that someone paid $380,000 for one he would have flipped out. 2. What are a few highlights of your current Texas Longhorn program?  We started out with 1 bull and 2 bred heifers. We now have 1 bull, 3 cows, and 3 heifer calves. One calf is from Broken Plow’s herd bull “Thunder Chief” which placed 1st in the Horn Showcase this past October in total horn and composite. 1 calf is from an awesome bull; another of Broken Plow’s bulls, “Guns of Texan”; our 3rd calf is from our own bull.    3. What are your future goals for your Texas Longhorn program? We are considering entering 2 calves in the “Southeastern Futurity” this spring. All of our kids are grown and several have expressed interest in raising Longhorns as well. I can see this thing turning into a family affair. 

WANT TO BE FEATURED? “Meet Our Members” is a way for newer breeders (3 years or less) to introduce themselves to the Longhorn industry. If you would like to be featured, simply email myra@tlbaa.org with the answers to the above questions. Submissions will run in order they are received as space permits. (max. space is approx. 300 - 350 words total, can be less)

Membership Matters

COMMON MISTAKES WHEN USING THE HORNS SYSTEM When entering the Registration number, prefixes must be used. B-Bull, C-Cow, A-Artificial Insemination, E-Embryo Transfer Mistaking the letter I for a 1 (one) in the animal’s registration prefix . When-ever a one is used instead of an I, the system will tell you that there is “insufficient information” to find the cow or bull. When this happens, change the 1 to an I in the prefix in the registration number of the dam or sire and hit the ”save changes and revalidate” button. This should clear out the message and allow you to complete your work. Trying to use the HORNS system to register a calf when one (or both) of the parents are ITLA registered and not registered with TLBAA. TLBAA honors ITLA registrations, but the ITLA registered animal must be “ghosted” into the TLBAA system prior to the registration of any off-spring. In order to do this, a copy of the parent’s ITLA registration certificate must be sent to the TLBAA office along with the registration application in order to register the calf. Once the parent is ghosted into the TLBAA system it will be given a registration number using it’s ITLA six digit number with a “G” in the prefix as in BG (for bulls) and CG (for females). After an animal is ghosted into the HORNS system the registration number with the G in the prefix can be used to register any other off-spring using HORNS. 8 | April 2018

Registering AI or Embryo calves without sending the completed AI Breeding and Embryo Transfer Certificate. Your work will be “flagged” with red letters telling you that before the work can be completed you must send it in to the office. Once the office has received the AI-Embryo Certificate we can complete your work. REMEMBER….in order to AI a calf the sire must be AI Herd Sire Certified with either ITLA or TLBAA. All forms can be downloaded from our web site, go to Registrations and Forms in the upper right corner of our home page. In TLBAA’s registration system, the owner of the dam at time of service is the “Breeder” that shows on the front of the certificate. When registering embryo calves, when the dam was flushed several years back, eggs frozen and dam since sold, the current owner of the dam will show as Breeder unless the office is notified that you were the owner at time of flushing. Staff must then override the system to show you as Breeder. Make sure your holding brand is loaded into your membership profile. You can do that through the HORNS system or simply send it to the office and we will scan it in for you. Please call or email the office should you have questions! 817-625-6241 or rick@tlbaa.org

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Frank Anderson Jr. and III 828 S. Rosemary Dr. • Bryan, TX 77802 (979) 846-8020 • (281) 501-2100 edie.wakefield@gmail.com Beadle Land & Cattle Ray & Bonnie Beadle Los Gatos & Hollister, CA 95032 (408) 834-0110 Ray.Beadle@gapac.com BPT Longhorns Ben & Phyllis Termin Weatherford, TX 817-374-2635 luvmylonghorns@gmail.com Christa Cattle Co. Jason & Louis Christa 2577 FM 1107 • Stockdale, TX 78160 christacattleco@msn.com www.christacattleco.com Louis (210) 863-7003 Jason (210) 232-1818 Dalgood Longhorns Malcolm & Connie Goodman 6260 Inwood Dr. • Houston, TX 77057 (713) 782-8422 dalgood@comcast.net www.dalgoodlonghorns.com Falls Creek Longhorns Stan & Sandi Tidwell Midlothian, TX 972-989-8939 Jack Mountain Ranch Hal & Betty Meyer 8000 Mount Sharp Rd. • Wimberley, TX 78676 (512) 422-4681 cell (512) 842-1116 halmeyer@hotmail.com Jane’s Land & Cattle Co. John & Jane Thate 418 W. Margaret St. • Fairmont, MN 56031 (507) 235-3467 Kaso, Lisa & Jake Kety Little Ace Cattle Co. P.O. Box 386 • Folsom, LA 70437 (985) 796-3918 ketyfolsom@aol.com LL Longhorns Neil & Cynthia Hall 1414 Thorton Rd. • Houston, TX 77018 (206) 574-8950 www.lllonghorns.com cynthia@lllonghorns.com McLeod Ranch Michael, Jackie, Mike & Makayla McLeod 355 CR 3031 • Edna, TX 77957 (361) 782-0155 Brennan & Michele Potts Rocking P Longhorns P.O. Box 579 • Emory, TX 75440 (903) 473-2430 Cell: (903) 348-5400 www.rockingplonghorns.com bpotts1@verizon.net Rio Vista Ranch Elmer & Susan Rosenberger 4818 Eck Lane • Austin, TX 78734 (512) 266-3250 • Cell: (512) 422-8336 e-mail: elmer@riovistaranch.com www.riovistaranch.com Triple R Ranch Robert & Kim Richey 21000 Dry Creek Rd. • San Angelo, TX 76901 (325) 942-1198 r3ranch@aol.com www.butlertexaslonghorns.com Westfarms Inc. Dale, Lynette, Leslie & Matt Westmoreland 13529 Hwy 450 • Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5713 • Cell: (985) 515-3172 e-mail: westfarmsinc@gmail.com


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Longhorn Beef

GETTING STARTED

SELLING TEXAS LONGHORN

BEEF

Part of the difficulty in covering the topic of starting to sell Longhorn beef is the vast differences in the ability to locate processors to take Longhorns, finding a processor with a state or USDA inspector on hand and educating the public about the benefits and great taste of the product., We have talked to several breeders who have been successful in establishing Longhorn beef

JONATHAN BENTZ HEAVEN ON EARTH Our whole goal of raising longhorns from the beginning was for the healthier beef. We knew that we wanted a product that would be better for our family and friends than what could be found readily available in the stores. The beef aspect of Longhorns is our primary focus. We utilize older cows, steers and cull animals in our meat program. We have found that this makes raising the Longhorns more profitable than selling breeding stock. First and foremost, we developed a great relationship with a USDA inspected facility so that our meat can be sold to our customers. This is harder than you might think as either they didn’t want to deal with the horns or their facility and/or packaging was not up to our standards. We drive 2 hours one way to our processing plant, but they are worth it. Then we started selling it to friends and family and eventually the word got around. Soon after we began listing it on Craigslist and other local sites. We sell mainly by quarters, halves and whole beef and 1 lb. packages of ground beef. We have recently began to dabble in processed cuts such as summer sausage, jerky and beef sticks, which have been successful. It is important that you manage your pastures well when producing a grass-fed beef product. The flavor of the meat is determined by what they eat. Also, you will want to butcher the animal at the peak times of forage growth, typically June/July and September/October for us in the Midwest. This will give your customers a superior product that will keep them coming back for more every year.

Avoid verbal commitments to a butcher animal. Get a down payment has worked for them. As you read their answers, sales and asked them how they started and what

you see that each faced different challenges to varying degrees. There are two factors common to them all: they put time and legwork into it and they give samples and educate their buyers. While there are many similarities in the following first person accounts of selling Longhorn beef, read carefully. Each person has some good insight to share and each has nuggets of information different from the others.

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Our original animals were purchased with beef qualities in mind, as well as strong maternal factors that would help raise a big healthy calf. It wasn’t until about 10 years into breeding that we felt like we had the bodies where we wanted them. I once was told by an older cattle guy that animals with shorter necks were generally easier keepers. So we selected our successive generations based upon that theory, knowing that easy keepers eat less feed to create the same amount of beef. That allowed us to have a slightly higher stocking rate and beefier, healthier looking animals. Then we decided to start adding the other value added traits such as color and horn growth while still maintaining the bodies that we wanted. The biggest thing about selling Longhorn beef is to educate your customers. Teach them the proper ways to cook lean meat and show them the literature and even give them taste tests if possible. One pitfall to avoid is the verbal commitment to a butcher animal. Get a down payment of some sort to

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lock that animal into a customer. Without it, you could end up with a whole beef at the processor and no one to sell it to if your buyer backs out at the last minute. Another is to not sell your older animals as anything other than ground beef or processed cuts. Yes, to some people it still tastes great, but new customers to Longhorn that are used to corn fed beef will typically dislike the flavor.

KEVIN BRYANT BRYANT CATTLE CO. We started in the Longhorn industry in 2010, but my family moved back to the farm in 1969 where primarily was a back grounding program with cow calf operations, When getting into the Texas Longhorn Cattle we purchased large cattle, that milked good.  I see Longhorn beef as a profitable venture, especially when dealing with culls. Take buying older bulls that have been proven, If you purchase a 1,300 pound mature bull they will dress out about 50% which gives you approximately 650 pounds hanging weight. For example, look at the case of the 2 bulls that I put into our beef program because they went sterile. 1 had 1,020 pounds hanging weight and the other was 980 pounds hanging weight. Lean beef sales for $2.50 to $8.00 per pound it does not take long to recoup your loss. Especially if you can put a couple of good offspring out of them back into your herd.  The first thing that we looked for when starting was a slaughter house that will take Longhorns. Secondly we made sure they were state or federal inspected so that the meat could be marketed under a private label. Our steers and young cows we will cut into roasts, KC Strips, and Filet, Flanks, round and grind. We also will sell halves, quarters, or whole beef by hanging weight and the purchaser pays processing to get the cuts they prefer. On older cows and bulls, everything goes to grind except the filet.  Beef is always on my mind because of the ‘what if?’ factor. Body and conformation are the most important to me, then docility, and type of horn. In the last year we also introduced DNA. We use Ingenty and have it checked for 7 to 13 different traits depending on whether we use the Gold or Silver test. This tests against commercial cattle for Maternal Traits, Heifer Pregnancy, Milk ability, Calving ease, Docility, Beef quality, Tenderness, Rib eye, Marbling, Back fat and the ability to gain. The newest thing that we are working on is doing a Longhorn profile for DNA, so that we can compare Longhorn against Longhorns and commercial cattle. Our goal is to get data for commercial breeders to use so they can utilize the Texas Longhorn cattle in areas that other breeds do not work as well without a lot of feed. This will make our cattle that do not produce as much horn valuable so we can sell by the pound instead of the inch.  We have found that you can overload your mouth pretty fast. Once  a person sees the benefits of taste, less fat in the skillet and health benefits and they tell a couple

of people, its hard to stay in front of the production. To me, using DNA data you can cull earlier in a calf’s life to be a roper, grinder, or if that animal needs to be saved, to retain back into the herd. Condition cattle that go to the packers. If the animal does not have the frame flesh to hang on the rail you will be disappointed. Keep in mind, it does not matter what the price is, the animal still has to weigh enough to pay the processing, get more than the average price at the sell barn of the black commercial cattle, to make it worth your while. A mature 800 lb. cow will not cut enough meat to make any money, on the other hand a cow that weighs 1,200 lbs. does a lot better.  DNA is the most important thing when using Longhorns to produce beef. If an animal is not capable of producing, it can show up in the DNA as a weanling. It costs less to grow a calf that has the potential to add weight. On an animal that does not have the ability to gain it could take an extra 12 to 18 months to get an animal large enough to process at a break even or better point.  In our case I tested 5 bulls. KC Just Respect, Victory Lap, White Dragon, Grand Exit, and Viper Dragon, GS Calving Ease Maternal – Grand Exit 9, KC Just Respect, Victory Lap and White Dragon were all 8, and Viper Dragon was a 6. GS Milk – Grand Exit was a 9 while the others were 6. Tenderness – KC Just Respect was 7, White Dragon and Viper Dragon was 6 while Victory Lap and Grand Exit were a 4. Rib eye area – Victory Lap 6, White Dragon 5 and Grand Exit and Viper Dragon were 4. Marbling – KC Just Respect was a 5 while the others were 3 and 4. When testing the daughters of these bulls you can track the progression of these traits. Out of 11 animals it showed that you wanted to take Victory Lap daughters and breed to White Dragon and his sons then take those offspring and breed to KC Just Respect. 

DNA testing can indicate whether or not an animal will be a producer. In September of 2017 we had our first Elite Futurity. We compared the DNA to the phenotypes and by doing ultra sound on the Rib eye area, Marbling, and back fat. It was interesting to find that out of the 38 head Cowboy Chex descendants had some of the best scores. Please keep in mind that approximately 50 percent of the cattle were represented by Cowboy Chex blood lines including, Woodrow ST, Cowboy Catchit Chex, Bubba Tuff Chex, and others. While Top Caliber, Victory Lap, KC Just Respect and White Dragon Blood lines had larger frames and rib eye areas they did not carry the higher grade that day. The more data that comes form the Elite Futurity the questions above will be easier to answer. The Elite Futurity collected more data in 2 days than any other event that I know of to date. Tip-To-Tip, Total Horn, Composite, Hip Height, Scrotal Scores, Conformation, Ultrasounds on Rib Eye area, back Fat and Marbling. Also included were DNA for 7 traits including Calving Ease Maternal, Stability, RFI, Average Daily Gain, Tenderness, and GS marbling.

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Longhorn Beef

MIKE CRAWFORD RED PEAK RANCH Just like most, we got into Longhorn cattle for the love of the breed. As we got more and more longhorns over time, we had two problems. The first was more bull calves than I knew what to do with. At first, they easily sold as ropers but that market slowed and we had to find another option. The second problem was we had some cattle in our herd that were not going to be ideal for Texas Longhorn buyers and we wanted them out of our breeding pool. After researching various options, Red Peak Ranch and Lonesome Cowboy Ranch focused on grass-fed beef. American’s taste buds and food priorities were changing. The growth of grass fed beef demand combined with the very lean nature of longhorns created an opportunity. That became the inspiration to sell grass-fed beef using my low-end cows and bull calves. We started our venture by developing a plan based on the priorities of buyers in the market. The plan focused on product line development, marketing , operations and a sales strategy. We launched the Chisholm Trail Longhorn Beef brand with promotional materials, packaging and labeling. We also had to develop our operations process that included selecting a processor who could meet our specific needs and requirements. Finally, we had to decide on our sales strategy.

Grass-fed beef demand couple with Longhorn lean beef created opportunity. We learned along the way that Longhorn beef did not add value from a customer standpoint. Consumers were starting to understand the value of grass-fed beef and we did not have the budget to educate them. The consumer wanted grass-fed beef and that is what we had to offer. We also chose to make the investment to have each individual cut of meat tested by a third party lab so we could include these nutritional facts on our labeling which further differentiated our grass-fed beef products. We learned that all processors are not alike and we changed processors to improve the quality of our cuts, customize our product offerings and increase our volume. All of these improvements along the way contributed to increased demand. We also made the decision to sell to retailers and restaurants only. Our sales volume continues to grow as we continue to expand our geographic footprint and target larger customer entities. We process more than 120 head of Longhorns annually and sell all cuts of meat where we see consumer demand. We have our grass-fed beef products custom packaged and ready to distribute to meet the Just-in-Time (JIT) demand and order activity 14 | April 2018

of our customers. As a result of this demand we manage the Longhorns dedicated to our Chisholm Trail Grassfed Beef program separately from our other Longhorn cattle. Marketing our brand, developing an efficient operations process and an adherence to ensuring quality grass-fed beef products have been the keys to our success.

JAMES GENTZ GENTZ CATTLE CO. My daddy, James A. (Jimmy) Gentz, started buying Longhorns in 1979. He basically bought average cows, nothing with big horns. He went to a lot of the sales and he didn’t by the high end animals. We sold very few registered Texas Longhorns. Back then we sold mostly to the roping industry. A friend of mine who is a Longhorn owner and in the beef business, Pete Hood, told me to start selling beef. So, in 2005 that’s what we did and right now I have about 200 head of Longhorn cattle that produce our beef animals. Beef sales are meant to be a profitable venture. What I call selling culls today means selling the ones that take too long to grow out, because I’m in the meat business. I still do ropers and sometimes trade back the used ropers of mine who have gotten too large to rope for smaller ones, so it won’t take as long to get them ready to process. To get started, first find a state or USDA processor. I go to a state processor. The difference is with state inspection you can only sell within your state and with USDA you can sell in any state. I have to go 120 miles to the nearest state inspected facility. I’ve been to three different facilities. The closest one was about 90 miles, the other was 130 and the one I use currently is 120 miles from our ranch. The biggest thing is finding the facility with an inspector on hand if you are going to sell individual cuts. If you are only selling halves, sides or wholes by hanging weight that’s a whole different thing. Right now, Farmers markets are a real big thing. I go to one weekly every Saturday from February until the third week in December and the other one is once a month all year long. I do well at the markets. I get return customers who won’t eat anything else except this Longhorn meat. There is a lady that started selling grass fed beef there and she took some of my customers because a few wanted 100% grass fed every time. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the grass-fed beef. It’s different. It has a yellow fat as opposed to fat with a white color. I’ve had my meat tested for fat content, calories, and all of that. I even did the Omega 3 and Omega 6 to see what the difference was between the Longhorns that were fed and the cattle that were grass fed and it looked like it fell close to the grass fed. I used Quantum labs outside of San Antonio, TX. I just wanted to know what I was selling. I’ve had my

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continued on pg. 16


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Longhorn Beef continued from pg. 14

Longhorn ground meat test out at 6%, 7% and one at 11% fat so I tell people my product is at least 90/10. Some are going to be little fatter than others. To start selling I did advertising, word of mouth, and I gave away some of the beef to fundraisers for different organizations to get the beef out there. I did the local paper, I ran a small ad on the local radio station, made a website and used Facebook. I don’t do a lot of “I have a bunch of Longhorn beef come and get it” on Facebook. I’ll just mention that I’m going to be at a farmer’s market.

Plan ahead for how much freezer space you’re going to need. It doesn’t all sell at once. I sell all the cuts. I do not sell on the hoof. When I sell a half or a whole calf the processing is included in the price. I sell every cut– ground meat, stew meat, cutlets, T-Bones, ribeyes, sirloins, roasts, briskets, fajita, soup bones with meat around it, liver, short ribs, tongue, ribs, tenderloins, oxtail, marrow bones and heart. I sell all of it. It is harder to sell the liver and heart in my area, but I can sell everything else. The marrow bones are a big hit right now. A lot of folks are dieting and want to make their own broth with the bones. I have also made a beef sausage. It’s 100% beef smoked sausage with no pork added. It’s not seasoned very hot. It’s a little bit drier than with the fatter pork, but I didn’t want anything in it except 100% Longhorn beef. I buy beefy animals. I’m not really interested in the horn part of it, I want something that’s going to grow out. I want a bull that’s going to bring some beef to my herd. Be honest when selling your product. Don’t tell people it’s grass-fed if you are finishing it on feed. Grass-fed is in demand right now and I’ll have people come up to me and say, “Is this grass fed?” And I’ll tell them no, it’s not 100%. You know, if it’s got any feed in it, it’s not 100% grass fed.   Explain to them that it’s lean and the steaks are going to cook different. At first I cut my steaks 3/4” thick. That was too thin. Went to 1” thick and now everything I cut is 1 1/4” thick. With the meat I raise the 3/4” was a little tougher based on feedback from my customers. I tell people to cook this meat low and slow. You have to be honest and tell them what they need to know. Once you find a state inspected facility you’ll have to get a label approved by the state. Make sure that you have every single cut that you want to sell on that label. If it is not on there you can’t sell it. I know we wanted to label ours something like “Lightning Fresh Longhorn Beef” on our label and they said no you can’t because it is frozen not fresh. You’ll have to get some freezer space. Think about how many you’re going to do and how much freezer 16 | April 2018

space it takes. You need to have somewhere to store it. You’re not going to sell it all at one time. A big part of marketing is word of mouth. I’ve had people go to their doctors and when the doctor asks what they’ve been doing because their cholesterol has gone down, they’ll tell him the only change is that they’ve been eating Longhorn beef. People spread the word when they find out it is healthy and tastes good, too. Get your product out there. You’ll have to work at it a little bit. You may even have to give some of it away and let them try it and then see if they come back for some more.  Start with one and go from there. I think the first year we did 6, then we doubled the next year and doubled again, until in 2015 I ended up processing 130. In 201617 I dropped down a little. Some of that was the lady selling the grass-fed beef at our farmers market. I am higher on my price right now than the grocery stores are but not as high as the grass-fed beef is.  The Longhorn calves that I process will yield about 53-58% of their body weight. So, if you have a 700 lb. calf your hanging weight is going to be about 350 lbs. or so. That’s how mine have been for a long time. A lot of mine are weighing 600-700lbs when I process some will be up in the 800 lbs. I’m processing at 15-18 months. I’m trying to stay below 20 months. A lot of time I can’t get them any bigger because of the demand for the meat. That’s why I process fairly low (age and weight). If you do over 30 months they want to take the spine out and make sure it doesn’t have mad cow disease. You end up losing some of your beef – some of your T-Bones and some of your chuck roasts.

MATT MCGUIRE MCGUIRE LAND & CATTLE About 8 years ago, our ropers went from bringing a pretty good market value to almost nothing so we needed to replace that income. We needed to give ourselves a new floor of what our worst animal was worth. Being in the cattle business, everything we do with cattle is meant to be profitable. It’s not just a way to deal with culls, although it is a great one because it gives you a floor of what your worst animal is worth. Not only is it an avenue for income, but of good health. Due to healthy nature of the beef, it provides a healthy alternative for your family and families you sell it to. If you educate people and get them to try the product it will start to sell itself. Sometimes you have to give it away. I’ve given away lots of one pound packages of ground beef to people to try it. Often I wind up selling them 10 or 20 times that amount.

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Longhorn Beef continued from pg. 16

To move into the beef market simply took utilizing farmers markets and food co-ops. When you join a food co-op, they actually start doing some marketing for you. I went from that to just good old fashioned knocking on doors of restaurants or others that might buy in volume. That takes a lot of doors closing in your face, but there are some that don’t so it can be lucrative at times. Being in the cattle business, Longhorns have so many positive traits that are of value to the cattle industry. Not just their horns, but everything about them makes a Longhorn beneficial. Our program consists of a healthy fleshy animal, but we still breed horn in as well. We’re not going to sacrifice a good healthy sized productive cow for the horn and we’re not going to have marshmallows with no horn. We’re going for middle of the road. Don’t get me wrong, we do breed for horn but with limitations I guess. That way when a mature cow, has given me all the healthy calf crops she’s gonna give me, I can utilize her in the meat program and still make a pretty good profit off of her in carcass value. We save our steers and shoot for an optimum weight of about 900 lbs. In a year with normal grass, that’s going to be between the ages of 24 to 28 months for us. We want to be under that 30 month mark and still get the tenderloin. We use those for cuts like any type of roast or cube steaks or stew meat. Things that marinate well in juices or cook slowly, which is the best for Longhorn meat. On the older animals, the bulls and the cows, we grind the entire animal to give that meat a little more flavor. When you grind the steak, the roast and everything it helps as far as the palatability and tenderness. It’s not all shoulder cuts and the normal tougher cuts that normally get ground.

Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Try one animal and go from there. We market sides of beef, ground beef and pre-made hamburger patties. People will at times ask for something like filets. I can do that, I just don’t do it in large quantities. I don’t keep cuts on hand because it’s too hard to manage. It’s too much expense to carry over that kind of an inventory. I’m not a butcher shop. I’m not a meat store. I’m merely having a product that is easy to deal with and easy to market. One pound packages of ground beef is pretty easy to market. Whether it’s one pound, 10 pounds or 20 pounds, there is always an avenue for that. If I can market it close it makes more sense for me. So I just do state inspection. I have not found fit for me at this point to be worth the cost to sell outside the state lines. Don’t try to jump off and bite off more than you can chew. I would tell people to try an animal and go from there. Don’t butcher five animals and expect to sell all that meat right away. Build a little bit of a clientele if you 18 | April 2018

can. If you already have some beef of your own in the freezer, don’t be afraid to give samples away. People unfamiliar with Longhorn beef are going to be leery. If you give someone a free sample to try what do they have to lose? You might just win a new customer.

WILTON WILTON ASTERA MEADOWS RANCHES As a teenager I helped my family on a small place with chickens and a milk cow. When we freshened the cow every two years we fed out the calf and processed it. So it was natural for me to process a calf as needed for our own use. From supplying family, to neighbors and networking our Longhorn Beef produce grew gradually into a business. The TLBAA was a big help initially. The Registered Texas Longhorn Lean Beef Program helped us make the decision to open the program to the public. I saw the potential of beef sales as another avenue to sell our Longhorns. Today we sell Grass-Fed Longhorn Lean as a business under the label AMR BEEF. Clearly we use the male culls. If there is another market for the calf I would prefer to sell that way; mainly because I love the breed and want to support others that want to perpetuate it. We furnish calves to youth for show, ropers for the rodeo sport, private treaty to new breeders; cattle auction sales and Texas Longhorn specific consignment sales. However, there is much more profit in the beef business than any of these other methods. Our retirement necessitated Carolyn and I supplementing our income. And the herd size continued to grow. Actually Carolyn suggested the Farmer’s Market. We studied the existing Markets around Austin and Bryan/College Station because the ranch is near there. Our study included visiting the markets, determining the type of people who shopped the market, and whether or not it already had a beef offering. Our vetting was thorough and I would advise anyone considering the Farmer’s Market to talk to the vendors and the managers. Meanwhile, Carolyn determined what licensing and permitting and fees would be necessary. Our processor helped us with the necessary labeling of the product. In addition to the business name and logo, wording of the label is a very significant step. This processor is Texas Sate approved and that works well for us. However, USDA licensed processors are available; to ship out of state USDA labeling is necessary. There are many other licensing nuances as well. Each county and city is different; each market management is different. We found each market had specific rules for display, local and state inspection, booth safety, signs, times for setup and tear-down, participation requirements; each used a specific contract although the

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Longhorn Beef continued from pg. 18 markets belonged to the state organization. After the study and cost evaluation we began the venture in Brazos Valley Farmer’s Market, in Bryan, TX on Saturdays. While we sell whole, half and quarter processed calves, the Farmer’s Market requires a participant to sell their product on site. We will take orders for the batch size packages, but sell individual cuts on site. For example. one vendor delivers to the Saturday market their CSA orders. (Google C.S.A. as it pertains for agriculture sales) But they must stay the time and offer product for sale. Our choice was to offer the basic beef cuts priced by the pound: steaks, roasts, ground beef, stew and chili meat, organs, and any special cuts on order. Each cut is wrapped and frozen. This Farmer’s Market requested us to provide an on site freezer for storage. (An inspector will often measure the temperature of your product; having a freezer assured compliance.) So we would use our generator or available electricity. Our market research (on-line and at the super market) gave us a range of prices to list for our cuts. Over time we determined how much of the product and which cuts to bring each Saturday. Going forward, volume and profit is based on sales and marketing skills. Business acuity plays a big role as well. There are breeders that have contracts with butcher shops, restaurants and individuals. So they have forecasts. Buying animals to sell into their program may work. For us it does not. The requirements of my pro-

gram for registered stock, and for the Farmer’s Market requiring me to RAISE the product I sell precludes me including purchased animals.

Each county, city and farmers market is different. Do your homework. As a cattleman I raise the Texas Longhorn to enjoy a lifestyle. Our business model is based on leasing bulls for horn production, because now that’s the rage. We use a clean-up bull that produces beefy calves: weight on their hips and heavy birth weight. At weaning we make the decisions on where those calves go: auction or meat program. There are no more secrets to success in this business than any other. Choose a niche market you have some experience and enjoy. Develop a quality product, in this case healthy and safe. Find a location that meets your costs. Take good care of your customers; never hesitate to satisfy an unhappy customer. Work hard and then some more. Always be happy. We’ve all made mistakes in business. Some pitfalls to avoid are: • Don’t over extend yourself with cattle that aren’t sold or don’t meet firm predictions. • This is a perishable product. Take all the precautions to safe guard it. Have adequate power, backup freezer space, etc. We use an overflow cold storage business for backup. • Remember you are selling a product for human consumption. Always dress, ship and display the product cleanly. • Don’t assume your customers know anything about the cuts or about preparing and cooking. Simply be helpful. • As a business preference we do not sell at markets where there are non-food items. The clientele is different and we found those markets a waste of time.

Want to contact one of these breeders or someone selling Longhorn beef in your area? • Go to www.tlbaa.org • Scroll down and click on Texas Longhorn Registered Beef. • On that page, lower right side, there is a link to the Registered Longhorn Beef Providers List where you can find providers by state with contact information. Look for more information about Longhorn beef in each upcoming issue of Trails Magazine as well. 20 | April 2018

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Shows

2018 TLBAA Join us for the 2018 World Expo to be held on June 27- July 1 at the Bell County Expo in Belton, TX. We celebrate our 31st year in a new venue with excellent facility amenities and in a city which has welcomed us with open arms. The 31st World Expo will feature the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America’s World Show, the National Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow’s Youth Show, the Texas Gold Futurity, Membership Meeting, Awards Banquet and so much more! We are happy to report that out of the 54 World Qualifying shows this 2017-2018 season we experienced an estimated 16% increase in show entries. Thank you to all who participated and helped promote the Texas Longhorn breed in the show ring, the barns, and on social media. Over 1,300 invitations will be mailed to World Qualifying exhibitors this year! To receive a qualifying invitation, an exhibitor must have exhibited and placed 1st or 2nd in an affiliate or major show throughout the year. The Longhorn Expo is much more than a show. It is a celebration of friendships, breeding programs, hard work and of course Texas Longhorns. This 4-day event features numerous activities and learning opportunities for longhorn enthusiasts of all levels.

Instructor at the LSU College of Agriculture & Animal Science. Additional activities will include Livestock Judging; whereby exhibitors will have the chance to compete by judging heifer, bull, steer and cowcalf classes. Gold Merit is a two-part event where exhibitors are requested to keep a record book for the year and give a speech in front of judges. Quiz Bowl tests exhibitor’s knowledge, from agriculture, current news, and health topics. The TLBT General Membership Meeting is the perfect time for youth to get involved as well as the election of new officers.

NATIONAL TLBT YOUTH SHOW:

TLBAA WORLD SHOW:

Our National Youth Show showcases the future of the breed, our youth program - the Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow. Youth will present females, bulls and steers in their respective classes. This year we welcome Tyler Braud as our youth judge, an

Our World Show will feature divisions including Haltered, Free, Trophy Steer and Miniature. This year’s judges are: Open Haltered- Dr. Blake Bloomberg, Non-Haltered- Doug Pierce, Trophy Steer- Deb Lesyk, Russell Hooks and Jason Christa.

TEXAS GOLD FUTURITY:

We are thrilled to host the 2018 Texas Gold Futurity in conjunction with the TLBAA World Expo on Thursday June 28th at 4pm. Established in 1984, the Texas Gold Futurity allows breeders an opportunity to present animals in their respective classes for evaluation by a panel of five judges who score them based upon TLBAA Breed Guidelines. The high and low scores from the judges are thrown out, and the remaining three scores are averaged, with the highest score winning the class. Our judges: Chase Vasut, Curtis Ohlendorf, Dora Thompson, James

22 | April 2018

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By Lindsay Maher

WORLD EXPO JUNE 27-JULY 1, 2018 PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST:

The Photography Contest returns with a new theme this year; your interpretation of “Splash of Color”. The cost to enter is $10 per submission.

SENIOR HEIFER SALE:

Graduating seniors present their animal and actively market to raise money for their college education at the Senior Heifer Sale. We hope you will attend and raise your hand for a good cause.

BREEDER’S MEMORIAL:

We give tribute and honor to those who have passed during the year.

AWARDS BANQUET: Wilkins, and John Parmley. Futurities are an excellent opportunity to showcase and promote your 2016-2017 animals. The fee to enter is $100 with a 75% cash payout determined on size of class. In addition to the payout, class winners will receive a banner with grand and reserve winners receiving buckles. Enter now through May 15th. Visit tlbaa.org/tgf for more information.

You will not want to miss the awards banquet held in the luxurious Special Events room overlooking the Garth arena. It will be an epic banquet – full of awards, recognition, and great food. Tickets are $35 each; reserve yours today. The table decorating contest returns; view entry information and more at tlbaa.org.

MEMBERSHIP MEETING:

All TLBAA members are encouraged to attend the Membership Meeting to be held on Friday June 29 after the Free & Miniature divisions. The meeting provides another opportunity to discuss industry issues and best practices.

HERE’S WHAT TO DO:

Get involved; exhibit, volunteer, sponsor or support the 2018 World Expo!

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26 | January 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


SPONSOR TOP HAND - $1,000

CHAIRMAN - $750

BREEDER - $500

EXHIBITOR - $300

YOUTH - $200

ARENA BANNER DISPLAY- $125

CLASS SPONSORS - LIMITED

PROGRAM ADVERTISING

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Marketing

By Myra Basham

Market What Mother Nature Provided While Guiness Book records and sales figures that many breeders only dream of are what grab media attention beyond the Longhorn community, that is not why the majority of breeders raise Longhorns. There is certainly a market for high end animals with big horn genetics. There is no harm in pursuing that. But, many people who approach you out of curiosity about the breed can be just as easily swayed by the every day positives that Longhorn cattle possess. Promote those qualities! The beauty of color and horn can get people to stop by your ranch and inquire or call after seeing an ad. The stories of the high end of the industry can certainly entertain and put a goal out there to work towards. However, when speaking to people about Texas Longhorns, the bulk of your conversation should include the following 8 points: 1. They are great producers. Keep records on the productivity of your cows and share that information. The expectation of having a healthy calf hit the ground every year gives a potential buyer the hope of recouping their investment. The fact that many Longhorn females breed back easily and calve regularly appeals strongly to buyers. 2. They are good mothers. Talk about milk production, attentiveness to the calf and protective nature. No one really wants to have to bottle feed calves. 3. Calving ease. While it is possible to have a problem with a delivery, Longhorn cows are well-known for their ease of calving and not normally needing any assistance. That is a very appealing and marketable trait, especially if you’re speaking to someone already in the cattle business. It also appeals to those who are taking care of the animals while maintaining a busy schedule. 4. Resistance to disease. This does NOT mean you should not vaccinate. Just because they have a lower incidence of disease does not mean they’re immune. But it does mean less vet calls and loss in the long run. 5. Docility. The majority of Longhorns, when raised around people, enjoy their company. Many even crave attention. This a trait that can sway potential new owners. You can talk about it, but it is best to demonstrate it. Let visitors hand feed cubes or scratch a few backs and they may well be a customer! 6. Nostalgia. To own a Longhorn is to own a piece of history. Read up on the history of the breed and talk 26 | April 2018

about the origins and history of the breed. The fact that they were crafted by nature in the wild is unique. That appeals to one’s sense of preserving and continuing a piece of living history. 7. Adaptability. Longhorns are tough and resilient. They can thrive where other breeds cannot. This does not mean they never need to be fed or supplemented! It means they can make use of forage that other cattle cannot eat, as well as tolerate a variety of climates from dry and hot to wet and cold successfully. They adapt well to their environment. 8. Longevity. Not only is the Longhorn a good producer, they live and produce longer than other cattle breeds. Hearing of females calving into their early 20’s is not that uncommon. Bulls can normally be bred for more years than other breeds as well. There are many other reasons they are desirable to own, but the previous 8 points appeal to every buyer out there, from owners of other breeds of cattle, to folks who want to show or do futurities, hobbyists and those hoping to break horn records. Now you’re ready to talk, but no one is calling or stopping by to hear what you have to say. This is a big problem for many who start with Longhorns in an area where people are unfamiliar with the breed. Having a website can help draw folks in, as well as getting listed Photo courtesy of Lynette Haltom. in directories of breeders both online and in print. There are other things to consider as well. While many have found some success with Craigslist, you still have a market out there of people who do not spend time on computers and smart phones. Consider local newspaper ads and local radio. In a day and time when many are too busy to stop and read, they probably have a radio playing in their vehicle . Local radio is especially popular if you are in a rural areas. Contact civic groups in your community that might like to learn about Longhorns. Even your local school agriculture department or extension group may have a need for speakers and be interested in presenting something new. If you’re selling beef, cooking clubs or groups that focus on natural, healthy living may be possible audiences. Always remember, you are marketing the Longhorn every time you speak to anyone about them. Never miss an opportunity to extoll the basic traits that make them a desirable breed of cattle.

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Breeding

A PLANNED CALVING SEASON

Large herd owners and backyard hobbyists alike can benefit from healthier calves and reduced management costs by choosing a calving season that works for their specific program and region and sticking to it. What are the two biggest investments you make in your herd each year? For most people, that answer would be time and feed costs. Not only does planned calving help reduce costs, it also enables other management practices to be implemented more effectively. Best management practices should include a vaccination schedule for your herd. If you have calves in your pasture ranging from birth up to a year, it requires much more time and diligence to keep them all vacci-

needs. The season can also play a part in the ease of a female re-breeding as well. Try to time calving seson so a female is ready to breed before temperature extremes (hot or cold) affect her ability to breed back quickly. Areas with a longer winter may push their calving season back a little later in the spring. This allows calves to be born in better weather conditions and takes into consideration later spring growth or forage. In some areas, timing can be tricky to avoid trying to have the cow re-breed in hot summer temperatures. Heat stress can interfere not only with conception but fertility of the bull as well. So why would anyone choose a fall calving pe-

Photo courtesy of Chrisann Merriman

Photo courtesy of Linda Blackwell

Having calves in your pasture with a wide range of ages can make management practices such as vaccinations harder to coordinate. Having a set calving period can help with meeting nutritional requirements, especially for the cows. nated properly according to their age. Often schedules get behind or missed simply because of the extra time required to gather calves at various times throughout the year instead of being able to gather all of them at the same time. Another consideration is nutritional requirements of cows at various stages of production, from dry to lactating. If you are supplying supplemental feed or minerals, it is difficult to make sure cows are receiving the required nutrition when the needs in the herd vary greatly. One will be underfed while the other is eating more than she needs. This not only results in a cow becoming poor while lactating, but wasting money overfeeding a dry cow. The seasons where you are located can play a big part in choosing calving seasons as well, not only for safe calving, but for feed costs and forage quality as well. Spring calving works well for most areas, and left on their own many cows naturally fall into a spring calving schedule. Nature knows their nutritional needs will be high right before and after the calf is born and the abundant spring and early summer forage meets those 28 | April 2018

riod? Depending on where you live and what forages you have available, some producers actually get better growth results from their cool weather forages due to nutrient density. Also, those calves will be ready to sell in the spring when everyone has pastures coming on strong and they are looking to buy replacement animals or add to their herds while forage is abundant. When cows are calving, they need to be monitored. It is much easier, especially if you are the only one taking care of you cattle, to watch for potential issues when the cows are calving in a predictable time frame. We know that Longhorns are renowned for easy calving, but that process is made even more positive by having calves come in good weather and being around to help if there is an issue. As seen often on Facebook lately, even if a Longhorn cow has no problem calving, predators tend to strike right after birth. Your diligence is recommended to reduce potential losses and a planned season makes that easier for you. One argument given by breeders for calving year round is to always have animals at various ages for potential customers. In the Longhorn world that is a com-

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By Myra Basham

MAY BENEFIT YOUR PROGRAM

mon practice. One option to maintain variety in the the cattle become a burden instead of a pleasure to own. ages of your available Longhorns while still benefitting While the Longhorn market does not always operfrom the controlled breeding ate on the same precepts as season is to split your herd the local sale barn, the prininto a fall calving pasture and ciples of producing healthy a spring calving pasture. This calves while keeping cows in allows you to see over time good condition, re-breeding whether one season outquickly and not eating you performs the other in terms out of house and home are of costs and production. It the same as any other cattle also makes it easier to move producer. Taking the time a cow that didn’t re-breed to consider your resources successfully into the other of forage and time, as well group without much loss of as the climate you are loproduction time. cated in, and then choosing Unfortunately, there is no a calving season accordingly calving season that works should ultimately reflect in Photo courtesy of Deb Lesyk best for every producer. Each your bottom line. The correct season for calving is the season that breeder must take into conSince breeding systems works the best for your program and your climate. sideration available forage are so dependent on your and nutrition, seasons in the forage and climate for opregion they live in and how limited their time invest- timum success, seeking out the help of a local county ment needs to be. Even a hobbyist must be careful to not agent or other cattle producers in your area may help let feed costs or time investment become so high that you determine what would suit your herd the best.

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22 | March 2018

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Bred & OWNED

HEIFER &

horn showcase sale OCTOBER 5-6 LAWTON, OK

CONSIGN BEFORE 5/15 SAVE $100 - CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE 6/15

MEMBER NUMBER _______________

CONSIGNOR NAME ____________________________PHONE _____________________ EMAIL_______________________ ANIMAL NAME______________________________________________________________ REGISTRATION # _______________________ Consignment Fee: $350 includes one measurement, please specify __ TTT __ TH __ Twisty Horn Showcase Saturday Sale

Bred & Owned Heifer Sale, must be 12 - 30 months as of 10/5/18

ADDITIONAL OPTIONS Additional Measurement $100ea __ TTT __ TH __ Twisty Extended Pedigree $100 PAYMENT

Sponsorship Package $____________

__ Full Page Sale Catalog Ad $400

Visa, Master Card, Discover

CC on file

__ Half Page Sale Catalog Ad $250 Total $ ________________

Check Attached

Name on Card:_____________________________________________________ CID#(3 digit code on back) ______________ Card Number ___________________________________________________________ Exp. Date ______________________

Commission: Participating 5% Non-Participating 10%

Requirements: 1. Payment in full 2. Completed consignment form 3.Original TLBAA certificate or dual registration certificate 4. Completed transfer application 5. Digital photo sent to salesandevents@tlbaa.org

Selection: Notifications will be sent the week of 6/18/18 confirming accepted consignments. 3 lot limit per consignor. BREEDING INFORMATION Cow Exposed To __________________________________________

From ______________ To ______________

Cow Exposed To __________________________________________

From ______________ To

_____________

Confirmed Bred ______________ Calf at Side Information: Sex _________________ Date Calved__________________ OCV Vaccinated Yes __ No __ Calf Sired by ______________________________________________________________ COMMENTS________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Comments will be published in sale catalog. Changes for pedigree reader must be submitted in writing to management no later than 24 hours before sale start.

WAIVER/CONSENT FORM

The Horn Showcase Sale (HSS) assumes no responsibility for any guarantee made by the consignor. All guarantees are strictly between the consignor (seller) and the buyer. HSS is not responsible for the health or safety of any animal consigned to the sale. This includes loss of life, loss by theft or other perils. All consignors must comply with the rules and regulations. The undersigned hereby agrees to conditions of the sale and agrees that all guarantees are between seller and buyer. The undersigned further agrees to indemnify and hold harmless HSS, sale employees and duly authorized representatives from any and all claims, demands, causes of action or liabilities of any nature which may arise from or in any way relate to the Horn Showcase Sale. The undersigned agrees that if the buyer is unable to accept delivery because of Interstate health requirements, the consignor, not HSS or its management, shall be responsible for refund or adjustment.

______________________________________________ Consignor Signature

____________________________ Date

PO Box 4430 • Fort Worth, TX 76164 • P 817.625.6241 F 817.625.1388 • salesandevents@tlbaa.org TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS March 2018 | 23


Health/Nutrition

NUTRITION FOR COWS AFTER CALVING Adequate levels of important nutrients are crucial for reproduction, since the body always takes care of other needs first. Reproduction is a luxury that won’t take place unless maintenance needs are met. A thin cow or heifer will not settle as readily as an individual in good flesh; if she is too thin she won’t even cycle. Spring-calving cows must be in good flesh through winter. Cows that are thin at calving take longer to start cycling again. Monitor body condition closely through winter to make sure your feeding program is on target. The easiest time to put flesh back on a cow if she’s pulled down after summer lactation is in the fall after weaning her calf—before weather gets cold. A pregnant dry cow should gain weight on pasture alone, unless the pasture is overly mature or in short supply, in which case she may need an energy and/or protein supplement. If a cow is thin at calving, it is very hard to pick up her weight after she starts lactating. She puts the extra energy into milk instead of body weight. A fat cow can coast through winter and even lose a little weight without detrimental effects, whereas a thin cow needs to gain weight through fall and winter if you expect her to breed back on time. You don’t want cows losing weight just before or after calving. Even if 2 cows have the same body condition at calving, if one is losing weight and the other is gaining, the cow gaining weight is better programmed for fertility than the cow losing weight. Studies have shown that each 10% of weight lost before calving can delay the first heat cycle by about 19 days. So you want cows in good flesh at calving.

NEEDS FOR POST-CALVING NUTRITION ARE AFFECTED BY NUTRITION DURING PREGNANCY Dr. John McKinnon, Professor and Saskatchewan Beef Industry Chair, University of Saskatchewan, says that many producers today are calving later in the spring, and many are using winter feeding strategies like bale grazing, corn grazing and swath grazing to cut winter feed costs. “One of the biggest changes I see, especially here in western Canada and the northern US, is more effort by ranchers to reduce costs. The best way 32 | April 2018

to do this has been to go to more extensive winter management rather than confined feeding,” he says. If the cow can harvest her own feed by swath or bale grazing, this saves time, fuel and machinery costs. “There’s also a significant move toward later calving—away from February and March and moving to May-June—so the cows are calving on grass. The big issue then, as we go into the winter, looking at whatever management system we are dealing with, is to recognize the basic biology of the cow in terms of how her requirements change during the stages of pregnancy. If she will be calving in late May or early June, she was likely bred in late August or early September. She will probably be turned out on some type of winter grazing system in mid to late November. At that point she is at the end of the first trimester and moving into the second trimester,” says McKinnon. “At that stage of gestation you are still looking at just maintaining her body condition. Photo by Gary Wilson She doesn’t have a lot of requirements yet for the developing fetus.” As she moves through December, January and February she will probably be able to maintain her condition utilizing typical quality bale or swath grazing, etc. “Then as we move into her final trimester we need to look at increasing either the quantity or quality of the feed. She has higher requirements for protein and energy as the fetus is growing significantly at this stage. These requirements may increase by as much as 20 to 25%. We have to recognize those needs and either supply enough forage (swath grazing or hay) of a certain quality or supplement it with grain or some type of pellet to add the necessary protein and energy,” he says. “It doesn’t matter whether we are calving early or late, swath grazing or feeding in confinement, the biology of the cow at that stage of pregnancy must be recognized and those needs must be met. One of the things that stockmen sometimes don’t recognize in extensive management systems is the effect of the environment on the cow and the need for shelter. A harsh environment can bring down the body condition of that cow.” Cold stress can cause significant weight loss if cows don’t have a way to get out of the wind or stay dry during blizzards. Trees or portable windbreaks can be a big

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


By Heather Smith Thomas

factor in helping cows deal with winter weather. Oth- breeding season, you have to be sure that your feeding erwise it takes more energy to maintain body heat, and program during the last trimester and post-calving (prethe cow robs her stores of fat to create that energy—and breeding) is meeting the requirements of the cow and she is not losing condition,” he says. If she doesn’t have loses weight. “Ideally we’ll have cows coming into the winter in adequate nutrition for maintenance and lactation, she won’t rebreed. good body condition. “When we talk about We use a 5 point body If you want a successful breeding season, you all of the different feedcondition score (1 behave to be sure that your feeding program during ing systems, whether ing emaciated and 5 being obese) so we typ- the last trimester and post-calving (pre-breeding) it’s swath grazing, bale ically don’t want cows is meeting the requirements of the cow and she is grazing, whatever, it is just as important now to be any lower than not losing condition. as it ever was to know 3 on this scale. Body the quality of the feed. condition is very important when coming off pasture in the fall. If the cow A good forage analysis is an important aspect of manneeds to gain weight we want to put on that weight in agement. And if you are swath grazing you need to the fall and not try to do it during winter,” says McKin- know how much you should allocate to these cows. In non. It’s a lot harder to put on body condition during most cases we are not turning them out into the whole field. We are limiting what they eat with a hot wire and cold weather, and takes a lot more feed. “If cows are losing weight as they approach calving, moving it daily or every 2 or 3 days. If you are going to they will be slower to return to estrus after calving. If allocate a certain amount of swath per head, you need to they are also losing weight after calving, you will see know the quality of the feed,” he says. It might be easy to figure out how much quantity both delayed return to estrus and poor conception even after they start cycling again. If you want a successful they need (in terms of pounds of dry matter) but if you

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April 2018 | 33


Health/Nutrition don’t know the quality you may still be shortchanging minerals. The mineral levels will have a big impact on the cows. “We hear of cases where animals are losing reproductive success after that cow calves,” he explains. condition even though they have lots of feed in front of “Many producers are using some type of range pelthem. It may not have the energy or the protein neces- let to provide energy and protein when the cows are sary, and they can’t eat eating lower-quality enough to supply their Cows eager for green grass may ignore nutrient forages, and they can needs.” have the pellets fortiMineral nutrition is dense hay, actually losing weight when lactat- fied with the minerals also a key factor when ing in spring. This is a crucial time to supplement they need. These may talking about the preg- for adequate nutrition in order for them to cycle be customized for their region, and if not, they nant cow, particularly can certainly work with during the last trimes- quickly and re=breed on schedule. their feed company to ter and post-calving. “It’s important to have an appropriate mineral mix in provide a trace mineral salt mix or a one-to-one minfront of that cow, and this will depend a lot on the forage eral that contains trace minerals. These can be fed free base—and whether it is adequate or deficient in certain choice if the cows aren’t receiving a customized pellet. There are many ways to do this,” he says. If cows are calving later in the season when they can be on green grass, this is often the ideal situation for nutrition and breed-back, if the grass is good. “Paying attention to body condition is very important, however, even when cows are turned out on grass. Following the last trimester, and from calving to breeding, cows can do well if they are on grass. But sometimes in early spring the grass may not be well started,” says McKinnon. The cows may be eager for green grass and not very interested in hay, but may lose weight chasing after the grass. Early spring growth may be more “washy” with a higher water content than when it becomes a little more mature, with more nutrients per pound of grass. Cows often tend to lose weight when lactating on early spring grass with no supplementary feed. This may be the most crucial time to make sure The easy way to work Longhorn cattle! the cows have adequate nutrition • Can be shipped by common carrier anywhere in in order for them to cycle quickly the U.S. and breed back on schedule. • Galvanized pipe and steel sheeting

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TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Facilities/Handling

By Temple Grandin Department of Animal Science, Colorado State University

Animals Have Excellent Memories A question I often get asked is: Do cattle and other animals have good memories? They definitely do. The difference between human and animal memory is that it is specific because their memories are sensory based instead of word based. Memories of either good or bad previous experiences would be stored as pictures, sounds, smells, touch or taste sensations. If a cow gets hit hard with the headgate, she will remember it. The next time she will be less willing to put her head in the headgate. The animal will also remember which specific part of the squeeze chute is bad. She may enter the squeeze section, but then balk at the headgate. To cattle, a person on a horse and a person on the ground are two different things. In the animal’s memory, they are two totally different pictures. Cattle that are exclusively handled on horseback, may have a small flight zone and allow the horse and rider to get very close. The horse and rider are perceived as safe and a person suddenly appearing on foot would be perceived as new and scary. This may make the flight zone increase from 3 ft. to 30 ft. This is why it is so important to get cattle acclimated to going in and out of pens with people on foot.

BE MORE OBSERVANT People need to take the time to be observant. If your cattle stop moving through your handling facility, observe and see where they are stopping. A calm animal will look right at a distraction they do not like. Maybe they are looking at a shiny reflection on a parked truck. Vehicles parked around the chutes are a common distraction. Moving them may improve cattle movements. Remove hoses, loose chains, and coats on fences. If your cattle balk at steel braces on the ground that held the handling facility together, you should cover them with dirt. There is further information in my book Temple Grandin’s Guide to Working with Farm Animals. Dr. Grandin is a designer of livestock handling facilities and a Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University. Her writings on the flight zone and other principles of grazing animal behavior have helped many people to reduce stress on their animals during handling. She obtained her B.A. at Franklin Pierce College and her M.S. in Animal Science at Arizona State University. Dr. Grandin received her Ph.D in Animal Science from the University of Illinois in 1989. Today she teaches courses on livestock behaviour and facility design at Colorado State University and consults with the livestock industry on facility design, livestock handling, and animal welfare. www.grandin.com

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April 2018 | 35


Futurity Results

CATTLE BARON’S WINCHESTER FUTURITY RESULTS Place DOB

1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3 4

1 1 2 3

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3

Animal Name Owner Class 1 (DOB April - May 2017) 4/1/17 SR 007’s Clout’s Adel 725 Strutthoff Ranch 4/20/17 JR Cookies and Cream Dick Weir 4/5/17 Kettle’s Twister John & Christy Randolph 5/23/17 HB Blaze Diamond Steve Hollywood 5/26/17 BCR Raindrops 733 Bill & Suzanne Torkildsen Class 2 (DOB February - March 2017) 2/11/17 Dunn All Time High Nancy C. Dunn 3/15/17 Gimmie that Wink BCB Bolen Longhorns 3/8/17 BCR Katherine of Castle Bill & Suzanne Torkildsen 2/12/17 GL Wagon Maid Steve Hollywood Class 3 (DOB December 2016 -January 2017) 12/6/16 Dunn High Resolution Nancy C. Dunn 1/3/17 Kettle’s Ah-Che-Wa-Wa John & Christy Randolph 12/22/16 Dunn Fast Forward Nancy C. Dunn 12/21/16 Horseshoe J NS Neal & Stann Maraman Class 4 (DOB October - November 2016) 10/23/16 Riverforks Oh So Pretty Terry & Tammy King 11/22/16 Horseshoe J Emoji Jimmy Jones 11/3/16 Horseshoe Gimy-Da-Money Jimmy Jones Class 5 (DOB August - September 2016) 8/18/16 Riverforks Special Medicine Terry & Tammy King 9/4/16 SR 007’s Sunny Hermes 662 Strutthoff Ranch 8/24/16 Sarcee Rowdy Rio Gal Bruce & Connie Olive Class 5A Claims Class (DOB August - September 2016) 9/22/16 MB EOS Mike Beijl Class 6 Entries (DOB June - July 2016) 7/28/16 Riverforks Play the Field Terry & Tammy King 6/26/16 SR 007’s Latta Chanel 633 Strutthoff Ranch 6/16/16 DDL Abbys Cowboy Mikeal Beck Class 7 (DOB March - May 2016) 3/10/16 BCR Tari True Bill & Suzanne Torkildsen 4/8/16 Cat Nap BCB Bolen Longhorns 4/20/16 Hoosers Sweetheart Mike Davis 5/9/16 Cherry Mary Kettle’s John & Christy Randolph Class 8 (DOB January - Feburary 2016) 1/30/16 BCR Wynonna 614 Bill & Suzanne Torkildsen 1/27/16 Red Roulette HCL Mikeal Beck 2/20/16 CF Crystal Find Clarice Francis Class 9 (DOB October - December 2015) 10/8/15 Jungle Princess BCB Bolen Longhorns 11/15/15 Riverforks Black Diamond Terry & Tammy King 10/11/15 Blaze of Glory Don & Kandi Edwards Class 10 (DOB August 2012-August 2015) 9/22/14 Riverforks Minnie Pearl Terry & Tammy King 9/27/12 Leading lady BCB Bolen Longhorns 3/15/14 Ocean Fire Sara Jennings

Grand Champion Heifer: BCR Tari True Bill & Suzanne Torkildsen

Payout* $400 $280 $240 $160 $120 $420 $280 $210 $140

1

$450 $300 $225 $150 $245 $175 $105

2

$280 $200 $120 $75 $315 $225 $135

3

$420 $280 $210 $140 $315 $225 $135

4

$135 $90

$315 $225 $135 5

1. Brent Bolen, Rick Friedrich, Class 2 & 3 Winner Nancy Dunn, & Steve Azinger. 2. Class 4, 5, 6 & 10 Winners Terry & Tammy King 3. Class 1 Winners Lynn Struthoff & Josie Becker 4. Class 5A Winner Mike Beij. 5. Class 9 Winners Brent & Cindy 6 Bolen. 6. Cow Patty Bingo Winner Kathy Palladini

36 | April 2018

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Sale Results

2018 CATTLE BARON’S PREMIER LONGHORN SALE RESULTS February 25, 2017 • Navasota, Texas Auctioneer: Joel Lemley • Sale Host: TLBGCA 1

Sale Results Submitted by Rick Friedrich Photos by Trace Neal

2

HIGHLIGHTS

Volume Buyers Matt & Heidi Shepherd

HIGH SELLING LOT: 3

8,000

$

4

LOT 102 – RR LEXI

OTHER HIGH SELLING LOTS: 5

8

6

7

9

10

11

15

$7,600 – Lot 79 - RR Calico Rose $7,100 – Lot 90 - TX W Clementine $5,500 – Lot 74 - Sandy Bandita BCB $5,200 – Lot 51 - JH Monaco’s Refuge $5,000 – Lot 30 - Spring Into Stars $4,750 – Lot 04 - Flickering Stars $4,500 – Lot 50 - TX W Hanna $4,100 – Lot 37 - Higher Hopes $4,000 – Lot 39 - Summ Dinger

12

16

13

17

14

18

1. Top Selling Lot buyers Kyle & Greta Drennan with sellers Rick & Tracey Friedrich. 2. Kim & Stephen Head received the Lifetime Honorary Achievement Award presented by John Stockton. 3. Wilton & Carolyn Wilton, Astera Meadows Ranch; Bill McMoran, Ragnar Ranch. 4. Mikeal Beck & Brandi Shukers, Holy Cow Longhorns. 5. Volume Buyers Matt & Heidi Shepherd, Shepherd Ranch. 6. George & Peggy Wilhite, graciously hosted the Friday Night Social. 7. Nikki Gambroll, Sandhills Ranch; Patty Smith, 585 Asville Ranch. 8. Hal Meyer & Beckham Kelly, Jack Mountain Ranch. 9. Mike & Priscilla David, Rafter J7. 10. Vern & Crystal Stahl, DBS Longhorns. 11. David & Bracy Wars, W5 Texas Longhorns; Neal & Stann Maraman, N5 Horns. 12. Nick & Lynn Trujillo, Whispering Oaks Ranch. 13. Franklin & Steve Baxter, White Rock Mesa. 14. Dora Thompson & Nikki Gambroll, Sandhills Ranch. 15. Jeramie & Annette James with Asher & Chapel, 3J Farms. 16. Sara Pariseau & Karen Wrenn, Beauty and the Beast Stables. 17. DeCarlo Noble & Dale Metz, FHR Longhorns. 18. It was a packed house for the sale.

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AFFILIATE NEWS

AFFILIATE UPDATES One of the upcoming events for the NTLA is the Youth Progress Shownewly named: The Rodger Damrow Progress Show. It will be held on Saturday July 14. This is the 3rd year for the Progress Show held in Crawford, NE. This is our first show of the 2019 World Show Season. The youth show is for points only and is a great starter for the newly shown calves. It is a lot of PRESIDENT fun and anyone is welcome to join us. We make a weekend out of it at Fort PAUL SCHLECHT Robinson State Park. 402-719-7317 The Nebraska State Fair World Qualifying Shows will be August 25th and 26th in Grand Island. This is our 2nd year that the Longhorns are exhibited in the Cattle Barn. The large air conditioned building with wash racks close by is located right by the show arena. We are anticipating more exhibitors and expecting more Trophy Steers. There will be additional payouts for the Trophy Steer Show. So if you have a Trophy Steer to show please consider bringing him to the Nebraska State Fair. Entry deadline beginning of August. More to come later. Show contacts are Delwin & Vicki Smeal 402-568-2407.

NEBRASKA TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

The CTLA 5th Annual Spring Sale will be held Saturday, April 7th at Saskatoon Livestock Sales, Saskatoon, Saskethchewan. The Annual Meeting will be held at 9:30 am, followed by the Yearling  Heifer Jackpot at noon. Sale will start at 1:30 pm. Thank you to Barn Spider Designs for designing a new look to the sale catalogue this year. The catalogue and Annual Meeting CODY ROBBINS Agenda can be viewed on the CTLA website: www.ctlalonghorns.com. PRESIDENT An upcoming event that will be discussed and finalized at the meeting will 306-380-6618 be the return of the Texas Longhorns to the Canadian Western Agribition at Regina, Sasketchewan in November. Agribition is a well known, internationally recognized livestock event that brings breeders together from around the world. The opportunity to return to the event after a 24 year absence is exciting, and is bringing breeders across Canada and the northern United States together to plan the event for this year. Hope to see you in Saskatoon, and watch for updates about Agribition.

CANADIAN TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

Spring Show – Buckle/ T-Shirt Sponsors and Calf Donors Needed! Help us host the Spring Show at Miracle Farms near Brenham, Texas on May 4, 5 & 6. • Details, classes and schedules are posted at www.TLBGCA. com . This year there will be 35 classes of competition. Last year we had 250 entries spread out over those classes. This is the biggest qualifying show towards the World Show. Please join us in making it happen. RICK FRIEDRICH Be a buckle and/or a T-Shirt Sponsor for the Spring Show - We need twelve PRESIDENT RICK@RIVERRANCHLONGHORNS of each. The cost is $350 each. This is how it works; Buckle Donation - Your $350 buckle donation will get your name or your ranch name engraved as the sponsor on one of the (Twelve Only) Grand Champion buckles. Be one of the first twelve to commit and you will be included. T-Shirt Donation - Your $350 T-Shirt Donation will get your ranch brand printed on the back of our Spring Show T-Shirt. Only twelve brands will be sold and printed. Be one of the first twelve to commit and your brand will appear on one of the most popular T-Shirts of the season. 250 T-Shirts will be printed and distributed to all participants at this event. Discount for doing both (Buckle & T-Shirt), why not. $600 will get you both and get us to our goal even faster. Let’s do it! Email Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com and I will put you on our committed list. Mail sponsorship checks to TLBGCA, P.O. Box 750067, Houston, Texas 77275. Calf Donations - The Spring Show has become the go to place for donating calves that get kids started in showing Longhorns. Here is how it works - You donate a heifer or steer calf to the event and it is given to a youth at the event via random drawing. Stephen keeps track of the calf and the youth’s efforts to raise and show it for a year. You also get monthly reports. After a year the calf is put in the youth’s name and becomes their own. I wish that I would have kept track of how many calves have been given way (8-14 a season) and how many Grand Champions have been won with them. The number is many! To donate a calf it needs to be approximately 4-6 months old in early May. If you have one to donate, please schedule it with Stephen Head at Headshoms@hotmail.com or contact Stephen Head @ 979-549-5270.

TEXAS LONGHORN BREEDER GULF COAST ASSOCIATION

38 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


This is the tenth year the West Texas Longhorn Association has hosted a Longhorn Show at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo and we would like to thank everyone who attended the San Angelo Stock Show. We had a great turnout with 281 entries. The weather was good, with warm sunny skies on Sat. Much needed rain on Sun. which cleared up about noon. JEREMY JOHNSON We gave away three steers to Youth members. The steers were donated by PRESIDENT Brian and Karen Rubel (KB Longhorns) and Dennis and Judy Urbantke (Top 210-413-2105 of the Hill Ranch). The lucky winners were Jason Moore, Emma Stapp, and Karlye Williams. The $50 Visa gift card for the Seniors in high school was won by Dylan Matthews. Our judges were David War, Carla Payne, and Russell Hooks. All three judges did a great job and we would like to thank them for taking the time to come to West Texas for our event. We would like to remind all of our WTLA Youth members to apply for our scholarships. Along with our regular $1000 scholarship, The San Angelo Federal Credit Union has donated the funds to enable us to give another $1000 scholarship this year. The deadline for applying is April 15th. Go to our website (westtexaslonghorns.com) for the rules and requirements. We are looking forward the show we sponsor in Abilene (West Texas State Fair) on September 8th and 9th. Please make plans to attend. More details on the show will be posted as they become available.

SOUTH TEXAS LONGHORN ASSOCIATION

WANT TO FIND AN AFFILIATE NEAR YOU? Go to www.tlbaa.org and click on the AFFILIATES tab (see right) to find a list of our affiliates and their contact information.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

April 2018 | 39


NEWS On the Trail...

Texas Longhorn International: Diepenhoek We are Martien(56) and Marianne Adriaans(55) and we live in the Netherlands Europe. The Netherlands is 17 times smaller than Texas. We have 17 million inhabitants. For comparison, Texas has 27 million. We are the second largest country, after America, in terms of agricultural exports. So we deal very efficiently with our agricultural land. This is also the reason that grassland is very expensive. An acre costs around 30,000 American dollars. We both had a dream to start a dairy farm. There were no opportunities on the farms of our parents. As 20-year-olds, we went to Canada to see if we could buy a small farm there. We also visited countries such as France, Denmark and Germany. Eventually, we bought a very small dairy farm in the Netherlands. We started milking 40 cows. We also had to invest in milking quota. This was $10,000 per cow. With these numbers you understand that it’s almost impossible to build a successful business. We produce for the world market and therefore we have no protection from our government.

Students come out for practical lessons about breeding.

In the meantime, Marianne had another dream. As a small child, she always watched “Little House on the Prairie” on TV. In Europe this series was very popular. How beautiful would it be to realize this atmosphere on their own farm in the Netherlands? First, a veranda was built. A ranch with Texas Longhorn cows was her next dream. At that time there were no Texas Longhorn cows in Europe. In 2007 she went with her husband Martien to Dickinson cattle in Ohio to inspect the cows and to buy some embryos to start their own herd in Europe. The result of the 20 embryos were 6 calves, three female and three male. It was her intention to import semen from America to Europe. During the years that she was doing this, it turned out to be almost impossible. Veterinary obstacles were the problem, but a solution came up for this. Diepenhoek John Wayne , the first 70” T2T bull in Europe, was housed on an AI station and semen was collected from him. In the meantime, Marianne sells semen from this bull throughout Europe. In 2010, 10 embryos were again purchased to acquire new bloodlines. Again 6 calves came from this. She started breeding with these animals. The intention was to quickly build up a large herd by embryo transplant or In Vitro Production. She wanted to become a European trading company for everything that has to do with Texas Longhorns. They had over 20 years of experience with ET and IVP with their Holstein cows successfully. Unfortunately, the Texas Longhorns did not succeed. Again a solution was found for this. A Canadian breeder was interested to pick this up. In a few months we hope to start this project. Meanwhile, the number of cows grew and investments were made in a new barn with a milking robot. It became clear that none of their three children were interested in the Holstein business. But to Marianne’s great joy, their eldest daughter Wendy indicated that she wanted to set up a recreational activity on the farm with

We have always been interested in breeding. Our cows were not good enough, so we decided to buy embryos with high quality genetics. These embryos came from the best cow families around the world. We started breeding with these calves. In 1998, together with three other fellow breeders, we launched a sales site www.eurogenes.com. This has now become the largest website in Europe. In the meantime, Marianne also started working for a company that exports male and female breeding stock, embryos and semen around the world. Here she learned the tricks of the trade. Meanwhile, the Holstein breeding was excellent. Diepenhoek Rozelle 54 was number one in the world in 2012. Other family members from this cow family are among the best in Europe. Several bulls went to AI centers throughout Europe and we even had a breeding bull in America. Embryos were sold to all countries in Europe, Canada, America, South Africa Diepenhoek Miss Temptation (80.375” TTT) and Dirk’s Ranger Grande (79.25” TTT) are and even to Japan. currently the Texas Longhorns with the biggest horns in Europe.

40 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Texas Longhorns The Netherlands

Submitted by Marianne Adriaans

in the horse show in Euro Disney her mother. She has been a scoutParis. He wants to come and dising child from a young age and has cuss the Wild West to come alive been in charge of her own group at The Longhorn Ranch. Martien, for years. She envisioned cooking Marianne and Wendy are always on a campfire surrounded by Texas looking for people to work togethLonghorn cattle. Today she offers er. So anybody who reads this has campfire cooking for groups, High something that might be interestTea on campfire for the ladies, and ing for Europe. Please send them an beer, meat and fire for the men. It e-mail. is impossible to always do this outAnd our wish with the Longside, so when it rains everything horns? We now sell our meat to resmoves inside our stable where the taurants. It would be much nicer if young stock is housed. you could only go to De Longhorn Marianne was increasingly apRanch for this piece of quality meat. proached by schools to give pracI hope to realize that in the short tical lessons about breeding. Partly term. Breeding and trade is really the lessons are about the theory Marianne’s thing. Every week eof breeding. Genomic selection is mails come from all over Europe a part that students want to know from people who want to buy Texmore about. The other half goes as Longhorns. The last few years into the barn with Martien and we were not very lucky with heifer Wendy and will actively assess catcalves. This year we have eight tle. Martien is a connoisseur and pregnancies. If female animals are has participated in national shows. born we will not sell them. We want Regionally, Martien and Marianne to grow in numbers until we have have also participated in shows for 30 head. What I do now is mediate years. Martien is actually in the ring between a buyer and seller. Recentwith the cows, Marianne works ly the first deal was with a zoo in the with organizing the show. They Czech Republic and a Texas longreceived more and more questions horn breeder in Austria. from visitors whether we also proHistory was made in October vided farm excursions. Meanwhile, 2017. For the first time in Europe, ofa number of families have already been booked to learn more about When weather is bad the dining simply moves inside ficial horn measurements were takthe farm. We will teach them about the barn. A lot of work has been done to achieve en for the HSC in America. Diepenhoek Miss Temptation measured breeding and test their practical more of an American/Canadian western look. knowledge. Our government has made it compulso- 80.375 inches. She was the first Texas longhorn in Eury for all primary schools that the children must have rope to achieve this status. The herd sire Dirk’s Ranger been on a farm at least once. Our government considers Grande measured just a hair under 80 inches. He scored it important that children see where their food comes 79.25. Both are currently the Texas Longhorns with the from. In collaboration with these schools, we will give biggest horns in Europe. Diepenhoek Ponderosa is a two-year-old bull out of these two animals. substance to this. Dirk Vogelaere from Belgium made this possible. He They wanted to receive their guests in style. An American / Canadian barn was still on Marianne’s wish has been appointed by TLBAA to do official horn mealist. These buildings are not known in Europe but every- surements in Europe. What will the future bring? Together with a numone knows what it is. She started this immense caraway nearly two years ago. A former pig barn was converted ber of Texas Longhorn pioneers in Europe, the Texas into a saloon. Here she could give shape to all the ideas Longhorn breeding as a whole is lifting to a higher level. that she gained from their American travels. A project We would like to possibly set up a European herdbook. like this is impossible to realize alone. Luckily she got Jonathan Bentz has succeeded in qualifying semen for help from a good friend who loves The Old West as export to Europe. This could be extended in the future. And for Diepenhoek itself? Calmly expanding to evmuch as Marianne herself. The barn is almost ready but erything that has to do with Texas Longhorns. And in she has new ideas to start building. Visitors ask us what we still want to achieve. We have the meantime they do not forget to enjoy with what an application from a young couple to be allowed to hold they have already achieved. their wedding ceremony here. They would like to marry If you’d like to learn more you can email Marianne at with the Longhorns in the background. Soon Marianne info@texaslonghorn.nl or visit www.delonghornranch.nl has an appointment with a Dutch cowboy who works or find them on Facebook, search delonghornranch.

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April 2018 | 41


NEWS On the Trail (cont’d)

2018 San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Brings New Longhorn Experiences to Visitors And Parade Viewers

(top) The Alamo is a fitting backdrop for the herd of Longhorns participating in the parade. The cattle drive draws thousands of spectators to the parade each year. Photo courtesy of Texas General Land Office

Photo courtesy of Thurmond Longhorns

Miss Rodeo Texas Shoots Stock Show Commercials From the Back of Longhorn Miss Rodeo Texas, Tianti Carter, riding Real McCoy of Rafter M Ranch and owned by Cody Garcia. Ms. Carter and the San Antonio Livestock Show film crew taped all of the weekly commercials while sitting on McCoy. Real McCoy won his 51st individual title including 2017 Grand Champion Steer at Autobahn. McCoy just won Reserve Grand Champion Trophy Steer at the 2018 San Angelo Stock Show. He is owned by Cody Garcia of Rafter M Ranch and exhibited by Cori Garcia. 42 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

The 2018 Annual Western Heritage Parade and Cattle Drive made a course change this year that brought the Longhorn back to the Alamo as a part of San Antonio’s 300th celebration. TLBAA members Thurmond Longhorns and Kimble Cattle Company supplied and herded roughly 120 head of Texas Longhorns down Houston Street and turned in front of the Alamo. Facebook was full of videos from observers and participants as well. The Longhorns coming through the city is always a popular attraction and draws large crowds but seeing them pass in front of the Alamo had a special impact this year. This year saw a new addition at the Stock show involving Longhorns as well. “Texas Longhorns 101” allowed vistors to get an up close and educational look at Texas Longhorns courtesy of the Crossed T Ranch family. The San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo draws approximately 2 million vistors over the course of 18 days in February each year.

WE WANT TO SHARE YOUR STORY! The purpose of “News on the Trail” is to let folks share what they and their Longhorns have been doing to spread the word about Texas Longhorns. It also serves to let others know when a member or Longhorns have garnered media coverage of any kind. If you have an item that would be suitable, please email text and photos to myra@ tlbaa.org for consideration.


IN THE

PEN

We thank these folks for kindly droppin’ in at the TLBAA office.

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1. Sid Stewart Fort Worth, TX 2. Carlton Williams Paradise, TX

2

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Want a chance to see your photos in Trails Magazine? Send them to myra@tlbaa.org. We reserve the right to use submitted photos in editorial or in the promotional material for Trails or TLBAA. Appropriate photo credit will be given.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

April 2018 | 43


Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow

President’s Message Dear TLBT Members, Whoever prayed for rain, I think you can stop that prayer for a few weeks because we have had an enormous amount of rain. Over a week, we had a total of nine inches of rain over the period of time! How are our New Year’s Resolutions coming? I hope everyone is staying true to the promises and goals we set for ourselves at the beginning of the year. As shows come and go, I would like to draw everyone’s attention to the next TLBT fundraiser at the OTLA show in Stillwater, Oklahoma. The show supervisors were generous enough to allow us to lead a fundraiser at the show. The fundraiser that we would like everyone to participate in will be cow patty bingo. The amount of rounds that we will play will be decided by the amount of people who are interested. For anybody who would like to help set up and run the fundraiser, please find me at the show and I’d be happy to receive the help. We plan to hold this fundraiser after the open show on Saturday. I would like to remind all of the kids who intend to participate in the Gold Merit competition at the World Show to be keeping track of your animal’s info. I also would like to advise everyone to write your speeches for The World Show and Autobahn, so that you will have it perfectly memorized when the show comes around. I hope everyone is doing well and encourage you to stop by and talk if you see me at the show.

Matthew Wallace OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

JACKSON GRACE

TLBT Office: Junior Director Age: 13 1.)Where are you from? Sunset, Texas 2.)How many years have you been a member of the TLBT? 7 years 3.)Why did you join the TLBT? My parents were members. 4.) What is your favorite Longhorn show, and why? Fort Worth Livestock Show and Rodeo because it’s the closest to home. 5.) What is your favorite Longhorn color and/or pattern? Roam or Black & White. 6.) Where did you earn your first award? What type of award? First major award was 1st place junior showmanship at the NTLBA spring show in Glen Rose in 2012. 7.) What is your funniest TLBT moment? When Caden said his muscles were bigger than Matthew’s head. 8.)What has been your biggest challenge showing Longhorns? Keeping my animals clean.

44 | April 2018

9.) What is your favorite movie? Jurassic Park 10.) Do you enjoy showing Longhorns and why? Yes, because it’s fun! 11.) What person has influenced you the most? My Mom. 12.) If you were going to be turned into a mythical creature, what would you want to be? Cerberus 13.) What is your favorite quote? Why? Different day, different judge and another chance to try your best (my mom’s favorite saying to us at shows) 14.) What is your favorite season? Why? Fall - because it’s my birthday season! 15.) What do you want to be when you grow up? I’m not sure yet. 16.) What is the best part about being a TLBT member? The people! 17.) What advice would you give a newcomer to TLBT? Never give up!

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


SHOW RESULTS COLORADO STATE FAIR #1 September 3, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. FCL PISTOL ANNIE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO 2. FCL DOMINO 17, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 5: 1. ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion: FCL PISTOL ANNIE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: FCL DOMINO 17, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 8: 1. JR LUNA MISS B HAVEN, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. BAR D RED ELEGANCE, Keith & Tina DuBose, Ben Wheeler, TX CLASS 9: 1. MS LIBERTY BELLE SH, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. BAR D LELIA, Keith & Tina DuBose, Ben Wheeler, TX CLASS 10: 1. ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 11: 1. FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO 2. SALTILLO MIZTY 58, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Senior Champion: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: JR LUNA MISS B HAVEN, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: JR LUNA MISS B HAVEN, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 16: 1. FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO 2. RUNBELING DRAGON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 17: 1. FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion: FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 23: 1. CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO 2. ANDERS PECOS MAZE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 24: 1. ANDERS RAFFLE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Junior Champion: CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: ANDERS RAFFLE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 28: 1. ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. JR HAWKEYE BRANDON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 29: 1. SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. CARSON’S NEED FOR SPEED, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

OPEN FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 5: 1. RAFTER J2 BUSY BODY, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX 2. WINDY POINT SELA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Junior Champion: RAFTER J2 BUSY BODY, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 9: 1. WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 10: 1. RAFTER J2 TEXAS CALICHE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX 2. WINDY POINT PAGE JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 11: 1. WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. WINDY POINT GYPSY JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Senior Champion: WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: RAFTER J2 TEXAS CALICHE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Female Grand Champion: WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: RAFTER J2 TEXAS CALICHE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. BLANCA CALIENTE, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 17: 1. SALTILLO SHARI 21, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. WINDY POINT SAMOA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 18: 1. WINDY POINT PAWNEE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. SALTILLO OUTBACK ZANIA20, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 19: 1. SALTILLO CG 305, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. WINDY POINT SHAWNEE RED, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Mature Female Champion: SALTILLO CG 305, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PAWNEE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

CLASS 8: 1. JR LUNA MISS B HAVEN, Mikayla Dyess, MANSFIELD, TX 2. BAR D RED ELEGANCE, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 9: 1. BAR D RUSTY LYNN, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX 2. BAR D TELITHA, Shay Speer, BURLESON, TX CLASS 10: 1. JR ROCKIE ROCKDALE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX 2. BAR D MINTA, Nina Stephens, BURLESON, TX CLASS 11: 1. DV PEACHES, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. SALTILLO MIZTY 58, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Senior Champion: DV PEACHES, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO MIZTY 58, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Grand Champion: DV PEACHES, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: SALTILLO MIZTY 58, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 19: 1. ANDERS WINDY LEGEND, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. SALTILLO IRISH AGIE 73, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 20: 1. ANDERS RAFFLE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion: ANDERS RAFFLE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS WINDY LEGEND, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

YOUTH STEER DIVISION CLASS 31: 1. VIOLET’S VICTORY, Shay Speer, BURLESON, TX 2. BAR D MI6, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 32: 1. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX 2. MORNIN’S SHADOW, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 33: 1. TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX 2. SHOTGUN SAM, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. BJM TOMAHAWK, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 2. TACO BUENO, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 2: 1. KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 1. DARK ROAST, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Junior Champion: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Junior Champion Reserve: SGT MAJOR KETTLE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 5: 1. WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. JR’S HOOK’EM GO TEXAS, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Steer Senior Champion: WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Steer Senior Champion Reserve: JR’S HOOK’EM GO TEXAS, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Steer Grand Champion: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Grand Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

COLORADO STATE FAIR #2

September 4, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. FCL PISTOL ANNIE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 5: 1. ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion: ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 9: 1. WF ZIGGY’S MELODY, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 10: 1. ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 11: 1. FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO 2. SALTILLO MIZTY 58, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Female Senior Champion: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Female Grand Champion: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 16: 1. FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 17: 1. FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion: FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 23: 1. CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO 2. ANDERS WINDY LEGEND, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Junior Champion: CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: ANDERS WINDY LEGEND, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE 2. ANDERS CONFETTI, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 5: 1. ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

CLASS 24: 1. ANDERS RAFFLE, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 28: 1. ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 29: 1. SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. OBRYANS HOME RUN, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD

Youth Female Junior Champion: SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Ella Wieczorek, HICKMAN, NE Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

Haltered Bull Senior Champion: SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

April 2018 | 45


SHOW RESULTS Haltered Bull Grand Champion: SALTILLO AGIE UP 67, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 5: 1. RAFTER J2 BUSY BODY, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX 2. WINDY POINT SELA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Junior Champion: WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: RAFTER J2 BUSY BODY, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 10: 1. WINDY POINT PADOT JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. RAFTER J2 TEXAS CALICHE, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX CLASS 11: 1. WINDY POINT GYPSY JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Senior Champion: WINDY POINT GYPSY JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion: WINDY POINT GYPSY JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PAOLA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. HIGH HARMONY, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 17: 1. WINDY POINT SAMOA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. SALTILLO SHARI 21, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 18: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACK ZANIA20, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. WINDY POINT SIS, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 19: 1. SALTILLO CG 305, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. WINDY POINT SHAWNEE RED, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Free Mature Female Champion: SALTILLO OUTBACK ZANIA20, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: SALTILLO CG 305, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE 2. ANDERS CONFETTI, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 5: 1. ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Junior Champion: ANDERS CANDY SPICE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: SALTILLO OUTBACK AGIE 74, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE CLASS 8: 1. JR LUNA MISS B HAVEN, Mikayla Dyess, MANSFIELD, TX 2. BAR D RED ELEGANCE, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 9: 1. BAR D RUSTY LYNN, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX 2. BAR D TELITHA, SHEY SPEER, BEN WHEELER, TXCLASS 10: 1. ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 11: 1. ANDERS MAPLE DUST, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. DV PEACHES, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Senior Champion: ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: BAR D RUSTY LYNN, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: ANDERS PRAIRIE ROSE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: BAR D RUSTY LYNN, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

ARK-LA-TEX ANNUAL FALL SHOW Oct 27, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. JCG ROXANNE, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 4: 1. CHAPARRAL SWEETCITYWOMAN, Doug and Deborah Burkham, Red Oak, TX 2. ANCHOR T SUNRISE DIXIE, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX CLASS 5: 1. DIAMOND Q CLORINDA, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX 2. KETTLE’S AH-CHE-WAWA, John R. Randolph, SMITHVILLE, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q CLORINDA, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 8: 1. 4E KIMBER, Megan Ekstrom, KEMAH, TX 2. R4 CHOCOLATE S’MORE, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 9: 1. 5SL MALIBU, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX 2. JCG CHARLIE 1042, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 10: 1. CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX 2. JCG SWEET CAROLINE, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 11: 1. SUNRISE SEECO, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX 2. SVR CARMELLO, Stephen P. Head, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: 5SL MALIBU, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: CF CRYSTAL FIND, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 16: 1. LLC LADY BIRD, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. PK’S BUTTER CREAM, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 17: 1. ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: LLC LADY BIRD, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: PK’S BUTTER CREAM, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 22: 1. ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX 2. JCG ABERDEEN, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 23: 1. TL CHAIN BREAKER, Phillips Longhorns, ANGLETON, TX 2. RAFTER M REAL STUFF, D.L. & Mary McCoy, HICO, TX CLASS 24: 1. WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, Junction, TX 2. HPBT THE ERNEST WAY, Hacienda PBT, LLC, HUMBLE, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, Junction, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: TL CHAIN BREAKER, Phillips Longhorns, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 27: 1. JK OVER EASY, Jacob & Kathryn Juneau, DURANT, OK 2. IRON NOGGIN, Jeremy and Tina Johnson, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 28: 1. SARCEE DUECES WILD, Bruce and Connie Ollive, BIG SANDY, TX 2. HI 5’S HEATWAVE, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX CLASS 29: 1. REDSTAR THAT’S RIGHT, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX 2. 4E MAVERICK, Megan Ekstrom, KEMAH, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: SARCEE DUECES WILD, Bruce and Connie Ollive, BIG SANDY, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: REDSTAR THAT’S RIGHT, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: SARCEE DUECES WILD, Bruce and Connie Ollive, BIG SANDY, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: WINNIN’ KID, Kathy Palladini, Junction, TX

CLASS 19: 1. ANDERS PECOS MAZE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. ANDERS WINDY LEGEND, Cash Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 20: 1. ANDERS RAFFLE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

PRODUCE OF DAM CLASS 34: 1. SAKE-SALLY, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX

Youth Bull Grand Champion: ANDERS RAFFLE, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: ANDERS PECOS MAZE, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

GET OF SIRE CLASS 35: 1. SH DOCTOR FEEL GOOD, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 31: 1. VIOLET’S VICTORY, Shay Speer, BURLESON, TX 2. BAR D MI6, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 32: 1. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX 2. MORNIN’S SHADOW, Dylan Matthews, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 33: 1. SHOTGUN SAM, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX 2. TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX

CLASS 4: 1. DBL-K FIRE’S JUBILEE, Kathy Palladini, Junction, TX CLASS 5: 1. AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX 2. 5SL BLACK DIAMOND, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX

Youth Steer Senior Champion: SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: SHOTGUN SAM, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX

CLASS 9: 1. TH MISS REINDROP, Savannah Duncan, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. 5SL LUCY, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX 2. CR CUPID’S CANDY HEART, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX CLASS 11: 1. MW AIN’T I SWEET, Skylar Vasil, ARLINGTON, TX

Youth Steer Grand Champion: SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: SHOTGUN SAM, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. BJM TOMAHAWK, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 2. JOHN WAYNE’S CHISHOLM, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 2: 1. KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM 2. DARK ROAST, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Junior Champion: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM Steer Junior Champion Reserve: BJM TOMAHAWK, W.R. Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM CLASS 5: 1. WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Steer Senior Champion: WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Steer Grand Champion: WINDY POINT STOCKYARD, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO Steer Grand Champion Reserve: KABAR, Joni Van Gundy, JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM

Free Female Junior Champion: AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: DBL-K FIRE’S JUBILEE, Kathy Palladini, Junction, TX

Female Senior Champion: 5SL LUCY, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: TH MISS REINDROP, Savannah Duncan, ARLINGTON, TX Free Female Grand Champion: 5SL LUCY, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX CLASS 19: 1. SAKE-SALLY, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX Free Mature Female Champion: SAKE-SALLY, Grace Cattle Company, LLC, FORT WORTH, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. JCG ROXANNE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX 2. REDSTAR AMERICAN BEAUTY, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 4: 1. STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. BH NITE STAR, Ashlyn Holson, ALBANY, TX CLASS 5: 1. TL MINNIE PEARL, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. AMR FANCY FRILLS, Chloe Nichols, RED OAK, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: TL MINNIE PEARL, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: STRIKIN’ R MINNIE, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX

46 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


CLASS 8: 1. OL PLAYLIKE, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. APPLE BLOSSOM TP, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 9: 1. DIAMOND Q SONORA, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. SR 007’S CELINE CHEX 614, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 10: 1. TTT ROYAL RAINA, John Kofnovec, WORTHAM, TX 2. DIAMOND Q KYLEE, Kydie Edwards, ALBANY, TX CLASS 11: 1. SVR CARMELLO, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX 2. BH CHAPSTICK, Ashlyn Holson, ALBANY, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: SVR CARMELLO, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q SONORA, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: SVR CARMELLO, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q SONORA, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 18: 1. JCG ABERDEEN, Matthew Wallace, SUNSET, TX 2. CINCO DE MAYO 67, Sierra Wood, LEANDER, TX CLASS 19: 1. CVL JSC RODEO GENE, Skylar Vasil, ARLINGTON, TX 2. OL PROPLAY, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX CLASS 20: 1. OL DURATOR, Lainey Lampier, MALAKOFF, TX 2. WINNIN’ KID, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 21: 1. JK OVER EASY, Lydia Salsbury, LEAGUE CITY, TX 2. AMR COLUMBUS, Chloe Nichols, RED OAK, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: JK OVER EASY, Lydia Salsbury, LEAGUE CITY, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: JCG ABERDEEN, Matthew Wallace, SUNSET, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. JR’S TRIPLE NICKEL, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX 2. SKH OH HENRY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 27: 1. REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX 2. TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve:TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 30: 1. SARCEE FIRE FOX, Cutter Ollive, YANTIS, TX 2. KDK JUNEBUG SENKO, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 31: 1. ACR BIG GUY, Trinity Summerfill, CROSBY, TX 2. JTW SADDLEBACKS SONG 622, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 32: 1. DUNN MIGHTY MOUSE, Kyrah Schanbachler, CLEVELAND, TX 2. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 33: 1. CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX 2. TACO BUENO, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: TACO BUENO, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TACO BUENO, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. TEMPTATIONS TAZO T, Skylar Vasil, ARLINGTON, TX 2. BRAVADO BCB, Circle Double C Ranch, TAFT, TX CLASS 2: 1. 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX 2. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Steer Junior Champion: 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX

ARK-LA-TEX ANNUAL FALL SHOW POINTS ONLY Oct 27, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. REDSTAR AMERICAN BEAUTY, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. JCG ROXANNE, James Caden Grace, SUNSET, TX CLASS 4: 1. RINGMAN’S ELLIE 752, Chase Hayman, HOUSTON, TX 2. SKH SUMTHIN’ PRECIOUS, Cameran Emory, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 5: 1. KETTLE’S AH-CHE-WA-WA, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. RB STORMY MORNING, Chase Hayman, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: KETTLE’S AH-CHE-WA-WA, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: RINGMAN’S ELLIE 752, Chase Hayman, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 8: 1. BRR BELLA BAMBI, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX 2. APPLE BLOSSOM TP, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 9: 1. DAUNTLESS KILL CUTELY, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. SR 007’S CELINE CHEX 614, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 10: 1. DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. BF SUNRISE DIAMOND, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 11: 1. SVR CARMELLO, Annalisa Romero, HOUSTON, TX 2. JKG REGINA JAWGE, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: DAUNTLESS KILL CUTELY, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: DAUNTLESS KILL CUTELY, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 18: 1. CINCO DE MAYO 67, Sierra Wood, LEANDER, TX 2. RAFTER M PRETTY BOY, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX CLASS 19: 1. TL CHAIN BREAKER, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX 2. CVL JSC RODEO GENE, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 20: 1. WINNIN’ KID, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX 2. HPBT THE ERNEST WAY, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 21: 1. IRON NOGGIN, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. JK OVER EASY, Kelli Jones, HOUSTON, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. SKH HE’S ROCK SOLID, Kelli Jones, HOUSTON, TX 2. SKH OH HENRY, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX CLASS 27: 1. TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. NETOAPLIS ECR, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: TETON SIOUX, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: NETOAPLIS ECR, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 30: 1. ROPE BURN BCB, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. JTW GHOST WITH THE MOST, D’Marcus Adams, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 31: 1. ACR BIG GUY, Trinity Summerfill, CROSBY, TX 2. BZB BRUISER, Sierra Wood, LEANDER, TX CLASS 32: 1. CR STRIKING GOOD LOOKS, Jodie Ging, PALACIOS, TX 2. DUNN MIGHTY MOUSE, Kyrah Schanbachler, CLEVELAND, TX CLASS 33: 1. REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: CAMP BOSS, Jason Moore, ARLINGTON, TX

STATE FAIR OF LOUISIANA Nov 9, 2017 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. SUNRISE SELECT, David & Deborah Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. DREAMLOVER, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 5: 1. DISCOVERY DANCER C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. JR’S COUNTRY GIRL DIANA, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: SUNRISE SELECT, David & Deborah Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: DREAMLOVER, The Cattlerack Ranch, BOWIE, TX CLASS 8: 1. TC3 MISS FARMER, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX 2. LADY GAGA 10/16, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX CLASS 9: 1. 5SL MALIBU, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX 2. SANDDOLLAR BELLA ANGELINA 19/6, Aaliyah Haslip, TERRELL, TX CLASS 10: 1. SANDDOLLAR HIGHBROW LADY, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. MS SAUCY LADY SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS CLASS 11: 1. CT SYDNEY, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX 2. JR SOPHIA CAITLIN, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: CT SYDNEY, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: TC3 MISS FARMER, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: SUNRISE SELECT, David & Deborah Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: CT SYDNEY, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX CLASS 16: 1. RUNBELING DRAGON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. PK’S BUTTER CREAM, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 17: 1. ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX

Steer Grand Champion: 2LB ELI, Bronson Baker, BRENHAM, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

Youth Bull Grand Champion: WINNIN’ KID, Sara Jennings, ANGLETON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: TL CHAIN BREAKER, Clarice Francis, ANGLETON, TX

Haltered Mature Female Champion: ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: RUNBELING DRAGON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 22: 1. 5SL RUBBLE, 5 Star Livestock, DAYTON, TX CLASS 23: 1. CT RED RAIDER, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX 2. CVL JSC RODEO GENE, Clinard Longhorns Partnership, ROCKDALE, TX CLASS 24: 1. TC3 BULLETT HOLE, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX 2. HPBT THE ERNEST WAY, Hacienda PBT, LLC, HUMBLE, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: TC3 BULLETT HOLE, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: CT RED RAIDER, Joe Tucker, PARADISE, TX CLASS 27: 1. ACR GERONIMO, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. IRON NOGGIN, Jeremy and Tina Johnson, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 28: 1. DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS 2. HI 5’S HEATWAVE, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX CLASS 29: 1. HI 5’S THUNDERSTRUCK, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX 2. REDSTAR THAT’S RIGHT, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: HI 5’S THUNDERSTRUCK, Infinity Ranch Land and Cattle, BURLESON, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion: TC3 BULLETT HOLE, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: DEJA VU SH, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS PRODUCE OF DAM CLASS 34: 1. ALLY CHEX, Cody M. Himmelreich, DAYTON, TX 2. TATER TOT 505, Chris D. & Brandi Lindsey, LAUREL, MS

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. MELO SKYKNIGHT C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX CLASS 5: 1. DISCOVERY SALLY C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Free Female Junior Champion: DISCOVERY SALLY C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: MELO SKYKNIGHT C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

April 2018 | 47


SHOW RESULTS CLASS 8: 1. TC3 PEARL ROSE, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX CLASS 10: 1. DISCOVERY JUNO C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX CLASS 11: 1. BE MELO C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX 2. PREACHER’S KATRINA C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Free Female Senior Champion: BE MELO C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: TC3 PEARL ROSE, Todd Williams, DALLAS, TX Free Female Grand Champion: DISCOVERY SALLY C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: BE MELO C P, Carla Payne, SLIDELL, TX CLASS 16: 1. CO GRAND SAFARI, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX CLASS 19: 1. RAFTER J2 BRAZOS GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX Free Mature Female Champion: CO GRAND SAFARI, John and Sandra Juarez, SANGER, TX Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: RAFTER J2 BRAZOS GIRL, Sylvia Johnson, ANTHONY, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. REDSTAR AMERICAN BEAUTY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. JR’S HAZEL’S SUGAR, Mary Margaret Morin, BURLESON, TX CLASS 4: 1. MELO SKYKNIGHT C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX 2. 5SL LIBERTY BELLE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 5: 1. HI 5’S SANGRIA, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX 2. DISCOVERY SALLY C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: MELO SKYKNIGHT C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: REDSTAR AMERICAN BEAUTY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 8: 1. KETTLE’S CHOCOLATE CHIP, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. BRAZOS LUCY 691, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 9: 1. SANDDOLLAR BELLA ANGELINA 19/6, Aaliyah Haslip, TERRELL, TX 2. FIREBALL FRANNIE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX CLASS 10: 1. SANDDOLLAR HIGHBROW LADY, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX 2. APPLE DUMPLING KISSE, Kyrah Schanbachler, CLEVELAND, TX CLASS 11: 1. BE MELO C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX 2. KETTLE’S GARNET, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: BE MELO C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: SANDDOLLAR HIGHBROW LADY, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: BE MELO C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: MELO SKYKNIGHT C P, Savannah Donahue, DECATUR, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 18: 1. 5SL RUBBLE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX 2. SHY’S RAPTOR, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX CLASS 19: 1. CVL JSC RODEO GENE, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. CVL JSC RODEO PRINCE, Chase Hayman, HOUSTON, TX CLASS 20: 1. HPBT THE ERNEST WAY, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. BAR D ROYAL SAVAGE, Alexandria Rodriguez, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 21: 1. IRON NOGGIN, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX 2. CVL JSC HOMERUN HAMERMAN, Chase Hayman, HOUSTON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: 5SL RUBBLE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: IRON NOGGIN, Skyler Joachimi, HOUSTON, TX

Haltered Female Junior Champion: OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: OBRYANS 171, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 9: 1. WF ZIGGY’S MELODY, Nicky Adams and Fayne McDowell, COLORADO SPRINGS, CO CLASS 10: 1. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 11: 1. FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Senior Champion: OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Female Grand Champion: OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD CLASS 16: 1. FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO CLASS 17: 1. FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion: FCL GYPSY QUEEN, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: FCL KEROSENE, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO

OPEN HALTERED BULL DIVISION

CLASS 22: 1. SEDALIA COWBOY CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 23: 1. CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO 2. BOOKER, Art (Sonny) A. Smith, GERING, NE CLASS 24: 1. RACSAN, Art (Sonny) A. Smith, GERING, NE 2. OBRYANS FIRST THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Bull Junior Champion: CALIENTE JAKE, Jill Walkinshaw, ELIZABETH, CO Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: BOOKER, Art (Sonny) A. Smith, GERING, NE CLASS 28: 1. ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 29: 1. OBRYANS HOME RUN, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Bull Senior Champion: ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: OBRYANS HOME RUN, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD Haltered Bull Grand Champion: ANDERS MAPLE RANGER, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: OBRYANS HOME RUN, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD

FREE FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 4: 1. DIXIELAND DELIGHT 72, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO CLASS 5: 1. WINDY POINT SELA, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

Free Female Junior Champion: DIXIELAND DELIGHT 72, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Free Female Junior Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PATSY, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

Youth Steer Junior Champion: REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: SHY’S APPLE JACK, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX

CLASS 9: 1. WINDY POINT ANNA JAMIN, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. BLING BLING COWGIRL CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 10: 1. WYO SILVER, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY 2. STONYRIFIC, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 11: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACKHONEY505, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. STEEL MAGNOLIA 52, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 27: 1. REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX 2. SHY’S APPLE JACK, Shyanne McClendon, MARSHALL, TX

CLASS 30: 1. SSS ABBY’S SONNY DAY, Nina Stephens, BURLESON, TX 2. SARCEE FIRE FOX, Cutter Ollive, YANTIS, TX CLASS 31: 1. AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. VIOLET’S VICTORY, Shay Speer, BURLESON, TX CLASS 32: 1. DUNN MIGHTY MOUSE, Kyrah Schanbachler, CLEVELAND, TX 2. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, Hannah Norman, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 33: 1. REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: REDSTAR RADAR, William Coleman Yarborough, FERRIS, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX 2. SARCEE ZORRO, Walker Hays, DALLAS, TX CLASS 2: 1. JR PRIDE OF ECR CASTLE G, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Steer Junior Champion: JR PRIDE OF ECR CASTLE G, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX Steer Grand Champion: JR PRIDE OF ECR CASTLE G, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX

NATIONAL WESTERN STOCK SHOW Jan 19, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

Free Female Grand Champion: SALTILLO OUTBACKHONEY505, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Female Grand Champion Reserve: STEEL MAGNOLIA 52, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 16: 1. WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO 2. MANDOLIN RAIN, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 18: 1. SALTILLO OUTBACK ZANIA20, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE 2. VIVIAN 01, Toby Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 19: 1. TARI’S PRIDE, Sandcreek Longhorns, BETHUNE, CO Free Mature Female Champion: SALTILLO OUTBACK ZANIA20, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Mature Female Champion Reserve: WINDY POINT PENELOPE, Ronald C. or Lana K. Pearson, FOWLER, CO

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 3: 1. FCL BARRACUDA, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE 2. ANDERS MAPLE WINDS, SAVANNAH WESTON, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 4: 1. FCL DOMINO 17, BRODY WESTON, GREELEY, CO 2. OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Jimmie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD CLASS 5: 1. MS DELILAH SH, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK 2. OBRYANS 171, Jimmie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD Youth Female Junior Champion: MS DELILAH SH, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: OBRYANS 171, Jimmie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD

CLASS 3: 1. FCL BARRACUDA, Fossil Creek Longhorns, GREELEY, CO 2. ANDERS MAPLE WINDS, Art Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 4: 1. OBRYANS ROAN THRILL, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD 2. SALTILLO AGIES GAL 706, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE CLASS 5: 1. OBRYANS 171, Scot & Jodie O’Bryan, BELVIDERE, SD 2. MS DELILAH SH, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK

48 | April 2018

Free Female Senior Champion: SALTILLO OUTBACKHONEY505, Damrow Longhorns, ROCA, NE Free Female Senior Champion Reserve: STEEL MAGNOLIA 52, Kris Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

CLASS 10: 1. OBRYANS IRISH LEGEND, Ty Anders, CRAWFORD, NE CLASS 11: 1. FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE 2. STEEL MAGNOLIA 52, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Female Senior Champion: FCL BLACK EYED GYPSY, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: STEEL MAGNOLIA 52, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


Youth Female Grand Champion: MS DELILAH SH, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: FCL BARRACUDA, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE

Haltered Bull Senior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q RAWHIDE, Quary/ Rangel Partnership, PRAGUE, OK

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

Haltered Bull Grand Champion: BZB BADA BING BADA BOOM, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN Haltered Bull Grand Champion Reserve: AMR COLUMBUS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX

CLASS 18: 1. SEDALIA COWBOY CPL, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 19: 1. SALTILLO UPPER CUT 702, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE 2. THE RHINESTONE COWBOY, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY CLASS 20: 1. OBRYANS FIRST THRILL, Harlie Gulbraa, WALLACE, SD 2. AD RAIN TOTEM 2K1 727, Dalli Anders, CRAWFORD, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion: SALTILLO UPPER CUT 702, Dylaney Rose Georges, ROCA, NE Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: THE RHINESTONE COWBOY, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 26: 1. FIESTA COWBOY CPL, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 27: 1. THE PIANO MAN, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Steer Junior Champion: FIESTA COWBOY CPL, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK Youth Steer Reserve Junior Champion: THE PIANO MAN, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Youth Steer Grand Champion: FIESTA COWBOY CPL, Cheyenne Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. TRIPLE CROWN, Barbara J. Fillmore, ELBERT, CO 2. IRISH COWBOY CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK Steer Junior Champion: TRIPLE CROWN, Barbara J. Fillmore, ELBERT, CO Steer Junior Champion Reserve: IRISH COWBOY CPL, David & Kimberley Nikodym, NEWCASTLE, OK CLASS 5: 1. BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Senior Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion: BN JIM REEVES, Ryan Johnson, BIG HORN, WY Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TRIPLE CROWN, Barbara J. Fillmore, ELBERT, CO

SAN ANGELO STOCK SHOW Feb 16, 2018 OPEN HALTERED FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. BZB SKIPPER’S MOONRAKER, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 2: 1. ROSEY AKAMAI MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. ANCHOR T BLACK PEARL, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX CLASS 3: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. C2R POP TART, Copper Creek Ranch, AUSTIN, TX CLASS 4: 1. PLR JU JU BELLA, Allen & Suzanne Perry, EVANT, TX 2. ANCHOR T SUNRISE DIXIE, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX CLASS 5: 1. AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX 2. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion: AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX Haltered Female Junior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 8: 1. HD SASSY SWEETIE, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. SS ELLIOTT, James Todd Sanford, SAN ANGELO, TX CLASS 9: 1. JP WIND IN THE WILLOWS, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX 2. MS GUINEVERE SH, Kendall Johnson, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 10: 1. MISS TEXAS DEA, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX 2. JR ROCKIE ROCKDALE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 11: 1. SS SHOWGIRL, James Todd Sanford, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion: MISS TEXAS DEA, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX Haltered Female Senior Champion Reserve: JP WIND IN THE WILLOWS, Rick & Cori Garcia, HICO, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion: MISS TEXAS DEA, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX Haltered Female Grand Champion Reserve: AMR FANCY FRILLS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX CLASS 16: 1. GYPSY MERLOT, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX 2. PLR TEXAS EUREKA, Randy & Catherine Morris, TUSCOLA, TX CLASS 17: 1. ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. HO HAY YOU REINDEER, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion: ECR SPICY RANGERETTE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX Haltered Mature Female Champion Reserve: GYPSY MERLOT, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX CLASS 21: 1. SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 22: 1. BZB READY, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX 2. ANCHOR T CAPT ANCHOR MAN, Anchor T Ranch, KEMAH, TX CLASS 23: 1. BZB BADA BING BADA BOOM, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX CLASS 24: 1. BAR D ROYAL SAVAGE, Keith & Tina DuBose, Ben Wheeler, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion: BZB BADA BING BADA BOOM, Brown’s Longhorns, SAN ANTONIO, TX Haltered Bull Junior Champion Reserve: SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX ANTONIO, TX CLASS 27: 1. AMR COLUMBUS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX 2. DIAMOND Q RAWHIDE, Quary/ Rangel Partnership, PRAGUE, OK CLASS 28: 1. HI 5’S SHARP SHOOTER, Randy & Catherine Morris, TUSCOLA, TX 2. JR HAWKEYE BRANDON, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX CLASS 29: 1. CARSON’S NEED FOR SPEED, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. FENCE MONEY FRED, John & Judy Moore, TUSCOLA, TX Haltered Bull Senior Champion: AMR COLUMBUS, Wilton and Carolyn Wilton, COUPLAND, TX

YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. ROSEY AKAMAI MOON, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX CLASS 3: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. REDSTAR AMERICAN BEAUTY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX CLASS 4: 1. DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. DIAMOND Q ANNALEE, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 5: 1. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX 2. HD SAMSONITE’S SABLE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 8: 1. SS ELLIOTT, Mattie Jo Sanford, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. DG SITTIN’ AUTUMN, Chamelia Ray, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 9: 1. MS LIBERTY BELLE SH, Nina Stephens, BURLESON, TX 2. DAUNTLESS KILL CUTELY, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 10: 1. DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. ROCKING T CHARLOTTE, Emma Stapp, ALVARADO, TX CLASS 11: 1. KETTLE’S GARNET, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 11: 2. DIAMOND Q SERINA, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: KETTLE’S GARNET, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: KETTLE’S GARNET, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: DAUNTLESSROAMINGCATHOLIC, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 16: 1. TH MYSTERY MAN, Chamelia Ray, ARLINGTON, TX 2. FLYNP SWEET RAINBEAUX T, Savannah Duncan, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 17: 1. BRR TEX, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX 2. SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 18: 1. SR AJ, Jaelyn Young, TERRELL, TX 2. RAFTER M PRETTY BOY, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX CLASS 19: 1. BRR PAOLO, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX 2. EJS KING RA, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 20: 1. DAUNTLESS IRON TAIL, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 21: 1. AMR COLUMBUS, Chloe Nichols, RED OAK, TX 2. DIAMOND Q RAWHIDE, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: AMR COLUMBUS, Chloe Nichols, RED OAK, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q RAWHIDE, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. TH BLITZEN’S GUS, Jaelyn Young, TERRELL, TX CLASS 26: 1. V BAR PRINCIPE, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX 2. SCATTERGUN, Lucinda Endy, SEYMOUR, TX CLASS 27: 1. BZB ZIPPITY DO DA, Wyndser Baker, HELOTES, TX 2. REDSTAR CHILL WILLS, Alyssa Brady, RED OAK, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: BZB ZIPPITY DO DA, Wyndser Baker, HELOTES, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: V BAR PRINCIPE, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 30: 1. COWBOY HOUDINI, Braylin Miller, COLEMAN, TX 2. DG HASHTAG JUMA, Logan Beaty, SEYMOUR, TX CLASS 31: 1. AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. VIOLET’S VICTORY, Jillian Ramos, MANSFIELD, TX CLASS 32: 1. REDSTAR CASH MONEY, Rylee Yarborough, FERRIS, TX 2. TEMPTATIONS TAZO T, Skylar Vasil, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 33: 1. TA GUNS ‘N ROSES, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX 2. TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: A GUNS ‘N ROSES, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: TACO BUENO, Corey Smith, MANSFIELD, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: BZB ZIPPITY DO DA, Wyndser Baker, HELOTES, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TA GUNS ‘N ROSES, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX

TROPHY STEER DIVISION

CLASS 1: 1. SGT MAJOR KETTLE, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 1. TACO BUENO, JR Richardson Ranch, GRANDVIEW, TX 2. COWBOY HOUDINI, Braylin Miller, COLEMAN, TX 2. RS CLANCY, Jax Kenney, CANYON, TX CLASS 2: 1. TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX 2. R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX Steer Junior Champion: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX Steer Junior Champion Reserve: R4 RESISTANCE, Justin & Ronda Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 5: 1. TH COYOTE RED, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX 2. VNR BLUEGRASS, Braylin Miller, COLEMAN, TX Steer Senior Champion: TH COYOTE RED, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Steer Senior Champion Reserve: VNR BLUEGRASS, Braylin Miller, COLEMAN, TX Steer Grand Champion: TH COYOTE RED, Dennis and Judy Urbantke, SAN ANGELO, TX Steer Grand Champion Reserve: TTT REAL MCCOY, Cody Garcia, HICO, TX

SAN ANGELO STOCK SHOW POINTS ONLY Feb 16, 2018 YOUTH FEMALE DIVISION

CLASS 2: 1. ROSEY AKAMAI MOON, Cason Rangel, ALVORD, TX CLASS 3: 1. CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX 2. DIAMOND Q MAYLINDA, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 4: 1. DIAMOND Q LANORA, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. DIAMOND Q ANNALEE, Jacob

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April 2018 | 49


SHOW RESULTS Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 5: 1. CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX 2. HD SAMSONITE’S SABLE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Junior Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Junior Champion Reserve: CHAPARRAL SKYELINE, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX

Scholarship Applications Due 4/30/18

CLASS 8: 1. RS TIGER, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX 2. DG SITTIN’ AUTUMN, Chamelia Ray, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 9: 1. DAUNTLESS KILL CUTELY, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX CLASS 10: 1. DADDY’S DREAM CRUSHER, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. EJS CLEOPATRA, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 11: 1. TTT DIZZY DIVA, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. DIAMOND Q SERINA, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Senior Champion: TTT DIZZY DIVA, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Senior Champion Reserve: DIAMOND Q SERINA, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Female Grand Champion: CHAPARRAL GALA, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Female Grand Champion Reserve: TTT DIZZY DIVA, Allison D. Lowrie, RHOME, TX

YOUTH BULL DIVISION

CLASS 16: 1. FLYNP SWEET RAINBEAUX T, Savannah Duncan, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 17: 1. SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. EJS SEBA, Evelyn Sabio, BOYD, TX CLASS 18: 1. RAFTER M PRETTY BOY, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. BRR SOLDATO, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 19: 1. EJS KING RA, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX 2. EJS KING TUT, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX CLASS 20: 1. DAUNTLESS IRON TAIL, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 21: 1. SLICK JAWGE STRAIT CR, Emily Ray, ARLINGTON, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion: EJS KING RA, Justin Sabio, Jr., BOYD, TX Youth Bull Grand Champion Reserve: SHOOT 4 THE MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX

YOUTH STEER DIVISION

CLASS 25: 1. TH BLITZEN’S GUS, Jaelyn Young, TERRELL, TX CLASS 26: 1. TS RED RIVER ACE, Zoe Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX 2. V BAR PRINCIPE, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX CLASS 27: 1. NETOAPLIS ECR, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX 2. BRR JULIUS, Oran Chambliss, CROWLEY, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion Reserve: NETOAPLIS ECR, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX Youth Steer Junior Champion: TS RED RIVER ACE, Zoe Robertson, LUBBOCK, TX CLASS 30: 1. COWBOY HOUDINI, Braylin Miller, COLEMAN, TX 2. TH T-BONE 44, Emily Ray, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 31: 1. AUCKLAND MOON, CrisseiA’ne Meador, TERRELL, TX 2. JTW SADDLEBACKS SONG 622, Joseph Gerlach, DECATUR, TX CLASS 32: 1. HS THUNDERBOLT, Lucinda Endy, SEYMOUR, TX 2. TEMPTATIONS TAZO T, Skylar Vasil, ARLINGTON, TX CLASS 33: 1. SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX 2. REDSTAR MOST IMPRESSIVE, Gabby Curtis, LANCASTER, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion: HS THUNDERBOLT, Lucinda Endy, SEYMOUR, TX Youth Steer Senior Champion Reserve: SSS ABBY’S PISTOL PETE, JayCee Parsons, FORT WORTH, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion: HS THUNDERBOLT, Lucinda Endy, SEYMOUR, TX Youth Steer Grand Champion Reserve: NETOAPLIS ECR, Jacob Daniel Lowrie, RHOME, TX

Go to www.tlbaa.org and click Events for all of your show information needs! Find links to The Latest Youth and Animal Points World Show Information Official Handbook Class Breaks Texas Longhorn Breeders of Tomorrow and more... Can’t find what you need? Call the tlbaa office and we’ll be glad to help.

(817) 625-6241 50 | April 2018

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APRIL

TLBAA Breed Advisory Committee’s

Herd Management Guide

SPRING Calving: 1. Weigh your yearling heifers and make necessary culling decisions prior to the start of the breeding season. Make sure that all replacement heifers are weighing at least 65 percent of their mature weight prior to breeding and are exhibiting estrus activity on a regular basis. The post partum interval (interval from calving to first observed estrus) for first– calf heifers is typically 20­–30 days longer than mature cows. Therefore, begin breeding replacement heifers 20–30 days before the rest of the cow herd to allow sufficient time after calving for the heifers to resume estrus activity and join the rest of the cow herd during the breeding season. 2. Continue supplemental feeding as previously recommended. During the first 3–4 months of lactation, nutrient requirements increase substantially. Warm season pasture grasses are dormant until mid–April and provide most of the energy needs, but limited protein, phosphorus and Vitamin A. Sufficient nutrients must be supplied to the lactating females in the form of protein and/or energy supplements as well as mineral and vitamin mixes to meet their nutrient requirements. Feeding 3–4 pounds of a 40 percent CP supplement, 4–6 pounds of a 30 percent CP supplement or 6–8 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement per head per day, should be adequate to meet most protein and energy needs. Choice of appropriate supplement (20 percent CP, 30 percent CP or 40 percent CP) should be based upon cheapest source of protein. Price per pound of protein may be determined by dividing the cost per pound of protein supplement by the percentage of crude protein in the supplement. A source of salt, as well as a good commercial calcium:phosphorus mineral mix with added Vitamin A, should be available on a free choice basis. If your cows are thin in body condition or pasture grass is limited due to overgrazing, then feeding a medium (8–10 percent crude protein) hay free choice plus 2–3 pounds of a 20 percent CP supplement daily or approximately 15–20 pounds of a high quality (15–17 percent crude protein) hay per head per day will provide an excellent source of energy and protein for the females. If winter pasture is available, then the females should not need additional energy or protein supplementation.

3. After calving and before breeding, vaccinate cows for leptospirosis. Check with your veterinarian concerning vaccination for vibrosis and anaplasmosis. 4. If not done previously, semen evaluate bulls. A standard breeding soundness exam should be conducted on all bulls prior to the start of the breeding season. 5. Complete sire selection and order any semen needed for artificial insemination. Plan ahead to have sufficient breeding bulls to service all females. Mature bulls in single sire pastures should be able to service 30–50 females in a 60– 90 day breeding season. Young yearling bulls can be excellent breeders, but reduce the number Photo courtesy of Linda Blackwell of females per bull to 15– 25 head and limit the breeding season to 60 days. Special attention to maintaining good nutritional condition of the young bulls is needed. Yearling bulls should only run with other yearling bulls in multisire pastures. Older bulls will tend to establish a social dominance over young bulls, creating potential problems. 6. Check spraying equipment, dust bags, etc., and purchase needed chemicals for external parasite control.

FALL Calving: 1. Continue a supplemental feeding program until good spring grass is available and calves are weaned. Lactating cows grazing dormant range grass require approximately 3-4 pounds of a 40 percent range cube or 6-8 pounds of a 20 percent range cube daily to meet their protein requirement. If winter pasture is available, forage intake should be sufficient to meet nutrient requirements of lactating females. 2. Vaccinate all heifer calves between four and 10 months of age for brucellosis. 3. As weaning is approaching, consider routine calf management while the calves are still on their dams to reduce stress often associated with weaning. Calves should be vaccinated with a 7-way Clostridial bacterin, vaccinated for IBR-P13-BVD and de-wormed. Cull bull calves should be castrated prior to weaning. 4. Consider limited creep feeding (16 percent crude protein) for calves, nursing older cows, first-calf heifers, or any calves needing additional nutrition.

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April 2018 | 51


ALABAMA

COLORADO

ARKANSAS

FLORIDA

INDIANA

CALIFORNIA

IOWA

KANSAS

KANSAS

LOUISIANA

MISSOURI

MONTANA

NORTH CAROLINA

Need registration or transfer forms? Go to www.tlbba.org 52 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


OKLAHOMA

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS

CENTRAL TEXAS

SOUTH TEXAS

SOUTHEAST TEXAS

OREGON

WEST TEXAS

PENNSYLVANIA

CANADA ALBERTA

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April 2018 | 53


Classifieds Auctioneers

Cattle For Sale BEAVER CREEK LONGHORNS - Est. 1995. Conformation, color, disposition, pedigree and HORNS.  Reasonable prices.  Carole Muchmore, Ponca City, OK.  580 765-9961 (calls only) or email cmuchmor@ poncacity.net. www.beavercreeklonghorns.com

April is showering our Longhorn friends (old, new and soon to be) with GOOD DEALS… • our new SPRING TIME SPECIAL will highlight beautiful trophy steers that will become unforgettable front pasture traffic stoppers. • Also for sale: Females, Cow/Calf Pairs, Heifers and Future Herd Sires For information or to schedule a tour at either of our ranch locations, please call: Dorie Damuth - Flying D Longhorn Ranch 40206 Community Rd. • Magnolia, TX 77354 281-356-8167 • fax: 281-356-2751 dorie27@sbcglobal.net • www.damuthflyingdranch.com Scott Damuth, Legal Counsel • Shery Damuth, Vineyard Consultant sdamuth@damuthlaw.com • Gun Barrel City, TX Law office: 903-887-0088 • Fax: 903-887-2925 Scott Cell: 214-546-3681 • Shery Cell: 940-393-0991

54 | April 2018

Cattle For Sale REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS FOR SALE - Great selection of heifers, herd sire prospects, bulls, cows & pairs...... Offspring of Rip Saw, now 851/2” TTT. We offer lots of horn and color and a lot of variety in bloodlines because we have over 300 longhorns and we’ve been breeding up for a long time. We have over 40 really nice herd sire prospects and over 40 beautiful heifers available. We are using 7 top quality bulls. We’re about 20 minutes off the E TX line below Shreveport in NW LA. I also have straight BUTLERS. New Breeders Welcome!

Dora Thompson Tel 318-872-6329

echoofambush@aol.com•www.sandhillsranch.com

SMALL HERD OF REGISTERED LONGHORNS FOR SALE - Most are Drag Iron and Clear Point breeding. Wayne Starch, Riodosa, NM (806) 797-6358.

LONE WOLF RANCH Dr. Lee and Linda Ragains

918-855-0704 • Sallisaw, OK

www.lonewolfranch.net

BUTLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR BIG-HORNED BUTLER CATTLE.

THATE Cattle Company

Your source for big-horned cattle in the North— utilizing the right bloodlines to produce the horn. Fairmont, Minnesota

507-235-3467

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS

Trade & Barter TRADE YOUR LONGHORNS – We’ll take your bulls and steers in trade for cows, heifers, pairs, herd sires or semen from breed’s top quality bulls. Stonewall Valley Ranch, Fredericksburg, TX. Days 512-454-0476 / Weekends 830-644-2380.

Transportation

FMB Land & Cattle LLC Custom Hauling...Shows....Sales 8ft wide Trailer for Longhorn Care Ron Bailey 254.534.1886 Rodney Brown 682.220.8501

Want an affordable way to let others know about services you offer or livestock for sale? How about that property for sale or lease? Contact Myra today to learn about the options available on the classified page and for pricing. 817-625-6241 x 104 or email myra@tlbaa.org

To Find a Breeder in your area, check out our Breeders Guide or view the Online Breeders Directory.


Advertising Index —A—

—J—

AA Longhorns..............................................52

J.T. Wehring Family Ranch........................53

A & S Land & Cattle.....................................53

Jack Mountain Ranch............................ 9, 53

American Livestock.....................................43

—K—

Anderson, Frank Jr. and III...........................9

King, Terry & Tammy...................................52

Arch Acres.....................................................52

—L—

Astera Meadows..........................................53

Lightning Longhorns..................................53

Autobahn....................................................IBC

Little Ace Cattle Co...................................... 9

—B—

LL Longhorns.................................................9

Bar H Ranch..................................................52

Lodge Creek Longhorns............................52

Beadle Land & Cattle............................. 9, 52

Lone Wolf Ranch.........................................53

Bentwood Ranch.........................................53

Longhorn Sale Pen......................................43

Big Valley Longhorns..................................52

Lucas Ranch.................................................52

BPT Longhorns..............................................9

— M—

Broken Spur Ranch.....................................52

Midwest Sale.............................................. IFC

JUST FOR GRINS HAVE A CUTE PIC?

Send us your photo with a funny caption included! Send your photo with caption to: Texas Longhorn Trails, Attn. Myra, • P.O. Box 6030 • Fort Worth, Texas 76164 or myra@tlbaa.org (Email entries should include address.) Photo may be used in a future issue due to number of responses

Buckhorn Cattle Co....................................53

McCombs Ranches of Texas............... 10-11

Bull Creek Ranch...........................................3

McLeod Ranch...............................................9

I’ll have another lemon cookie mom!

Butler Listings.................................................9

Millennium Futurity..................................... 15

—C—

— N—

Thanks to Lynette Haltom, Haltom Hollar Ranch, for the submission

Caballo Bravo Longhorns..........................52

Northbrook Cattle Company....................53

Cedarview Ranch........................................52

— O—

Champion Genetics....................................35

Oak Hill Farms..............................................35

Christa Cattle Co...........................................9

—R—

—T—

Cliffhanger Genetics................................... 17

R 3 Hilltop Ranch.........................................35

Triple R Ranch (TX)........................................9

—D—

Rancho El Dios.............................................29

Triple S Bar Ranch.......................................53

Dalgood Longhorns......................................9

Red River Longhorn Sale...........................19

TS Adcock Longhorns................................53

DCCI Equipment.........................................39

Rio Vista Ranch..............................................9

—U —

Diamond Q Longhorns..............................53

Rockin Hil Longhorns.................................52

Underwood Longhorns.............................52

Dickinson Cattle Co...................................BC

Rockin I Longhorns.....................................53

—W —

DK Longhorn Ranch...................................52

Rocking P Longhorns.................................. 9

Walker, Ron.................................................. 53

Double A Longhorns..................................52

Rocky Mountain Longhorns.....................52

Westfarms Inc................................................9

—E—

Rolling D Ranch...........................................52

WI Longhorns & Leather............................53

El Coyote Ranch............................................ 1

Running Arrow Longhorns........................39

Wichita Fence Company...........................34

Elkanah Ranch.............................................34

—S—

End of Trail Ranch................................ 21, 52

Safari B Ranch..............................................53

Eyman Bucakaroo Longhorns..................33

Sand Hills Ranch......................................7, 52

—F—

Singing Coyote Ranch...............................53

Falls Creek Longhorns..................................9

SS Longhorns...............................................53

Four Color Press..........................................43

Star Creek Ranch.................................... 5, 53

Flying Diamond Ranch...............................52

Stotts Hideaway Ranch..............................53

—H—

Struthoff Ranch..................................... 27, 53

Helm Cattle Co............................................53

Sunrise Supply............................................. 20

Hickman Longhorns...................................53

—T—

Husky Branding Irons.................................43

Thate Cattle Co.............................................9

—I—

TLBAA Horn Showcse......................... 30-31

ITTLA..............................................................19

TLBAA World Expo............................... 24-25

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UPCOMING ISSUES: May: Brood Cow Edition June: Setting Up Facilities July: A.I. Sire Directory April 2018 | 55


SAVE THE DATE APRIL 2018 APRIL 6-8 • Bayou Classic, West-Cal Arena, Sulphur, LA. Entry Deadline March 23rd. Contact Chris Lindsey, clindsey04@yahoo. com, 601-319-8296 or Ryan Culpepper, Culpepper.Ryan@gmail. com, 940-577-1753. Qualifying Free, Haltered, & Youth. APRIL 13-14 • Blue Ridge Ranch Sale Llano, TX. Bubba Bollier 325-247-6249 or bollier7572@yahoo.com. APRIL 13-15 • Heart of Texas Spring Show, Circle T Arena & Resort, Hamilton, TX. Cori Garcia 479-381-8331 or rafter-m-ranch@hughes. net. Qualifying Haltered, and Youth and Youth Points Only, Trophy Steers, Miniatures. APRIL 15 • 2018 Butler Breeder’s Online Futurity, Deadline for entries is April 15. Winners announced May 1, 2018. James Turner 936-689-1914.

APRIL 20-22 • Rockdale Spring Show, Rockdale Fairgrounds, Rockdale, TX. Sandi Nordhausen (512) 898-2401 or sandi.nordhausen@gmail.com Qualifying Haltered, Youth & Youth Points Only (x2) APRIL 21 • NTLA 37th Annual Sale, Broken Bow, NE. Bonnie Damrow 402-580-3673 or brdamrow6@aol.com. APRIL 28 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com.

MAY 2018 MAY 4-6 • TLBGCA Spring Show, Miracle Farm, Brenham, TX. Stephen Head at 979-549-5270 or headshorns@hotmail.com. Qualifying Haltered & Youth. MAY 5-6 • Red McCombs Fiesta Sale, Johnson City, TX. Alan & Teresa Sparger 210-445-8798 or dodgeram52@yahoo.com. www.redmccombslonghorns.com MAY 11-12 • Millennium Futurity, Red River Sale Barn, Overbrook, OK. Christy Randolph (713) 703-8458 or www.millenniumfuturity.com MAY 25 • ITTLA Heifer Futurity, Red River Livestock Auction, Overbrook, OK. Rob Van Liew at 405-420-1728 or vanliewranch@ gmail.com. MAY 26 • Red River Longhorn Sale, Overbrook, Oklahoma. Rick Friedrich 713-305-0259, Rick@RiverRanchLonghorns.com

JUNE 2018

Coming Events

JUNE 27 - JULY 1 • TLBAA World Expo, National TLBT Show & Texas Gold Futurity, Bell County Expo Center, Belton, TX. Lindsay Maher (817) 625-6241 or lindsay@tlbaa.org. Qualifying Free, Haltered, Youth. NQ Trophy Steers & Miniatures. Texas Gold Futurity. Banquet.

AUGUST 2018 AUGUST 4 • Deschutes County Fair Texas Longhorn Show, Deschutes County Expo Center, Redmond, OR. Entry Deadline July 13th. Contact Tami Kuntz & Renee Scott, tamaroo300@gmail. com & scottranch@hotmail.com or 541-280-1645 &541-573-3719. Qualifying Free, Trophy Steers, Youth, Points Only, & Miniatures. AUGUST 10 • Rocky Mountain Select Winchester Futurity, Latigo Trails Event Center, Colorado Springs, CO. Start time 9 a.m. Marlene Reynolds 719-510-2151 or cowgirlmama83@gmail.com. AUGUST 10 • Dinner and Select Heifer Sale, Latigo Trails Event Center, Colorado Springs, CO. Start time 5:30 p.m. Marlene Reynolds 719-510-2151 or cowgirlmama83@gmail.com. AUGUST 11 • Rocky Mountain Select Texas Longhorn Sale, Latigo Trails Event Center, Colorado Springs, CO. Charlie Searle 719-6490058 or charliesearle02@gmail.com

SEPTEMBER 2018 SEPTEMBER 1 • Butler Breeder’s Invitational Sale, Lockhart, TX. Kaso Kety 985-674-6492 or Michael McLeod 361-771-5355. SEPTEMBER 7-8 • Struthoff Ranch “Deep in the Heart of Texas” Longhorn Consignment Sale, Lynn Struthoff 210-473-7768 or Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 SEPTEMBER 14-15 • Elite Futurity, Chisholm Trail Expo Center, Enid, OK. Contact L.D. McIntyre 308-750-8384, Kevin Bryant 580254-1864 or Joe Dowling 979-271-0277. www.elitefuturity.com SEPTEMBER 14-15 • Ft. Worth Stockyards Longhorn Auction, Fort Worth, TX. Lorinda Valentine panthercreekranch@att.com 270-996-7046 or Lori McCarty hvauction@gmail.com 817-991-8825. hudsonvalentineauctions.com

OCTOBER 2018 OCTOBER 5-8 • TLBAA Horn Showcase, Lawton, OK. Lindsay Maher (817) 625-6241 or lindsay@tlbaa.org

JUNE 1-2 • Great Northern Longhorn Classic II Sale, Dave Bilgrien Ranch, Montello, WI. Dan Huntington 715-853-7608. JUNE 8 • Heifer Futurity of the West, Yamhill, OR. Daniel Fey 503.349.7866/daniel@feylonghorns.com or Angelina Fey 503.537.8962/angelinapike@yahoo.com JUNE 9 • Fey Longhorns Consignment Sale, Yamhill, OR. Daniel Fey 503.349.7866/daniel@feylonghorns.com or Angelina Fey 503.537.8962/angelinapike@yahoo.com JUNE 12-17 • Diann Chase Expo, Will Rogers Memorial Center, Fort Worth, TX. Pam Dodson 817-390-3130. www.autobahnyouthtour.com

TLBAA World Qualifying Shows need to submit show application to the TLBAA office prior to being placed on calendar. 56 | April 2018

TEXAS LONGHORN

OCTOBER 26-28 • Ark-La-Tex Annual Fall Show, George H. Henderson Jr. Exposition Center, Lufkin ,TX. Entry Deadline Oct. 8th. Contact Jessica Wade, 903-948-5194 or dubosejessica@yahoo. com. Qualify Haltered, Free, Youth, and Miniatures.

NOVEMBER 2018 NOVEMBER 17 • Texas Longhorn Fall Select Production, Consignment & Ranch Horse Sale, Crossroads Centre, Oyen, AB. Ron Walker, 403-548-6684, Cell 403-528-0200, walkersu7texaslonghorns@gmail.com, www.walkerslonghorns.com

APRIL 2019 APRIL 27 • Midwest Longhorn Sale, Winfield Livestock Auction, Winfield, KS. Joel Lemley 325-668-3552 or jlem@camalott.com.

TEXAS LONGHORN TRAILS


26 | April 2018

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26 | April 2018

April 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America

April 2018 Texas Longhorn Trails Magazine  

The Official Publication of the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America