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www.FishGame.com Published by Texas Fish & Game Publishing Co., LLC. TEXAS FISH & GAME is the largest independent, family-owned outdoor publication in America. Owned by Ron & Stephanie Ward and Roy & Ardia Neves.

ROY NEVES PUBLISHER

DON ZAIDLE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CHESTER MOORE EXECUTIVE EDITOR

C O N T R I B U T O R S

JOE DOGGETT DOUG PIKE TED NUGENT BOB HOOD MATT WILLIAMS CALIXTO GONZALES LENNY RUDOW STEVE LAMASCUS LOU MARULLO KENDAL HEMPHILL TOM BEHRENS GREG BERLOCHER PAUL BRADSHAW CAPT. MIKE HOLMES REAVIS WORTHAM JOHN GISEL

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SENIOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR SENIOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR EDITOR AT LARGE HUNTING EDITOR FRESHWATER EDITOR SALTWATER EDITOR BOATING EDITOR FIREARMS EDITOR BOWHUNTING EDITOR POLITICAL COMMENTATOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR HUMOR EDITOR WEBSITE CONTENT MANAGER

A D V E R T I S I N G

ARDIA NEVES VICE PRESIDENT/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

NICOLE BECKA • DENISE BELL •

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DENNISE CHAVEZ ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR TEXAS FISH & GAME (ISSN 0887-4174) is published monthly by Texas Fish & Game Publishing Co., LLC., 1745 Greens Road, Houston, Texas 77032. ©Texas Fish & Game Publishing Co., LLC. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reprinted or otherwise reproduced without written permission. The publication assumes no responsibility for unsolicited photographs and manuscripts. Subscription rates: 1 year $19.00: 2 years $34.75; 3 years $48.50. Address all subscription inquiries to Texas Fish & Game, 1745 Greens Road, Houston, Texas 77032. Allow 4 to 6 weeks for response. Give old and new address and enclose latest mailing address label when writing about your subscription. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: TEXAS FISH & GAME, 1745 Greens Road, Houston, TX 77032. Address all subscription inquiries to TEXAS FISH & GAME, 1745 Greens Road, Houston, TX 77032. Email change of address to: dhruzek@fishgame.com Email new orders to: dhruzek@fishgame.com Email subscription questions to: dhruzek@fishgame.com. Periodical postage paid at Houston, TX 77267-9946 and at additional mailing offices.

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EAMSTIME ILDLIFE, DR PHOTO: © TW

FEATURES SEPTEMBER 2010 • Volume XXVI • NO. 5

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2010-11 WATERFOWL FORECAST Texas waterfowlers should expect another normal-to-excellent season, but — as is often the case — the devil is in the details.

by Chester Moore

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WALK-UP SALTWATER

PUBLIC DOVE PARADISE

This is part nine of our year-long series on fishing without a powerboat. In this installment we look at some great spots along the Texas coast where you can find Walkabout access to saltwater fishing.

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BASS IN THE GRASS(LANDS) Exploring North Texas’ LBJ Grasslands for secluded small lakes, each one churning with unmolested bass.

by Paul Bradshaw

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As the price of private dove land rises, many Texas wingshooters are taking another close look at public hunting opportunities. And with over 1.2 million acres of public hunting land available — and over 50,000 acres of special dove hunting units spread over 46 counties — they are finding some surprisingly producting hunting ground. STORY:

by Chester Moore

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COVER STORY:

5 THINGS A TAXIDERMIST HATES

by Bob Hood

On the Web

Just like every other working person in the world, taxidermists have problems and complaints about there work. Here are five of their top peeves.

by Gayne C. Young

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2011 FISHING TACKLE SHOWCASE Reporting live from the annual ICAST fishing tackle industry expo, we showcase some of the exciting new gear you’ll be seeing in stores in 2011.

by Chester Moore 4 |

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COLUMNS and DEPARTMENTS SEPTEMBER 2010 • Volume XXVI • NO. 5

COLUMNS 10 Editor’s Notes

30 Texas Saltwater

September

Friendship Journal

by DON ZAIDLE TF&G Editor-in-Chief

by CALIXTO GONZALES TF&G Saltwater Editor

14 Chester’s Notes

36 Texas Freshwater

Tips for Better Bank Fishing

DEPARTMENTS 8

LETTERS

12

TF&G REPORT

12

BIG BAGS & CATCHES

38

TRUE GREEN

Bass Towns

by CHESTER MOORE, JR. TF&G Executive Editor

by MATT WILLIAMS TF&G Freshwater Editor

16 Doggett at Large The Late Summer Surf

by JOE DOGGETT TF&G Senior Contributing Editor

18 Pike On the Edge Oh, Snap!

by DOUG PIKE TF&G Senior Contributing Editor

20 TexasWild

42 Hunt Texas

Blunt-Force Logic

Ancient Trophies

by TED NUGENT TF&G Editor at Large

by BOB HOOD TF&G Hunting Editor

21 Commentary

56 Open Season

‘Jaywalking’ for Ignorance

How to Trim Hedges with a Fly Rod

by KENDAL HEMPHILL TF&G Political Commentator 6 |

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Letters me whether I can shoot or not. Plus, lawyers make a lot of noise.

Killing IS Kindness Regarding Don Zaidle’s August issue Editor’s Notes column, “Killing is Kindness,” get ready for the backlash. I have told folks for years that trying to “save” all those oil-soaked birds and animals is futile. As Zaidle said in his editorial, the money and effort could be better used on something else. When birds and animals get oil (or any thing else nasty) on their feathers or fur, they try to clean themselves. Since most animals don’t have hands, they use their mouths or beaks and tongues. They ingest the oil and it makes them sick. The only ones that can be caught are the sick ones. If they are already sick, they are doomed. It would be more humane, as Zaidle suggested, to quickly and painlessly kill them. Most of the folks that insist on helping the poor, defenseless critters have no concept of this reality. These are wild animals. They are terrified of humans. So, instead of “saving” them, their misery is compounded by subjecting them to the trauma of being handled by humans, and they are still going to die slowly from the effects of the ingested oil. In the past, when I have tried to pass on this truth, I have been condemned as being heartless, cruel, etc. I admire Zaidle for putting this into print—but get ready for the backlash.

Noel E. Adams, Jr. One-time Wildlife Biologist Via email

Extreme Measures In reference to the article about new restrictions on buck antlers entitled “Extreme Measures” by Chester Moore, I am a relatively new deer hunter, but I am considering giving it up. It is just too expensive to take an attorney along with me to tell 8 |

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R.L. Frazier Via email

Stephen Coffman Via email Last year, while hunting on a lease near Pineland, I shot the largest deer I have killed in more than 50 years of hunting in East Texas. I was hunting a narrow strip about 15 feet wide that had been thinned by the lumber company. The deer was about 150 yards away. After shooting the deer, I noticed that the distance between the antlers could be less than the 13 inches the law allowed. I made the decision to take the deer to camp for measurement and cleaning. The deer was an eight-point that field dressed at 126 pounds. After my grandson and great grandson cleaned the deer and put the meat in my cooler, a member of the lease called the game warden. He gave me a criminal citation, but said he would inform the judge I was not trying to hide anything. He then took the meat! When I went before the judge, I showed him a picture of the deer. He said he probably would have shot the deer, too. I received a 90-day “deferred adjudication” instead of a fine. A couple of months later, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department charged me $750 as a restitution fee. At the time I shot the deer, I was convinced it was a legal deer. My grandson has struggled with what he would advise his son that they should do under similar conditions. Should he (1) leave the deer in the woods, (2) clean it in the woods and sneak the meat out, or (3) be embarrassed before friends, be charged with a crime, have the deer meat taken, and pay a stiff civil penalty. Either the antler restriction needs to be revised, or game wardens need to not only be provided with alternatives to charging all violations as crimes, but also clearly instructed in the use of those alternatives. Game wardens are experienced and intelligent enough to know if they are faced with a deliberate T E X A S

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Trash Talk I read Kendal Hemphill’s column in the May 2010 issue, “Talking Trash,” about litter, and agree with him and James Turner that it is huge eyesore. I used to think it was a “cultural” problem caused primarily by lower income folks, but now I am not so sure. I work in the oilfield and spend a great deal of time traveling and working in South Texas. Most deer leases in South Texas are not in the budget of the average Joe Sixpack. Every year during hunting season, I see huge mounds of trash left at roadside parks and picnic areas. At this time of year, the trash is often stuffed into deer corn bags. I suppose the dumpers think they are doing the right thing by placing it into or next to trash barrels, but I don’t think they realize the Texas Department of Transportation will not get to that trash before the raccoons and coyotes spread it all over the road. Maybe you can get the word out that they should take the trash to a more “secure” location. As to clean up efforts, you might spend a few sentences in your magazine highlighting the efforts that people like Billy Sandifer on North Padre Island do about the problem. Also, a little sponsorship might not hurt. Dan Ryan Via email

Send Your Comments to: Letters to the Editor 1745 Greens Road Houston TX 77032 E-mail: letters@fishgame.com


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Editor’s Notes by Don Zaidle| TF&G Editor-in-Chief

September HOUGH SEPTEMBER IS NOT MY FAVORITE month (October holds that distinction), I have always looked forward to it with great anticipation, but I am not sure why. Maybe it is because it is the first month with an “R” in it following a swelter of meltdown summer, hence the implied promise of abating temperatures. It could be that it is the first month with hunting bearing an official seal of approval (I am a hunter by genetic imperative and a fisherman by choice)-which is not to imply there is anything wrong or less than satisfying about busting varmints

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and chasing hogs; I guess I just like the feeling of “officialness.” I remember the smell of my grandfather’s faded canvas hunting vest, which hung in the back porch closet all summer, keeping company with worn boots, leaky waders, an Army surplus parka, horse blankets, bridles, a lariat, Grandmother’s canned goods, and ancient leather riding chaps. The shell loops always bore a few paper hull 12-gauge leftovers from last season, and the game bag a few grey feathers that smelled like autumn and sere fields burned crisp in dry summer heat. I liked to wear that vest (though it hung down to my knees) because it reminded me of the field and hunting dove with Pop, though I was too young to shoot. It reminded me of ham sandwiches wrapped in wax paper and coffee from a battered red ther-

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mos, fresh apples, and the smell of nitro powder. It reminded me of September. “Going to the lake” was a year-long weekend rite, but the first September visit always seemed more special; it just “felt” different. The lake cabin seemed brighter, more comfortable, and inviting. The tangle of spin-cast rods in the corner of the bedroom beckoned with fresh appeal, and the faded black of my Zebco 202 seemed new, like I was seeing it for the first time after a long absence. The little “five horse” Sea King had new zip that pushed the battered 14-foot aluminum Lone Star with pride befitting the name. The crappie, fried golden crisp in a cast iron skillet on a wood fire stove, tasted sweeter. Everything seemed newer, brighter, better; it was September. It was late in the season and “winter”


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had arrived early in earnest. A razor-edged north wind howled over the far tree line and funneled down the slope of the pasture. Dove rode the wind like tiny missiles in the jet stream, zipping along at astonishing speed. A flight of six cleared the trees with the wind behind them, barreling toward the withered sunflower patch at the back edge of the pasture. They flared left and right as they passed over me, and I dropped two with a left and right swing of the old Stevens 16gauge double. It was the best shot of my life, and no one there to see it. It was my first dove shot over my own land. I saw it, and I remember. It was September. My three-year-old daughter, no bigger than a bug’s ear and twice as cute in her cutdown cammies, retrieved my first dove of the season with the enthusiasm of a Lab pup. I watched her turn it in her hands, minutely inspecting it like a matron shopping for cantaloupes. She looked at the blood on her hands, remarked at its warmth and sweet smell, and asked a hundred questions: Where did the bird come from? How far away? How high could it fly? Did it have brothers or sisters? Why is it called a “dove”? What would we do with it? Could she keep it? I shot less than a limit (not that I usually do) to spend time answering her questions, explaining how nature works, and why we hunt. Two seasons later, she shot her first dove. It was September. Two of my grandsons and I sat by the tank down in the pasture, waiting for dove to come for evening water. They asked a hundred questions: Why do dove migrate? Why are some much bigger than others? What do they eat? Where do they nest? Why are there so many? Why must my shotgun be plugged for three shots? A flight of three bobbed into view over the trees south of the tank, 300 yards across my neighbor’s field. “Get ready,” I said. “Here they come.” The oldest grandson stood and fired as the birds set wings to settle beside the tank. He missed his first dove, and stood dismayed with an emptied magazine, watching them disappear. It was September. The new spinning rod and reel hanging above my desk looks just as it did the day I got it. It has hung there for months, beckoning unheeded. It looks the same, but it isn’t; it “feels” different. Though it has no discernable odor, it is as if I can smell the lake, a faint scent of shiner minnows fresh dipped from the bucket. It fits my hand almost mag-

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ically, perfectly balanced. I can see the bend and quiver as a crappie struggles against the tension. In a couple of weeks, I think I will shut up the office and go fishing. It will be September. The thorn- and tooth-worn Remington 870 slides out of the case, sharp with the reek of Hoppe’s gun oil. It smoothly digests the red-hulled 7-1/2’s without mechanical gagging, its metal belly less than half full with two rounds. Its familiar heft swings

smoothly to my shoulder, the stock caressing my cheek with gentleness unbefitting manly walnut. It is still hot outside, but summer seems far past. The air “feels” different, smells like sere fields burned crisp in dry summer heat--it is September.

E-mail Don Zaidle at editor@fishgame.com.


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TF&G Report

PHOTO: COURTESY CAPT. LES THOMPSON

New Record Broadbill CAPT. LES THOMPSON AND HIS SON, TIM, SET out from Freeport the last Saturday night in May for a night’s fishing in their 26-foot center console, seeking the fabled broadbill swordfish. They found one. After a six-hour battle (the fish was hooked in a pectoral fin, close to the body, which made the fight even harder and longer), the pair subdued the sea monster, tied up the head and tail alongside the boat, and headed the certified scales at Surfside Marina. The fish weighed 340 pounds; length 138-1/2 inches, girth 53. While the record application process will need to be finalized, the previous state record

PRESENTS

B IG B AGS & C ATCHES

Redfish

Amberjack

Whitetail Buck

Port Aransas

Matagorda

East Texas

Taylor Neal, age 10, of Odessa caught this 25-pound redfish on her first fishing trip with Captain Doug Stanford and Chris Young in Port Aransas.

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Kevin Burnett (left) of Spring caught this 54.5-pound amberjack during the Texas Oilmen’s Charity Fishing Tournament out of Matagorda. He was fishing with the CDI Seals team and Capt. Nick Stillwell (right). The amberjack got first place in that division. T E X A S

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Nicholas Hirsch, age 11, of San Augustine shot this buck while hunting in East Texas. The buck scored 162-6/8” with a spread of 20-7/8 inches.


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record for broadbill was 326 pounds with a length of 141.5, but less girth. Shayne Babich caught that fish in 2009, also out of Freeport. The world’s largest broadbill’s have come from the fertile waters off Chile, including the current all-tackle record, taken by Lou Marron in 1953, that weighed 1182 pounds and measured 179.25 inches. The Gulf of Mexico has seen a lot more broadbills caught in recent years, from those taken deep in the daytime off Louisiana and Florida, to the more traditional night fishing at night with big squid baits and lights of some type. —by Capt. Mike Holmes

Gunfire Caused Nosler Explosion A RIFLE SHOT IN AN UNDERGROUND TESTING facility caused the fire and explosion that fire officials say caused an estimated $15 million-plus in damages to the Nosler manufacturing facility in Bend, Oregon.

Largemouth Bass Lake Merritt R.J. Mersinger of Goldthwaite shows off a 26-inch largemouth bass he caught out of Lake Merritt on a white spinnerbait.

Bend Deputy Fire Marshal Susie Lovisco told reporters Saturday the “initiating event was related to the testing of a rifle by an employee in the south tunnel”. That tunnel is the concrete underground firing range used by the firm for ballistics testing. Lovisco says a “backdraft effect occurred” in the “oxygen-starved environment” of the tunnel, with the pressure blowing out the southeast corner of the building. On-scene investigations by local, state

and federal authorities ended Saturday when officials turned control of the building back over to the company. Nosler’s insurance company has declined to attach a dollar figure to the blast, saying the $2.8 million in damages to the structure and $12.9 million numbers for the contents were fire officials’ estimates.


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Chester’s Notes by Chester Moore | TF&G Executive Editor were fishing the plastics sub-surface. Chumming: Most anglers associate chumming with offshore fishing, but it can do wonders for land-bound anglers. By simply taking a fish basket or a commercially sold chum bag, tying it off to something on the bank, and throwing it out, anglers can bring in fish that might otherwise never come. Mashed up shad, shrimp, or any other kind of aquatic life will work, but I have found canned jack mackerel hard to beat. It is the oiliest fish I have ever seen and you can buy a can for about $1. Punch some holes in the cans, throw them in your chum bag, and it will create a big oil slick. I have seen it stimulate sharks into a feeding frenzy. Another way to chum is to find an old 35 mm film canister, punch it full of holes, put a hole on the top and bottom, and slide it under your cork or between your weight and swivel on a leader. Fill this with the mackerel or other kind of chum and throw it out. This will lead fish directly to your bait. European anglers employ a similar method using canisters made specifically for this kind of fishing. They are not available in Texas stores, but a film canister will get the job done.

Tips for Better Bank Fishing HAVE BEEN DOING A LOT OF BANK FISHING this year. With boat motor troubles, I decided to go boatless until I could pay cash for the problem, and to tell the truth, I have not had this much fun fishing in a long time. I still venture from shore with friends that have working boats, but several times a week my family and I drive out to different areas and fish from shore. So, as I sat down to write a column about the experience, I thought the best thing I could do to benefit other land-bound anglers is to give some tips that will greatly increase your odds of catching fish from the bank.

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Corks: Most structure in Texas waterways is based along the shorelines. When anglers are casting from the shore, they get snagged a lot. The reason is most fish on the bottom, so they drag right across the structure. Consider using a popping cork in areas with lots of tangles. You can adjust the depth so that you float above problem areas, and you also have a means of drawing the fish to you. By simply popping the cork, you simulate fish feeding and thus attract real fish. Many anglers think of fishing with corks as child’s play because their first experiences were probably watching a red/white round bobber in a farm pond, but corks are for the savviest anglers, too. I watched my friend Mark David of the Outdoor Channel’s Big Water Adventures catch big trout after big trout on soft plastics fished under a Bomber Paradise Popper XTreme near Port Mansfield last year. He is one of the most skilled anglers I have ever fished with, and he wore out the rest of us who 14 |

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Circle Hooks: Circle hooks do not look as if they would be effective at catching anything, but the polar opposite is true. Circle hooks were developed by commercial fishermen who needed something that would hook a fish in the corner of the mouth where it will stay lodged. The reason I recommend circle hooks for land-bound anglers using live or cut bait is that you really do not have to set the hook; the fish hook themselves. The angler just grabs the rod, pull back with a sweeping motion, and starts reeling. This saves the frustration of having a big fish spit the hook as you stand on the shore.

have to forego talking or anything that extreme, but you might want to tone things down a bit if it is typically noisy. In clear water, I have seen both salt- and freshwater fish spook because of land-based noise. Use Big, Live Bait: The No. 1 complaint I hear from bank-fishermen is they rarely catch legal-sized game fish. This is especially true of saltwater anglers who complain of catching tons of hardhead, croaker, and under-sized specks and reds, but few big or legal-sized fish. Every time someone tells me this, I ask them if they were using dead shrimp for bait, and almost every response is “yes.” Dead shrimp will catch everything—but that is the problem. Little fish gobble it up as soon as it hits the water, and the big ones do not get a shot at it. By learning to throw a cast net and using live mullet, menhaden, croaker, and sand trout, you can greatly increase your odds of catching big fish. If you are land-bound in freshwater, use live shad and perch, which you can easily catch in a cast net. Big fishes eat smaller fishes, and the tiny ones have a hard time gobbling something that does not fit in their mouths. Over the summer, I have caught some really nice fish from the bank using these principles, and hope you will give them a chance. They work—and I have the fillets to prove it.

Be Quiet: This one might seem a bit strange, but keeping quiet can keep the fish biting. Fish have great sensitivity to vibrations, and having a big party on shore with kids splashing around in the water, a stereo cranked up, and people shouting will send a lot of fishing packing. You certainly do not |

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Doggett At Large by Joe Doggett | TF&G Senior Contributing Editor Remember that seasonal water readings are at their hottest, often in the upper 80s, and the relative cool and low light encourage shallow-water activity. So, also, does a strong incoming tide. The ideal scenario for a surf wade brings rising water with the dawning light; conversely, the combination of high sun and low water can be a dismal draw for anything this side of a starving hardhead catfish. The best time to go fishing is when you can, but these are guidelines to keep strongly in mind along the fickle beachfront. And don’t forget to wear a flotation vest if the waves are rough or you are working anywhere near the currents of a free-running pass. Live baits and lures both are effective in the surf. There’s no arguing with the killer status of a 2-1/2- to 3-inch brown shrimp on a green tide; indeed, a fresh, kicking “brownie” will attract everything with fins except maybe a bull mullet. But live bait can be a hassle—and an added expense, about $15 per quart at many camps. Cost aside, three setbacks can occur before the first rod is bent: First, white “live bait” flags at available camps or marinas might not be flying. Second, the “bugs” might be over-stressed or puny, mere “whiskers and eyeballs.” Finally, keeping even frisky shrimp alive amid the heat of summer can be sketchy with a portable aerator or bait bucket. This especially is true when the only oxygen support available during the frantic drive to the beach is one of those cheesy little pocket-type clip-on battery packs. If you opt for the natural approach, the proven technique is to rig the shrimp on a small hook several feet below a popping or rattling cork. The weighted cork provides the payload for smooth casts, and the suspended approach keeps the bait off bottom, segregated from riff-raff such as tiny, wriggling hardheads and whiting. Not to mention stingrays. Free-shrimping with little or no weight also is effective, assuming you can lob the bait a fishable distance. I often prefer the simplicity of plugging. I like the style, the clean, long casts across

The LateSummer Surf URRICANES AND OIL SPILLS ASIDE, THE Texas surf offers accessible and affordable fishing for any able-bodied angler, and the dog days of summer are an excellent time to wade the green tides. All the inshore warm-water sport species are within reach of the beach during August and September. Wading the surf is a satisfying experience. And it’s easy. You drive to the hightide line, rig with minimal gear, and step into the suds. The bottom is well defined, with a series of firm sandbars and deeper “guts” running parallel to the beach. Most fishing is done on the waist-deep bar approximately 50 yards off the dry sand. Speckled trout are the primary target, but anything from a Spanish mackerel to a 6-foot tarpon might slash into a long cast. This thrilling uncertainty is one of the great appeals of the surf. It’s wild out there—a definite contrast from the lazy farm pond. Here are a few pointers gained from more than 40 years of practicing the “Gulf Coast Two-Step”: Confirm in advance that the water is “green to the beach.” This means sub-surface visibility of at least 2-3 feet. Sandy surf is a loser for light-tackle action. Fishable clarity never is a sure thing, especially along the upper coast, but the stable conditions of late summer improve the odds. A light east or southeast breeze blowing from the open Gulf is ideal; be wary of side-shore gusts from the south or, worse, southwest. Commit to the “dawn patrol.” This is no time to sleep in. The early assault is necessary to coincide with prime-time potential.

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open water. I also favor the mobility that chunking hardware allows. You can move unencumbered, with no dragging bait bucket battered and yanked in the foam. Plugs, jigs, and spoons all are effective in proper trout sizes. Many old salts favor the slow-sinking mullet-type plugs for bigger trout. A shrimp- or bait-tail plastic rigged on a jighead is a proven choice for mixed-bag action, but these soft “tails” are vulnerable to sharp teeth and rough jaws. If mackerel, skipjack, or bluefish move in, the attrition rate from your pouch of tails can be alarming. For this reason, the savvy surf wader seldom is far from a silver or gold spoon. Frankly, if I had one lure to use in the Texas surf, it would be a spoon rigged with a swivel to prevent line twist. It is a catchall choice that offers several significant advantages. Most important, the compact metal spoon casts like a spitzer bullet into or across the wind—and the prevailing Gulf wind is onshore to the surf wader. Remember, you can’t catch ‘em if you can’t reach ‘em, and the spoon with its superior ballistics will give additional yards under a skilled thumb. Also, the flash and jive of a bright spoon can attract bonus fish amid the reduced visibility of rolling foam, low light, or (oh, no) a sandy-green tide. And the metal lure is bulletproof against teeth and jaws. You might need a short wire leader amid a stampede of mackerel or skipjack but, properly rigged, you can fish an entire session without losing a lure. Finally, like the jig, the spoon with its single hook is quick and safe to work with when grabbing and unhooking flapping fish. The same cannot be said for the mullet plugs with two or three sets of trebles. Trust me, the spoon is a killer in the surf. Do not sell this classic old lure short. And do not sell the beachfront short during the green tides of late summer. When it’s right, when solid trout strike at the end of your longest cast, wading the surf is one of the most rewarding of all fishing experiences.

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Pike on the Edge by Doug Pike | TF&G Senior Contributing Editor Wait until boats and tackle are put away. Wait until shotguns and rifles are out for hunting seasons. Then tell fishermen they can make a couple more trips—so long as they don’t mind getting bounced by autumn chop. I have been offshore in September and October. The average day this month and next is much bumpier than summer’s pancake-flat norm. Fall isn’t Deadliest Catch rough (those people are nuts), but it’s wrinkled enough to make breakfast take a Uturn. If the same managers were in charge of candy stores, they would be open only one day each month, and you could buy only one piece per visit. This isn’t new. It’s an ongoing problem, in fact, and one that won’t go away nearly so

Oh, Snap! T’S A GOOD THING FOR FEDERAL FISHERIES managers that Texas hunting seasons open this time of year. Without those welcome distractions, many of us might still be fuming over the shortest-ever red snapper season and its unwarranted two-fish daily bag limit. And fume we should. A decade and change into federally mandated recovery of this and other “overfished” marine fisheries, we are, with new regulations heaped one after another onto us, and little positive has been forthcoming. It’s been years, but I recall attending a conference and returning home optimistic that solutions to what ailed ailing fisheries were imminent. The audience was assured by well meaning managers that if only we would encourage our readers and listeners and members to abide by slightly more restrictive rules, red snapper would be fully recovered in an historic snap. Couple of years, maybe five tops later, we would have so many snapper that limits could be relaxed again. Happy days, they’d be—but always just over the horizon. As a token of its appreciation for recreational fishermen not going absolutely ballistic during this reign of perpetual ineptitude, federal managers hinted that there might be extra days or even a couple of weeks tacked to the 2010 Gulf red snapper season. Instinct and past performance say their talk will prove nothing more than dry wind. Even if red snapper season were reopened for an hour and a half, few anglers would bother. Perhaps that’s the strategy:

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quickly as have the number of days we can fish for snapper or the number of snapper we can bring home. The fate of recreational red snapper fishing is in the hands of men and women, no matter how well intended in their first days on the job, who lack the tools necessary to do their work. They are carpenters without hammers, yet they manage every year to hit us squarely on our apathetic thumbs. The logic used to justify this year’s 54day sprint hit us below the belt. Our adherence to stricter bag limits and fewer days on the water, we were told, moved red snapper |

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off the list of overfished Gulf species. Good news, right? Uh, no. Apparently, it was lost on managers that a reduced bag limit might bring an effort shift toward larger fish. Nobody at the National Marine Fisheries Service looked across the table at any meeting and said, “You know, low bag limits and short seasons might make those guys target bigger fish.” Either that, or they didn’t consider us capable of switching hooks and using larger baits and running a little farther offshore— aiming a little higher, as it were, to help justify the effort and investment necessary to enjoy a renewable natural resource. A public resource, by the way, to which a handful of commercial license holders are given majority allocation. But that’s another story. When we could catch four or six or eight or ten snapper per day, smaller fish looked tasty in the box. If we get only two, we want each of them to make an audible “thump” when they hit the deck. And if we are like some fishermen under current circumstances, we are probably going to release—in whatever condition they come to hand—smaller red snapper that find their way onto the hook. Other fisheries and their situations vary, but the bottom line with red snapper is that user groups and managers are at loggerheads on exactly how many fish actually are out there. And without that number, it’s impossible to set accurate limits or seasons. Population models are based on data hardly more scientific than what could be generated by a Ouija board or Magic EightBall. We’ve sent robots to Mars, for goodness sake. Surely, someone can figure out how to count red snapper.

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Ted Nugent’s TexasWild by Ted Nugent | TF&G Editor-at-Large

Blunt-Force Logic

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N A WORLD INCREASINGLY HELL-BENT ON abandoning logic and its ensuing escalation of Obama madness, it is clearly time for the maximum celebration of the good old always-reliable Uncle Ted crowbar of logic. I am ThumpMaster, hear me roar. In the otherwise universally recognized perfection of the American experiment in self-government, where evil monsters like Che Guevera and Mao Tse Tung are routinely worshipped by the very imbeciles that these historic murderers would have unhesitatingly slaughtered; to a community organizer-in-chief who’s terminal rookie agenda is to maniacally spend our way out of debt and drop charges against clear and present criminal Black Panther thugs threatening voters in Philadelphia; black-robed idiots claiming Americans have no right to selfdefense; and pimps, whores, and welfare brats party hearty with the mindless fantasy that Fedzilla will wipe their butts eternally, ad nauseum; I am compelled to increase my crowbar swinging to new heights every day. I am the steel ballerina. Let’s dance. It is not good enough to simply spotlight cockroaches, but ultimately all caring people must always rally to the requisite stomping party. For us varmint hunters, these are truly the good old days of a target-rich environment with no bag limit. Let the stomping increase to a furious frenzy and cacophony of good over evil. May America create the splat! heard around the world. My steel-toed boots are giddy with anticipatory delight. Stomp on into a voting booth near you. Since the 1960’s LSD-inspired goofiness of peace and love, I have always been convinced that the gun control issue has been the tip of the culture war spear. In spite of the tsunami of global evidence from every imaginable study, source, and evidence, why the 20 |

peaceniks still deny the hand, and a proud truth that more guns national respect for equal less crime is one their fellow citiI am compelled of mankind’s greatest zens, mind you, to mysteries. the multitude of to increase my From the Nazi gunjurisdictions across crowbar-swingin to new banner’s dream of America where heights every day. herding six million more concealed defenseless Jews onto weapons per capita the death trains, the no are issued, violent guns or gunpowder crime not only allowed IRA bombings and plummets, but personal assault crimes like shoot-’em-ups in Bono’s Irerape, carjacking, and armed robbery actualland, to the Idi Amin unstoply disappear in many instances. pable slaughter of unarmed victims in UganCould I please hear from someone who da, Mayor Daley still fails to grasp the self- actually prefers Mayor Daley’s gun-ban evident truth that gun bans and preposterous slaughter zones to the safe streets of armed buyback programs are just what gangbangers America? You’ve got to be kidding me. dream of. Who doesn’t get this stuff? LiberThe line drawn in the American sand is al, dopey, denial cultists, that’s who. very unfortunate, at times rather heartbreakRecently, the blindly obedient Canadian ing, but as long as there are people who radio host I “debated” on his show once insist on demanding policies that guarantee again failed completely to grasp how Cana- the continued slaughter of innocent lives, dians were trusted with blow torches, chain- those of us who cherish life, liberty, and the saws, hatchets, wood chippers, bulldozers, safe pursuit of happiness and good over coping saws, welders, front-end loaders, paroled evil must not only stand strong and razor sharp grain scythes, and large diesel unmovable on our side of the self-defense trucks, but not with wonderfully designed, line, but we must fight diligently to either perfectly safe, utilitarian handguns. educate the soulless and brain dead amongst He resisted with every sheep-like fiber of us, or eliminate them from the debate at the his being that the drug wars and biker wars voting booth. in Toronto were not obeying the Draconian, Some things, like life, are indeed sacred, ultra laughable C68 gun law in his fine and where gun control freaks have their way, country. What the insane C68 has accom- innocent lives will always pay the ultimate plish so far is to have wasted approximately price. Gun-free zones are a murderer’s play6 billion tax dollars and inefficiently regis- ground. People who value life must do all we tered a bunch of farmers’ goose guns. Phe- can to ban gun-free zones. Join the NRA. nomenally stupid. More phenomenally stupid is the whole world’s denial of the plethora of statistics proven in John Lott’s book, More Guns E-mail Ted Nugent at Less Crime, where the desirable condition of tnugent@fishgame.com safer streets and communities with drastically reduced violent crime is accomplished most readily where more citizens not only have access to firearms, but actually carry them daily on their persons. From the ultra safe streets of Switzerland where every household has a real honest to For more Ted Nugent writings, God full-auto assault rifle and ammo on visit www.tednugent.com

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Commentary by Kendal Hemphill | TF&G Political Commentator

‘Jaywalking’ for Ignorance

S COMEDIAN RON WHITE LIKES TO SAY, YOU can’t fix stupid. Jay Leno has proven that for almost twenty years with the ‘Jaywalking’ segment of the Tonight Show. In case you’re not familiar with the Tonight Show, or Jaywalking, or stupid people, I’ll explain. Leno goes out on the streets of Los Angeles, armed with nothing but a cameraman and a list of incredibly easy questions, and causes people to present themselves as absolutely the most ignorant life forms in the universe. He asks them questions like, “Who was the first president?” He gets answers like, “Benjamin Franklin,” or “Ronald Reagan,” or “President of what?” The people Leno finds seem far too dumb for the segments not to have been staged. Leno claims they are all random people who are actually trying to answer the questions correctly. If you’ve ever seen one of these Jaywalking bits, you probably find that hard to believe. So do I. So I decided to find out for myself if there were really people in the world, specifically in Texas, who were as intellectually challenged as those on Jaywalking. I went to San Antonio, to a mall, where people seem to waste a lot of time, and looked for folks who didn’t appear to be in a big hurry, and asked them basic outdoor questions. I figured, at a mall, with lots of witnesses around, I might not get killed too often. Since this was Texas, I expected most people to know something about hunting and fishing. So I started with deer. I asked several random people what a baby deer is called. Simple, right? Wrong.

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The answers I said ‘witchery.’ Or got ranged from something. She also ‘kid’ to ‘papoose.’ told me it was illegal, The concept One lady said a and I should be of Deer mating only for a baby deer was ashamed of myself. month or two sounded called a calf. One Another lady said unreasonable to them, guy said ‘herd.’ I’m someone who practices not sure he was archery is an engineer. obviously. from Texas, though, I believe she figured it since he was wearmust have something ing a shirt that said, to do with arches. “If you don’t know where I decided to switch to camping. Just you’re going, go faster.” about everyone knows something about Next I asked people camping. I asked people, “What do you do what is going on when you see bucks chasing call it when you put up a tent?” One lady does. Mostly what I got was, “What?” No said, “Throw ... no, toss ... right?” At least one seemed to have heard of the rut. Almost she had the general verb category. Most every person I explained it to seemed fasci- everyone else had no idea. nated, but skeptical. The concept of deer I moved on to guns. I asked what ‘semimating only for a month or two of the year automatic’ means. Everyone thought it was sounded unreasonable to them, obviously. the same as automatic. I figured I was They seemed to think I had my facts wrong. dreaming if I expected anyone to know anySo I went to fishing. I asked, “What do thing about bolt actions or lever actions. they fish for at the Bassmaster’s Classic?” Gave up on that. Only one person I talked to had heard of the Then I decided to ask people what the event, and he didn’t know what they fished NRA is. Phttt. One woman said, “Oh, for. One lady said, “Tuna.” One guy told they’re those bad lobbyists.” Another said, me, “Oh, I never get in a boat.” When I told “I don’t like them. They want to give guns to him it was a contest for professional anglers, kids.” Where she got that I have no idea. he looked at me strangely and said, “Yeah, Shows what the liberal media has been up right,” and walked away. to, I guess. One woman said, “The NRA? I decided the questions were too hard, My kids’ school has one of those. I had to and I needed to tone things down a little. I make a lot of punch one time.” I think she asked some people, “If you’re an angler, thought I was asking about the PTA. what do you do?” One lady said you’re a So, for your information, Jaywalking is welder. I guess she’d heard of angle iron. probably real and unrehearsed. Our country One girl said you’re a carpenter. One just has no idea where it’s going. Which is probstarted laughing and walked off. One guy ably why it’s going faster. said, “A hang glider?” I said, “No, an angler.” He shook his head and said, “Oh, man, are you a cop?” Fishing was evidently not commonly E-mail Kendal Hemphill at understood in San Antonio, so I moved on commentary@fishgame.com to bowhunting. I asked, “If you practice archery, what do you do?” Two people said, “You shoot a bow and arrow.” They looked at me like I was an idiot. One guy said an archer runs a fish farm. I guess he got it mixed up with “hatchery.” One lady said you were a Satanist. I think she thought I

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2010-11 Waterfowl Season Forecast

TEXAS WATERFOWLERS SHOULD EXPECT ANOTHER NORMAL-TO-EXCELLENT SEASON, BUT — AS IS OFTEN THE CASE — THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS by Chester Moore

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WATERFOWLERS ANNUALLY WAIT impatiently for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to release its spring survey of breeding ducks and pond counts. It is the first indicator of what kind of fall flight they might expect. According to USFWS, the 2010 preliminary total duck population estimate from the traditional survey area is 40.9 million birds. This is similar to last year’s estimate of 42 million birds and 21 percent above the long-term average. Estimated gadwall numbers of 3 million was 3 percent below 2009 and 67 percent greater than the long-term average. Shoveler declined 7 percent and were 76 percent above the long-term. Green-winged teal increased 1 percent and remain 78 percent above the long-term average. Pintail increased 9 percent and remain well below the long-term average, causing continual concern from the waterfowl management community. Blue-winged teal declined 14 percent from last year but remain 36 percent above the long-term. Estimated mallard abundance was 8.4 million birds, down only 1 percent from last year. Widgeon saw a 2 percent decrease while scaup increased by 2 percent. Canvasback, a species of perpetual concern, was down 12 percent from last year. On the surface, this might look like any 24 |

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normal year with reasonable fluctuations in numbers, but if you examine the details, some very abnormal things jump out. First, let’s look at the heart of waterfowl production—habitat. This is the second year in a row that the United States Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) produced more ducks in Canada. Historically, Canada has produced the bulk of the ducks, but major declines in habitat acreage and quality have shifted more ducks to the U.S. side of the border. According to Delta Waterfowl Senior Vice President John Devney, part of the reason was an all-time record 2.9 million wetlands on the U.S. side of the region, with 2.3 million of those in the eastern Dakotas. Wetlands are what attract nesting ducks and the U.S. has never been wetter. “It was definitely a super wet year, and |

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when you have abundant wetlands you will attract ducks. However, even prairie Canada was wetter than normal, but a lot of ducks did not settle there,” Devney said. The USFWS survey shows Prairie Canada led by a 21 percent year-over-year increase in the pond count in southern Saskatchewan. Yet, despite being 34 percent wetter than its long-term average, 72 percent fewer pintail and 18 percent fewer mallard settled in Saskatchewan than its historical average, according to Delta Waterfowl’s scientific director, Dr. Frank Rohwer of Louisiana State University: “That’s pretty remarkable when you consider that twothirds of the prairie exists on the Canadian side of the border. Delta has been saying for years that Canada is broken, and the latest survey numbers once again bear that out.” And for those ducks that did nest in Canada, chances are slim for successful production. “The amount of predation occurring in parts of Canada is stunning. We have seen some areas averaging over many years only 5 percent nest success, and some areas as bad as 1 percent,” Devney said. The United States holding so many ducks in a wet year like 2010 is indeed cause for celebration for some, but the same thing happened last year and not everyone was cheering. “We heard from a lot of duck hunters who told us the recent season didn’t live up to their expectations after the great wetland conditions last spring,” Devney said. “The best explanation is the ducks that settled in the Dakotas and Montana a year ago weren’t as productive as they were in the 1990s because there was a lot less nesting cover than there was in the 90s.”

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Loss of traditional grasslands is a huge problem in the Dakotas as well, and the less natural grass cover ducks have, the more chance foxes, raccoons, skunks, and other predators have to dine on duck nests and the ducks themselves. “In one area we surveyed, the vast majority of the nests were along road right of ways and roadside ditches. That is because that is some of the only nesting cover in these areas due to the gigantic losses we have seen. Predators literally had a buffet to follow, with high concentrations of nests in very narrow areas. This is not a good scenario for production,” Devney said. The pond counts and breeding survey estimate mature birds and the amount of ponds present, but does not give a number for the fall flight since that includes whatever ducks made it through nesting. They have to survive the barrage of predators and other factors that can lead to few young birds. “The Dakotas have lost close to 2 million acres of grass since 1999--that’s more than 3100 square miles--and another 2 million acres of CRP are scheduled to expire by 2012,” Devney said. “Research conducted

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by the USFWS showed that upland-nesting ducks need large blocks of grass to produce at population-expanding levels, but we’re losing Conservation Reserve Program and native prairie acres at an alarming rate. Not only are we losing grass, but also the highquality wetlands embedded in those acres. “The take-home message is that the U.S. side of the region carried Canada during the wet cycle of the 1990s, but if the U.S. keeps losing habitat, who’s going to pick up the slack?” What does this mean for Texas hunters? That is difficult to tell at this point. If actual production is low, that will mean another year with a large component of mature birds that are decoy-wary and hard to hunt. Last year, for example, was a tough one in the Mississippi Flyway, and harvest surveys showed the vast majority of birds were produced in seasons past. A big plus for Texas hunters is that key species important here, like green-winged teal, increased slightly from last season, and bluewing, gadwall, and shoveler remain well above the long-term average. Pintail are up again, which could allow for season-long

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harvest, but remain a species of concern. Last year, we said keep an eye on widgeon because it was a species with a slow but steady decline, and this year bears that out. Mallard is also a species to look for because it seems to be in a slight negative trend and is what USFWS bases annual regulations around. With solid winter weather, parts of Texas should have a fair to good season, but hunters should be mindful of the trends indicated and check the hunting forums and fishgame.com for detailed analysis of harvest and migration as the season begins.

On the Web Delta Waterfowl: www.deltawaterfowl.org US Fish & Wildlife Service: www.fws.gov

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The Best Spots on the Coast for Walkabout Saltwater Action

BY CHESTER MOORE And while there are a fair number of

NOT ALL ANGLERS HAVE

quality bank fishing destinations on the

BOATS. That is something Texas Fish &

coast, many anglers are not aware of

Game has known for a long time,

them. We get questions all the time

which is why we include bank-fishing

from anglers asking the location of cer-

locations on all of our coastal Hot

tain spots they might have heard of or

Spots Focus columns every month.

where to fish when on vacation.

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This is a collection of some of the very best of these destinations ranging from the obvious to the obscure. We realize for Walkabout Anglers access is key and this is our way of continuing and upgrading this coverage. Before we get into these many locations, there are some important things to remember when fishing from the shore in saltwater venues. Many anglers complain of rarely catching legal-sized game fish from the bank and I believe a big reason for this is their choice of bait. Dead shrimp is by far the easiest bait to get and it will catch everything but that is just the problem. It catches hardheads, small croaker, sand trout and lots of undesirables. My advice is to bring one rod rigged with dead shrimp (let kids use it if they are fishing) and use just the croaker, sand trout and piggy perch you might catch as live or cut bait. Also, learn to throw a cast net and catch mullet, mud minnows and baby croaker. All of these fished on a Carolina rig will catch reds, specks and flounder and the beauty of using a cast net is you do not have to pay for your bait. Of course it is a lot of work but it will save you money. Something else to consider is using a popping cork. There are lots of snags along shorelines and when fishing on bottom you are bound to get snagged. By using corks you can fish just above the bottom and avoid most snags while at the same time have the advantage of being able to draw attention to your bait by utilizing the popping action of the cork. There are lots of good ones on the market but I am a big fan of the Bomber Paradise Popper X-Treme, which has a killer sound and a titanium shaft that survives plenty of punishment and is easy for casting long distance. Another good long distance caster is the Outcast from Midcoast Products. Little details like these can go a long way when your fishing these saltwater walk up venues.

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Lure/Baits: Live mud minnows, finger mullet and jigs tipped with shrimp Best Season/Time: Fall and Spring on outgoing and incoming times respectively.

MCFADDIN BEACH Location: Off of Highway 87 past Sabine Pass Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Live croaker, mullet or whole crab Best Season/Time: On high tides during the summer and fall.

LOWER NECHES WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA (West Side) Location: Highway 87 between Bridge City and Port Arthur Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Cut and live mullet, dead shrimp Best Season/Times: Summer and fall on outgoing tides

SABINE LAKE AREA

GALVESTON AREA

CAUSEWAY BRIDGE

U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE FISHING PIER

Location: At Pleasure Island on SH 82 at the causeway bridge. Species: Flounder

Location: CR 476 and CR 227 at Bastrop Bayou Species: Redfish, trout

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Successful shore-based fishing involves more than walking up--or in--and lobbing a bait. Knowing the Hotspots makes it an adventure, not an endeavor.

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Surfside Adventure Lure/Baits: Finger mullet, cut bait, crab Best Season/Times: First couple of hours of outing and incoming tides yearround.

ROLLOVER PASS Location: Highway 87 between High Island and Port Bolivar Species: Flounder Lure/Baits: Live mud minnows Best Season/Times: Fall and Spring (while it lasts)

BOLIVAR POCKET Location: Off of Highway 87 near the jetties Species: Speckled trout Lures/Baits: Topwaters and silver spoons Best Season/Times: Summer during early morning hours on high tides is good as is late, calm evenings

MIDCOAST LIGHTHOUSE BEACH & BIRD SANCTUARY Location: 700 Lighthouse Beach Drive, Port Lavaca Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Crab

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Best Season/Times: On the last half of rising tides.

COPANO BAY BRIDGE Location: FM 136, Bayside Species: Speckled trout, flounder, sheepshead Lure/Baits: Soft plastic shrimp and shad imitations and live mud minnows Best Season/Times: The fishing tends to be best on outgoing tides. Summer and fall

MUSTANG ISLAND STATE PARK Location: SH 361 Port Aransas Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Live mullet, croaker, Gulp! Crabs and cracked crabs Best Season/Times: High tides during summer and fall

JFK CAUSEWAY Location: At Humble Channel in Corpus Christi Species: Black drum Lure/Baits: Dead shrimp, sea lice Best Season/Times: Spring, Winter

JETTY PARK LOCATION: End of FM 2031, Matagorda Species: Speckled trout, redfish Lure/Baits: Live shrimp Best Season/Times: When light winds are blowing and waters are running clear in summer for trout. Fall for redfish.

HIGHWAY 188 Location: At Port Bay in Rockport Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Cracked crab, cut mullet Best Times: Look for high tides in summer and fall to provide the best fishing.

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FULTON FISHING PIER Location: 250 Deforest Loop, Rockport Species: Speckled trout Lure/Baits: Live shrimp Best Times: At night and early in the morning in spring, summer and fall

LOWER COAST SOUTH PADRE ISLAND Location: North end of Park Road 100 Species: Speckled Trout, Redfish Lure/Baits: Live croaker and mullet Best Season/Times: Early in the morning and late in the evening in summer and fall

PIRATE’S FISHING PIER Location: 204 North Garcia Species: Speckled Trout Lure/Baits: Live shrimp Best Season/Times: First hour of outgoing, last of incoming tides during spring and summer

CR 1145 SOUTH Location: Kingsville Species: Redfish Lure/Baits: Crabs, dead shrimp, mullet Best Season/Times: Early in the morning in spring, summer and fall

PARK ROAD 100 BAY ACCESS 1

Location: Across from Edwin King Atwood Park, South Padre Island Species: Redfish, trout Lure/Baits: Soft plastics fished under a popping cork, topwaters Best Season/Times: Evenings on strong, moving tides in spring, summer and fall

FOLEY RESERVE PARK Location: East Bayshore/Palacios Species: Flounder Lure/Baits: Live mud minnows Best Times: First hour of falling and last hour of rising tides in spring and fall

On the Web www.FishGame.com/hotspots T E X A S

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Texas Saltwater by Calixto Gonzales | TF&G Saltwater Editor and floating grass made even the lightest jighead a salad fork. I tried a new technique learned from Captain Eddie Curry: I rigged a 4-inch Gulp! Shrimp onto a weedless hook and just glided the bait into potholes. Those shrimp suspend when weightless. The redfish come up, stare at the thing for a moment, then slurp it down. You learn something new every day. June 13: Finally got out with Roy Sanchez after talking about it for a year. He has been keen on going after some of the big mangrove snapper in Laguna Madre I told him about. Calm to Southeast winds about 2-3 mph. Incoming tide. Deep water, but clear. Well, that was interesting. We found some big mangroves around the swing bridge. Most were 14 inches, but Tino, Roy’s friend landed a beast pushing 20. Not fast action, but steady. Roy suggested we run out to the Old Causeway to see if we could find more. First cast, Roy hooks something big and loses it. It doesn’t swim off like a snook or a jack, but rather stays in place. Maybe one of the big grouper that sometimes sneak into the bay? We also found a bunch of big sheepshead between 4 and 7 pounds. Roy suggested that we go back to the swing bridge. He is my guest, so he makes the call, but, boy, it was weird leaving those big sheepies. Each has his own favorite fish; trout for some, snook for others, redfish for many, flounder for the low-down Chester Moore. For Roy, it’s the mighty mangrove snapper. He could choose much, much worse. June 18: Fished with Mark Gordon and Juan Saavedra, two assistant principals from my school. Juan has never been fishing, so this might be interesting. Conditions are back to normal, but the shrimp were small, so I made a risky executive decision—lures only, no bait. It couldn’t have worked out better. Both Juan and Mark handled the lures like champs. We were fishing Gulp! Shrimp in Glow. Juan learned how to fish them quickly and never looked back. Of the nine trout we boxed, he got four. Not bad for a rookie.

Friendship Journal N THE PAST, I HAVE WRITTEN ABOUT THE USEfulness of a journal. I have learned a great deal about the fish I chase, the lures and bait that work, and when they work best. My journals also help me flesh out ideas for columns and articles. My journals also document slices of my life. I thought some of you fair readers would get a kick out of a peek inside my journals. The following is from June 2010, which was a particularly busy month of fishing—certainly busier than it had been in a very long time.

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June 7: Finally got on the water after the grind of school. I have been dying to get the new Teacher’s Pet, a Bay Quest 200 (thanks Cleve and Miriam at Dargel) on the water. Sandie, Calito, and Captain Jimmy Martinez on board. Southeast winds 7-12. High tide all morning. Water is a nice clear green with some bait flipping. Lots of shrimp in the water. I’m surprised. Not much is biting. One trout in the box, and a couple of throwbacks. Calito and Sandie caught skipjack after skipjack. Most of a quart of bait went to those big-eyed herring. Wife and boy don’t seem to care. They are having fun catching fish. Some of the “sportsmen” could take a lesson from that. June 9: Back-to-back trips—wow. I haven’t done this since I was single. Then again, that would explain why I didn’t date much. Fished out of Arroyo City with Captain Denny Donohoe (Texas Slam Charters). Windier than yesterday. Southeast 15-20, water off-colored to dirty. Low tide. Six redfish and a trout, but we had to work for them. Peyton’s Bay had lot’s of redfish in the potholes, but the shallow water 30 |

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Then again, I took time to make sure he knew how to fish them, and stayed out of the way the rest of the time. That took the pressure of Juan, I think. I wish I had known that strategy when I was teaching Calito how to fish; it would have made things easier. June 24: First night trip of the summer. Mis-timed the tides and hit it at dead low. No water, no fish. I got to fish with my friends, Anibal and Dave, though, so it wasn’t a total loss. June 25: This was a very special trip for me. I got to fish with the Hurys, Charles and Alice, and SyLynn and Kyle Braswell. The Hurys have known me since I was 12, and SyLynn and I could be brother and sister we are so alike. Kyle is just a great guy and someone who will always have a place on my boat. I wish Sandie could have been here to round out the group. Great time with great friends. We laughed, we caught fish, we laughed some more. Conditions do not matter, although they were perfect. What mattered was that the fishing was secondary to who I was fishing with. June 27: I can’t believe how much I have fished this month. Nice dilemma. Got out with Steve Garza, my doctor’s son. That has been another fishing trip I have been trying to set up for some time. Gorgeous day. Calm winds. Clear water. Double limit of trout (5 each). Not only am I amazed how much I fished in June, but at how many different people I fished with. I count 15. That tells me more than the fish, or the techniques, or the conditions. That tells me how important fishing is to the people in my world. How important fishing is to me. Fishing doesn’t define me, but it does help knit some very important relationships. Who said you can’t learn from a journal?

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E-mail Calixto Gonzales cgonzales@fishgame.com


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As the Price of Private Dove Land Rises, Many Texans are Taking Another Look at Public Hunting Opportunities, With Surprisingly Positive Results BY BOB HOOD 32 |

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D A V I D S T A P L E S O F F O R T W O R T H drove his two sons to a public hunting unit in Denton County last year hoping they would enjoy the outing but not counting on them bagging many mourning doves. A few hours later he found himself cleaning 20 doves the trio had bagged and asking himself why he had not looked more closely at Texas’ public hunting program in the past. Staples and his sons, Jacob, 12, and Josh, 15, have joined the ranks of several thousand Texas hunters who have discovered the availability of more than 1.2 million acres of public hunting lands including more than 50,000 acres on 140-plus special dove hunting units in 46 counties. "The ranch I used to hunt dove on in Hamilton County was sold three years ago, and I just didn't have any place to hunt the next season, or so I thought," Staples said. "A friend told me about a pond he had

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hunted on some public land near Denton, so I thought I would give it a try--if for nothing else other than to get my boys out. We got there in the afternoon on opening day and I couldn't believe the birds that were there. I

shot ten, Josh got six and Jacob four, and we saw only one other pickup at the parking area. One reason Staples thinks the action was so good around the small pond was because much of Texas in 2009, including the area he hunted, had been in a drought. Dry conditions may affect dove nesting success, but it does not equate to bad dove hunting. The availability of native sunflowers and watering holes usually spell good dove hunting in traditional areas that hold large numbers of native birds, as well as attract migrating dove. Interestingly, this year's season may be even better for another reason--high moisture levels brought about by an unusual number of late-winter snowfalls and, even more recently, from Hurricane Alex. The public dove hunting areas in Texas include numerous private lands leased by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department as well as five Wildlife Management Areas and National Grasslands controlled by the U.S. Forest Service, and lands under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. However, unlike the national forests, grasslands, and areas around large Corps reservoirs, the departFood, water, and roosting areas are the priment's 50,000-acres mary keys to look for in a good dove-hunting of public dove fields area. offer many urbanites dove hunting opporDove Habitat tunities just a short distance from their homes. That's because approximately 71 percent of the public dove fields are located in the four major metropolitan areas of Austin-

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lined stock tanks and gravel pits, but you might also find it void of many dove if it has been heavily hunted. In the Fort WorthDove Land Dallas area, the best areas are to the north and west, generally along I35 to the north and west along I20. In the Hill Country, the area from Hamilton, Lampasas, and Blanco are good bets, while anywhere from San Antonio southward throughout the Brush Country is good. The extensive farming communities in the Panhandle are just like any other areas, but somewhat more predictable. Hunting pressure as well as the birds' migratory instincts can change things from one day to the next. This season's dove populations in Texas are estimated at more than 40 million birds. Surveys indicate approximately 300,000 Texas dove hunters harvest around 6 million dove annually (that's about 30 percent of all dove taken annually in the U.S.). The public dove hunting areas have become a big factor in hunter and harvest numbers. This year's 70-day dove seasons runs from September 1-October 24 and December 25-January 9 in the North and Central Zones; and from September 17October 31 and December 25- January 18 in the South Zone with a 15-bird daily bag limit. Choosing your best bet for dove hunting success on a public hunting land might require more pre-season scouting, simply because you are not likely to be able to contact an on-site person such as the actual landowner or land manager prior to your hunt. But good assessment about what's there (stock tanks, gravel pits, sunflower, croton, maize fields, flyway channels such as draws, tree-lines, etc.) will up your chances for good times afield on some of Texas' greatest, and most economical, dove hunting areas.

A map of public hunting areas is available on the Texas Parks & Wildlife website (see end of story)

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Waco, Fort Worth-Dallas, HoustonBeaumont, and San Antonio-Corpus Christi. Dove hunting has long been a "traditional" season-opener to other hunting opportunities for many hunters, while at the same time being a once-a-year family- or friendsgathering for many others. It is relatively economical, and many hunters go after dove only during the first one to two weekends of the season--much less costly than stalking deer or other larger game for weeks or months. The public dove hunting areas provided by TPWD, especially those close to large metropolitan areas, make dove hunting even more affordable and accessible to thousands of hunters. All that is required other than normal hunting gear is a $48 Annual Public Hunting Permit available at all TPWD offices. To find where to hunt dove, the department has incorporated its Dove Hunting Supplement into its Annual Public Hunting Map Booklet, available where the permits are sold. The map also is available on-line. Because of the diversity of Texas habitat in the eight ecological regions, dove hunters can increase their chances of success by concentrating on the best dove "attractants" available where they plan to hunt. Staples, for example, said he chose the small pond to MAP: TEXAS PARKS & WILDLIFE DEPT.

hunt because many stock tanks were low at the time he and his sons hunted. "There were only a few sunflower fields in the area, and I figured our best chances were at the pond where some birds would water before going to their roosts," he said. In the Pineywoods of East Texas, clearcut areas that provide new growth of wild seed-producing plants often attract dove, whereas large, open fields of sunflowers, maize, croton, and other plants offer the best hunting in North and Northwest Texas. Along the same lines, heavy draws in South Texas that provide "flyways" for dove heading to and from their roosts as well as stock tanks during mid-day hours are great bets. Gravel pits, stock tanks, and grain fields always are great bets in the Hill Country and surrounding areas. As for the Panhandle region, huge grain fields attract lots of birds, but in some areas, the best hunting is along tree lines or around sources of water. Finding the best places to bag dove on public lands is no different than finding the hotspots on private lands. It involves a threestep consideration: food, water, roosting areas. A fourth factor that should not be ignored, especially after the second week of the season, is hunter pressure. You might find an area with the best sunflower, maize, or croton fields ever, along with good dirtT E X A S

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Texas Freshwater by Matt Williams| TF&G Freshwater Editor the fringes of the Atchafalaya Basin in southern Louisiana, Morgan City is Cajun to the bone. “There aren’t any greater people in the world,” Nixon said. “They all fish, hunt, cook, and love to live life to the fullest. You’d be surprised at how many of them would actually let you move into their house for a week if you wanted to. It is definitely my kind of town.” One of Nixon’s favorite stops is the Atchafalaya Seafood Bar, where he enjoys getting his hands dirty. His favorite dishes are boiled shrimp and crawfish. “You can sit down at this rough-looking

Bass Towns VER HEARD OF A TOWN CALLED BASSVILLE, USA? Probably not. I know I hadn’t until I went dabbling on the internet and discovered that there is such a place in Green County, Missouri. From what I can tell, Bassville is hardly more than a rural bump in the road along State Highway 125. Established way back in the mid-1800s, Bassville was built around a steam-powered gristmill near the Pomme de Terre River. There are bass swimming in the river today, but it is doubtful they see much local pressure. Modern day Bassville consists of nothing more than an old cemetery, a church, a handful of residents, and a few weathered remnants of a not-so-eventful past. Even Bass, Arkansas, is a similar wide spot on an otherwise featureless rural road. While Bassville, Missouri, and Bass, Arkansas, hold very little appeal for a bass junkie like me, there are a number of towns outside this bass-rich state that I would like to visit before I turn in my flipping stick and Ribbit Frogs for the easy chair. I know this because of the close ties I have with professional fishing and the guys (and gals) who earn their livings casting for cash on lakes across the country. I recently a queried a few well-known pros and asked them to name a few of their favorite bass fishing towns across America. Interestingly, some were of the opinion that the fishing needn’t be “lights out” for a destination to rank high on the list. Larry Nixon’s top pick, Morgan City, Louisiana, is good example. Located along

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bar and eat until you pass out,” Nixon said. “I have never left that town unhappy, even when the fishing turns off. The atmosphere just won’t let me.” Former Bassmaster Classic Champ Tommy Martin of Hemphill is a country boy at heart, so it may come as a surprise that he would point to Plattsburg, New York, as one of favorite fishin’ towns. “It’s one of those rare places that offers everything a fisherman could dream of,” Martin said. “The smallmouth fishing on Lake Champlain is five star, the scenery is gorgeous, the people are outstanding, and the restaurants are out of this world. Going out to eat in Plattsburg is an adventure in itself for guys like me, because they have so many specialty places to choose from.” |

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Guido Hibdon is another legendary pro who prefers good food and pretty scenery with his bass fishing. In his book, Osage Beach, Missouri, fills the bill better than most. “It is the best, no doubt about it,” he said. “The facilities, the campgrounds, and the great eating places like Bentley’s are second to no other place in the country.” Of course, the fishing can be outstanding as well. Lake of the Ozarks is legendary for its brawny largemouths. Kimberling City is another Missouri destination that drew high marks from Martin. Never mind the big Kentucky, largemouth, and smallmouth bass that swim around in the clear waters of Table Rock Lake. Martin cited the convenient layout of the town and primo eating establishments as the primary reasons he likes to go there. “It’s a lot like Osage Beach; it’s a real convenient place to fish,” he said. “You are right on the water, the motels are affordable, the people are friendly, and there are a wide variety of places to eat. That’s what bass anglers look for in a bass fishing town.” George Cochran of Hot Springs, Arkansas, is equally fond the aforementioned destinations, but said none compare to his hometown when it comes time to roll out the red carpet for bass anglers. “I am a fisherman and this town has everything a fisherman could ask for,” he said. “We’ve got three great lakes here [Ouachita, Hamilton, and Catherine] that are tied together by the Ouachita River, and everything revolves around fishing. Factor in the beautiful country, excellent facilities, sporting goods options, and great restaurants, and it is not a wonder why everybody enjoys coming here as much as they do.”

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E-mail Matt Williams at freshwater@fishgame.com GRAPHIC: TEXAS FISH & GAME


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GREEN CCA, Partners to Build Outlook Fishing Pier

described a prominent tattoo on the suspect’s face and the word “vegan” tattooed across his neck. According to press reports, when arrested, Bond had a backpack in his possession containing propaganda literature titled, “The Declaration of War - Killing People to Save Animals - Strike a Match, Light a Fuse, We Only Have the Earth to Lose.” Bond faces 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine if convicted.

CCA Texas has partnered with EcoVantage, Turner Roofing Company, and Urban Engineering to build the new “Outlook Fishing Pier” at the CCA/CPL Marine Development Center in Flour Bluff. Also contributing to the project are Sunset Marine Works, CC Contractors, Decksteriors, and Texas Decks. This 400-foot pier will allow children of all ages as well as physically challenged children to fish the hatchery ponds, and thus gain an appreciation for fishing, and Texas’ natural resources. The brainchild of CCA Texas Mid-Coast Chapter President Hector Mendieta, the pier is an important conservation project. “This pier is vital to the education of our future fisherman in Texas,” Mendieta said. “The topquality materials donated by the participating companies have the strength and durability to last for years even in the harsh environment of South Texas. EcoVantage, Turner Roofing, Urban Engineering and the other contributing companies should be commended for their generous donations of materials and time for the construction of this pier.”

—Staff Report TG

—Staff Report TG

PHOTO: PUBLIC DOMAIN

AR Terrorist Busted POLICE HAVE ARRESTED WALTER EDMUND BOND, A 34-YEAR-OLD ANIMAL RIGHTS TERRORIST FROM SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, ON ARSON CHARGES AFTER HE ALLEGEDLY BURNED DOWN A SHEEPSKIN FACTORY IN COLORADO. Investigators said Bond might be linked to other arson cases in Utah. A man using the nickname “A.L.F. Lone Wolf ” posted a message on an internet website: “Be warned that making a living from the use and abuse of animals will not be tolerated. Also be warned that leather is every bit as evil as fur, as demonstrated in my recent arson against the Leather Factory in Salt Lake City. Go vegan!” An FBI informant reported Bond admitted to the arsons. The informant 38 |

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New Study: Organic Pesticides Not Always ‘Greener’ A NEW UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH STUDY REVEALS SOME ORGANIC PESTICIDES CAN HAVE A HIGHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT THAN CONVENTIONAL PESTICIDES BECAUSE THE ORGANIC PRODUCT MAY REQUIRE LARGER DOSES. Environmental sciences professor Rebecca Hallett and PhD candidate Christine Bahlai compared the effectiveness and environmental impact of organic pesticides to those of conventional and novel reduced-risk synthetic products on soybean crops. “The consumer demand for organic products is increasing partly because of a concern for the environment,” said Hallett. “But it’s too simplistic to say that because

it’s organic it’s better for the environment. Organic growers are permitted to use pesticides that are of natural origin and in some cases these organic pesticides can have higher environmental impacts than synthetic pesticides often because they have to be used in large doses.” The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, involved testing six pesticides and comparing their environmental impact and effectiveness in killing soybean aphids

— the main pest of soybean crops across North America. The scientists examined four synthetic pesticides: two conventional products commonly used by soybean farmers and two new, reduced-risk pesticides. They also examined a mineral oil-based organic pesticide that smothers aphids and another product containing a fungus that infects and kills insects. Compared to the synthetic pesticides, the mineral oil-based and fungal products were less effective, as they also killed ladybugs and flower bugs, which are important regulators of aphid population and growth. These predator insects reduce environmental impact because they naturally protect the crop, reducing the amount of pesticides that are needed. —Staff Report TG


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Electrofishing and the Texas Gar Connection success, he went on to develop the “Electrical Gar Destroyer,” an 8x16-foot barge equipped with a 200-volt generator to electrify a net that zapped the fish and scooped them up. A bright red floodlight on the bow blinded garfishes not sufficiently stunned or dead, making them more manageable. Burr killed millions of garfishes over the years. The colonel compiled data on killing gar at various depths, the voltages required, water salinity affects, and seasonal variances. This data was the board from which modern electrofishing methods and equipment sprang. Burr was following the admo-

MOST ANGLERS KNOW ELECTROFISHING IS A COMMON TOOL FISHERIES SCIENTISTS USE TO CENSUS AND SURVEY FISH POPULATIONS. FEW KNOW THAT THE GODFATHER OF ELECTROFISHING WAS A TEXAS FISHERIES SCIENTIST WHO DEVELOPED IT AS A MEANS TO ERADICATE GARFISHES. Colonel J.G. Burr was Director of Research for the Texas Game, Fish and Oyster Commission (now the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department). Like most fisheries scientists of his day (and many anglers of today), he considered gar a pestilence that decimated game fish populations. Aiming to selectively eradicate gar without collaterally harming more desirable

Quoted in a recent Wall Street Journal article, Elroy Krueger, a retired South Texas guide said alligator gar “overran” Choke Canyon Reservoir in the early 1990s. Krueger said he tried to fish them to extinction, but, “This lake is doomed.” Fisheries professionals say gar eat whatever is most abundant, including bass and other game fishes, but primarily feed on forage species such as shad, and other “trash fish” such as carp. Many anglers are recognizing the gar’s value as a sport fish, and many state game agencies now have regulations in place to protect garfishes from overharvest, with Texas most recently joining in by imposing

John Paul Morris (right) of Bass Pro Shops took this 8foot, 3 inch, 230 pound alligator gar while bowfishing.

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nitions of other fisheries managers and state game departments to “devise methods for gar control, since it is clear that this species is a real menace to many forms of fish and other wildlife.” Anglers, too, both then and now misconceived the impact gar might have on game and forage fishes. |

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a one-gar daily limit Gar by Bow effective this month. After September, every southern state with gar populations except Louisiana will have some kind of alligator gar fishing limits. Among anglers and bowfishermen, alligator gar is the most sought species for its immense size, formidable appearance, and fighting abilities. Even Col. Burr could not help but admire the fish he sought so diligently to destroy, noting during a gar kill at Lake Caddo: “I saw one immense gar, which seemed to be 7 feet long, spring entirely out of the water 30 feet away. His jump was at an angle of 45 degrees and I am sure he felt the current. This jumping of the gars, whether they went into the net or not, produced a thrill which cannot be found in any other kind of fishing.” —Staff Report TG


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Improved Barrier Design Withstands Waves Better A NEW BARRIER DESIGN COULD PROTECT RESERVOIR LEVEES FROM THE EROSIVE FORCES OF WIND-DRIVEN WAVES, ACCORDING TO STUDIES BY USDA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE (ARS) SCIENTISTS AND PARTNERS. THESE FINDINGS COULD HELP LOWER THE MAINTENANCE COSTS FOR CONSTRUCTED PONDS IN THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA WHERE LEVEE REPAIRS CAN AVERAGE $3 PER FOOT-AND SOMETIMES ARE NEEDED JUST FIVE YEARS AFTER A RESERVOIR IS BUILT. Hydraulic engineer Daniel Wren, who dynamics from a 70-acre irrigation reserworks at the ARS Watershed Physical voir in Arkansas. Then they took their data Processes Research Unit in Oxford, Miss., into the lab and designed several wave barpartnered with ARS hydraulic engineer riers that they tested in a 63-foot-long wave Carlos Alonso (now retired) and Universiflume. ty of Mississippi research associate Yavuz Their results indicated that a floating Ozeren for his research. The research team barrier held in place by two rows of pilings gathered data about wind and wave would provide the most effective embank-

ment protection from wave action. Since the barrier was confined between the two rows of pilings, it could rise and fall with fluctuating water levels, unlike a barrier tethered to the bottom of the pond that might become submerged by rising water levels. The team found that a two-pipe barrier was able to dissipate 75 percent of wave energy before the waves washed against the levees. The waves lost some of their force when they broke against the first tube and then lost even more energy as they broke against the second tube. The engineers also found that bundling several lengths of smaller tubing together to obtain an optimal diameter for the floating barrier was less expensive than purchasing one tube with a larger diameter. —Staff Report TG


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Hunt Texas by Bob Hood | TF&G Hunting Editor creek I was riding beside some 600-700 or more years earlier. My trip to the area had begun several days earlier when four hunting buddies and I packed a string of horses and a mule with our gear 22 miles into the Gila Wilderness Area, a 558,014acre treasure of high mesas, rolling hills, and deep canyons. We were after deer and turkey and would camp in tents for 14 days near a drainage to Turkey Creek. One day while riding alone in a canyon

Ancient Trophies O MATTER HOW MANY HUNTING TRIPS you make in a lifetime, many of the most memorable events have nothing to do with hunting. I was on a hunting trip in the Gila Wilderness Area north of Silver City, New Mexico, several years ago when a simple glance from horseback in a deep canyon to the rimrock high above took me out of the modern-day world and into the primitive life of a family, who had looked down on the

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hooks, split shot, and a jar of salmon eggs I had packed with my gear for just such an opportunity. I cut a willow limb nearby to use as a fishing pole and soon was hiding behind a tree at the edge of one of the deeper holes in the creek, flipping salmon eggs to unsuspecting trout. I made a makeshift stringer out of the monofilament and left the several trout I caught in the water so I could continue hunting for a few more hours before returning to camp. The pan-fried fish were a welcome change for all of us, and were all it took for two of my hunting buddies to want to follow me to the canyon the following day and try their luck with the trout. As we rode along the bottom of the canyon toward my fishing hotspot, our conversation soon involved the numerous dark “holes” in the rock walls high above. I remember asking one of my buddies if he thought any of them might be caves used by Indians years ago. We were nearing my trout hole when I glanced far above to the steep canyon walls and noticed three rectangular “holes” just below the top. Two were facing the creek and the third faced left. Upon further study, it appeared the one facing left was the entrance to what appeared to be a room with mud and rock walls. We decided to investigate but could ride our horses only about two-thirds up the canyon wall because of its steepness. We climbed the remaining distance on our hands and feet, and soon were standing in front of a cliff dwelling where the last footprints of Man were likely made many centuries earlier. The two smaller rooms facing the creek had rectangular entrances so small I had to squeeze through them to enter. Once inside, I discovered the dirt on the floor was fine as flour. The larger room to the right did, indeed, provide entrance to an area walled off with rock and mud, and vented at the top. The ceiling inside was blackened, apparently from smoke of ancient fires used for cooking and heating. There also was a large open cave to the left of the three rooms. I photographed the dwellings, but even as we resumed our quest for trout, deer, and turkey, I could not take my mind off the incredible find and the people who had lived there. I soon realized that instead of scanning my surroundings for game, I was

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searching for anything that might reveal another cliff dwelling. After returning home, I contacted the U.S. Forest Service archeological office and learned my find was, indeed, a first. An archeological official gave me information about the Mogollon Indians that had lived in the area in the 13th and 14th centuries, and later sent archeologists to the site to post a marker, just as they do with other archeological discoveries that deserve protection.

Although my hunting buddies shot two deer and one turkey during our 14 days in the Gila, I did not pull the trigger on my rifle. But to me, I had come away with a true trophy of a lifetime. E-mail Bob Hood at hunting@fishgame.com.


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EXPLORING NORTH TEXAS’ LBJ GRASSLANDS FOR SECLUDED SMALL LAKES, EACH ONE CHURNING WITH UNMOLESTED BASS BY PAUL BRADSHAW T E X A S

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IT PROBABLY WASN’T A REAL GOOD idea for me to be stopped in the middle of a gravel road somewhere in Wise County, but since the only other traffic I’ve seen all morning consisted of couple whitetail deer and a roadrunner, I think I’m pretty safe. Sitting there in the predawn darkness with a flashlight in my teeth and a map spread across the steering wheel, I am trying to find a needle in a haystack. Somewhere a few miles to the north, I think, is a 40 acre pond with bass that are virtually begging to be caught. The best part is that when, or if, I ever locate the small lake I’ll probably be the only one fishing it. Welcome to the secluded bass fishing which is typical of all the lakes on the LBJ Grasslands. Texas is the land of massive reservoirs which in turn are home to some of the largest bass in the nation. We really are spoiled to live in a state where you can drive a few hours in any direction and hit world class

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fishing in your state you know you’ve got it good. Due to the publicity surrounding these large lakes we often forgot about the other public fishing opportunities that are available to anglers who don’t mind pulling off the paved road or hiking a trail to find a bass or two. If you live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area you’re less than an hour away from the LBJ Grasslands which is covered up with small ponds and lakes giving shore bound or anglers in small vessels the opportunity to chase bass without being molested by hoards of fisherman in fiberglass rockets. For the thousands of anglers in the state who have never heard of fishing in a national forest or in this case, a national grassland, it will come as a surprise that fishing LBJ is free. That’s right; any licensed angler can walk right up, drop in a boat, and start fishing without so much as paying a launch fee. With the price of everything going up it’s nice to know that fishing can still cost next to nothing. The LBJ Grasslands are a patchwork of properties located just to the north west of Decatur and if you believe the information on their website there are around 400 fishable ponds ranging from 15 to 40 acres spread out across it’s 20,250 acres. I haven’t had the time to fish them all yet but the ones I have hit are the epitome of farm pond fishing, which to me is about as fun as it can get. With names like Clear Lake, Dan’s Pond, and Black Creek Lake, what the LBJ fisheries lack in first name recognition they more than make up for with first class bass fishing. Plan to spend a lot of time unhooking smallish bass but don’t be too surprised if you hook into something pushing ten pounds.

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For the uninitiated, small water bass fishing isn’t the same as chasing them on large public reservoirs. Yes, a bass is a bass no matter what water it swims in but the techniques used to catch them differ because their diets differ. There’s a good chance that a bass swimming in the LBJ waterways has never seen a gizzard shad or fed on a crappie so if you hit the lakes with the intention of chunking swim baits all day then expect to home empty handed. Pond bass feed on small shad, bream, and insects more than their cousins swimming in large reservoirs so when fishing LBJ downsize your presentations. The pond angler’s tackle box should consist of small baits that might be better suited for panfish. Instead of a magnum deep diving crankbait in a shad pattern, throw a shallow running crankbait that imitates a cricket or grasshopper. Jerk baits are also great small water baits but need to be downsized as well. One of my current favorites is the three inch, (1/4 oz.) Sebile Koolie Minnow that is absolutely deadly on bass. Spinnerbaits need to be on the small side as well with a 1/4 oz. bait being the absolute largest you

throw. Topwaters are great for pond bass as well but from my experience poppers work better than walking type baits. When fishing large reservoirs some anglers get into the habit of running and gunning. There is so much fishable water to cover and so many other anglers out there that the fisherman with the fastest boat and quickest cast typically comes home with the most fish. On LBJ, the exact opposite is true. The last trip I made out there was a two day camping/fishing excursion where I saw a total of three other anglers the whole time, all on the same lake, and two of those were on the shore. Instead of burning up the water trying to cover as big an area as possible, slow down and meticulously pick apart every piece of cover you find, most of which will be along the shoreline. The biggest lakes in LBJ only cover around 40 acres each, so if you run and gun you’ll be through fishing the whole lake in 20 minutes. Take your time make multiple casts to likely cover and when you find one fish keep casting because chances are they’ll be a few more hanging out nearby.

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A kayak is an ideal boat for chasing bass on LBJ due to its combination of ease of portability and carrying capacity but I’ve seen anglers out there in everything from float tubes to 20 foot bass boats. The point here is that whatever you have that floats will work. Fishing on LBJ isn’t like anything you’ve probably ever done before. There are hundreds of ponds dotting the landscape all accessible to anglers on foot or in small boats. The best part is you’ll never see more than one or two other anglers the whole day. But do yourself a favor and get a map because these little gems take some digging to get to.

On the Web US Forest Service: www.fs.fed.us/

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NEAL’S* EYES CAROMED within their sockets so feverishly that I was afraid he was on the verge of having a seizure. Jerry’s face screwed up so tightly that for a split second he mirrored Dirty Harry before pulling the trigger. Without warning, Neal’s eyes seemingly and suddenly broke free and slammed into the part of his brain that controls speech. He bounced in his chair and cackled nervously.

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“You sure you really want to hear all this?” He asked, tennis lobbing his head between me and his partner in taxidermy. “I mean, just sit here and complain? Heck, give me a beer and I’ll go all day.” Just like every other working person in the world, taxidermists have problems and complaints about their work. There are aspects about their jobs that are tough, irritating, and a pain to deal with. But knowing what taxidermists biggest complaints are could possible lead you to a better mount, turnaround time, and bill. So, without further adieu (I never thought I’d be able to work the word “adieu" into an outdoor piece) here are the top five taxidermist complaints that I discovered while speaking to a group of them, in no particular order.

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know” and expect the taxidermist to spend hour after hour with you trying to decide which direction to have your deer face.

Set Price and Discounts “Can’t tell you how frustrating it is,” Neal explained, detailing one of his biggest complaints. “Guy comes in and starts bragging about blowing $60K on his last African safari or $20K on his last elk hunt, and then he complains about my fees.” Most taxidermists are professionals and should be treated as such.

The Customer Not Knowing What He Wants Un f ortun a te ly, many hunters and anglers enter the taxidermy shop without having given any thought to how they want their trophy mounted. While it’s true a good taxidermist is a valued source of ideas, that doesn’t mean he (all taxidermists and customers will be addressed as males henceforth) has all the time in the world to run you through a shopping list of options. Taxidermy is a labor-intensive job, so for him, time really is money. If you’re truly lacking ideas, browse his shop, look through his trade magazines, or spend some time

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Imagine getting more than 70 percent of your work for the year assigned in a period of two weeks. Crazy? That’s what most taxidermists get come deer season. They are inundated with assignments and every one of them wants top priority. What customers need to remember is that taxidermy is an art and art takes time. How much time? That depends. Some smaller shops promise a six-month or less turnaround time, others a little longer. A reputable taxidermist should be able to give you a pretty solid estimate of how long your mount will take. When he does, give him the time to do the work. If he says it will take four months, don’t call him after three weeks. Remember that every time he comes to the phone to tell you it’s not ready is time he isn’t working on your--or anyone else’s-mount.

Animals in Extremely Poor Shape

They have set prices that reflect their expertise as well as the market demand. To brag about how much money you just spent on the hunt of a lifetime and then ask for the price of preserving that memory to be cut in half is insulting, not only to the taxidermist but to the memory of the animal. Taxidermist shops are often full of examples of their work. If you don’t feel the work he’s doing is worth what he’s charging, go somewhere else. But don’t treat him like he’s a kid selling gum on the street in a third world country. Likewise, don’t ask for a discount because of the number of animals you bring in. As one taxidermist put it, “Call a plumber and ask if he will give you a discount to come unclog two toilets instead of one! It won’t happen. Pros don’t work that way.”

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Although they sometimes produce work that defies expectations, taxidermists are not magicians and can’t always turn lemons into lemonade. Animals that are brought in with visible damage or that were poorly prepared or “butchered” in the field have little hope of being turned into museum quality work. If you are unsure of how to prepare an animal for delivery to a taxidermist, ask a taxidermist before you take to the field. In fact, some taxidermists actually prefer to do

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all the skinning work and will ask that the only thing you do an animal in the field is to dress it.

Deposit, Payment, and Pick-up Just as with the “set price” complaint above, many taxidermists I spoke to put the customer’s failure to show up with a deposit at the top of their financial complaints. Considering how much work a taxidermist does before getting paid for his services, is a 10 percent deposit too much to ask? I don’t think so. In fact, I can think of very few businesses that operate on this much “faith in the customer to pay.” And that final payment is also a big

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Furthermore, they are constantly updating their skills with new training, so stopping by to ask them to show you how to do something--so you don’t have to pay to have it done--is insulting to say the least. Do you really think a lifetime of mastery can be compressed into a quick 10-minute lesson? Most taxidermists learned their skills because they were interested in wildlife and art and wanted a way to combine the two. Not because they wanted to teach someone how to mount a bass over the phone.

Understanding what a taxidermist needs from the customer in order to do a professional job and addressing those needs can only lead to a better relationship between the two. And that better relationship can only lead to better and quicker service and, in some cases, preferential treatment.

complaint among those in the industry. “It’s always the same guys,” Jerry explained. “The ones that call almost every week about their mount, that once I tell them it’s ready they suddenly stop calling. And then I can’t get them on the phone. These are also the same guys that leave their mount in my shop for two months after it was finished.” Bottom line: If you have plans to have a mount made, make sure you plan to pay for it and pick it up when it’s finished.

Bonus Complaint I have to admit that I’m guilty of this one. Taxidermists are professionals and most have years and years of training. PHOTO: © ROMAN SLUSHAENKO

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OVER THE SUMMER, Texas Fish & Game attended the International Convention of Sportfishing Trades (ICAST) show in Las Vegas. This is the annual show where tackle manufacturers debut their new products. TF&G Publisher Roy Neves, Saltwater Editor Calixto Gonzales and I worked from open to close every day conducting video interviews and basically learning about what products will benefit our readers. The videos are up now in a special wide-sweeping swimming action and it ICAST section of fishgame.com and some worked. In the clear water, I got to see a five-pound of the products made it home with me to test largemouth come up and swallow the lure out in the field. with the hook stuck in the top of the fish’s Before press time I had a chance to test mouth. This spoke well both for the weight out a handful of mainly freshwater-based system as well the Money Minnow which is products at home in Texas. These were all not an entirely new lure but I have sort of used in the field and represent some of the rediscovered. latest trends in freshwater fishing. The innovative people at Berkley were quite At the new product showcase one of the proud of their Gulp! crickets and rightly so. first products to catch my eye was the Z-Man I did the ultimate field test of these taking Ultra Mouse. I took this out to a private clear three boys from our church out fishing. They water lake I have access to and on my first cast used both Gulp! crickets and earthworms. drew in a four-pound class bass which folAfter a few minutes of one boy using the lowed the lure for about 20 yards before seecrickets and catching way more than the other ing me and getting spooked. Walking to the two, they quickly switched. This was done in other side of the pond I threw out and immesome off-colored water, which did not allow diately caught a smaller bass that inhaled the for much visual study. lure as I slowly swam it over a grass bed. The Costa Del Mar 580P lure is made of Elaztec plastic, which is super When I went to my tough and after the strike showed no signs of clear testing pond entire schools of perch would come up within a few seconds of the wear and tear. When swimming at a slow to medium crickets being in the water. The crickets pace, the tail walks back and forth and wig- would survive thee to Daiwa Steez gles like crazy, creating a nice wake in the four catches before they water. It did tend to go subsurface when ripped it off the hook or we had to fished with a fast retrieve but otherwise I have change, which is a lot higher no complaints. I was able to throw it in brush than live crickets. They are and crawl it over logs with no problems of also easier to store. Vicious Fishing having to reset the hook and found it extremehas a unique ly easy to cast. new prodSebile’s Soft Weight System debuted at uct that can ICAST and was one of the first products I help give a put to the test. These weights are made of Tungsten gum rubber and are round St. Croix Mojo Inshore allowing the angler to slip them up and down the hooks included in the kit (from 1/0 little extra life your to 6/0 available). I rigged two of the hooks to toward the front of the hook shank and anothShimano Terez er toward the middle that gave the lure a 54 |

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braid and fusion line. It is called Vicious Ink and is basically a highlighter type marker with a V tip that allows you to run the line over it and get it re-inked with a moss green-colored ink that just so happens to be environmentally friendly. I tried it out on one of my spools that had some faded braid on it and found it was easy to apply, dried fairly quickly and stayed on pretty good. This will not be a permanent fix but at a suggested retail price of $2.99, it is something to keep in the tackle box and might save you from having to buy a new spool of braid as soon as yours starts to fade. During all of my post ICAST field-testing, I was testing out Costa Del Mar’s new 580P lenses on the Jose frame. When speaking with Costa’s Al Perkinson at ICAST, I learned they were made of a super lightweight, impact resistant injected polycarbonate, which is an alternative to Costa’s existing 580-glass lens. While glass is more scratch resistant, it is not able to withstand as much impact, so I figured these were the lenses for me. I can break anything. I am happy to report not only did they not break, but they allowed me to see far more fish than I would have otherwise. The bass I mentioned at the beginning of the story was almost invisible without them. I know because I took them off to see the difference. The polarization and clarity was great and the frame was lightweight and comfortable.

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They are also made with a special coating called C Shell, which helps it with scratch, oil and water resistance. One of the many PLine products that caught our eye at the show was their new Adaro pliers. Machine Shakespeare EZ Cast cut aluminum reduces its weight, while a tung-


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casting. Shakespeare had a cool new reel designed to prevent backlash: the appropriately dubbed EZ Cast has an antibacklash sensor bar that pops Columbia Blood-N-Guts up in the event of an “imperfect” BadonkADonk SS cast, protecting the spool from tangling. Ardent unveiled a new rod and reel package wrapped in the new Fishoflage bass camo finish, that not only ups an angler’s stealth factor, but also Strike King Baby Burner enhances his “cool” factor as well. Daiwa, which is unveiling a new logo and always brings exciting new designs to ZMan UltraMouse ICAST, introduced a new model of its Zillion Type R baitcaster, this one with 7.3to-one (reeling in a blazing 32 inches of line with every crank). Daiwa’s new Steez rod BrassNBlades series boasts incredible sensitivity while maintaining impressive strength. Shimano has a new smaller Curado, offering a new 50 model with all the same features as the popular 200 model. They also have a new Stella spinner with double bearings supporting the pinion gears, a feature they call “X Shift.” And they have developed a new line of rods, Terez, for their new smaller reels. St. Croix has enlarged a UPF 30 rating with Omni-Shade sun pro- their successful Mojo Bass rod line with an tection that is great for guys like me who are inshore version featuring 15 moderately skin cancer conscious. priced models. On the line front, you can expect improved Other Cool Stuff We Found: performance and innovation in 2011 from There were a number of Texas-based lure Trilene, Stren, Spiderwire, P-Line, Power manufacturers getting national attention at the Pro, Vicious Fishing, Eagle Claw’s Bioline show. Among them were Brass N Blades and a new Texas brand, Para Helium. based in Brownsboro, Ultimate Bucket Both Ego Nets and Frabill displayed innoMouth Lures, from Spring, and Larry the vation in the landing net category, from Lizard, hailing from Lake Fork. And a Texas Frabill’s boat paddle-attachment to their popcompany has successfully brought back the out Hybernet, to Ego’s best-in-show new televenerable Russelure, giving it new life not scoping net/accessory system. only in saltwater, but also fresh. We saw way too much to mention everyBomber Saltwater broadened the hot thing here, but you can view more than 70 BadonkADonk line with BadonkADonk SS, video interviews in a special ICAST video a slow sinker complimenting the successful feature on our website (see topwater version. Strike King introduced a below). 1/4-ounce version of their Burner spinnerbait. Rod and reel manufacturers were there in force, and you can expect some exciting technological advancements from them in 2011. Abu Garcia unveiled a spinning version of See them all in a special webtheir new Revo model reels. Penn has a new site Video Feature: surf baitcaster with a magnetic contolled www.FishGame.com brake and a “live spindle” for more accurate

Power Pro Russelure

Gulp! Cricket

P-Line Adaro Pliers

Ultimate Bucketmouth

Sebile Soft Weight

sten carbide cutter gives it great fishing utility. And although this product was not an ICAST debut, it is new and was worn throughout the summer: Columbia’s BloodN-Guts shirts. When my friends and I go fishing, they typically come home looking as if they walked away from a “GQ” photo shoot and I look like Leatherface, the power tool wielding maniac from “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” with blood, slime and guts everywhere. So when Columbia gave me a chance to go fishing and try out their Blood-N-Guts shirts designed to repel blood, motor oil and other nasty stuff I jumped at the chance. This involved me fishing with lures and live bait as well as simply handling lots of fish. The results were I didn’t look like Leatherface after coming home this time. By simply wiping off the slime with a damp rag, I could get most of it off and after a wash at home there was no staining so mission accomplished. These Columbia shirts are seriously comfortable and are fully vented giving a cool fishing experience even in hot weather. It even has PHOTOS: TF& G COMPOSITES OF IMAGES SUPPLIED BY PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS

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Open Season by Reavis Wortham | TF&G Humor Editor raised the tip and caught the line in the redbud. “Dang it!” I almost shouted. Buster Bad Dog stared at me long and hard, wondering if he was in trouble again. I ignored him and trimmed off the lower limbs of the little tree. Finished, I stepped back to see if anything else needed to be lopped off when I felt something squish under my foot. I said a related word. Buster Bad Dog immediately left. I used a shovel to clean up the small grassy area he uses for a bathroom. That done, I again flicked the fly line across the pool and watched it settle just a little to the side of my target. “That’s better,” I said to myself. I lifted the rod tip and attempted a tower cast. A slight breeze tangled the 7-foot leader in the top of the tulip tree. Frustrated, I attacked the tree with the clippers and soon it was no longer an obstacle. Limbs and leaves littered the low understory growth. “I’ll get that later.” After several well-placed casts, I was pleased with my progress. Most of the time the Humpy landed in the ring. Knowing we will be fishing in Oklahoma soon, and knowing the small water I intended to work, I made a side cast. The Humpy dangled from the yaupon holly. The kids weren’t home, so I referenced the tree’s dubious heritage while giving the line a few yanks. The leader snapped and the fly line fell in a tangle on the 3-foot-high sage plant beside the pool. The clippers got a workout that time. I hacked at the sage and yaupon in a rage. Shredded leaves littered the pool’s surface. The yaupon bent to my will. I even raised it up from underneath so I wouldn’t tangle the rod tip the next time. My next side cast was perfect. I practiced that way for a while, and then in my newfound confidence overshot the pool entirely and wound up hanging the fly in an overhanging banana leaf. It held the fly like it was cemented there. I walked around the deck and removed the fly. While I was there, I used my pocketknife to trim the banana tree. That one

How to Trim Hedges with a Fly Rod HAD ORDERS FROM THE WAR DEPARTMENT TO finish getting the backyard ready for an outdoor party. This always involves cutting the banana trees back, and trimming the Texas sage and several hundred yards of Indian hawthorn lining the entire perimeter of the yard. In addition, I needed to trim the crepe myrtles, the tulip tree, and all the palms we had planted near the pool. Instead, I rigged up my four-weight fly rod and cast a Yellow Humpy toward a floating ring at the other end of the pool. I’m not afraid of her. She’s not the Boss of Me. A door slammed inside and I lay the rod against the fence. When the War Department stepped outside, she found me considering the redbud tree. “Think I should raise this up?” I asked. “I always hate limbs to hit my hat.” She looked the yard over. “I would. You have a lot to do back here,” she said. “I’m going to the grocery store; I’ll be back in a little while. Don’t get sidetracked.” “Don’t worry, it’s too cold to swim. Haha!” “Ha-ha,” she said without enthusiasm, eyeing me with suspicion before she left. I picked up the rod, made one false cast, and hung my backcast on the Carolina jessamine growing on the fence near the pump. It was an unruly clump of vines, so I picked up the clippers and trimmed it so that it wouldn’t catch my fly line. Rod again in hand, I made a backcast over the freshly trimmed fence and placed the fly about a foot short of the ring. I was out of practice. With the water loading the rod, I quickly

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looked so good I trimmed the other four growing nearby. When I turned, the largest banana near the War Department’s lounge chair looked unkempt. I trimmed it and returned to the fly rod. For the next few minutes, everything was perfect. Then I started working on harder casts. I moved to the deck between the pool and the garage. Dead and dying morning glories growing on the garage wall captured the fly and leader. Enraged beyond sensibility, I grabbed great handfuls of the vines and yanked them off the trellis. They fell in ropy heaps until nothing was left but the lattice attached to the bricks. I guess I was tired. The next four casts tangled in the potted peach tree, the palm, the potted crepe myrtle, and a nearby Indian hawthorn. Each tangle resulted in a vicious attack with my clippers until nothing protruded to catch my line or fly. Exhausted, I sat on the swing to rest. Returning from the grocery store, the War Department walked back outside and stared at me, seated amid the shorn limbs, leaves, and vines. “Well, you’ve been busy,” she observed. “I didn’t think you’d really do yard work today as pretty as it is. I’m sorry, but I doubted that you’d really work while I was gone. I thought you’d just fool around and clean out your tackle box or something.” She came across the patio and gave me a big hug. “You’re a pretty good guy, you know that?” I smiled, hugged her back, and shoved the fly rod under a large trimmed banana leaf with my toe. She’s right. I am a pretty good guy.

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SEPTEMBER 2010

PART TWO Two-Part Series

Life on the Bottom MAGINE GETTING TO LIE AROUND THE POOL, CONCEALED FROM EVERY- which eventually migrates to the opposite side. Both eyes in adults one, watching the world go by, and having fresh fish delivered are on the “up” side of the head and the coloration of the upper to you any time you want it. Then, once a year, you head out side of the body varies greatly to match the surrounding environtoward the Gulf to socialize and come back to the coast in the ment. The down or bottom side of all flounder is solid white. Anglers often catch flounder that look almost coal black, but spring. That is essentially the life of the flounder. They lie camou- spot up when held. That is the flounders attempt to match its new flaged on the bottom, the tides bring fish to them, and then make surroundings. No one ever said flounder were intelligent creatures, just adaptable. one big trip to mate once a year. Flounder can change colors more than most anglers might Paralichthys lethostigma, the southern flounder, is the largest of more than 25 species of flatfishes found in Gulf coastal waters. think. I once kept several flounder in a 400-gallon aquarium I creAnglers occasionally catch other varieties, but dockside harvest ated for fish behavior study in my workshop. The sand in the surveys show that southern flounder make up 95 percent of the aquarium was fine white sand used for sandblasting. The flounder in this tank turned a very, very light shade of gray and their flatfish catch in the Gulf. normally white spots were almost a luminescent white. It was All flatfishes, including the interesting to see. southern flounder, are lateral and There is some debate over the life history of these fish, but spend most of their life on the bot• TF&G Executive Editor the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department gives a good explatom, where they swim on their sides and lie in ambush for unsuspecting baitfishes. In the case of nation in a publication called The Southern Flounder in Texas: our perennial favorite, the southern flounder, the left side is always “Adult southern flounder leave the bays during the the “up” side while in other species the opposite is true. fall for spawning in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn for The flounder is tailor made for life on the bottom. When the the first time when two years old at depths of 50 to 100 fish first hatch, they have eyes on each side of their head, one of

I PHOTO: © RICHARD GUNION, DREAMSTIME

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In This Issue

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COVER STORY • Life on the Bottom | BY CHESTER MOORE

HOTSPOTS FOCUS: ROCKPORT • Early Northers Alter Plans | BY CAPT. MAC GABLE

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HOTSPOTS FOCUS: CORPUS TO BAFFIN • Target Ship Channel Reds | BY CHESTER MOORE

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HOTSPOTS FOCUS: LOWER COAST • Schooling Reds for Fast Fun | BY CHESTER MOORE

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SPORTSMAN’S DAYBOOK • Tides, Solunar Table, Best Hunting/Fishing Times | BY TF&G STAFF

HOW-TO SECTION

HOTSPOTS & TIDES SECTION

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TEXAS HOTSPOTS • Texas’ Hottest Fishing Spots | BY TOM BEHRENS, CALIXTO GONZALES, AND BOB HOOD

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TEXAS KAYAKING • Chewy’s Cove | BY GREG BERLOCHER

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BOWHUNTING TECH • The Essence of a Bow Hunter | BY LOU MARULLO TEXAS BOATING • Disaster Story | BY LENNY RUDOW

HUNTING TALES • Crossbows: 1 Year After |

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HOTSPOTS FOCUS: UPPER COAST • Record Redfish | BY CAPT. EDDIE HERNANDEZ

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HOTSPOTS FOCUS: GALVESTON • COMPLEX • September Mysteries | BY CAPT. MIKE HOLMES

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HOTSPOTS FOCUS: MATAGORDA • Tides, Shell Crucial for Early Fall Specks | BY CHESTER MOORE

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feet. The eggs are buoyant. “Females become sexually mature at two years of age in Texas waters. The youngest mature female southern flounder in northern Florida was four years old according to scientists there. Of the mature females collected in August, eight percent of the four year-olds, five percent of the five year olds, and 18 percent of the six-year-olds were developing eggs. “After hatching, the larval fish swim in an upright position and the eyes are located on opposite sides of the head. As the young fish grows, the right eye begins to “migrate” to the left side of the head. When body length reaches one-half inch or so, the eye migration is complete and the fish assumes its left-side-up position for life.” At this point, the young fish enter the bays during late winter and early spring. They are about 1/2-inch in length and seek shallow grassy areas near the Gulf passes. Southern flounder post-larvae show up all 58 |

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GEARING UP SECTION

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NEW PRODUCTS • What’s New from Top Outdoor Manufacturers | BY TFG STAFF

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TEXAS TESTED • Cor-Bon, Sebile, Buff, Bumper Stumper | BY TFG STAFF

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INDUSTRY INSIDER • Cor-Bon, Minn Kota | BY TFG STAFF

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TEXAS TASTED • Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork | BY BRYAN SLAVEN

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OUTDOOR CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY AND EAT ACROSS TEXAS • Classifieds/Eat Across Texas | BY TF&G STAFF

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PHOTO ALBUM • Your Action Photos |

BY TF&G READERS

BAITS & RIGS • Floating Worm | BY PAUL BRADSHAW

BY BOB HOOD

along the Gulf of Mexico coast during winter and early spring. According to studies in Aransas Bay, the peak movement of post-larvae flounders into estuaries is in February, when water temperatures are still low. Small flounder grow rapidly and might reach 12 inches in length by the end of their first year. As noted in my book, Flounder Fever, males seldom exceed 12 inches, but females grow larger than males and often reach a length of 25 inches. Most flounder caught by anglers are females between 12 and 16 inches long, weighing 1 to 1-1/2 pounds. This does not mean flounder cannot get huge though. The Texas state record is a 13-pounder caught by H. Endicott of Groves at Pleasure Island in 1976. The world record is a 22-pounder caught in Florida in the 1980s, and there have been reports of a number of other truly monstrous flounder caught throughout the years. Late author A.C. Becker caught a 17-pounder in a shrimp trawl in the mouth of Double Bayou near Anahuac in 1948. To attain such sizes, a flounder would have to be very old and it would have to be a supreme predator—which is exactly what flounder are. T E X A S

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www.FishGame.com Flounder do not put up impressive jumping displays like a tarpon nor make brutal, determined runs like a redfish, but they are certainly a challenge to catch. They do not chase and corral schools of baitfish like speckled trout, redfish, mackerel and sharks do. For the most part, flounder are ambush predators, lying camouflaged on the bottom and waiting for prey to come to them. It is a very effective way of making a living. Sometimes it is possible to encounter flounder chasing baitfish on a shallow flat or point, but that is rare, indeed. Understanding this dynamic is the key to catching these delectable, challenging fish. Editor’s Note: Chester Moore will be hosting a unique free event called “Flatfish University” on Saturday October 9. To learn more about the event, email cmoore@fishgame.com.

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LOWER GULF COAST

South Bay Specks by CALIXTO GONZALES cgonzales@fishgame.com

LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Southeast Corner GPS: N26 1.548, W97 11.02302 (26.0258, -97.183717) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live pinfish, DOA tandem in Smoke, black/clear/glitter, Glow/pink CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Drift from the Southeast corner of the bay out into deeper water. Trout will be spreading out on the flats and holding in deeper pockets. LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Center Channel GPS: N26 2.59398, W97 10.95198 (26.043233, -97.182533) SPECIES: flounder BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live finger mullet, Gulp! Shrimp in Glow, Rootbeer CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Fish the edges with fish-finder rigs and live bait or soft plastics on 1/4-ounce jigheads. Bounce the jigheads along the bottom around cuts in the grass beds. Fish inside the channel on a falling tide. LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Center Channel GPS: N26 2.59398, W97 10.95198 (26.043233, -97.182533) SPECIES: black drum BEST BAITS: live shrimp, fresh shrimp CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 95660 |

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551-9581 TIPS: Fish in the channel itself for cruising schools of black drum. Use live or fresh shrimp on a free-line rig with a 1/4-ounce split shot sinker. Anchor up on the edges and not in the channel. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Mexequita Flats GPS: N26 3.624, W97 11.523 (26.0604, -97.19205) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwaters early; Gulp! Jerk Shad and Shrimp in Rootbeer, Lime Glow CONTACT: Captain Eddie Curry, 956943-8301, www.currygishing.com TIPS: Schools of bigger redfish cruise these flats just prior to moving out to through Brazos Santiago Pass. Big topwaters in Bone, Chrome/blue are solid bets. If fish begin sitting in potholes, work a shrimp tail or jerkbait past them. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Brownsville Ship Channel GPS: N26 2.124, W97 13.10802 (26.0354, -97.218467) SPECIES: snook BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live mullet, SPI Lures tandems in glow/pink, chartreuse; topwaters CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Fish around docks and riprap with topwaters and soft plastics early in the morning. There are some very big snook in the Ship Channel in late summer and early fall. Live bait works well, too. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Drum Boats GPS: N26 10.713, W97 11.10702 (26.17855, -97.185117) T E X A S

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SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwaters, gold spoons, Gulp! Shrimp and jerkbaits in New Penny, Rootbeer CONTACT: Captain Eddie Curry, 956943-8301; www.curryfishing.com TIPS: Redfish take off in September. Fish are very aggressive as they feed prior to migrating Gulf-ward. Use topwaters and gold spoons for best results. Don’t discount Gulp! baits, especially on windier days. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: There won’t be as many trout as in past months, but the ones you find will be good solid 18 to 24-inch trout. Use larger baits to tempt them. A topwater like a Top Dog or Super spook are classic bit trout getters. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: This is the prime time of year to ambush herds of redfish as they start to move towards the passes. Early in the month, you will find the smaller groups of redfish developing. Look for groups of redfish moving south, fish soft plastics in white / chartreuse LOCATION: South Padre Island C O A S T A L

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HOTSPOT: Andie Bowie Park (Bank Access) GPS: N26 8.90802, W97 10.17102 (26.148467, -97.169517) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live mullet, cut ballyhoo, cut mullet, silver spoons, soft plastics CONTACT: White Sands Marina, 956943-2414 TIPS: Surf-fishermen have a shot at a big bull redfish starting in September. A bottom rig with live or cut fish is tough to beat. Some anglers like to “run and gun” up and down the beach and stop to fish spots that look fishy. LOCATION: South Padre Island HOTSPOT: Boca Chica Beach GPS: N26 3.02802, W97 9.174 (26.050467, -97.1529) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live finger mullet, cut mullet,

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ballyhoo; soft plastics in glow/chartreuse, red/white, chartreuse/white tail CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Watch for changes in the surf shoreline and set up in the first gut early in the morning, and the second gut as the day progresses.

MIDDLE GULF COAST

Cavallo at Port O by TOM BEHRENS tbehrens@fishgame.com

GPS: N28 14.9778, W96 13.7052 (28.24963, -96.22842) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish grass lines and sand pockets LOCATION: San Antonio Bay HOTSPOT: Big Reef GPS: N28 22.2, W96 25.71 (28.370, 96.42850) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch or live croaker CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361.785.2986 TIPS: Key on oyster shell bottoms LOCATION: Mesquite Bay HOTSPOT: Rattlesnake Reef GPS: N28 7.92702, W96 52.06542 (28.132117, -96.867757) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Texas Tackle Factory Red Killers in white, Pumpkinseed, or chartreuse, with 1/8-ounce jigheads CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish the drop-off

LOCATION: Port O’Connor HOTSPOT: East Cavallo Hump

LOCATION: Redfish Bay HOTSPOT: Klondike Reef GPS: N27 54.468, W97 6.7662 (27.9078, -97.11277) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live piggy perch under a Mansfield Mauler CONTACT: Capt. Brent Hopkins, 361729-6911 TIPS: Keep your leader just long enough to keep the perch out of the grass LOCATION: Copano Bay HOTSPOT: Copano Reef GPS: N28 6.70698, W97 6.40398 (28.111783, -97.106733) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp under a popping cork CONTACT: Capt. Ed. Zielinski, 361-7292026 TIPS: The trout will stay shallow until 62 |

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LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N27 54.28398, W97 6.00198 (27.904733, -97.100033) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. John Filla, 361-2152332 TIPS: Towards the end of the month, big redfish should start to appear in 1-2 feet of water. LOCATION: Corpus Christi Bay HOTSPOT: Causeway GPS: N27 51.89298, W97 21.13002 (27.864883, -97.352167) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: “When fishing over the flats, I put a bubble float on with a long enough leader to keep the perch above the grass.” Caserta LOCATION: Upper Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Intracoastal Canal GPS: N27 16.674, W97 23.82102 (27.2779, -97.397017) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: Check the deep water potholes along the canal LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N27 50.61498, W97 3.44298 (27.843583, -97.057383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or crab CONTACT: Capt. Randy Filla, 361-2152332 TIPS: Redfish action should heat up along the jetties by the end of September.

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LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N29 40.371, W93 50.25 (29.67285, -93.8375) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics such as the Big Nasty and Bomber Flukes with chartreuse tails CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Trout are in the transition period between summer and fall. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Beachfront GPS: N29 40.62744, W93 52.70766 (29.677124, -93.878461) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Catch 5 and Catch 2000 CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: The second week in September is when the main bull redfish run usually takes place. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: East Pass GPS: N29 58.92, W93 47.13498 (29.982, -93.785583) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in natural colors CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Look for working birds. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Green’s Bayou GPS: N29 49.68786, W93 48.99516 (29.828131, -93.816586) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in bright colors for off-colored water; natural colors in clear T E X A S

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water CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Lots of rain in September could shove the shrimp from the marshes out into the lake; the trout will follow the shrimp. LOCATION: Trinity Bay HOTSPOT: The Wells GPS: N29 42.67398, W94 48.513 (29.711233, -94.80855) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Bass Assassins in 10W40 and Chicken on a Chain colors, using 1/8 or 1/4-ounce jigheads; Jig head size is based on wind and tide CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Good location for a lot of reds and some good trout in September LOCATION: East Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Hannah’s Reef GPS: N29 28.6806, W94 45.6786 (29.47801, -94.76131) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: Red Shad Bass Assassin with 1/8-ounce jigheads CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: In September, you are not going to catch a lot of trout but the fish you catch will be big. If it’s a sunny day, try baits in Limetreuse color. LOCATION: Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Seabrook Flats GPS: N29 33.306, W95 1.38498 (29.5551, -95.023083) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: She Dog topwater baits; soft plastics in Pumpkinseed CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Look for rafting mullet. Good spot in late September LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Cotton’s GPS: N28 30.60198, W96 12.603 (28.510033, -96.21005) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: crab or pink shrimp flies C O A S T A L

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CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: September is a good time for the angler using a fly rod for redfish in West Matagorda Bay. The fish are starting to school; concentrate on grass beds. LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Shell Island GPS: N28 37.65498, W96 3.80202 (28.627583, -96.063367) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: She Pups and SkitterWalks CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: Look for pods of redfish along the grassy shoreline. The fish will be chasing shrimp in the grass. LOCATION: East Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N28 39.25398, W95 52.70298 (28.654233, -95.878383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwater lures early; Norton Bull Minnows in Black Magic color later in the day CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: Look for working beds

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PINEY WOODS

Primos Conroe Cats by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Conroe HOTSPOT: Main Lake Channel GPS: N30 25.8903, W95 35.8932 (30.431505, -95.598220) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Primos dipping bait CONTACT: Richard Tatsch, admin@fishdudetx.com, 936-291-1277, www.fishindudetx.com TIPS: Pre-bait two or three areas in 1525 feet of water along the edge of the main channel with cattle cubes. Use a No. 4 treble hook. Ease the bait off the bottom occasionally while feeling for the slightest resistance. BANK ACCESS: Stowaway Marina LOCATION: Caddo Lake HOTSPOT: Main Lake Points

GPS: N32 42.59028, W93 59.50452 (32.709838, -93.991742) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: plastic frogs, buzzbaits, flukes CONTACT: Paul Keith, Caddo Lake Guide Service, www.caddolakefishing.com, 318-455-3437 TIPS: Fish the main-lake pads and hydrilla beds with your surface baits. Usually, the closer to the main-lake creek channel the better. BANK ACCESS: Piers at the Texas State Park and Louisiana State Park sites. LOCATION: Lake Granger HOTSPOT: Main Lake Ridge GPS: N30 42.13896, W97 20.23698 (30.702316, -97.337283) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: 1/2-ounce slab spoons CONTACT: Tommy Tidwell, crappie1@hotmail.com, 512-365-7761 TIPS: The white bass are schooling on main lake humps and hit best during the middle of the day. Anchor directly over the humps and drop slab spoons to the bottom. The larger fish are on the bottom picking up injured shad. LOCATION: Toledo Bend HOTSPOT: Myrick’s Reach GPS: N31 45.04002, W93 50.21298 (31.750667, -93.836883) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, tail spinners, Road Runners, slabs, spoons CONTACT: Greg Crafts, gregcrafts@yahoo.com, 936-368-7151, toledobendguide.com TIPS: White bass are following the shad and schooling throughout the day all over the lake. During early morning and late evening hours, look for them to school in the same locations such as off main-lake points, road beds, and flats close to deep water.

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PRAIRIES & LAKES

Jigs Take Texoma Stripers by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Mill Creek Flats GPS: N33 49.43568, W96 46.15392 (33.823928, -96.769232) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: slabs and jigs CONTACT: Bill Carey, bigfish@striperexpress.com, 877-786-4477, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: Jig 1-ounce chrome, white and chartreuse slabs off the bottom in 10-30 feet of water. White and Glow Coho Minnow jigs with 3/4-ounce jighead and 4-inch tail are perfect. Cast the jigs and use a medium retrieve. BANK ACCESS: Mill Creek Campsites LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Juniper Point East GPS: N33 51.892, W96 49.883 (33.864867, -96.831383) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: RipTide Curltailers, and topwaters CONTACT: Bill Carey, 903-647-4022 Cell, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: The big fish move onto the flats during September. Early mornings cast pencil poppers and chug bugs on the shallow banks. Mid-morning change your lures to Rip Tide Curltailers and Sassy Shad soft plastics. Concentrate on the flats that run about 20 feet in depth. Locate the creek channels and drop-offs; these are the routes that the fish use to move up from deep water to feed. The gulls have arrived, so pay close attention to the birds, as they are your best fish-finders. BANK ACCESS: East Juniper Point and Washita Point, watch for stripers chasing shad along bank LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Flat Creek Docks GPS: N32 11.77662, W95 30.51738 (32.196277, -95.508623) C O A S T A L

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SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: crankbaits, Shimmy Shakers, spinnerbaits, and buzzbaits CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-5617299, www.rickysguideservice.com TIPS: Fish crankbaits and chartreusewhite Shimmy Shakers around the docks, and 1/4-ounce jigs, buzzbaits, and spinnerbaits in the back of Flat Creek and other creeks. LOCATION: Lake Whitney HOTSPOT: McCowan Flats GPS: N31 55.482, W97 24.858 (31.9247, -97.4143) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white ribbon tail trailers CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Stripers are scattered due to the heavy thermocline, making trolling the most productive pattern. Easy limits result from using white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white trailers. Drag the lures anywhere from 19-22 feet in 26-35 feet of water. LOCATION: Lake Somerville HOTSPOT: Spillway South GPS: N30 18.09774, W96 31.5441 (30.301629, -96.525735) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: shad, worms, punchbait, chicken livers CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water drops off rapidly from the shore here. Chum the drop-off close to the boat. Fish straight down with the bait close to the bottom near the chum. Use a cork or fish with a tight line. Set the hook when the least bite is detected. LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: hybrid striped bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: Troll crankbaits in 25 feet of water off the flats for big hybrid striped bass. T E X A S

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BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: White bass will be stacked up on the drop-offs and can be caught on slabs bounced off the bottom. BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Oak Creek Point GPS: N31 57.33714, W96 15.56028 (31.955619, -96.259338) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Steve Schmidt, steve@steveschmidtsbigbass.com, 817929-0675 TIPS: This point has numerous large boulders. Put your boat in 15 to 18 feet of water and cast a Carolina rig onto the point. Drag the rig across the boulders. LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: Triplet Point GPS: N31 54.84978, W97 12.88818 (31.914163, -97.214803) SPECIES: white bass

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BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Watch for early-morning schooling action on the point. Retrieve the lures just under the surface for fast action. LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: The Bubbler GPS: N31 54.8709, W97 12.375 (31.914515, -97.20625) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: After the sun becomes high, head to the bubbler and fish Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges or small chrome spoons in the heavily-oxygenated water that attracts tons of baitfishes and game fishes. LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Highway 155 Bridge GPS: N32 8.74926, W95 28.3023 (32.145821, -95.471705) SPECIES: crappie BEST BAITS: Mister Twister / Mister Minnow jigs CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-5617299, www.rickysguideservice.com TIPS: Fish around the pilings beneath the Highway 155 bridge as well as brush piles in 16 feet of water. White jigs usually work better than those of other colors.

LOCATION: Fayette County HOTSPOT: Pekema Creek Channel GPS: N29 56.0946, W96 43.0308 (29.93491, -96.717180) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: punchbait, worms CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water is 15 feet deep here with submerged structure. Fish close to the bottom with a cork or tight line. Chumming will increase your chances of catching fish. Use a No. 6 or No. 8 treble hook. LOCATION: Gibbons Creek HOTSPOT: Eagle Point South GPS: N30 37.92102, W96 2.79 (30.632017, -96.0465) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Shad, shrimp, worms, stinkbait CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The fish are feeding out of Sulphur Creek into the more shallow water in the timber early mornings and after dark. Tie to a tree and put out chum around the boat. Use a No. 6 treble hook on punchbait just off the bottom.

PANHANDLE

Striper Kingdom by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Possum Kingdom HOTSPOT: Costello Island GPS: N32 54.14196, W98 28.068 (32.902366, -98.467800) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: live shad, topwaters, jigging spoons CONTACT: Dean Heffner, fav7734@aceweb.com, 940-329-0036 TIPS: Fish the breaklines at 20-30 feet 68 |

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along the river channel from Costello Island to Broadway. Once you catch fish at a certain depth, use it to catch many more. White and red colors are good bets but try chartreuse when fishing deep or stained waters. LOCATION: Lake Palo Pinto HOTSPOT: Power Plant Outlet GPS: N32 39.30528, W98 18.51282 (32.655088, -98.308547) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Jigs, slab spoons CONTACT: Dean Heffner, fav7734@aceweb.com, 940-329-0036 TIPS: Fish the water discharge early and then work the edges of the deep holes with slabs and jigs.

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GPS: N30 35.35584, W98 24.51102 (30.589264, -98.408517) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: buzzbait, Pop-R, mediumdiving crankbait, spinnerbait, jerkbait CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Start early with topwater lures and expect the bite to last longer at this time of the year. Texas and Carolina-rigged soft

plastics also work well. Look for laydowns, docks, and grass beds. Up the river, bass will move to the corners of docks. LOCATION: Lake Granger HOTSPOT: Brush Piles Near Dam GPS: N30 41.70318, W97 20.229 (30.695053, -97.337150) SPECIES: crappie BEST BAITS: chartreuse 1/32-ounce jigs CONTACT: Tommy Tidwell, crap-

BIG BEND

Bass at the Marker by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Amistad HOTSPOT: Marker 28 to the Dam GPS: N29 27.24582, W101 2.6502 (29.454097, -101.04417) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Ribbit Frogs, buzzbaits CONTACT: Larry Scruggs, Amistad Lodge and Adventures, fisherofmenlrs@hotmail.com, 210-789-1645 TIPS: The bass are in the grass. Work buzzbaits and Ribbit Frogs over the grass beds. Expect catches of 70 to 80 fish per boat with an occasional 10-pounder.

HILL COUNTRY

Beaching Bass at Sunrise by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Lyndon B Johnson HOTSPOT: Sunrise Beach C O A S T A L

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pie1@hotmail.com, 512-365-7761 TIPS: The crappie are very fat after feeding all summer on shad. They are feeding heavily and are very willing to take a jig dropped over brush piles in 6-12 feet of water. LOCATION: Lake Medina HOTSPOT: Walton Island GPS: N29 33.897, W98 55.3851 (29.564950, -98.923085) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: live minnows, small chrome or white jigging spoons, Rat-L-Traps, shad-colored grubs, shad topwaters CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: White bass fishing is best at night with floating or submersible fishing lights. Anchor off the points or next to a bluff along the main river channel. Position sev-

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eral lights around the boat. Baitfishes will move in first, then the white bass. LOCATION: Canyon Lake HOTSPOT: Tom’s Creek GPS: N29 52.38528, W98 15.47004 (29.873088, -98.257834) SPECIES: smallmouth bass BEST BAITS: Smoke/red flake, Watermelon, Pumpkin, and silver fleck tubes, grubs, and worms rigged on 1/8-ounce to 1/4ounce jigheads; Zara Puppies, Pop-Rs, medium-diving lures CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Look for bushes and rocks in 1015 feet of water along breaklines and points. Fish topwater lures early and late. Swim grubs along the bottom to get strikes. Fish crankbaits and grubs along the bluffs.

LOCATION: Lake Travis HOTSPOT: Anderson Bend GPS: N30 22.06998, W98 0.58998 (30.367833, -98.009833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Bone or shad-colored topwaters; purple, Watermelon-red and red shad plastic worms and tubes; chartreuse spinnerbaits; crawfish-patterned crankbaits CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Topwater lures early. Once the surface bite is over, throw a spinnerbait or crankbait in the same areas; plastic worms catch less-active fish. Also focus on docks, a key cover on this lake. BANK ACCESS: Pace Bend Park for bass,

SOUTH TEXAS PLAINS

Bass on the Border by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

catfish LOCATION: Falcon Lake HOTSPOT: Big Tiger Creek GPS: N26 44.32602, W99 8.74998 (26.738767, -99.145833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Robert Amaya, Robert’s Fish N’Tackle, robert@robertsfishntackle.com, 956-765-1442 TIPS: Work the brush lines early with crankbaits, targeting those close to rock piles or rocky banks and then move out to 12 to 18 feet of water and work the underwater bushes along the main channel and other drop-offs with the Carolina-rigged worms.

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Record Redfish HEN I VISUALIZE FISHING SABINE Lake in September it always seems to come with a red backdrop. Or should I say a bronze backdrop. The redfish are always super thick on Sabine in September and this year should be off the charts. For the past few years we’ve been blessed with extremely high populations of these bronzed brutes, and according to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department officials this year is among the best on record for reds in the Sabine ecosystem. “We definitely won’t be hurting for a long time as far as redfish are concerned,“ said avid Sabine angler Danny Hernandez. Her-

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nandez, who also doubles as my brother, has, like most folks down here, noticed a dynamic increase in red drum populations over the last few years. “We, as fishermen should pat ourselves on the back for bringing back the redfish. Starting with the redfish wars of the eighties, to decreasing the daily bag limit and tweaking the slot limit, as well as lots of help and support from TPWD and organizations such as CCA, we have definitely come full circle on this matter”, he said. When we first started noticing a great increase in redfish numbers, the vast majority of them were rat reds in the 13 to 16 inch class. Now that those fish have a couple of years under their belt we’re seeing an abundance of fish covering the entire spectrum of the slot and beyond. The future is looking bright too as the marsh and shorelines are loaded with juvenile as well as nice slot reds. Coaxing them into a game of potential life or death tug ‘o war is relatively easy as they are not scared to eat live or dead bait, plastic or metal.

In the lake, you should have little problem locating them along the eastern bank from Blue Buck Point all the way to East Pass. Troll down the shoreline in about 2 to 5 feet of water and tempt them with soft plastics, topwaters or gold spoons. Some excellent choices as far as plastics are concerned are Flounder Pounder CT Shad, Norton Bull Minnow and Sandeel, and Zoom Super Fluke. Good colors are glo/chartreuse, margarita, and white ice. For topwaters, pearl or pink Skitterwalks and black with chartreuse SheDogs are hard to beat. If you prefer the real deal, anchor on the points on either side of the mouths of the bayous. Use a fish finder rig with a 3/0 Kahle hook. Live or cut mullet and croaker, fresh dead shrimp and cracked crab fished either on the bottom or under a popping cork will work well. Also, on calm afternoons expect to find big schools of reds roaming the mid lake area from Madame Johnson’s Bayou to East Pass. These massive schools shouldn’t be hard to find or stay on when the wind is calm and the lake is smooth. Keep an eye out too, for the giant clouds of shad that you’ll encounter in September. Fish the perimeters with Hoginars, gold spoons, or shad and mullet under a popping cork. Make sure to set your drag and come join us for some super redfish action on Sabine Lake in September.

THE BANK BITE LOCATION: Intracoastal Canal Hwy 87 (Sabine Pass) SPECIES: Reds, Specks, Flounder, Croaker BAITS: Soft plastics, fresh shrimp, cut bait BEST TIME: Mornings and evenings (Best with moving tides) . Contact: Eddie Hernandez at, ehernandez@fishgame.com 72 |

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September Mysteries ITH OR WITHOUT “CLIMATE CHANGE,” September is a month that is difficult to predict on the Texas coast. There are years when August decides to cancel September, and the heat of summer continues unabated right up to the beginning of our all-too-brief period of fall. In other years, the first real cold front of the season might move through in mid September, dropping temperatures into the 50s for a day or two before summer weather returns to close the month. September can be a time of temperatures more moderate than either extreme, with gentle breezes to complement them, or it can bring deadly and devastating hurricanes Like Ike and Rita in recent years. Some things September brings regardless of the weather patterns: Children are back in school, for one, although these days many have been back in classrooms nearly a month by then. Most summer vacations have ended, for folks who take them; organized sports from the Pee Wee to professional level are taking up the time and interest of many who fish the coast in summer, and a few early hunting seasons have begun. All this means the really dedicated fishermen will find things a lot less crowded at the boat ramp, beach, rock groins, piers, and bait stands. When temperatures do drop into the high 70s and low 80s, this can be the most pleasant month of the year to fish. None of the various sport- and panfishes common to the Galveston area will have gone elsewhere in September, but with moderating temperatures and less pressure, they will often be easier to find and catch. With decent tides, reds and flounder should be up in the grass of back bays and

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coastal streams, and trout will be roaming green surf just off the beaches. Huge shoals of mullet (the big ones that attract the attention of apex predators) will be rafting along the beachfront, surfing in on clear breakers that show them silhouetted by the morning sun. Chasing these will be bull reds, jack crevalle, tarpon, an occasional king mackerel, and sometimes really big bluefish. Oh, and shark. I forgot the shark. Giant stingrays will also shadow the schools, feeding off dead and injured fish the jacks and sharks allow to escape. If you have never witnessed a school of hungry jacks charging through a school of mullet, causing frightened baitfish to spray out of the water like a silver eruption, then you have missed one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights. Since the 2010 summer was expected to be fairly dry after mid July, water clarity and salinity should be good in the bays, and with calm seas, Gulf waters should be at least clear green from the shore to the blue water lines, wherever that might chose to be. This means perfect water for those who love arti-

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ficials, including flies, over oyster reels in the bays or around near-shore buoys and rigs in the Gulf.

THE BANK BITE LOCATION: Pelican Island, from the pier on the end, or the Galveston-facing bank. SPECIES: Good spot to intercept moving flounder, reds, and puppy drum, along with trout and panfishes. BEST BAITS: Live finger mullet work on large flounder to bull reds. Mud minnows are also good, as well as shrimp or even cut squid. BEST TIMES: Early and late, and combining these times with good tidal flow add up to the best chance of success.

Capt. Mike Holmes runs tarpon, shark, and bluewater trips on a classic 31 Bertram. To book a trip, call 979-415-0535. Email him at mholmes@fishgame.com.

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Tides, Shell Crucial for Early Fall Specks HELL IS AN IMPORTANT FACTOR IN FINDING wrecks so they can give themselves extra big trout during the early fall in the propulsion toward a baitfish by having Matagorda area. Learning how to something to push off. For example, a six-foot rattlesnake can target the shell and play the tides on conjunction can give you a much-needed only strike a foot or two when its body is in a straight position, but advantage over the fish. when that rattlesnake is I once read an article coiled up next to a rock it that said walleye in the can strike half the length Great Lakes use big • TF&G Executive Editor of its body or more. clumps of mussel and

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Applying this to fish may be dissecting fish behavior too much, but it sounds logical to me. This could be why trout and other predatory bay fish bond to structure so tightly during the fall. Since they have slow metabolism, any boost to their speed can be a big help in catching prey. Keep in mind that all shell reefs are not equal and not all parts of a shell reef are the same. It is important to look for the structure within structure. An oyster reef is a structure all by itself, but there is structure on top of that structure. A big clump of oysters rising up on a slight ridge on a reef with an average depth of 10 feet is structure on structure. A sunken boat on a reef is structure on structure. Spots like this give trout facing the current a place to hide out, stay out of the full-blown current itself and attack baitfish. An indispensable tool in reef fishing is a marker buoy. You can purchase these buoys at a tackle store or simply make your own with two-liter cola bottles. When coming across a hot spot throw out the buoys so you can return there. There might be 200 fish bunched up in a 20-yard spot and that may be where they stay all day. You have got to be able to stay within the bite window to be successful and slowing down the tides effects on your boat can help you achieve this. Determining which tide is best for trout fishing in your area will be something you have to do. There are many factors that contribute to this phenomenon but there are a few helpful hints, some of which might seem glaringly obvious. Here are a few to consider. • If you are fishing a spot like an oyster reef on the southern end of a bay system, then incoming tides are often best. Trout like to feed a lot of the bait that comes in and out of the Gulf and the rising tide tends to bringing in lots of it.

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• Fish structure that breaks up An oyster reef can act as a “starting block” of sorts from which a speck can gain momen- tides. If you find a spot that tum for predatory strikes, especially in the is breaking up fall when their metabolism slows. a strong curShell Game rent, fish that spot and expect the trout to hold tight to structure.

• Conversely on the north end of bay systems, outgoing tides that flush the marsh are often the best and will spark trout feeding. • If you are jetty fishing, try the outside of the jetties first if the tides are going out and the outside of the walls if it is coming in. It is not an exact science but I have found that rule to ring true in many cases. • Trout cannot feed in an area if there is no water. In other words if the tide has been falling for a while and a flat has little water on it, pass it up. This might seem obvious but even a flat with just perhaps a foot of water can be trout free in certain areas.

THE BANK BITE LOCATION: Matagorda Beach SPECIES: Speckled trout, redfish BAITS: Live shrimp, live mullet and Gulp! BEST TIMES: Varies


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Early Northers Alter Plans TARTING IN LATE SEPTEMBER, ONE MUST start thinking in terms of cool fronts and how they affect the way you fish. A drastic water temperature drop associated with a passing front can allow the savvy angler to put an absolute spanking on

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coastal bay fishes. With fast dropping temperatures, be on the water as the temperature is dropping. The closer you can get to shallow shell or sand reefs with a deep-water egress, the better. After the water temperatures have dropped, wait 24 hours or so and target the deeper water edges these egresses feed into. Strong north winds pushing water from the bays is an ideal time to set up at the mouth of marshes where predators await bait moving with the outgoing flow. Copano Bay: On pre-front days, middle depth reefs like Lap Reef or little Reef are good bets using free-lined live shrimp for trout. The lull right before a front hits is killer topwater action with lures in Bone and red. Post-front with a 15-degree or more drop in water temperature, use New Penny colored jerk shads. Fishing slow is the ticket, targeting the edges of sand and shell that transition at least 2 feet, such as the mouth of Mission Bay for flounder and reds. Aransas Bay: Pre-front, work the outer/north side of Mud Island, drifting or wading and casting into and on the edge of the sand pockets using piggy perch and mud minnows for reds. Post-front, the south side of Mud Island when a strong north wind is blowing the water through the cuts is the place to be; a noisy popping cork with a Berkley Gulp! Shrimp is hard to beat for reds. St. Charles: Pre-front, the shallow water at the mouths of Cavasso Creek and Twin Creeks is good for reds and black drum using cut menhaden and peeled shrimp. Post-front, the deeper water off of Egg Point is good for drifting using Sassy Shads in Electric Chartreuse and Cajun Pepper colors for trout, reds, and bigger flounder. Carlos Bay: Pre-front, target the Carlos Lake shell reef on the north side using live croaker and mud minnows for trout and reds. Peeled shrimp on a fish-finder rig is good for some nice black drum as well. PostT E X A S

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front, hit Carlos Dugout using free-lined shrimp and mud minnows for trout and flounder. Mesquite Bay: Pre-front, Bray’s Cove using free-lined mud minnows for flounder, and popping cork and shrimp for reds. Postfront, the Finger Reefs on the east shoreline using cut sardines and mullet for reds. The key here is to cast into the deeper water about 20 yards off the reef. Rattlesnake Reef is a good spot for trout during a strong north wind; free-lined croaker is the ticket. Ayres Bay: Pre-front, mid bay reefs like 100-Yard Hole and Horseshoe Reef are good bets for trout using free-lined mud minnows and piggy perch. Post-front, Ayres Reef is hard to beat as the north wind blows. The small cuts in the reef channel bait as the water moves out of Ayres Bay. A Berkley Gulp! Shrimp in Morning Glory or Watermelon under a bubble cork is good for nice trout and big reds.

THE BANK BITE Your best bet is to fish St. Charles Bay north shoreline right next to the road. The key here is to wade out and cast off the edge of the transition to deeper water. Live bait is a must. Carolina-rigged shrimp and finger mullet are good for reds and trout. Switch to mud minnows for flounder. Close bait is at the Sea Gun Bait House (361-727-2220) at the north end of the LBJ Causeway. If a norther blows you off the water, take a break and enjoy the best hamburger in the country at Pops Tavern (361-729-2862) just up the road off of Park Rd. 13.

Contact Capt. Mac Gable at Mac Attack Guide Service, 512-809-2681, 361-790-9601

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Target Ship Channel Reds NGLERS FROM CORPUS TO BAFFIN CAN score on big redfish this month by targeting what I call “holds” in the Intracoastal Canal and along the various shipping lanes and channels. The ideal red hold is a small spot or shelf on the edge of a steep drop-off. This hold might be a 20-square-foot area in 15 feet of water that borders a 30-foot drop-off. In most situations, the 15-foot zone will gradually get shallower as you move toward the bank, but then drop off suddenly into the main channel. Such shallow-to-deep scenarios provide a specific zone in which reds like flounder can feed on baitfish that might also move to this spot. Furthermore, such an area provides reds a place in which to trade between the deeper main channel and the shallower shoreline. After locating such a spot, fishing it is the second challenge. Position the boat so the anchor is right on the edge of the hold and you can fish straight up-and-down. Use a stout casting rod and a high-caliber bait-casting reel spooled to the brim with braided line. The terminal rig is simple. It consists of only a 1-1/2- or 2-ounce jig head. Finding such specialized jig heads may require visiting a top-end tackle store but the trip is well worth the effort. On this jig head, I use live mullet up to 8 inches long or some of the larger croaker you can buy from bait camps. Remember, big reds have a big mouth that can swallow big bait. As I said earlier I discovered this method for targeting big ship channel reds by targeting big channel flounder so don’t be

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surprised if you catch a few of those as well. Some of the best fishing is around the rigs docked for repair in adjoining channels and marker buoys. These are great places to catch them under green lights at night. These are massive structures and as most anglers know, structure is a key component in any fishing venture. I have had some experience fishing these types of buoys in recent years and have learned that you need to be exactly where the fish are holding. For example, a couple of years ago I was fishing one of these rigs and there was another boat tied off on the opposite piling. We had the same kind of light, were using the same kind of bait and they were just hammering the trout while I only caught a couple of stragglers. When they left, I went to their spot and ended up bringing home a limit to grill the next day. The same thing happens with reds and in most cases, they will hold even tighter to a particular piece than trout do and usually deeper.

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Many times these rigs will create small eddies or areas of slack water behind them. If they do, that is usually the spot you will find the reds. The current in the ship channels can be intense and a lot of the small baitfish end up the eddies and of course the predators have figured this out. I like using the mud minnows for bait and have had good luck using live croaker, which in my opinion are the most underrated bait for reds. Any of the buoys in the Intracoastal can hold good numbers of fish, but it seems the best action is around those closest to really deep holes. It is best to let the anchor down up current and let enough line out to put you fairly close to the structure. Be careful not to make too much noise, especially if you are fishing in an aluminum boat like mine. Reds can be spooky at times and you certainly do not want to scare away any potential catches. CONTINUED If you are fishSEE PAGE 78  ing close to the

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Schooling Reds for Fast Fun HERE IS NOTHING LIKE SEEING SCHOOLS OF redfish in a feeding frenzy. A cacophony of slurps, gulps, hits, and tails splashing on top of the sight of shrimp scurrying from a seemingly possessed school of reds is an amazing site and it is one anglers can find in the shallows of the Lower Coast. Reds feed like this starting in the summer and continuing into the fall. I have always had better luck locating the big, aggressive schools during the summer. But the fall has plenty of opportunities as well. Before the cold fronts arrive, watch the tide charts and look for low tides and calm waters. If the winds are not blowing and you can get onto the main bay of wherever your redfish destination happens to be you have a good chance of scoring on them. Watch for the obvious splashing feeding action and also sitting birds. If the reds have their pray corralled below them, the birds will sit on top and get any of the escapees. Many angler pass sitting gulls, but they are likely

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passing lots of fish. When the bait is coming out with full force, you can often find the reds feeding on top. They’re easy to find this way, but not so easy to approach. Reds are notoriously spooky, inspiring anglers who seek them frequently to carpet their boats so as not to make any unnecessary sounds. Feeding reds are sometimes not as easily spooked as solitary ones but they can be. The best advice is to approach slowly with a trolling motor and stay within easy casting distance, but get no closer. I have had them feeding right alongside the boat, but that is a rarity. Close boats often give them lockjaw. When the water slows down, look for reds to be bunched up along drop-offs in the channel, attacking the remnants of the front’s purge. These fronts kill a fair number of baitfish due to a quick change in water temperature. I have come to believe the reds feed on the dead bait and my reasoning involves the presence of blue catfish during these same times. Lipless crankbaits like the Rat-L-Trap are good to throw into these are as are medium-running crankbaits typically designed for bass fishing like the Fat Free Shad. These baits allow you to cover lots of water and are proven redfish getters. Another good choice is a Crème Killer Diller (shrimp imitation) fished on the bottom and crawled at as snail pace. Sometimes, these reds will hit the bait as soon as it hits the water, but if not, be patient and

fish it slowly for best results. For anglers who prefer fishing with live bait, chunk a whole crab on a Fish Finder (Carolina Rig) and drag it along the bottom. I am usually a proponent of using crab with a cracked shell, but in this regard use the whole crab (with pinches removed) and drag it slowly across the bottom as if you were fishing for flounder. While these reds may be feeding on shrimp, they can’t resist a crab and having the shell on well help you avoid strikes by smaller fish. The point here is to catch the big reds and avoid any other scavengers that might come along for the ride.

THE BANK BITE LOCATION: Live Oak Point at the south end of the LBJ causeway SPECIES: trout and redfish BEST BAITS: Gold spoons, free-lined shirmp BEST TIMES: High tides.

HOTSPOT FOCUS: CORPUS TO BAFFIN mouth of a bay, bring along some  FROM PAGE 77 popping corks for fishing live shrimp or shad, as they seem to be more effective than free-lines in many scenarios. Also, do not be afraid to put out a couple of rods in holders with big live bait like a whole mullet in the back of the boat to CONTINUED

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draw the strike of a red. I am a big fan of having as many rods in the water as possible.

BEST BAITS: Live croaker, live mullet and crab BEST TIMES: Varies

THE BANK BITE HOTSPOT: Port Aransas Jetties SPECIES: Bull Redfish T E X A S

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Tides and Prime Times

SEPTEMBER 2010 USING THE PRIME TIMES CALENDAR

The following pages contain TIDE and SOLUNAR predictions for Galveston Channel (29.3166° N, 94.88° W).

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TIDE PREDICTIONS are located in the upper white boxes on the Calendar Pages. Use the Correction Table below, which is keyed to 23 other tide stations, to adjust low and high tide times.

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SOLUNAR ACTIVITY is shown in the lower color boxes of the Calendar pages. Use the SOLUNAR ADJUSTMENT SCALE below to adjust times for points East and West of Galveston Channel.

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AM & PM MINOR phases occur when the moon rises and sets. These phases last 1 to 2 hours.

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AM & PM MAJOR phases occur when the moon reaches its highest point overhead as well as when it is “underfoot” or at its highest point on the exact opposite side of the earth from your positoin (or literally under your feet). Most days have two Major Feeding Phases, each lasting about 2 hours.

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SOLAR & LUNAR ACTIVITY: Sunrise: 6:34a Sunset: 7:51p

PEAK DAYS: The closer the moon is to your location, the stronger the influence. FULL or NEW MOONS provide the strongest influnce of the month.

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AM Minor: 9:11a AM Major: 2:57a PM Minor: 9:40p PM Major: 3:25p

PEAK TIMES: When a Solunar Period falls within 30 minutes to an hour of sunrise or sunset, anticipate increased action. A moon rise or moon set during one of these periods will cause even greater action. If a FULL or NEW MOON occurs during a Solunar Period, expect the best action of the season.

Moonrise:9:27a Moon Set: None Moon Overhead:

T21

4:55p

TIDE CORRECTION TABLE Add or subtract the time shown at the right of the Tide Stations on this table (and map) to determine the adjustment from the time shown for GALVESTON CHANNEL in the calendars.

TIDE PREDICTIONS are shown in graph form, with High and Low tide predictions in text immediately below. SOLUNAR ACTIVITY data is provided to indicate major and minor feeding periods for each day, as the daily phases of the moon have varying degrees of influence on a wide variety of wildlife species.

T9 T8

T3 T2 T1

KEY T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6

PLACE Sabine Bank Lighthouse Sabine Pass Jetty Sabine Pass Mesquite Pt, Sab. Pass Galveston Bay, S. Jetty Port Bolivar

HIGH -1:46 -1:26 -1:00 -0:04 -0:39 +0:14

LOW -1:31 -1:31 -1:15 -0:25 -1:05 -0:06

KEY PLACE HIGH Galveston Channel/Bays T7 Texas City Turning Basin +0:33 +3:54 T8 Eagle Point +6:05 T9 Clear Lake +10:21 T10 Morgans Point T11 Round Pt, Trinity Bay +10:39

LOW +0:41 +4:15 +6:40 +5:19 +5:15

KEY PLACE T12 Pt Barrow, Trinity Bay T13 Gilchrist, East Bay T14 Jamaica Beach, W. Bay T15 Alligator Point, W. Bay T16 Christmas Pt T17 Galveston Pleasure Pier

HIGH +5:48 +3:16 +2:38 +2:39 +2:32 -1:06

LOW +4:43 +4:18 +3:31 +2:33 +2:31 -1:06

KEY T18 T19 T20 T21 T22 T23

PLACE San Luis Pass Freeport Harbor Pass Cavallo Aransas Pass Padre Island (So. End) Port Isabel

HIGH -0.09 -0:44 0:00 -0:03 -0:24 +1:02

SPORTSMAN’S DAYBOOK IS SPONSORED BY:

NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION T22 T23

KEYS TO USING THE TIDE AND SOLUNAR GRAPHS TIDE LE VEL GRAPH: Yellow: Daylight

12a

Tab: Peak Fishing Period

6a

12p

6p

12a

Light Blue: Nighttime

BEST:

7:05-9:40 PM

Green: Falling Tide

AM/PM Timeline

Gold Fish: Best Time

Blue: Rising Tide Red Graph: Fishing Score

Blue Fish: Good Time

SOLUNAR AC TIVIT Y: MINOR Feeding Periods (+/- 1.5 Hrs.) Time Moon is at its Highest Point in the Sky 12a

AM/PM Timeline

82 |

AM Minor: 1:20a

PM Minor: 1:45p

AM Major: 7:32a

PM Major: 7:57p

MAJOR Feeding Periods (+/- 2 Hrs.)

Moon Overhead: 8:50a 6a

12p

6p

12a

Time Moon is Directly Underfoot (at its peak on opposite side of the earth)

Moon Underfoot: 9:15p S E P T E M B E R

2 0 1 0

T E X A S

F I S H

&

G A M E ®

C O A S T A L

A L M A N A C

LOW -0.09 -1:02 -1:20 -1:31 -1:45 -0:42


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 = New Moon  = First Quarter  = Full Moon  = Last Quarter  = Best Day

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

30 SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Set: 7:41p Set: 2:05p

SATURDAY

2 Sunrise: 6:56a Set: 7:40p Moonrise: 12:31a Set: 3:03p

3

SUNDAY

4

5

Sunrise: 6:56a Moonrise: 1:30a

Set: 7:39p Set: 3:57p

Sunrise: 6:57a Moonrise: 2:34a

Set: 7:38p Set: 4:48p

Sunrise: 6:57a Moonrise: 3:43a

Set: 7:37p Set: 5:34p

PM Minor: 10:25p

AM Minor: 10:54a

PM Minor: 11:20p

AM Minor: 11:49a

PM Minor: ——-

AM Minor: 12:20a

PM Minor: 12:44p

AM Minor: 1:10a

PM Minor: 1:39p

AM Minor: 2:03a

PM Minor: 2:33p

AM Minor: 2:55a

PM Minor: 3:24p

AM Major: 3:49a

PM Major: 4:13p

AM Major: 4:42a

PM Major: 5:07p

AM Major: 5:35a

PM Major: 6:03p

AM Major: 6:30a

PM Major: 6:58p

AM Major: 7:24a

PM Major: 7:54p

AM Major: 8:18a

PM Major: 8:47p

AM Major: 9:10a

PM Major: 9:39p

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 6:51a

Moon Overhead: 5:58a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 7:47a 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 9:44a

Moon Overhead: 8:45a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Sunrise: 6:55a Moonrise: None

FRIDAY

AM Minor: 10:01a

Moon Overhead: 5:09a

12a

 SEP 1

31

Sunrise: 6:54a Set: 7:44p Sunrise: 6:55a Set: 7:42p Moonrise: 10:54p Set: 12:09p Moonrise: 11:39p Set: 1:07p

THURSDAY

Moon Overhead: 10:42a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 5:33p +2.0

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

BEST:

8:00 — 10:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:14p BEST:

12:30 — 3:30 PM

1:30 — 3:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 10:13p BEST:

Moon Underfoot: 11:10p +2.0

BEST:

2:30 — 4:30 PM

4:30 — 6:30 PM

TIDE LEVELS

7:00 — 9:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 8:16p

TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 7:19p

BEST:

9:30 — 11:30 AM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 6:24p

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:58 am 6:00 am 2:20 pm 11:32 pm

1.19 ft 1.39 ft 0.34 ft 1.35 ft

Low Tide: 1:04 am High Tide: 5:41 am Low Tide: 3:17 pm

C O A S T A L

1.35 ft 1.48 ft 0.25 ft

High Tide: 5:39 am Low Tide: 4:22 pm

A L M A N A C

1.58 ft 0.15 ft

T E X A S

High Tide: 5:44 am Low Tide: 5:31 pm

F I S H

1.65 ft 0.05 ft

High Tide: 4:27 am Low Tide: 6:37 pm

&

G A M E ®

1.69 ft High Tide: 3:57 am -0.04 ft Low Tide: 7:37 pm

1.70 ft High Tide: -0.08 ft Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

S E P T E M B E R

4:07 am 8:48 am 12:20 pm 8:33 pm

2 0 1 0

|

1.68 ft 1.49 ft 1.56 ft -0.06 ft

83

+1.0

0

-1.0


ALMANAC C.qxd:1002 Coastal

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NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

= Peak Fishing Period

7:45-9:40 AM

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

8 8

FRIDAY

9

SATURDAY

10

SUNDAY

11

12

Sunrise: 6:58a Moonrise: 4:52a

Set: 7:35p Set: 6:16p

Sunrise: 6:58a Moonrise: 6:02a

Set: 7:34p Set: 6:55p

Sunrise: 6:59a Moonrise: 7:10a

Set: 7:33p Set: 7:33p

Sunrise: 6:59a Moonrise: 8:18a

Set: 7:32p Set: 8:11p

Sunrise: 7:00a Moonrise: 9:27a

Set: 7:31p Set: 8:51p

AM Minor: 3:46a

PM Minor: 4:14p

AM Minor: 4:37a

PM Minor: 5:04p

AM Minor: 5:29a

PM Minor: 5:55p

AM Minor: 6:23a

PM Minor: 6:50p

AM Minor: 7:21a

PM Minor: 7:48p

AM Minor: 8:22a

PM Minor: 8:49p

AM Minor: 9:24a

PM Minor: 9:52p

AM Major: 10:00a

PM Major: 10:28p

AM Major: 10:51a

PM Major: 11:17p

AM Major: 11:42a

PM Major: 12:08p

AM Major: 12:10a

PM Major: 12:37p

AM Major: 1:07a

PM Major: 1:35p

AM Major: 2:08a

PM Major: 2:36p

AM Major: 3:10a

PM Major: 3:38p

Moon Overhead: 11:38a 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 1:25p

Moon Overhead: 12:32p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 2:18p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:00a Set: 7:29p Moonrise: 10:35a Set: 9:34p

Moon Overhead: 4:07p

Moon Overhead: 3:12p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:01a Set: 7:28p Moonrise: 11:42a Set: 10:22p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 5:04p 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

WEDNESDAY

7

6

12a

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: None +2.0

BEST:

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 1:52a BEST:

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 2:45a BEST:

7:30 – 9:30 AM

11:30A – 1:30P

Moon Underfoot: 3:39a BEST:

Moon Underfoot: 4:35a +2.0

BEST:

4:00 – 6:00 PM

5:00 – 7:00 PM TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 12:59a

TIDE LEVELS

5:30 – 7:30 PM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 12:05a

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:22 am 9:08 am 2:03 pm 9:24 pm

1.63 ft 1.29 ft 1.60 ft 0.06 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:38 am 9:45 am 3:26 pm 10:13 pm

1.57 ft 1.02 ft 1.64 ft 0.25 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:55 am 10:27 am 4:43 pm 11:01 pm

1.52 ft 0.73 ft 1.67 ft 0.52 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

5:12 am 11:13 am 5:59 pm 11:48 pm

1.49 ft 0.44 ft 1.68 ft 0.81 ft

High Tide: 5:30 am 1.49 ft Low Tide: 12:02 pm 0.21 ft High Tide: 7:18 pm 1.67 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:34 am 5:45 am 12:54 pm 8:43 pm

1.10 ft 1.52 ft 0.06 ft 1.65 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

1:21 am 5:56 am 1:51 pm 10:23 pm

1.35 ft 1.55 ft -0.01 ft 1.65 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


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ALMANAC C.qxd:1002 Coastal

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4:51 PM

Page 86

NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

7:45-9:40 AM

= Peak Fishing Period

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

13

Set: 7:26p Set: None

Sunrise: 7:02a Moonrise: 2:38p

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

16

17

SUNDAY

18

19

Set: 7:25p Sunrise: 7:03a Set: 12:07a Moonrise: 3:24p

Set: 7:23p Set: 1:03a

Sunrise: 7:03a Moonrise: 4:05p

Set: 7:22p Set: 1:59a

Sunrise: 7:04a Moonrise: 4:42p

Set: 7:21p Set: 2:55a

Sunrise: 7:04a Moonrise: 5:14p

Set: 7:20p Set: 3:49a

AM Minor: 10:26a

PM Minor: 10:54p

AM Minor: 11:25a

PM Minor: 11:53p

AM Minor: ——-

PM Minor: 12:20p

AM Minor: 12:45a

PM Minor: 1:11p

AM Minor: 1:32a

PM Minor: 1:57p

AM Minor: 2:16a

PM Minor: 2:38p

AM Minor: 2:56a

PM Minor: 3:17p

AM Major: 4:12a

PM Major: 4:40p

AM Major: 5:11a

PM Major: 5:39p

AM Major: 6:07a

PM Major: 6:34p

AM Major: 6:58a

PM Major: 7:23p

AM Major: 7:45a

PM Major: 8:09p

AM Major: 8:27a

PM Major: 8:50p

AM Major: 9:06a

PM Major: 9:28p

Moon Overhead: 6:00p 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 7:49p

Moon Overhead: 6:56p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 8:40p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 10:13p

Moon Overhead: 9:28p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 10:56p 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

THURSDAY

115

14

Sunrise: 7:01a Set: 7:27p Sunrise: 7:02a Moonrise: 12:46p Set: 11:13p Moonrise: 1:45p

12a

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 5:32a +2.0

BEST:

0

-1.0

BEST:

Moon Underfoot: 8:15a BEST:

12:30 – 2:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:04a BEST:

1:30 – 3:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:51a BEST:

3:00 – 5:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 10:35a +2.0

BEST:

4:00 – 6:00 PM

4:30 – 6:30 PM TIDE LEVELS

+1.0

BEST:

11:00A – 1:00P

Moon Underfoot: 7:23a

TIDE LEVELS

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 6:28a

Low Tide: 2:12 am High Tide: 5:47 am Low Tide: 2:55 pm

1.54 ft High Tide: 12:40 am 1.68 ft 1.59 ft Low Tide: 4:07 pm 0.04 ft -0.01 ft

High Tide: 2:47 am Low Tide: 5:25 pm

1.73 ft 0.10 ft

High Tide: 3:27 am Low Tide: 6:38 pm

1.73 ft 0.16 ft

High Tide: 3:50 am Low Tide: 7:38 pm

1.69 ft 0.23 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:01 am 9:33 am 12:23 pm 8:27 pm

1.63 ft 1.41 ft 1.47 ft 0.32 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:07 am 9:32 am 1:39 pm 9:07 pm

1.57 ft 1.31 ft 1.50 ft 0.44 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


ALMANAC C.qxd:1002 Coastal

7/29/10

4:59 PM

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 = New Moon  = First Quarter  = Full Moon  = Last Quarter  = Best Day

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010 MONDAY

TUESDAY

21

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

223

22

SATURDAY

 24

SUNDAY

25

26

Sunrise: 7:05a Moonrise: 5:45p

Set: 7:18p Set: 4:43a

Sunrise: 7:05a Moonrise: 6:13p

Set: 7:17p Set: 5:35a

Sunrise: 7:06a Moonrise: 6:42p

Set: 7:16p Set: 6:27a

Sunrise: 7:06a Moonrise: 7:11p

Set: 7:15p Set: 7:19a

Sunrise: 7:07a Moonrise: 7:42p

Set: 7:14p Set: 8:12a

Sunrise: 7:07a Moonrise: 8:16p

Set: 7:12p Set: 9:07a

Sunrise: 7:08a Moonrise: 8:54p

AM Minor: 3:33a

PM Minor: 3:54p

AM Minor: 4:10a

PM Minor: 4:31p

AM Minor: 4:48a

PM Minor: 5:08p

AM Minor: 5:28a

PM Minor: 5:48p

AM Minor: 6:10a

PM Minor: 6:31p

AM Minor: 6:56a

PM Minor: 7:19p

AM Minor: 7:46a

PM Minor: 8:10p

AM Major: 9:44a

PM Major: 10:04p

AM Major: 10:21a

PM Major: 10:41p

AM Major: 10:58a

PM Major: 11:18p

AM Major: 11:38a

PM Major: 11:58p

AM Major: 12:00a

PM Major: 12:21p

AM Major: 12:45a

PM Major: 1:08p

AM Major: 1:35a

PM Major: 1:58p

Moon Overhead: 11:37p 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 12:17a

Moon Overhead: None 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 12:57a 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 2:22a

Moon Overhead: 1:39a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Set: 7:11p Set: 10:04a

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

20

12a

WEDNESDAY

Moon Overhead: 3:07a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 11:17a +2.0

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 2:00p

Moon Underfoot: 2:44p

BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 AM

BEST:

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Moon Underfoot: 3:31p +2.0

BEST:

1:00 – 3:00 AM

8:30 – 10:30 AM

TIDE LEVELS

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Moon Underfoot: 1:18p

TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 12:37p

BEST:

5:00 – 7:00 PM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 11:57a

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:11 am 9:38 am 2:41 pm 9:40 pm

1.52 ft 1.18 ft 1.53 ft 0.58 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

C O A S T A L

4:18 am 9:51 am 3:37 pm 10:08 pm

1.49 ft 1.03 ft 1.56 ft 0.72 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

A L M A N A C

4:27 am 10:11 am 4:30 pm 10:34 pm

1.49 ft 0.88 ft 1.58 ft 0.87 ft

T E X A S

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:37 am 10:36 am 5:23 pm 10:59 pm

F I S H

1.49 ft 0.74 ft 1.60 ft 1.02 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:46 am 11:05 am 6:16 pm 11:25 pm

&

G A M E ®

1.50 ft 0.62 ft 1.62 ft 1.17 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:52 am 11:37 am 7:13 pm 11:53 pm

1.51 ft 0.52 ft 1.63 ft 1.31 ft

S E P T E M B E R

High Tide: 4:48 am 1.54 ft Low Tide: 12:13 pm 0.43 ft High Tide: 8:20 pm 1.64 ft

2 0 1 0

|

87

+1.0

0

-1.0


ALMANAC C.qxd:1002 Coastal

7/29/10

4:59 PM

Page 88

NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

= Peak Fishing Period

7:45-9:40 AM

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

27 SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

28

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

330

29

Set: 7:06p Set: 1:50p

AM Minor: 8:40a

PM Minor: 9:05p

AM Minor: 9:37a

PM Minor: 10:03p

AM Minor: 10:35a

PM Minor: 11:03p

AM Minor: 11:34a

PM Minor: ——-

AM Minor: 12:07a

AM Major: 2:28a

PM Major: 2:53p

AM Major: 3:24a

PM Major: 3:50p

AM Major: 4:21a

PM Major: 4:49p

AM Major: 5:19a

PM Major: 5:48p

AM Major: 6:16a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 5:41a

Moon Overhead: 4:47a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:10a Set: 7:05p Moonrise: 12:22a Set: 2:40p

Moon Overhead: 6:37a 12a

6a

12p

6p

SATURDAY

OC T 1

Set: 7:10p Sunrise: 7:09a Set: 7:08p Sunrise: 7:10a Set: 7:09p Sunrise: 7:09a Set: 11:01a Moonrise: 10:27p Set: 11:59a Moonrise: 11:22p Set: 12:56p Moonrise: None

Moon Overhead: 3:56a

12a

WEDNESDAY

2

6a

3

Sunrise: 7:11a Moonrise: 1:27a

Set: 7:04p Set: 3:26p

Sunrise: 7:12a Moonrise: 2:33a

Set: 7:03p Set: 4:09p

PM Minor: 12:31p

AM Minor: 12:57a

PM Minor: 1:25p

AM Minor: 1:48a

PM Minor: 2:15p

PM Major: 6:45p

AM Major: 7:11a

PM Major: 7:39p

AM Major: 8:02a

PM Major: 8:29p

Moon Overhead: 8:29a

Moon Overhead: 7:33a 12a

SUNDAY

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

Moon Overhead: 9:25a

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Sunrise: 7:08a Moonrise: 9:38p

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 4:21p +2.0

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

BEST:

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 8:01p BEST:

11:00A – 1:00P

Moon Underfoot: 8:57p

Moon Underfoot: 9:51p

BEST:

12:30 – 2:30 PM

+2.0

BEST:

2:00 – 3:00 PM

3:00 – 4:00 PM

TIDE LEVELS

9:30 – 11:30 AM

Moon Underfoot: 7:05p

TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 6:08p

BEST:

9:00 – 11:00 AM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 5:13p

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:20 am 4:32 am 12:54 pm 9:41 pm

88 |

1.46 ft 1.59 ft 0.37 ft 1.66 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:44 am 4:19 am 1:43 pm 11:28 pm

S E P T E M B E R

1.59 ft 1.67 ft 0.31 ft 1.71 ft

Low Tide: 1:00 am High Tide: 4:18 am Low Tide: 2:40 pm

2 0 1 0

1.70 ft 1.75 ft 0.27 ft

T E X A S

High Tide: 4:21 am Low Tide: 3:47 pm

F I S H

1.81 ft 0.25 ft

&

High Tide: 2:22 am Low Tide: 4:58 pm

G A M E ®

1.83 ft 0.24 ft

High Tide: 2:25 am Low Tide: 6:08 pm

C O A S T A L

1.82 ft 0.26 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

2:37 am 8:24 am 11:18 am 7:13 pm

A L M A N A C

1.77 ft 1.52 ft 1.56 ft 0.34 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


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Stanley Spins a New Vibe STANLEY LURES HAS COMBINED TWO OF THEIR most innovative designs into a single spinner bait for maximum thump and vibration... the Vibra-Wedge. Two patents, Vibrashaft wire and Wedge blades, combined to produce more water displacement than any other spinnerbait on the market. Stanley Lures’ The blades are wedge-shaped — new spinnerbait “It pulls and moves more thin at the top and thicker at the base, water than any other wiltransferring energy to the end of the Vibra-Wedge low blade on the market.” blade and delivering an extra wallop as Stanley Jigs has been building spinnerit twists and spins through the water. You baits and jigs for over 30 years and we can feel the vibration at each turn of the build only what we know to be proven winblades and big bass notice the extra action ners. We set the standard, you set the as well. hook. “What you have is a wedge that comes For more information please contact: through the water, with the vibration of an kenchaumont@fishstanley.com, or visit Indiana or Colorado blade and the flash of www.fishstanley.com. a willow leaf,” says Stanley.

Guns Get the Royal Treatment ROYAL PURPLE HAS DEVELOPED HIGH performance synthetic gun oil. Royal Purple gun oil is specifically formulated to provide exceptional wear protection as well as protection against rust and saltwater corrosion. It also prevents fouling. According to World Champion Sporting Clay Shooter and Elite Shooting School Instructor Bobby Fowler, Jr., “I’ve

High-performance oil for guns.

Royal Purple

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tried every gun lube out there. None of them compare to Royal Purple (gun oil) ”. Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil works well in a variety of temperatures and will not thicken in cold weather. Its performance advantages come from Synerlec, Royal Purple’s propriety chemical technology that strengthens the oil for unmatched performance and protection. No other gun oil is available with Synerlec technology. In addition to gun applications, Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil can also be used for other applications such as fishing tackle, locks hinges and more. Contact: Royal Purple Inc., One Royal Purple Lane, Porter, TX 77365, 281-354-8600, www.royalpurple.com.

MSRP is $499.00. The second model, the Warrior, offers a lighter draw weight of 165pounds while shooting an ideal speed of 285 FPS. This product provides a cost effective, yet precision performance alternative to its more powerful counterpart, the Invader. The Warrior package includes the Ridge-Dot 40mm, multi-dot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The bow is also designed to accept the addition of an ACU-52 integrated, self-retracting rope cocking system. The MSRP is $399.00. All Wicked Ridge Crossbows are covered by a 5-year warranty www.wickedridgecrossbows.com

Wicked Never Looked So Good

Miss November Inflatable Deer Decoy

WICKED RIDGE CROSSBOWS, A NEW BREED of crossbow designed and engineered by TenPoint, provides its customers with high quality, precision performance crossbows and accessories that are simple, reliable, and affordable. Wicked Ridge is committed to manufacturing supe-

EASY ON THE EYES AND HARD TO IGNORE, Tink’s new Miss November deer decoy is every buck’s and hunter’s dream come true. Miss November utilizes High-Definition printing technology to provide a realistic look and soft texture that feels real and is irresistible to those love sick bucks. Every detail is highlighted right down to the super-light tail that moves with the slightest rior breeze. products This lightweight which outperform inflatable decoy the competition at is compact similar priceenough to be points. Customers conveniently can expect the same carried in a customer service that backpack. TenPoint Crossbow Wicked Ridge Once you Technologies has been crossbow from reach your TenPoint notorious for providing. stand locaThe Wicked Ridge tion, Miss Wicked Bow product line consists of November’s overtwo crossbows and a few accessories. Lead- sized air valve makes it quick and effortless ing the way is the Invader crossbow. Gento inflate. This inflatable system eliminates erating devastating speed and dead-center the hassle of noisy, molded plastic or foam accuracy, the Invader sports a 180-pound decoys that are cumbersome to pack into draw weight creating shooting speeds of those remote honey holes. You can enhance 305 fps. The package includes the new your decoy setup by applying Tink’s 69 ACU-52 integrated, self-retracting rope Doe-In-Rut? to the free Tink’s Stretch cocking system, Ridge-Dot 40mm, multiWicks?. dot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The C O A S T A L

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Tink’s new inflatable deer decoy.

The lightweight, comMiss November pact size also makes it easy to carry in your luggage for those cross-country hunting trips. The system includes the doe decoy, four metal stakes, two Tink’s Stretch Wicks? and the decoy placement instruction sheet. All this comes at a value that cannot be matched by other decoys of this quality.

.223 Round Gets Shock Treatment EXTREME SHOCK IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE innovation of new .223 rifle round. This round embodies the reliability and safety of the handgun Air Freedom Rounds. Specifically designed for tactical entry teams in an urban environment, where it is crucial to contain the rounds within a limited space. The frangible characteristics of the new AFR make it a necessity when the situation requires a round with no ricochet, reduced over Extreme Shock’s new .223 round.

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penetration, and will drop all the kinetic energy inside the target thereby reducing liabilities. This round is designed to fragment after passing through two ¾ inch sheetrock partitions, thus making your .223 rifle an ideal home-defense weapon. SPECIFICATIONS Cartridge: .223 30gr AFR Projectile: 30 grain Tungsten core, copper-jacketed, flat-base, round nose Velocity: 3,100 feet per second Energy: 816 ft lbs of energy Test Weapon: Colt M4 with a 14 inch barrel.

Contact: Extreme Shock Ammunition, Inc., 182 Camp Jacob Road, Clintwood, VA 24228-9657 Phone: (276) 926-6772 Fax: (276) 926-6092 Website: www.extremeshockusa.net

Pocket-Sized Night Vision MINOX HAS ADDED TO THEIR WIDE RANGE OF optical equipment with introduction of a

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reliable new night vision device, the ultracompact NV mini II. It’s one of the smallest in the world, barely larger than a lipstick. Overall length is just 4-3/16”, the lens diameter is Iess than one inch and it weighs only 6.3 ounces. With its 2x magnification and ability to amplify available residual light, such as stars or horizon radiation not perceived by

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Minox NV mini II night vision device.

the human eye, Night Sight the NV mini II is ideal for discreet orientation or observation on land or at sea, for hunting or protecting property in low-light situations, from twilight and into full night. Night vision devices are needed when even the most powerful binoculars, with a high twilight factor, reach their optical limits. The multi-coated lens system on the new MINOX NV mini II provides a brilliant and clear image. And if the available light is not sufficient to provide a visible image, even when amplified, it has a connectible infrared illuminator. This additional light source, not seen by the human eye, provides perfect vision in complete darkness, such as on a moonless night or in a dense forest. With its ultra-compact size and minimal weight, the NV mini II can be used anywhere. Its ergonomic design and partially rubber armoring of the body, ensures silent, safe handling. It comes with a wrist strap and battery. Retail price is $649. Contact: Minox/USA Address: P.O. Box 123 City, State: Meriden, NH 03770; Phone: (866) 469-3080; Fax: (603) 469-3471 Email: usa@minox.com Website: www.minox.com/usa. C O A S T A L

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King Series Safes PENDLETON SAFES INTRODUCES THE NEW King Series Safes, built for the collector who demands the best. They include all standard gun management and security features offered on all Pendleton safes, as well as the premium features such as customization to secure up to 40 rifles and 54 pistols and is equipped with motorized Revolution Technology, which is a unique circular design with a modular shelving system that rotates 360° at the touch of a button to bring your guns directly to you. Other features include interior LED lighting, electronic moisture control, motorized rotation with outer shelf and the lockbolt indicator LED. The King Series is 100% Steel and a solid, fully reinforced ¼” high-strength, low-alloy steel top and bottom, detouring burglars as they often turn a safe upside down, exposing the vulnerable area on the bottom of a safe. The bolt operates on an innovative cam system that prevents tampering. If pushed on, the bolt will push back, making it impossible to retract the bolt by force. The specially designed ball-bearing hard plate prevents drilling out of the lock and protects the relocking mechanism from tampering. Pendelton’s new All PendleKing Series gun ton Safes are safes. pre-drilled for floor Castle Keep bolts, adding an extra layer of security and peace of mind. Visit www.pendletonsafes.com. C O A S T A L

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Looks Just Like a Bale of... ‘Hey!’ NEW FROM SPORTSMAN'S CONDO IS THEIR "Bale Condo,"designed to look like a bale of hay. This new design from the solid blind technology pioneer is a true "crossover blind," meaning it is a perfect fit for gun, bow, and crossbow hunters. The Bale Condo weighs 300 pounds and measures 6-1/2 feet in length and 67 inches tall. There is plenty of room for two hunters,

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Roomy new blind designed to look like a bale of hay.

or a hunter and video camera. Bale Condo Built-in runners allow for easy transport. Special features include removable shoot through mesh screen, glass windows and bow holder. There is even enough room to spend the night to beat that big buck back to his bed. For more information contact Mark at Southern Outdoor Technologies,662-2955702 or visit www.sportsmanscondo.com

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Cor-Bon DPX Ammunition I RECENTLY RECEIVED A TEST SAMPLE OF THE new Cor-Bon handgun ammunition. It is a partnership between Cor-Bon and Barnes Bullets. It is called DPX and comes in all the standard handgun calibers. My samples are in .45 Colt and .44 Magnum. DPX (no, I don't know what it stands for) is intended as self-defense ammunition. It incorporates a cavernous, solid copper hol-

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penetration. The advertisement on the box says: “DPX provides excellent expansion and deeper penetration due to the solid copper bullet. It retains 100% of its weight even after going through hard barriers like steel and glass.” Another advantage is getting high energy self-defense ammo with relatively mild recoil. By lessening the bullet weight the recoil is lessened also. When I first shot the .45 Colt ammo I was prepared for a handjarring explosion. I got the explosion, but recoil was much milder than I expected. I shot the .44 Magnum ammo in a 4-

pain of recoil that was not there. The next 4 shots went where they belonged. I would like to use this new ammunition on a hog or deer before I make any bold statements about its performance as a selfdefense or hunting round, but I feel safe in saying that it really is very good stuff. In fact, 6 of the big, ugly hollow points currently reside in the chambers of my S&W Model 25 .45 Colt Mountain Gun, a gun I carry a lot. DPX is not cheap, selling for over $50.00 a box. But how much is your life worth? The official Cor-Bon website is www.dakotaammo.net. —Steve LaMascus

Sebile Spin Shad

low point, in a lighter than normal weight, and higher than normal velocity. The .45 Colt +P ammo is loaded with a 225-grain HP at a blistering 1200 feet per second. The normal velocity for the 250-grain 45 Colt is about 850 fps. The .44 Magnum is also loaded with a 225grain hollow point, but at 1350 fps. The idea with the big hollow point at high velocity is to give massive impact energy and tissue destruction, which equates to stopping power, while the tough, solid copper bullet will still provide deep, positive 94 |

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The author pulled his first shot low and left, expecting more recoil than he got from Cor-Bon’s new DPX load.

Cor-Bon DPX inch S&W Model 29 with the thin, Roper plain clothes grips. This is a carrying rig, not a shooting-a-lot rig. With heavy handloads it is not very pleasant. With the CorBon DPX it was surprisingly shootable. Recoil was there, but not enough to bother an experienced handgunner. You will notice in the photo, the first shot I pulled low and left, expecting the T E X A S

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EVERYTHING THAT IS OLD IS NEW AGAIN. I’M not sure who first coined that phrase but I bet it was a bass fisherman walking down the aisle of his local tackle shop. Just about every “new” lure I see looks like a simple variation of something already riding in my tackle box and that was my initial impression when I first saw the new Sebile Spin Shad. I thought it was just an updated version of Mann’s Little George tail spinner but as soon as I took it out of the box I knew this was not your average hunk of lead with a spinner on its backside. Just like all lures manufactured by Sebile, the Spin Shad has a finish that is one of the best in the business which sets it apart from the other tail spinners on the market. What also differentiates the Spin Shad from the rest of the field is the fact that the body is made from bismuth instead of lead. The main body has features that mimic real bait fish and the design of the spinner mimics the shape of the body, with a wide nose and small tail. This design allows the blade to spin, even when retrieved at very low speeds. The Spin Shad is offered in two differC O A S T A L

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ent sizes, a Sebile’s Spin ¾ ounce Shad: a high-tech new twist on the version with old tail spinner. a single treble hook Spin Shad hanging from the belly of the main bait, and a 1 ¼ ounce size that also has a treble hanging off the back. Being heavy for their size, the Spin Shad can be cast a mile and the only thing limiting the distance you can chunk one is the amount of line you have on your reel. The weight lends one to believe that these baits are solely used for deep water applications but they can be used anywhere you would use a lipless crankbait or spinner bait including skinny water. As far as effectiveness, it takes just a few casts to realize that the Spin Shad is a flat out fish catching machine that catches just about anything that swims. The first fish I caught on one was crappie which was shortly followed up by both largemouth and white bass. A few weeks later this same lure (the exact same one, not just one similar) also caught speckled trout and Spanish mackerel in the surf. Anything that eats a baitfish, which is just about everything swimming, will hit a Spin Shad so an angler would be smart to add a few of both sizes to their arsenal. www.sebileusa.com —Paul Bradshaw

High UV Protection Buff THE VERY NATURE OF OUR HOBBIES (HUNTING, fishing, camping, etc…) leads us to spend more time outside than the average person. On any given weekend it’s likely that you and I will spend more time in the sun than some individuals get in a month. Because of this, outdoorsmen (and women) are more susceptible to skin cancer than most. It seems like each year I have more and more friends who have cancerous areas removed from ears, hands, or arms which are a direct result of over exposure to the sun. Since not going outside isn’t really an C O A S T A L

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option, protecting your skin from sun exposure is imperative. In the past that meant slathering up with SPF50 but now there is light weight clothing that not only protects but stays cool enough for you to stay outside all day. The latest piece of protective clothing I started wearing is an Angler High UV Buff. Popularized by the reality television series Survivor, a buff is a flexible fabric sleeve (for lack of a better term) that can be worn around your neck and head or covering both the neck and head, or if you’re small enough (which I am not) around the torso. To test the Angler High UV Buff ’s claim of blocking 95% of the suns rays I spent a week on the beach without sunscreen, only using the buff to protect my face and neck. Not smart, but a great test. I spent over eight hours per day, for a week, surf fishing and never once got a sunburn on my face or neck. That’s impressive, but even more so is the fact that I often forgot I even had the Buff on, in spite of the odd looks the other people on the beach gave me. With temperatures in the mid to upper 90’s the Buff stayed cool and breathable. My Buff happens to be in a largemouth bass pattern but there many other colors and designs to choose from. So you can make a fashion statement while protecting your skin making it well worth the investment. www.buffusa.com. —PB

Bumper Stumper IN MY BOOK, SHOPPING FOR A SPINNERBAIT IS no different than shopping for a good bait caster. The first thing I look for is a bait that is made using high quality components. To wit: • Premium ball bearings for the blades to spin on. • A heavy-gauge wire frame stout enough to withstand lots of abuse without impeding the performance. • A "sticky" sharp hook with some length to it for grabbing short-striking fish. • Paint that resists chipping. • Premium silicone skirting. When Bumper Stumper Lures sent us a few of their "Pro Painted Series" spinnerbaits to check out earlier this year, we were impressed by the goods. Based in Flower

Mound, Tx., Bumper Stumper has a rich history in the spinnerbait/buzz bait business. They have been A few of Bumper custom Stumper’s many building colors lures in the USA since 1990s. Bumper Crop The Pro Painted Series is one of 10 different series in the company line up. What sets them aside from others in the stable are the blades. As the name suggests, they are custom painted in some exciting colors designed to get the bass' attention in water that is stained, muddy or clear. The blades are painted and glittered on one side to color coordinate with the head and skirt, while at the same time providing an alternating combination of color and flash that will sometimes produce strikes when the traditional nickel or gold blades just won't cut it. The baits are available in five sizes and 16 color combinations with double willowleaf, double Colorado and Colorado/willow models. If you see a color you like, just ask company owners Kerry Kiker and Richard Deatherage. They can mix and match to order. I put a 3/8-ounce white willowleaf model to the test last spring and it scored high marks in all the key arenas. Not only did it fool countless bass in shallow, muddy water. It caught them, thanks on part to a super sharp Mustad long shank hook. Equally impressive was the way the bait held up well to dozens of violent strikes dished out by bass up to up seven pounds. The .035 gauge wire got knocked out of whack multiple times, yet it continued to run true with some minor adjustments. If you are in the market for a premium spinnerbait, Bumper Stumper is certainly worth a look. To learn more about the Pro Painted Series or the entire family of Bumper Stumper baits, 972-757-5893, or www.bumperstumper.com. —Matt Williams PHOTOS COURTESY MFG’S

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Cor-Bon Named Manufacturer of the Year

appeals to law enforcement agencies, specialty military units, private citizens, and hunters. Peter and Elaine Pi and their sons Pete and Dane, are primary owners and operators of the American family owned corporation. For information, call 800-6267266 or visit www.corbon.com

Minn Kota Receives ICAST Best of Show MINN KOTA’S INTRODUCTION INTO THE SHALlow water anchor market proved successful as it captured Best of Show honors in the Marine Category at the 53rd annual International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades (ICAST) show held in Las Vegas July 14-16. The new Talon was praised by show-goers for its innovative design and features that make it perform quietly, quickly, and built to last.

CORBON/Glaser’s staff show off their Manufacturer of the Year award.

top-grade workCORBON Honored force. The Sturgis area has created a reputation for becoming the new firearms and ammunition cluster in the Midwest due to its attractive economic development climate. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition manufactures proven, high quality ammunition. It offers a wide variety of ammunition that 96 |

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“Talon proved to be a grand slam for us at ICAST,” Minn Kota Marketing Director Joe Brown said. “We wanted to come into the shallow water anchor market with a product that would be superior to anything else currently available. Buyers and media representatives were blown away by the innovative features offered on Talon.” T E X A S

The New Products Showcase competition drew 750 tackle and accessories entries. Entries were judged by buyers and media representatives based on innovation, execution, workmanship, and practicality. Key features of Talon include: - Auto-Drive for automatic anchoring - Rough Water Mode continues the anchoring sequence to assure a secure hold in any conditions - Built-in wireless remote comes standard - Built-in Wave Absorption provides a floating suspension system to keep spike anchored when boat rocks - Easy, less expensive installation - Vertical and tilt adjustments for mounting flexibility - LED indicator lights show when spike is deployed and at what depth - Deployment Notification Alarm can be wired to the ignition to sound an alarm when the key is turned and the spike is still deployed Talon comes with a comprehensive 2year warranty and lifetime guarantee on the spike. It is available with a 6-foot, 4-inch or 8-foot, 4-inch spike and choice of a black or white color scheme. The manufacturer’s suggested retail prices for Talon are $1299 with a 6-4 spike and $1449 with an 8-4 inch spike. All models can be used in freshwater or saltwater and come standard with two wireless remote controls. Talon will be available to consumers this fall. For more information, visit minnkotamotors.com or call 800-227-6433.

PHOTO COURETSY COR-BON:

CORBON/GLASER AMMUNITION IS HONORED by the Black Hills Community Economic Development by being chosen to receive their Manufacturer of the Year award. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition was chosen to receive this honor due to its commitment to quality and excellence in manufacturing, located in the small community of Sturgis, South Dakota. The decision was unanimous by the board and selected from several other manufacturers within the surrounding communities of the Black Hills. Lt Governor Daugaard addressed the dinner and proceedings. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition started manufacturing 28 years ago in Detroit, Michigan, then moved to Sturgis in 1995 in search of a strong business climate and

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Chewy’s Cove ARLIER THIS SUMMER, I HAD THE PLEASURE of guiding Brian Burton and his 14year-old son, Matthew, on a kayak fishing trip. It was Mathew’s first fishing trip in the salt. Raindrops tapped on the hulls of our kayaks as we raced the dawn to the coast and the crackle of lightning interrupted Captain Mickey’s radio show coming from the car’s speakers. “We have a weather system moving in from the Gulf.” I said. “Let’s hope it clears soon.” A nasty lightning storm had cleared the coast and was moving inland when we topped the bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. We offloaded our yaks, rigged backrests and tackle, and pushed off into the clear, green water. The game plan was to fish the shallows early, dropping back into deeper water as the heat of the day increased. Brian headed down the shoreline a bit while Matthew, called “Chewy” by his family, and I stopped at scalloped area of spartina grass. Chewy fingered the 12-pound-test and fired a cast toward the shoreline. The little topwater wiggled across the surface for a stretch, only to foul on some floating seagrass. Standing next to Chewy in the knee-deep water, I showed him how to leave a rod’s length of line out and then gently swing the lure into your hand to pick off the strands of grass. In just five or six casts, my young charge was looking like a seasoned wade-fisherman. Unfortunately, seagrass was all we were catching so we hopped back in the kayaks and spent the next hour hop scotching down the shoreline in search of fish, Brian stopping at one cove, Chewy and I probing the next. Each stop involved a little more coaching: “Remember to slide your feet. If you can hear

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yourself wading through the water, you are going too fast.” Already possessing good fishing skills, Chewy, a soccer player on the freshman team at Ft. Bend Austin High School, was able to hone his casting skills making repeated casts shoreward. The fish were holding tight to the grass and wouldn’t travel far to eat. Chewy dropped a cast several inches from the bright green spartina and worked it down the edge. A trout, using the grass to break up its silhouette, detonated on the surface plug and Chewy’s rod bent into a pleasing arch. I slid the landing net under it and Chewy’s first trout taped an honest 16 inches. His smile was contagious. The action slowed so we hopped back in the ‘yaks and drift-fished so we could prospect a larger area. A promising looking cove beckoned ahead, stretching way back into the shoreline, so we anchored and grabbed our tackle. The corners of several broad tails broke the water’s surface, periodically submerging and coming up again. The fire red color was highlighted by the sunlight and the turquoise strip on each tail was unmistakable. Redfish! Brian and I saw the tails at the same time and urged Chewy to slide into casting range. He dropped his topwater into the middle of the cove and it quickly became a maelstrom as the entire school of reds raced one another to get to the wiggling bait. Seconds later, he was hooked up and the spool of his spinning reel screeched like a scalded cat. The redfish headed for the open bay, abandoning the tight confines of the inlet. A game of tug-of-war broke out as the red refused to surrender. Chewy kept his rod tip high and line tight, playing the fish patiently until it began to tire. Obstinately, the big fish circled the young angler four times before sliding over on its side. A quick sweep of the net and Chewy added a redfish to his stringer. Easing back to the mouth of the cove, Chewy made fan casts to probe every inch of the small cove. The bulbous head of a red T E X A S

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plowed through the shallows as it followed the topwater bait for a full 10 feet then violently lunged for it, creating a huge swirl with its broad tail. Again, the red hightailed it out of the close quarters, hoping it could secure its freedom in the open bay. Chewy’s second redfish was an inch shy of keeper status and it quickly swam away after being unpinned. The cove went quiet for a while. The commotion of the hooked fish had spooked the remainder of the school. Rather than leave, we paused for some water and smoked pork tenderloin I had packed as a snack. Ten minutes later, Chewy landed red No. 3. Brian and I remained fishless but were having a great time watching Matthew enjoy success on his first saltwater outing. Chewy’s last fish from the cove was a solid customer, creating a severe arch in his rod. Again, the drag protested as the red charged through the shallows. Moments later the line went slack and the fish was gone. A quick inspection of the little plug revealed a missing branch on the rear treble hook. It was a new lure, right out of the package, but the hook broke. The wardrobe malfunction cost Chewy his fourth red of the day and he learned first hand why we call it fishing rather than catching. All we needed was a flounder to round out a saltwater grand slam, but it wasn’t meant to be. Several stingrays milling about the cove were the closest we came to nabbing a bottom dweller. The heat of the day became increasingly ignescent and we decided to call it a day. And it was a good day. Mathews tally: one trout and three redfish, all caught on topwaters. Chewy’s Cove has become both a landmark and a great memory of young Matthew’s first saltwater fishing trip. Hopefully he will return many times, as I have to my childhood stomping grounds.

Greg Berlocher can be reached for question or comment at kayak@fishgame.com. S E P T E M B E R

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Dove Guns & Loads OVE SEASON IS HERE! THE LONG, HOT summer is nearly over, and the soulcleansing smell of gunpowder once again drifts gently on the warm breezes. Makes me want to go out and shoot something. This time of year is when ammunition manufacturers make their largest profits. Every store you walk into will have cases of

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Federal Game Loads stacked all over the floors. More ammo is expended on dove than on any other game animal in America. The stores are full of discount ammo that dove hunters purchase by the truckload. Most of us will do well with a standard field load. In 12-gauge, that means a load that shoots 1-1/8 ounces of shot. If it says it has less than that, beware. Some loads of less than the standard 12-gauge payload are very good. In fact, my favorite handload consists of 1 ounce of shot at about 1150 feet per second. And beware if the load brags about its velocity. That might be a way to take your attention away from the fact that it uses less shot. You do not need high velocity for dove.

Dove season launches a storm of ammo buyers into stores.

Anything that produces above Dove Time! about 1100 feet per second is just fine. Also, try to find shotshells that use plastic shot cups. Some of the low-end shells use wads and some kind of plastic shims that are supposed to protect the shot from contact with the barrel. These shells never pattern as well as those that are loaded with the tried and proven one-piece shot cup. You can tell when you shoot them because a couple or three of the thin plastic shims will come floating down to the ground like leaves falling from a dying tree. Most adults shoot 12-gauge guns and that's just fine. However, dove are small, light-boned birds and any of the gauges will work just fine if kept within their limits. If you are shooting a .410 or 28-gauge, you need to keep your shots inside 35 yards, but both of these smaller gauges are a lot of fun. One of my favorite types of hunting is shooting dove around a water hole with my little .410 Browning Citori. 98 |

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The best gauge for children to learn with is not the .410. The wonderful little caliber (.410 is the bore size, not its gauge) is an expert's gun, not an entry-level tool for children. Instead, try a single-shot 28-gauge. The kids will hit more and have more fun. If they are too small to shoot a .28-gauge, they are probably too small to hunt flying birds. A .410 is so unforgiving that it should be reserved for shooters sufficiently talented and experienced that they are looking to put more zing in their hunting; rather like the fisherman who switches to an ultralight rig in lieu of his thunderstick and 20-pound line. If you don't believe me, look up the scores shot with the .410 in NSSA skeet competition. Some shoot the .410 as well as they do the larger gauges, but the vast majority think the .410 is an unforgiving, difficult gauge and a necessary evil, and shoot it poorly compared to 28- and 20-gauges. I was A and AA in competition with all the gauges except the .410, in which I never graduated from Class B. I can attest that many targets I shot at with the .410 that didn't break,

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would have broken when shot at exactly the same way with a larger gauge. You can do a bit better with 3-inch shells, but it still doesn't compare with the 28-gauge. Keep that in mind when buying Junior's first shotgun. If you handload, you can still get No. 7 shot. This is my favorite shot size for dove and quail. I think No. 6 is a bit too big and No. 8 a little too small. Number 7 offers a wonderfully thick pattern, yet still has the mass to get the job done if only a couple of shot hit the bird. If you don't handload, No. 7-1/2 is great. Number 8 is okay, but I think I hit and lose (“feather� in the vernacular) a few birds with No. 8 that I would have killed instantly with No. 7 or 7-1/2. For you handloaders, my experience is that if I keep my velocity down to 1200 feet per second or a bit less, I get better patterns. Since your shots are (if you are an ethical hunter) under 50 yards, there is no need for higher velocity. If anything, increase your shot payload, not the velocity. The thicker pattern will increase the number of hits on each bird, but it also increases recoil. I prefer to shoot 1-ounce of shot and keep the

shots closer. I still do very well out to around 40 yards with a 12-gauge, using a modified choke. In all the other gauges, I use the standard loads: 7/8-ounce in 20-gauge, 3/4 in 28-, and 7/8- or 1-ounce in the 16-gauge. I really love the 16-gauge, by the way. If you are having trouble killing your dove or quail, try using a more open choke and shortening the range. A full or improved-modified choke will let you make shots a little farther, but they also produce smaller patterns. I prefer a modified or improved cylinder choke, and try to keep all my shots inside 35 yards. When I switch to a full choke, I seem to fringe more birds than I do with the open chokes, and I know I try to stretch the barrel a bit more. Fall is in the air and so are the dove. Get out there and burn some powder.

E-mail Steve LaMascus at guns@fishgame.com


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The Essence of a Bow Hunter F YOU ARE LIKE ME, THEN BY NOW YOU HAVE already read all about what new and improved equipment is available today for the modern archer. Every year there is a month that most magazines dedicate to this very subject. New technology that not too long ago offered us to view any deer in our area now has the “new and improved” version. No longer do you need to trek out to your hunting grounds to check the pictures on your scouting camera. Now, you simply inspect the pictures from the comfort of your living room right after you have

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checked your emails. some of this new Arrows have technology. Have we improved and are spinI know what you ning faster than ever to are thinkbecome so dependent on keep up with the new ing…and you gadgets that we have bows that boasts about may be right. I lost the reason we hunt how fast it can shoot an am starting to in the first place? arrow. New and sound a lot like improved fletching is my father. “Why available to accommoback in our day, date the new bow speed. we used recurve Carbon arrows of today are bows and hunted using our knowledge of a designed for speed. deer’s habits and habitat…we got plenty of You can purchase a bow deer back in the day”. today that shoots an arrow 350 feet per secI think that we, as bow hunters, have ond! Every single advertisement for any bow taken away some of the primitive aspects of will claim to be the fastest, most accurate hunting with a bow. I am not so sure that is bow on the market. a good thing. A bow hunter used to have to Have we become a society that is so be able to judge different distances in order dependent on gadgets and technology that to be successful. That took some practice. A we have lost some of the very reason we hunt bow hunter used to have to determine when in the first place? Leaving the pavement for to draw his bow and be able to hold it at full a while and just enjoying the beauty of the draw until a clean shot could be made. That outdoors seem to have taken a backseat to took patience. A bow hunter used to have to learn the woodlot he was hunting in by foot leather express. He had to get off the couch and take a few hikes until he could figure out the habits of the animal he hunted. That took dedication to your sport. How far do we we allow technology to take us before our “primitive” sport can no longer be called “primitive”? I, for one, think we may be there already. The modern bow hunter of today has been duped to believe that a faster bow is the better bow. Oh… it will kill more deer, because at these new speeds, a 20-yard shot is no different than a 30-yard shot. Our ability to be able to judge distance in the woods is not as important as it was in the past. I ask you, is that better? Or is part of being a bow hunter being able to judge distance? A bow that has an 80% let off at full draw can be held back for a much longer time than it’s predecessor. Once the bowstring is pulled back, upper body strength is no longer a necessity for the bow hunter to hold back the string for any length of time.

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A hunter can now pull his or her bowstring back while the deer is still 50 yards away and simply wait until the deer is in range. The ability to know when to pull back the bowstring so the deer does not see any movement is now less important and often eliminated completely. Is that a good thing? I understand that these technological improvements in bow hunting also make it much easier to harvest the animal we are hunting. I simply feel that these “improvements” have taken some of the primitive aspects of hunting in general out of the equation. For me, bow hunting is not just aim and pull the trigger. You need to take the time to learn where the deer are. You need to locate different food sources. You need to find where the deer are bedding and find where their sanctuary is. Where are the rubs and scrapes? All of this knowledge will eventually lead you to your prize. Remember, Bow hunting means getting close to the game you are after for a clean ethical shot. It means remaining undetected as your game draws ever closer to you. Bow hunting means

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stealth and covering all traces of human scent in the vicinity. Doing all of these without the help of modern technology brings with it a sense of satisfaction that only a veteran bow hunter knows and feels. I should make it very clear that I myself am one of those modern bow hunters that use everything technology has to offer. So, you may ask, why do I question the use of such technology? Simply put, I cut my teeth in the bow hunting world with a recurve bow and wooden arrows. The compound bow was not invented yet. I had to learn whatever was needed to get close enough for a successful whitetail hunt. It was not easy. Many trips to the hunting woods came back with nothing but memories… and those I cherish more than the hunt itself. When a new and improved model of anything was made available to the public…I had to have it, but I learned the basics of bow hunting years before. That is something that the novice bow hunter does not have to do. I have to say that by sitting in your chair to check on the deer in your area or depending on such things as speed instead of under-

standing the trajectory of an arrow, may not be such an “improvement” after all. I can see that there would be many pros and cons on this subject. There are way too many to discuss in this column, but if this read sparks a healthy debate on this issue, then I think that is a good thing. Hunt safe and have fun out there.

E-mail Lou Marullo at lmarullo@fishgame.com

On the Web Check out Lou Marullo’s video Bowhunting Tips: www.FishGame.com/video


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Disaster Story

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Can oil really the long term. Odamage your boat? rings, gaskets, and Plenty experts are neoprene impellers saying that the danmay also be susceptiTo state the obvious, you ger is minor, nut ble damaged by the should avoid visible oil there are also some oil, though the exact (including engine effects are as of yet slicks at all cost. manufacturers and unknown. boat builders) saying If you must run the opposite. As through oil or do so much as I hate to by accident, when even think about the possiyou return to the dock flush out your engine bility of running into a slick cooling system as thoroughly as possible. of goo, let’s run down the Some people are recommending you add a preventative measures and de-oiling proce- Dawn dishwashing liquid or another dures all Texas boaters need to know. degreaser to freshwater and run it through the cooling system, but the truth of the mat1. Engines: Your biggest worry should ter is that no one knows exactly what level of be about your power plant, because many effectiveness this will have, or if it will cause engines can be damaged if the raw water problems of its own. Engine manufacturers cooling system sucks in oil. It can coat and simply have not tested for this type of probclog the water passages and coat the water lem, so they are not entirely sure of the best jacket, leading to overheating problems in way to handle it themselves. The bottom the short term and cooling system failure in line: Lots and lots of freshwater flushing can only be a good thing.

S OF THIS WRITING, IT LOOKS LIKE TEXAS dodged a direct hit from the Deepwater Horizon bullet. But what about next time? To state the obvious, you should avoid visible oil slicks at all cost. But the problem of getting oiled when you are fishing or cruising is very real and present regardless of how hard you try to avoid it. You may leave the dock in the morning with clean water, and find oil blocking your way home as the sun sets. Or you may drive through suspended or mixed oil without even realizing it. In any case, if you do not know how to handle it, you could seriously damage your boat, your engine, or both.

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2. Mechanical Systems: Any system on your boat that uses raw water, such as livewells, raw water washdowns, marine heads, air conditioners, and refrigerators, can be damaged by thick oil. In some cases, the lines running to these systems go through areas of the bilge, transom, or inwales, which are difficult or impossible to access, and you will never be able to properly clean them out. Again, prevention is your best solution. If you find it necessary to go through a slick shut off all of your seacocks and through-hull fittings, and turn all of these accessories off. If you are getting oiled before you realize it and you can’t shut off these items in time to prevent contamination, flush them as best you can with a degreaser. Pay particular attention to livewells with roto-molded polyethylene liners, because the oil can degrade the plastic. 3. Gel Coat: Common sense tells you 102 |

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that oil will clean off of gel coat fairly easily, but common sense is wrong. Actually, gel coat is a porous material and it will soak that oil into its surface, discoloring it. Let it sit long enough, and the discoloration may become permanent. Start scrubbing, ASAP. Again, use a common degreaser like Dawn. Citrus-based cleaners also work well. If thick blobs of oil are present, wipe them away with a rag then use mineral spirits to remove any sticky tar-like substances. As an extra precaution, adding a few coats of wax around the waterline area of your boat prior to launching it (or ASAP, if it is kept in the water) certainly wouldn’t do any harm. It should help seal the gel coat’s pores, and make clean-up that much easier. Can the oil do any structural damage to the fiberglass? All reliable sources say no, at this time. In fact, at least one fiberglass boat manufacturer (Beneteau) sent a letter to its owners saying in part “there will be a permanent staining to the white gel coat,” but “this will not affect the structure of the boat.”

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4. Paint: Even if your boat is merely sitting in a marina, bottom paint is still in danger’s way. Bottom paints can become coated with a film of oil and fail to leach out the biocides that prevent growth, or the oil may create a slick layer that prevents future coats of paint from adhering. Light coats of oil can be scrubbed away with a degreaser and elbow grease, but in tough cases, the only way to the contamination is to use a paint stripper and start from scratch. (Note: Sandblasting is not a good idea, because it can actually drive the oil deeper into the boat’s bottom.) 5. Other Parts of your Boat: Anchor ropes and lines can become fouled in oil, and will require a scrub-down with Dawn and water. You should be able to get oil off the surface, but be aware that your lines will probably never look the same. Canvass that gets oiled will require the same treatment, but will also end up permanently discolored in most cases. Swim platforms made of teak or other woods may be affected as well, and if the oil remains in place for

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long it can eat away at the glues holding the laminate together. (A common problem when diesel, oil, or gasoline spills onto a teak deck). Use an oil-lifting product like K2r (a dry cleaning spot remover) to pull the oil out of the wood. Then scrub off any remaining mess (always going with the grain on teak,) and re-treat it with teak oil. Will your insurance cover any damage caused by oil from Deepwater Horizon or any other spill? Time will tell. But it should be noted that in some areas, insurance companies are already sending out letters urging boaters to keep their boats on dry land for the time being. Should you go that far? That’s your call, not ours. But we have faced disaster before and we will face it again. We are sure as heck not going to let it stop us from fishing and boating-and we doubt you will let it stop you, either.

E-mail Lenny Rudow at boating@fishgame.com

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wary bass to hit when they won’t look at anything else. Floating worms have been a staple of professional angler’s arsenals for decades

Floating Worm OMETIMES ANGLERS MAKE THINGS TOO complicated and I’m speaking about myself as much as any of you when I say that. If you’re anything like me your tackle bag is full of lures with holographic images, laser lights, fish scents, bells, whistles, rattles and enough lead weights to sink a flat-bottom boat. Well, mine might not weigh that much but it’s at least as heavy as the average nine year old. We buy all this stuff in efforts to catch a single little green fish. Of course, we’re all hoping that little green fish weighs over 10 pounds, over 20 would be better, but if we each took a look at our personal arsenal we’d realize that even with all this stuff most of us fall back to one or two very simple rigs to catch most of our fish. So this month we’re looking at a very simple bass rig that has been around for decades, is very simple to tie, and should be on one of your rods most of the year. When anyone mentions worm fishing, most will automatically think of a Texas or Carolina rig since the common perception of plastic worms is that they are used to probe the bottom. Occasionally we’ll suspend them on a dropshot, but for the most part, we tie them to a hunk of lead and drop them to the bottom to dig out big bass. The majority of anglers have forgotten about the floating worm, which is an outstanding way to get

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When anyone mentions worm fishing, most think of a Texas or Carolina rig.

and have accounted for a few wins at major tournaments across the country. Plus they are easy to tie which makes them that much more

appealing to the weekend angler. Start the floating worm by tying a barrel swivel to your main line; you’ll understand why this is necessary in a minute. Next, tie one a short leader, 12 to 18 inches, on the other side of the barrel swivel. As with most of the leaders we discuss, make this one out of line that has a slightly lower breaking strength than your main line (12-pound main line 10-pound leader). What you make your leader out of is completely up to you but there are a few things to consider when selecting leader material. Monofilament is more visible than fluorocarbon and stretches more at the hook set but it has a slower sink rate keeping the worm close to the surface longer. Fluorocarbon is less visible and more sensitive but sinks faster. T E X A S

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On the end of the leader tie on a 3/0 or 4/0 wide gap worm hook. Rig the worm on the hook by threading it through the tip of the nose, exiting the bottom of the worm about a quarter inch from the nose. Run the hook through the worm until the line eye rests at the nose then turn the hook pushing the point back into the body of the worm. Instead of making sure the worm is completely straight, put a small bend in it between the nose and where you pushed the hook point back into the body. This small bend will make the worm twist and jerk when you start to work it, which can cause a reaction bite even if the fish aren’t hungry. This bend in the worm is also the reason we’re using a barrel swivel, since it will keep the line from twisting as the worm spins. Fish the floating worm on a mediumaction spinning rod (to aid in casting since this is such a lightweight rig) and you can toss it near boat docks, standing timber, or grass. Skip it under a boat dock, let it sit for a minute, slowly sinking, then twitch it and let it sink again. Bass will normally hit it on the fall. Around grass, you can throw it in the middle and reel it back slowly with the worm spinning and twitching. Most of the time I’m not a fan of bright colored worms but when floating a worm choose a bright color since a lot of the bites are light and you’ll need to be able to see the fish hit as much as you feel it.

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your favorite sweet or dill pickles.

Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork HIS RECIPE MIGHT BE FAMOUS IN THE CARolinas and in Tennessee, but we enjoy it just as much here in the Lone Star State. It is easy to prepare and may be cooked the day before, then heated up for serving the next day at the picnic, fishing trip, or wherever your heart desires. Prep time: 30 minutes. Cook time: 6 hours. Yield 10-12 servings.

Texas Style Creamy Cole Slaw Prep time: 30 minutes. Yield: 8 to 10 servings.

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1 5- to 7-lb. pork shoulder roast (Boston Butt or picnic ham) 1/2 cup Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All* 10-12 sandwich buns 1/2 jar Texas Gourmet's Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce (this is a zesty blend; if you desire a mild flavor, substitute 1 cup of your favorite barbecue sauce 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 1/3 cup cider vinegar Remove the pork roast from the refrigerator and season on all sides with Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All. Wrap in plastic wrap and return to fridge for at least two hours, or overnight preferably. Pit Method: Place roast in preheated pit fat side up (using a combo of pecan and hickory wood) at 250-275 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from pit and set aside to cool slightly. Gas Grill Method: Place over low indirect fire, fat side up, and keep covered, cooking at 275-300 degrees for 3- to 3-1/2 C O A S T A L

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hours, turning once. Transfer to foil, seal tightly, and cook for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from grill and set aside to cool slightly. Oven Method: Place in preheated oven fat side up in a foil lined baking dish at 300 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 2-1/2 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from oven and set aside to cool slightly. Regardless of cooking method, open the foil and pour all of the meat juices into a bowl (be careful, the liquid is very hot), then transfer the bowl to the refrigerator for a few hours to allow the fat to separate. You can speed this process in the freezer for about 45 minutes. Scrape the fat off the top and discard. Pour the reserved juices into a saucepot over medium heat, then add the Pineapple Chipotle Grilling Sauce, 1/2 cup of brown sugar, and 1/3 cup of cider vinegar. Set aside for the next step. Using two forks, or your hands (with kitchen latex gloves), shred the pork into bite-sized pieces, removing any excess fat from the roast as you go. Add the shredded meat to the Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce, brown sugar, and vinegar mixture, then serve hot on buns with Texas Style Creamy Coleslaw (recipe follows) and T E X A S

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5 cups shredded green cabbage 5 cups shredded red cabbage 1 cup shredded carrots 1 cup coarsely chopped purple onion 2 Granny Smith apples, cored, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 tsp lemon juice 1/2 cup cider vinegar 4 tsp Texas Gourmet's Jalapeno Kiwi Jelly 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup sour cream 1 Tbs Creole mustard or other coarsegrained mustard Combine the green and red cabbages, carrots, and purple onion in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, toss the cubed apples with the lemon juice and add to the cabbage mixture. In a small mixing bowl, combine the vinegar, jelly, salt, and pepper and whisk until the ingredients are well blended. Pour the seasoned vinegar mixture over the cabbage mixture and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover with plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator for 20 to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, and mustard and stir to combine. Add the mayonnaise mixture to the coleslaw and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to overnight before serving.

Contact Bryan Slaven, "The Texas Gourmet," at 888-234-7883, www.thetexasgourmet.com; or by email at texas-tasted@fishgame.com S E P T E M B E R

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Crossbows: 1 Year After Editor’s Note: One year ago this month, crossbows became legal to use during the archery-only white-tailed deer season. Crossbow opponents predicted dire consequences, from rampant wounding, more hunters pouring into the woods, and unsustainable increased harvest. We asked hunting editor Bob Hood to look into the aftermath of the first “crossbow season” to see if any of those dire predictions bore fruit in the real world. —Don Zaidle EW REGULATIONS ALLOWING CROSSBOWS during the archery-only hunting season have spurred increases in crossbow sales at many retail stores since the law went into effect one year ago. It also has prompted Texas Parks & Wildlife Department officials to reformat how it collects harvest information from hunters. Prior to last year’s archery-only season, Texas hunters could not use a crossbow during the special season unless a disability made them physically unable to draw a convention-

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al compound, recurve, or longbow. The Texas Legislature changed that last year by passing a bill allowing crossbows during the archeryonly season in all counties except Grayson, an archery-only deer hunting county that some say echoes so-called “conventional bowhunters” attitudes toward crossbows. Soon after the new bill was passed, several Texas retail sporting goods stores saw crossbow sales skyrocket. Bass Pro Shops reported a more than 50 percent statewide increase in crossbow sales just before and during last year’s archery season. The Cabela’s store in Fort Worth saw its crossbow sales triple from the previous year, and similar increases were reported by other Cabela’s stores as well as Gander Mountain and other retailers.

by Bob Hood • TF&G Hunting Editor

Does this mean hunters are harvesting more deer now that they can use crossbows during the archery-only season? Or has the new law simply provided more hunting opportunities for people with no significant impact on harvest numbers? “After looking over last season’s Big Game Harvest Survey information, I see no evidence of an increase in harvest numbers

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due to the new crossbow regulations,” said Clay Brewer of Brownwood, Region II Wildlife director for TPWD. Brewer said information gathered on last year’s big game harvest survey does not specifically ask if the game was taken with a crossbow or vertical bow. Mitch Lockwood, TPWD whitetail deer program coordinator, said changes to this season’s harvest survey forms would address some questions that remain unanswered. “I have asked our data analysis people to reformat the Big Game Harvest Survey to give us more answers,” Lockwood said. “One thing we might do is split the Big Game Harvest Survey up between categories for conventional bows and those for crossbows. Right now, a hunter may have shot four deer and we don’t know if he shot two with a rifle, one with a conventional bow, and one with a crossbow, or all four with a rifle or whatever.” Asking specific questions on the hunter survey such as what type of weapon the hunter used might be the closest way the department can come to determining how many deer are taken by a particular type of weapon. Sales of $7 state archery stamps are not a good indication since those and all other stamps are included on the Texas Super Combo hunting and fishing license, purchasers of which might or might not hunt with a bow.

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The legalization of crossbows during the archery-only season likely has resulted in more hunters taking part in the special season, while having little if any effect on bringing new hunters into the sport. George Rule of Lake Tawakoni said he used to hunt with a conventional bow but quit after shoulder problems made it too difficult to draw. “Now that I can hunt with a crossbow, I will be able to hunt during the archery-only season and not just during the regular season,” Rule said. Why were crossbows not allowed during Texas’ archery-only seasons prior to last year? The answer is simple yet not a very good one for all hunters: “Traditional” bowhunters who did not consider crossbows archery equipment lobbied the legislature and TPWD to prevent crossbow use during archery season. Those activists considered their compound bows “true” archery equipment, while failing to remember that just a few decades ago they faced similar resentment against compound bows from longbow and recurve proponents. Similar resentment has developed over the years in many states (including Texas) among

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black powder and muzzleloading season-only enthusiasts, ranging from pour-the-powderdown-the-barrel advocates to those who prefer black powder cartridges, cylinders, and discand-cap primers instead of flint and other more primitive charges. Fortunately for Texas hunters, truth and reason prevailed and sportsmen can now enjoy more hunting opportunities than ever before. Just like a compound bow, a crossbow is a short-range weapon. Either one can be shot accurately at distances of 50 to 100 yards, but those ranges for most hunters are not practical for taking game animals with any type of bow. Like many of the fastest compound bows, most crossbows shoot a bolt (arrow) at 300 to 375 feet per second. When you consider the loud “whack” of a crossbow bolt leaving its rail and the importance of accuracy and penetration, a hunter with a crossbow still faces the same challenges as a vertical bowhunter, and that means getting within about 30 yards of a wild animal. Arrow and string-locking devices such as

the Draw-Loc have been legal in Texas on vertical bows for several years, with little attendant controversy. Also, lighted pins, peep sights, and mechanical string releases for vertical bows do exactly what crossbow scopes and trigger releases do—improve an individual hunter’s ability to harvest an animal. Many wildlife officials and hunters do not expect the legalization of crossbows for archery season to have any significant impact on deer harvest. It has had an impact on compound bow retail sales, but more importantly, it has resulted in more hunting opportunities for all archery enthusiasts, not just an elite few.

E-mail Bob Hood at hunting@fishgame.com


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established in 1952 in the Port Isabel, Texas area is family owned and operated. Marchan’s White Sands has a unique combination that offers a place to stay, fish and dine.

WHERE IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT ON THE TEXAS HIGHWAYS?

If you are a traveling tourist, winter visitor, fisherman, birdwatcher or local customer, you will find Marchan’s to be friendly, affordable and competitive. If you are not staying at their motel, stop by and eat at their famous seafood restaurant and be sure to check out their breakfast. Take advantage of beautiful Texas sunsets with their indoor waterfront dining. For more info. on Marchan’s White Sands Motel, Marina & Restaurant, and to view their restaurant menu and hours go to their website at www.the-white-sands.com or call 956-943-2414 ext. 0.

INTRODUCING TFG’S NEW EAT ACROSS TEXAS, PLEASE CALL 281.227.3001 X 5519 FOR ADVERTISING RATES AND INFO.

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Tarpon Catfish

Belize

Lake Conroe

Black Drum High Island

Texas, caught of Beaumont, drum at the k Chris Howard ac bl nd, 36-inch . He was this 22.5-pou at High Island ge id Br l ta rimp. sh ad Intracoas de th m tackle wi using mediu

tfish ht his first ca el, age 4, caug nroe. Co ke La on Justin Treich ily with his fam while fishing

Chealsea Altin ger caught an tarpon while d released th fishing with her dad, uncle is captain Hilly boo Laura in an San Pedro, Am d grise Cay, Be berlize.

Hybrid Striper Mangrove Snapper

Trinity River Faith Foster caught her fir st hybrid strip bass while fis er hing wither he ter, at the Tr inity River ou r dad, Barry Fost of Coleman Camp. The st ’s Bait riper was 13 inches.

Mixed Stringer

Offshore

Port Aransas

a ends went on cks and his fri th year. They Tommy Fran 18 e th r fo p avis ng tri 40-hour fishi th Captain Tr the Dolphin wi rt Aransas. were aboard Po in ck Do n lphi Kerr from Do

Speckled Trout

Chris Gonzale s caught his m of San Antonio, Texas, angr shore of Galve ove snapper 15 miles of fston. The sn apper was 7 pounds and 22 inches.

Redfish

Laguna Madre

Laguna Madre

Redfish Aransas Pass

this mpo caught age 9, of El Ca fishing with his Jared Cook, ile wh ut tro kled per Laguna 24-inch spec dparents in Up dad and gran Madre.

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cciaKimberly Pu pson, son of e Brendon Thom caught the biggest and th ia at Shoal p, tri rello of Victor ng hi fis his first most fish on oked! He is now ho Water Lodge.

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Catfish

Sabine Lake

Whitetail Deer

Lake Whitney

Harper

-inch caught this 22 4 years old, st Jake Carlin, caught his fir He . ke La bine redfish in Sa . ad sh ld co keeper red on

Bill Bryant, of Kopperl caug ht this mess catfish while of fishing on La ke cats ranged from 1 pound Whitney. The to 3 pounds size. in

ot his n Antonio sh e, age 6, of Sa rds. He was Walker Jenk ya 70 at a .270 first deer with rper. Ha hunting near

Black Drum Largemouth Bass

East Galveston Bay

Sam Rayburn Res.

Largemouth Bass Celeste Wolff of Houston, Texas, caught released this an 40-inch black drum while fis d ing with her parents and hfia ncé in East Galveston Ba y at the Boliv ar Peninsula.

Seguin

ught Huntington ca an, age 3, of d on da r he th Kylee Hickm wi while fishing her first bass ss weighed 3 yburn. The ba Lake Sam Ra nces. pounds, 8 ou

Todd Mcbrid e holds the la rgemouth ba that he caug ss ht in Seguin. The bass we 10 pounds, 1. ighed 1 ounces.

Carp

Flounder

Lake Whitney Galveston

Redfish Port O’Connor

is carp on caught th rn of Carrollt hitney W ke Glen Pensho La at on the pier the night fishing utes to land took ten min . el re ht lig State Park. It a pound-test on carp, with 8-

David Harris caught and re leased this bu redfish while ll fishing in the Port O’Conn Jetties. The or red was over 30 pounds an 47 inches of d pure fight!

ch pound, 23-in caught this 5This Julio Alderete Wolf Park in Galveston. a r ing live finge flounder at Se was caught us personal best mullet.

Flounder Whitetail Buck

Christmas Bay

Bedias

Mule Deer CJ Kizer, age 11, of Huntsv ille took his buck in Bedi fir as. The deer was an 8-poin st ter.

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f the biggest hey shows of Larry McGaug ever caught, at 8 pounds s n flounder he ha ng with his so . He was fishi and 24 inches y. Ba ristmas Nathan in Ch

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New Mexico Thomas Kahl de deer on a priv n of Caldwell shot this m ule at Eagle Nest, Ne e ranch while hunting in w Mexico.

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SEPTEMBER 2010

PHOTO CREDIT: © OSCAR1319 | DREAMSTIME.COM

Crossbows: 1 Year After Editor’s Note: One year ago this month, crossbows became legal to use during the archery-only white-tailed deer season. Crossbow opponents predicted dire consequences, from rampant wounding, more hunters pouring into the woods, and unsustainable increased harvest. We asked hunting editor Bob Hood to look into the aftermath of the first “crossbow season” to see if any of those dire predictions bore fruit in the real world. —Don Zaidle

say echoes so-called “conventional bowhunters” attitudes toward crossbows. Soon after the new bill was passed, several Texas retail sporting goods stores saw crossbow sales skyrocket. Bass Pro Shops reported a more than 50 percent statewide increase in crossbow sales just before and during last year’s archery season. The Cabela’s store in Fort Worth saw its crossbow sales triple from the previous year, and similar increases were reported by other Cabela’s stores as well as EW REGULATIONS ALLOWING CROSSBOWS DURING THE ARCHERY- Gander Mountain and other retailers. only hunting season have spurred increases in crossbow sales Does this mean hunters are harvesting more deer now that they at many retail stores since the law went into effect one year can use crossbows during the archery-only season? Or has the new ago. It also has prompted Texas Parks & Wildlife Depart- law simply provided more hunting opportunities for people with no ment officials to reformat how it significant impact on harvest numbers? collects harvest information from “After looking over last season’s Big Game Harvest Survey hunters. information, I see no evidence of an increase in harvest numbers Prior to last year’s archery-only due to the new crossbow regulations,” said Clay Brewer of • TF&G Hunting Editor season, Texas hunters could not Brownwood, Region II Wildlife director for TPWD. Brewer use a crossbow during the special season unless a disability made said information gathered on last year’s big game harvest survey does them physically unable to draw a conventional compound, recurve, not specifically ask if the game was taken with a crossbow or vertical or longbow. The Texas Legislature changed that last year by passing bow. a bill allowing crossbows during the archery-only season in all counMitch Lockwood, TPWD whitetail deer program coordinator, ties except Grayson, an archery-only deer hunting county that some said changes to this season’s harvest survey forms would address

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In This Issue HOW-TO SECTION

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COVER STORY • CROSSBOWS: 1 YEAR AFTER | BY BOB HOOD

HOTSPOTS & TIDES SECTION

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TEXAS HOTSPOTS • Texas’ Hottest Fishing Spots | BY TOM BEHRENS, CALIXTO GONZALES, & BOB HOOD

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SPORTSMAN’S DAYBOOK • Tides, Solunar Table, Best Hunting/Fishing Times | BY TF&G STAFF

some questions that remain unanswered. “I have asked our data analysis people to reformat the Big Game Harvest Survey to give us more answers,” Lockwood said. “One thing we might do is split the Big Game Harvest Survey up between categories for conventional bows and those for crossbows. Right now, a hunter may have shot four deer and we don’t know if he shot two with a rifle, one with a conventional bow, and one with a crossbow, or all four with a rifle or whatever.” Asking specific questions on the hunter survey such as what type of weapon the hunter used might be the closest way the department can come to determining how many deer are taken by a particular type of weapon. Sales of $7 state archery stamps are not a good indication since those and all other stamps are included on the Texas Super Combo hunting and fishing license, purchasers of which might or might not hunt with a bow. The legalization of crossbows during the archery-only season likely has resulted in more hunters taking part in the special season, while having little if any effect on bringing new hunters into the sport. George Rule of Lake Tawakoni said he used to hunt with a conventional bow but quit after shoulder problems made it too difficult to draw. “Now that I can hunt with a crossbow, I will be able to hunt 58 |

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INDUSTRY INSIDER • Cor-Bon, Minn Kota | BY TFG STAFF

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TEXAS KAYAKING • Chewy’s Cove | BY GREG BERLOCHER

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TEXAS GUNS & GEAR • Dove Guns & Loads | BY STEVE LAMASCUS

OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE SECTION

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BOWHUNTING TECH • The Essence of a Bow Hunter | BY LOU MARULLO

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TEXAS BOATING • Disaster Story | BY LENNY RUDOW

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BAITS & RIGS • Floating Worm | BY PAUL BRADSHAW

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SALTWATER TALES • Life on the Bottom | BY CHESTER MOORE

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TEXAS TASTED • Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork | BY BRYAN SLAVEN

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OUTDOOR CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY AND EAT ACROSS TEXAS • Classifieds/Eat Across Texas | BY TF&G STAFF

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PHOTO ALBUM • Your Action Photos | BY TF&G READERS

GEARING UP SECTION

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NEW PRODUCTS • What’s New from Top Outdoor Manufacturers | BY TFG STAFF

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TEXAS TESTED • Cor-Bon, Sebile, Buff, Bumper Stumper | BY TFG STAFF

during the archery-only season and not just during the regular season,” Rule said. Why were crossbows not allowed during Texas’ archery-only seasons prior to last year? The answer is simple yet not a very good one for all hunters: “Traditional” bowhunters who did not consider crossbows archery equipment lobbied the legislature and TPWD to prevent crossbow use during archery season. Those activists considered their compound bows “true” archery equipment, while failing to remember that just a few decades ago they faced similar resentment against compound bows from longbow and recurve proponents. Similar resentment has developed over the years in many states (including Texas) among black powder and muzzleloading season-only enthusiasts, ranging from pour-the-powderdown-the-barrel advocates to those who prefer black powder cartridges, cylinders, and discand-cap primers instead of flint and other more primitive charges. Fortunately for Texas hunters, truth and reason prevailed and sportsmen can now enjoy more hunting opportunities than ever before. Just like a compound bow, a crossbow is a short-range weapon. Either one can be shot accurately at distances of 50 to 100 yards, but those ranges for most hunters are not practical T E X A S

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www.FishGame.com for taking game animals with any type of bow. Like many of the fastest compound bows, most crossbows shoot a bolt (arrow) at 300 to 375 feet per second. When you consider the loud “whack” of a crossbow bolt leaving its rail and the importance of accuracy and penetration, a hunter with a crossbow still faces the same challenges as a vertical bowhunter, and that means getting within about 30 yards of a wild animal. Arrow and string-locking devices such as the Draw-Loc have been legal in Texas on vertical bows for several years, with little attendant controversy. Also, lighted pins, peep sights, and mechanical string releases for vertical bows do exactly what crossbow scopes and trigger releases do—improve an individual hunter’s ability to harvest an animal. Many wildlife officials and hunters do not expect the legalization of crossbows for archery season to have any significant impact on deer harvest. It has had an impact on compound bow retail sales, but more importantly, it has resulted in more hunting opportunities for all archery enthusiasts, not just an elite few.

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LOWER GULF COAST

South Bay Specks by CALIXTO GONZALES cgonzales@fishgame.com

LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Southeast Corner GPS: N26 1.548, W97 11.02302 (26.0258, -97.183717) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live pinfish, DOA tandem in Smoke, black/clear/glitter, Glow/pink CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Drift from the Southeast corner of the bay out into deeper water. Trout will be on the flats and holding in deeper pockets.

LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Brownsville Ship Channel GPS: N26 2.124, W97 13.10802 (26.0354, -97.218467) SPECIES: snook BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live mullet, SPI Lures tandems in glow/pink, chartreuse; topwaters CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Fish around docks and riprap with topwaters and soft plastics early in the morning. There are some very big snook in the Ship Channel in late summer and early fall. Live bait works well, too. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Drum Boats GPS: N26 10.713, W97 11.10702

(26.17855, -97.185117) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwaters, gold spoons, Gulp! Shrimp and jerkbaits in New Penny, Rootbeer CONTACT: Captain Eddie Curry, 956943-8301; www.curryfishing.com TIPS: Redfish take off in September. Fish are very aggressive as they feed prior to migrating Gulf-ward. Use topwaters and gold spoons for best results. Don’t discount Gulp! baits, especially on windier days. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: There won’t be as many trout as in past months, but the ones you find will be good solid 18 to 24-inch trout. Use larger baits to tempt them. A topwater like a Top Dog or Super spook are classic bit trout getters. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: This is the prime time of year to ambush herds of redfish as they start to move towards the passes. Early in the month, you will find the smaller groups of redfish. Look for groups of reds moving south, fish soft plastics in white / chartreuse LOCATION: South Padre Island

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HOTSPOT: Andie Bowie Park (Bank Access) GPS: N26 8.90802, W97 10.17102 (26.148467, -97.169517) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live mullet, cut ballyhoo, cut mullet, silver spoons, soft plastics

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CONTACT: White Sands Marina, 956943-2414 TIPS: Surf-fishermen have a shot at a big bull redfish starting in September. A bottom rig with live or cut fish is tough to beat. Some anglers like to “run and gun” up and down the beach and stop to fish

spots that look fishy. LOCATION: South Padre Island HOTSPOT: Boca Chica Beach GPS: N26 3.02802, W97 9.174 (26.050467, -97.1529) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live finger mullet, cut mullet, ballyhoo; soft plastics in glow/chartreuse, red/white, chartreuse/white tail CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Watch for changes in the surf shoreline and set up in the first gut early in the morning, and the second gut as the day progresses.

MIDDLE GULF COAST

Cavallo at Port O by TOM BEHRENS tbehrens@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Port O’Connor HOTSPOT: East Cavallo Hump GPS: N28 14.9778, W96 13.7052 (28.24963, -96.22842) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish grass lines and sand pockets LOCATION: San Antonio Bay HOTSPOT: Big Reef GPS: N28 22.2, W96 25.71 (28.370, 96.42850) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch or live croaker CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361.785.2986 TIPS: Key on oyster shell bottoms LOCATION: Mesquite Bay HOTSPOT: Rattlesnake Reef GPS: N28 7.92702, W96 52.06542 (28.132117, -96.867757) 62 |

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SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Texas Tackle Factory Red Killers in white, Pumpkinseed, or chartreuse, with 1/8-ounce jigheads CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish the drop-off LOCATION: Redfish Bay HOTSPOT: Klondike Reef GPS: N27 54.468, W97 6.7662 (27.9078, -97.11277) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live piggy perch under a Mansfield Mauler CONTACT: Capt. Brent Hopkins, 361729-6911 TIPS: Keep your leader just long enough to keep the perch out of the grass LOCATION: Copano Bay HOTSPOT: Copano Reef GPS: N28 6.70698, W97 6.40398 (28.111783, -97.106733) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp under a popping cork CONTACT: Capt. Ed. Zielinski, 361-7292026 TIPS: The trout will stay shallow until the first cold front comes through. LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N27 54.28398, W97 6.00198 (27.904733, -97.100033) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. John Filla, 361-2152332

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TIPS: Towards the end of the month, big redfish should start to appear in 1-2 feet of water. LOCATION: Corpus Christi Bay HOTSPOT: Causeway GPS: N27 51.89298, W97 21.13002 (27.864883, -97.352167) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: “When fishing over the flats, I put a bubble float on with a long enough leader to keep the perch above the grass.” Caserta LOCATION: Upper Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Intracoastal Canal GPS: N27 16.674, W97 23.82102 (27.2779, -97.397017) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: Check the deep water potholes along the canal LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N27 50.61498, W97 3.44298 (27.843583, -97.057383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or crab CONTACT: Capt. Randy Filla, 361-2152332 TIPS: Redfish action should heat up along the jetties by the end of September.

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CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: The second week in September is when the main bull redfish run usually takes place.

UPPER GULF COAST

Big, Nasty Specks by TOM BEHRENS tbehrens@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N29 40.371, W93 50.25 (29.67285, -93.8375) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics such as the Big Nasty and Bomber Flukes with chartreuse tails CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Trout are in the transition period between summer and fall. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Beachfront GPS: N29 40.62744, W93 52.70766 (29.677124, -93.878461) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Catch 5 and Catch 2000

LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: East Pass GPS: N29 58.92, W93 47.13498 (29.982, -93.785583) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in natural colors CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Look for working birds. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Green’s Bayou GPS: N29 49.68786, W93 48.99516 (29.828131, -93.816586) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in bright colors for off-colored water; natural colors in clear water CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Lots of rain in September could shove the shrimp from the marshes out into the lake; the trout will follow the shrimp.

LOCATION: Trinity Bay HOTSPOT: The Wells GPS: N29 42.67398, W94 48.513 (29.711233, -94.80855) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Bass Assassins in 10W40 and Chicken on a Chain colors, using 1/8 or 1/4-ounce jigheads; Jig head size is based on wind and tide CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Good location for a lot of reds and some good trout in September LOCATION: East Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Hannah’s Reef GPS: N29 28.6806, W94 45.6786 (29.47801, -94.76131) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: Red Shad Bass Assassin with 1/8-ounce jigheads CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: In September, you are not going to catch a lot of trout but the fish you catch will be big. If it’s a sunny day, try baits in Limetreuse color. LOCATION: Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Seabrook Flats GPS: N29 33.306, W95 1.38498 (29.5551, -95.023083) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: She Dog topwater baits; soft plastics in Pumpkinseed CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Look for rafting mullet. Good spot in late September LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Cotton’s GPS: N28 30.60198, W96 12.603 (28.510033, -96.21005) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: crab or pink shrimp flies CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: September is a good time for the angler using a fly rod for redfish in West Matagorda Bay. The fish are starting to school; concentrate on grass beds.

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LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Shell Island GPS: N28 37.65498, W96 3.80202 (28.627583, -96.063367) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: She Pups and SkitterWalks CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: Look for pods of redfish along the grassy shoreline. The fish will be chasing shrimp in the grass. LOCATION: East Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N28 39.25398, W95 52.70298 (28.654233, -95.878383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwater lures early; Norton Bull Minnows in Black Magic color later in the day CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037

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TIPS: Look for working beds

PINEY WOODS

Primos Conroe Cats by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Conroe HOTSPOT: Main Lake Channel GPS: N30 25.8903, W95 35.8932 (30.431505, -95.598220) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Primos dipping bait CONTACT: Richard Tatsch, admin@fishdudetx.com, 936-291-1277, www.fishindudetx.com

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TIPS: Pre-bait two or three areas in 1525 feet of water along the edge of the main channel with cattle cubes. Use a No. 4 treble hook. Ease the bait off the bottom occasionally while feeling for the slightest resistance. BANK ACCESS: Stowaway Marina LOCATION: Caddo Lake HOTSPOT: Main Lake Points GPS: N32 42.59028, W93 59.50452 (32.709838, -93.991742) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: plastic frogs, buzzbaits, flukes CONTACT: Paul Keith, Caddo Lake Guide Service, www.caddolakefishing.com, 318-455-3437 TIPS: Fish the main-lake pads and hydrilla beds with your surface baits. Usually, the closer to the main-lake creek channel the better.

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BANK ACCESS: Piers at the Texas State Park and Louisiana State Park sites. LOCATION: Lake Granger HOTSPOT: Main Lake Ridge GPS: N30 42.13896, W97 20.23698 (30.702316, -97.337283) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: 1/2-ounce slab spoons CONTACT: Tommy Tidwell, crappie1@hotmail.com, 512-365-7761 TIPS: The white bass are schooling on main lake humps and hit best during the middle of the day. Anchor directly over the humps and drop slab spoons to the bottom. The larger fish are on the bottom picking up injured shad.

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chartreuse slabs off the bottom in 10-30 feet of water. White and Glow Coho Minnow jigs with 3/4-ounce jighead and 4-inch tail are perfect. Cast the jigs and use a medium retrieve. BANK ACCESS: Mill Creek Campsites LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Juniper Point East GPS: N33 51.892, W96 49.883 (33.864867, -96.831383)

SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: RipTide Curltailers, and topwaters CONTACT: Bill Carey, 903-647-4022 Cell, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: The big fish move onto the flats during September. Early mornings cast pencil poppers and chug bugs on the shallow banks. Mid-morning change your lures to Rip Tide Curltailers and Sassy Shad soft plastics. Concentrate on the flats that run

LOCATION: Toledo Bend HOTSPOT: Myrick’s Reach GPS: N31 45.04002, W93 50.21298 (31.750667, -93.836883) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, tail spinners, Road Runners, slabs, spoons CONTACT: Greg Crafts, gregcrafts@yahoo.com, 936-368-7151, toledobendguide.com TIPS: White bass are following the shad and schooling throughout the day all over the lake. During early morning and late evening hours, look for them to school in the same locations such as off main-lake points, road beds, and flats close to deep water.

PRAIRIES & LAKES

Jigs Take Texoma Stripers by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Mill Creek Flats GPS: N33 49.43568, W96 46.15392 (33.823928, -96.769232) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: slabs and jigs CONTACT: Bill Carey, bigfish@striperexpress.com, 877-786-4477, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: Jig 1-ounce chrome, white and I N L A N D

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about 20 feet in depth. Locate the creek channels and drop-offs; these are the routes that the fish use to move up from deep water to feed. The gulls have arrived, so pay close attention to the birds, as they are your best fish-finders. BANK ACCESS: East Juniper Point and Washita Point, watch for stripers chasing shad along bank LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Flat Creek Docks GPS: N32 11.77662, W95 30.51738 (32.196277, -95.508623) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: crankbaits, Shimmy Shakers, spinnerbaits, and buzzbaits CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-5617299, www.rickysguideservice.com TIPS: Fish crankbaits and chartreusewhite Shimmy Shakers around the docks,

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and 1/4-ounce jigs, buzzbaits, and spinnerbaits in the back of Flat Creek and other creeks. LOCATION: Lake Whitney HOTSPOT: McCowan Flats GPS: N31 55.482, W97 24.858 (31.9247, -97.4143) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white ribbon tail trailers CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Stripers are scattered due to the heavy thermocline, making trolling the most productive pattern. Easy limits result from using white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white trailers. Drag the lures anywhere from 19-22 feet in 26-35 feet of water. LOCATION: Lake Somerville

HOTSPOT: Spillway South GPS: N30 18.09774, W96 31.5441 (30.301629, -96.525735) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: shad, worms, punchbait, chicken livers CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water drops off rapidly from the shore here. Chum the drop-off close to the boat. Fish straight down with the bait close to the bottom near the chum. Use a cork or fish with a tight line. Set the hook when the least bite is detected. LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: hybrid striped bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: Troll crankbaits in 25 feet of water off the flats for big hybrid striped bass. BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: White bass will be stacked up on the drop-offs and can be caught on slabs bounced off the bottom. BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Oak Creek Point GPS: N31 57.33714, W96 15.56028 (31.955619, -96.259338) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Steve Schmidt, steve@steveschmidtsbigbass.com, 817-

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929-0675 TIPS: This point has numerous large boulders. Put your boat in 15 to 18 feet of water and cast a Carolina rig onto the point. Drag the rig across the boulders. LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: Triplet Point GPS: N31 54.84978, W97 12.88818 (31.914163, -97.214803) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Watch for early-morning schooling action on the point. Retrieve the lures just under the surface for fast action. LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: The Bubbler GPS: N31 54.8709, W97 12.375

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(31.914515, -97.20625) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: After the sun becomes high, head to the bubbler and fish Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges or small chrome spoons in the heavily-oxygenated water that attracts tons of baitfishes and game fishes. LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Highway 155 Bridge GPS: N32 8.74926, W95 28.3023 (32.145821, -95.471705) SPECIES: crappie BEST BAITS: Mister Twister / Mister Minnow jigs CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-5617299, www.rickysguideservice.com

TIPS: Fish around the pilings beneath the Highway 155 bridge as well as brush piles in 16 feet of water. White jigs usually work better than those of other colors. LOCATION: Fayette County HOTSPOT: Pekema Creek Channel GPS: N29 56.0946, W96 43.0308 (29.93491, -96.717180) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: punchbait, worms CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water is 15 feet deep here with submerged structure. Fish close to the bottom with a cork or tight line. Chumming will increase your chances of catching fish. Use a No. 6 or No. 8 treble hook. LOCATION: Gibbons Creek HOTSPOT: Eagle Point South GPS: N30 37.92102, W96 2.79 (30.632017, -96.0465) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Shad, shrimp, worms, stinkbait CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The fish are feeding out of Sulphur Creek into the more shallow water in the timber early mornings and after dark. Tie to a tree and put out chum around the boat. Use a No. 6 treble hook on punchbait just off the bottom.

PANHANDLE

Striper Kingdom by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Possum Kingdom HOTSPOT: Costello Island GPS: N32 54.14196, W98 28.068 (32.902366, -98.467800) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: live shad, topwaters, jigging 70 |

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spoons CONTACT: Dean Heffner, fav7734@aceweb.com, 940-329-0036 TIPS: Fish the breaklines at 20-30 feet along the river channel from Costello Island to Broadway. Once you catch fish at a certain depth, use it to catch many more. White and red colors are good bets but try chartreuse when fishing deep or stained waters.

HILL COUNTRY

Headline for Hotspot Region by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Lyndon B Johnson HOTSPOT: Sunrise Beach GPS: N30 35.35584, W98 24.51102 (30.589264, -98.408517) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: buzzbait, Pop-R, mediumdiving crankbait, spinnerbait, jerkbait CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Start early with topwater lures and expect the bite to last longer at this time of the year. Texas and Carolina-rigged soft plastics also work well. Look for laydowns, docks, and grass beds. Up the river, bass will move to the corners of docks. LOCATION: Lake Medina HOTSPOT: Walton Island GPS: N29 33.897, W98 55.3851 (29.564950, -98.923085) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: live minnows, small chrome or white jigging spoons, Rat-L-Traps, shad-colored grubs, shad topwaters CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: White bass fishing is best at night with floating or submersible fishing lights. Anchor off the points or next to a bluff along the main river channel. Position several lights around the boat. Baitfishes will move in first, then the white bass.

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LOCATION: Canyon Lake HOTSPOT: Tom’s Creek GPS: N29 52.38528, W98 15.47004 (29.873088, -98.257834) SPECIES: smallmouth bass BEST BAITS: Smoke/red flake, Watermelon, Pumpkin, and silver fleck tubes, grubs, and worms rigged on 1/8-ounce to 1/4ounce jigheads; Zara Puppies, Pop-Rs, medium-diving lures CONTACT: David Burlington,

dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Look for bushes and rocks in 1015 feet of water along breaklines and points. Fish topwater lures early and late. Swim grubs along the bottom to get strikes. Fish crankbaits and grubs along the bluffs. LOCATION: Lake Travis HOTSPOT: Anderson Bend GPS: N30 22.06998, W98 0.58998


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(30.367833, -98.009833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Bone or shad-colored topwaters; purple, Watermelon-red and red shad plastic worms and tubes; chartreuse spinnerbaits; crawfish-patterned crankbaits CONTACT: David Burlington,

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dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Topwater lures early. Once the surface bite is over, throw a spinnerbait or crankbait in the same areas; plastic worms catch less-active fish. Also focus on docks, a key cover on this lake.

BIG BEND

Headline for Hotspot Region by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Amistad HOTSPOT: Marker 28 to the Dam GPS: N29 27.24582, W101 2.6502 (29.454097, -101.04417) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Ribbit Frogs, buzzbaits CONTACT: Larry Scruggs, Amistad Lodge and Adventures, fisherofmenlrs@hotmail.com, 210-789-1645 TIPS: The bass are in the grass. Work buzzbaits and Ribbit Frogs over the grass beds. Expect catches of 70 to 80 fish per boat with an occasional 10-pounder.

SOUTH TEXAS PLAINS

Bass on the Border by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Falcon Lake HOTSPOT: Big Tiger Creek GPS: N26 44.32602, W99 8.74998 (26.738767, -99.145833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Robert Amaya, Robert’s Fish N’Tackle, robert@robertsfishntackle.com, 956-765-1442 TIPS: Work the brush lines early with crankbaits, targeting those close to rock piles or rocky banks and then move out to 12 to 18 feet of water and work the underwater bushes along the main channel and other drop-offs with the Carolina-rigged worms.

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flaged on the bottom, the tides bring fish to them, and then make one big trip to mate once a year. Paralichthys lethostigma, the southern flounder, is the largest of more than 25 species of flatfishes found in Gulf coastal waters. Anglers occasionally catch other varieties, but dockside harvest surveys show MAGINE GETTING TO LIE AROUND THE POOL, that southern flounder make up 95 percent concealed from everyone, watching the of the flatfish catch in the Gulf. All flatfishes, including the southern world go by, and having fresh fish delivered to you any time you want it. Then, flounder, are lateral and spend most of their life on the bottom, once a year, you head out toward where they swim the Gulf to socialize and come on their sides and back to the coast in the spring. lie in ambush for That is essentially the life of • TF&G Executive Editor unsuspecting baitthe flounder. They lie camou-

Life on the Bottom

PART TWO Two-Part Series

I

by Chester Moore

fishes. In the case of our perennial favorite, the southern flounder, the left side is always the “up” side while in other species the opposite is true. The flounder is tailor made for life on the bottom. When the fish first hatch, they have eyes on each side of their head, one of which eventually migrates to the opposite side. Both eyes in adults are on the “up” side of the head and the coloration of the upper side of the body varies greatly to match the surrounding environment. The down or bottom side of all flounder is solid white. Anglers often catch flounder that look almost coal black, but spot up when held. That is the flounders attempt to match its new surroundings. No one ever said flounder were intelligent creatures, just adaptable. 74 |

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Flounder can change colors more than most anglers might think. I once kept several flounder in a 400-gallon aquarium I created for fish behavior study in my workshop. The sand in the aquarium was fine white sand used for sandblasting. The flounder in this tank turned a very, very light shade of gray and their normally white spots were almost a luminescent white. It was interesting to see. There is some debate over the life history of these fish, but the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department gives a good explanation in a publication called The Southern Flounder in Texas: “Adult southern flounder leave the bays during the fall for spawning in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn for the first time when two years old at depths of 50 to 100 feet. The eggs are buoyant. “Females become sexually mature at two years of age in Texas waters. The youngest mature female southern flounder in northern Florida was four years old according to scientists there. Of the mature females collected in August, eight percent of the four year-olds, five percent of the five year olds, and 18 percent of the six-year-olds were developing eggs. “After hatching, the larval fish swim in an upright position and the eyes are located on opposite sides of the head. As the young fish grows, the right eye begins to “migrate” to the left side of the head. When body length reaches one-half inch or so, the eye migration is complete and the fish assumes its left-side-up position for life.”

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into estuaries is in February, when water temperatures are still low. Small flounder grow rapidly and might reach 12 inches in length by the end of their first year. As noted in my book, Flounder Fever, males seldom exceed 12 inches, but females grow larger than males and often reach a length of 25 inches. Most flounder caught by anglers are females between 12 and 16 inches long, weighing 1 to 1-1/2 pounds. This does not mean flounder cannot get huge though. The Texas state record is a 13-pounder caught by H. Endicott of Groves at Pleasure Island in 1976. The world record is a 22-pounder caught in Florida in the 1980s, and there have been reports of a number of other truly monstrous flounder caught throughout the years. Late author A.C. Becker caught a 17-pounder in a shrimp trawl in the mouth of Double Bayou near Anahuac in 1948. To attain such sizes, a flounder would have to be very old and it would have to be a supreme predator—which is exactly what flounder are.

Flounder do not put up impressive jumping displays like a tarpon nor make brutal, determined runs like a redfish, but they are certainly a challenge to catch. They do not chase and corral schools of baitfish like speckled trout, redfish, mackerel and sharks do. For the most part, flounder are ambush predators, lying camouflaged on the bottom and waiting for prey to come to them. It is a very effective way of making a living. Sometimes it is possible to encounter flounder chasing baitfish on a shallow flat or point, but that is rare, indeed. Understanding this dynamic is the key to catching these delectable, challenging fish. Editor’s Note: Chester Moore will be hosting a unique free event called “Flatfish University” on Saturday October 9. To learn more about the event, email cmoore@fishgame.com.

At this point, the young fish enter the bays during late winter and early spring. They are about 1/2-inch in length and seek shallow grassy areas near the Gulf passes. Southern flounder post-larvae show up all along the Gulf of Mexico coast during winter and early spring. According to studies in Aransas Bay, the peak movement of post-larvae flounders I N L A N D

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Tides and Prime Times

SEPTEMBER 2010 USING THE PRIME TIMES CALENDAR

The following pages contain TIDE and SOLUNAR predictions for Galveston Channel (29.3166° N, 94.88° W).

T12

T4

T11

T10

TIDE PREDICTIONS are located in the upper white boxes on the Calendar Pages. Use the Correction Table below, which is keyed to 23 other tide stations, to adjust low and high tide times.

T13 T7

T6 T5 T17

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY is shown in the lower color boxes of the Calendar pages. Use the SOLUNAR ADJUSTMENT SCALE below to adjust times for points East and West of Galveston Channel.

T15 T16

AM & PM MINOR phases occur when the moon rises and sets. These phases last 1 to 2 hours.

T14 T18

AM & PM MAJOR phases occur when the moon reaches its highest point overhead as well as when it is “underfoot” or at its highest point on the exact opposite side of the earth from your positoin (or literally under your feet). Most days have two Major Feeding Phases, each lasting about 2 hours.

T19

SOLAR & LUNAR ACTIVITY: Sunrise: 6:34a Sunset: 7:51p

PEAK DAYS: The closer the moon is to your location, the stronger the influence. FULL or NEW MOONS provide the strongest influnce of the month.

T20

AM Minor: 9:11a AM Major: 2:57a PM Minor: 9:40p PM Major: 3:25p

PEAK TIMES: When a Solunar Period falls within 30 minutes to an hour of sunrise or sunset, anticipate increased action. A moon rise or moon set during one of these periods will cause even greater action. If a FULL or NEW MOON occurs during a Solunar Period, expect the best action of the season.

Moonrise:9:27a Moon Set: None Moon Overhead:

T21

4:55p

TIDE CORRECTION TABLE Add or subtract the time shown at the right of the Tide Stations on this table (and map) to determine the adjustment from the time shown for GALVESTON CHANNEL in the calendars.

TIDE PREDICTIONS are shown in graph form, with High and Low tide predictions in text immediately below. SOLUNAR ACTIVITY data is provided to indicate major and minor feeding periods for each day, as the daily phases of the moon have varying degrees of influence on a wide variety of wildlife species.

T9 T8

T3 T2 T1

KEY T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6

PLACE Sabine Bank Lighthouse Sabine Pass Jetty Sabine Pass Mesquite Pt, Sab. Pass Galveston Bay, S. Jetty Port Bolivar

HIGH -1:46 -1:26 -1:00 -0:04 -0:39 +0:14

LOW -1:31 -1:31 -1:15 -0:25 -1:05 -0:06

KEY PLACE HIGH Galveston Channel/Bays T7 Texas City Turning Basin +0:33 +3:54 T8 Eagle Point +6:05 T9 Clear Lake +10:21 T10 Morgans Point T11 Round Pt, Trinity Bay +10:39

LOW +0:41 +4:15 +6:40 +5:19 +5:15

KEY PLACE T12 Pt Barrow, Trinity Bay T13 Gilchrist, East Bay T14 Jamaica Beach, W. Bay T15 Alligator Point, W. Bay T16 Christmas Pt T17 Galveston Pleasure Pier

HIGH +5:48 +3:16 +2:38 +2:39 +2:32 -1:06

LOW +4:43 +4:18 +3:31 +2:33 +2:31 -1:06

KEY T18 T19 T20 T21 T22 T23

PLACE San Luis Pass Freeport Harbor Pass Cavallo Aransas Pass Padre Island (So. End) Port Isabel

SPORTSMAN’S DAYBOOK IS SPONSORED BY:

NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION T22 T23

KEYS TO USING THE TIDE AND SOLUNAR GRAPHS TIDE LE VEL GRAPH: Yellow: Daylight

12a

Tab: Peak Fishing Period

6a

12p

6p

12a

Light Blue: Nighttime

BEST:

7:05-9:40 PM

Green: Falling Tide

AM/PM Timeline

Gold Fish: Best Time

Blue: Rising Tide Red Graph: Fishing Score

Blue Fish: Good Time

SOLUNAR AC TIVIT Y: MINOR Feeding Periods (+/- 1.5 Hrs.) Time Moon is at its Highest Point in the Sky 12a

AM/PM Timeline

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AM Minor: 1:20a

PM Minor: 1:45p

AM Major: 7:32a

PM Major: 7:57p

MAJOR Feeding Periods (+/- 2 Hrs.)

Moon Overhead: 8:50a 6a

12p

6p

12a

Time Moon is Directly Underfoot (at its peak on opposite side of the earth)

Moon Underfoot: 9:15p S E P T E M B E R

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 = New Moon  = First Quarter  = Full Moon  = Last Quarter  = Best Day

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

30 SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Set: 7:41p Set: 2:05p

SATURDAY

2 Sunrise: 6:56a Set: 7:40p Moonrise: 12:31a Set: 3:03p

3

SUNDAY

4

5

Sunrise: 6:56a Moonrise: 1:30a

Set: 7:39p Set: 3:57p

Sunrise: 6:57a Moonrise: 2:34a

Set: 7:38p Set: 4:48p

Sunrise: 6:57a Moonrise: 3:43a

Set: 7:37p Set: 5:34p

PM Minor: 10:25p

AM Minor: 10:54a

PM Minor: 11:20p

AM Minor: 11:49a

PM Minor: ——-

AM Minor: 12:20a

PM Minor: 12:44p

AM Minor: 1:10a

PM Minor: 1:39p

AM Minor: 2:03a

PM Minor: 2:33p

AM Minor: 2:55a

PM Minor: 3:24p

AM Major: 3:49a

PM Major: 4:13p

AM Major: 4:42a

PM Major: 5:07p

AM Major: 5:35a

PM Major: 6:03p

AM Major: 6:30a

PM Major: 6:58p

AM Major: 7:24a

PM Major: 7:54p

AM Major: 8:18a

PM Major: 8:47p

AM Major: 9:10a

PM Major: 9:39p

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 6:51a

Moon Overhead: 5:58a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 7:47a 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 9:44a

Moon Overhead: 8:45a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 10:42a 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Sunrise: 6:55a Moonrise: None

FRIDAY

AM Minor: 10:01a

Moon Overhead: 5:09a

12a

 SEP 1

31

Sunrise: 6:54a Set: 7:44p Sunrise: 6:55a Set: 7:42p Moonrise: 10:54p Set: 12:09p Moonrise: 11:39p Set: 1:07p

THURSDAY

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 5:33p +2.0

BEST:

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

7:00 — 9:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 8:16p BEST:

8:00 — 10:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:14p BEST:

12:30 — 3:30 PM

1:30 — 3:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 10:13p BEST:

2:30 — 4:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 11:10p +2.0

BEST:

4:30 — 6:30 PM TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 7:19p

TIDE LEVELS

9:30 — 11:30 AM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 6:24p

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:58 am 6:00 am 2:20 pm 11:32 pm

1.19 ft 1.39 ft 0.34 ft 1.35 ft

Low Tide: 1:04 am High Tide: 5:41 am Low Tide: 3:17 pm

1.35 ft 1.48 ft 0.25 ft

High Tide: 5:39 am Low Tide: 4:22 pm

1.58 ft 0.15 ft

High Tide: 5:44 am Low Tide: 5:31 pm

1.65 ft 0.05 ft

High Tide: 4:27 am Low Tide: 6:37 pm

1.69 ft High Tide: 3:57 am -0.04 ft Low Tide: 7:37 pm

1.70 ft High Tide: -0.08 ft Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:07 am 8:48 am 12:20 pm 8:33 pm

1.68 ft 1.49 ft 1.56 ft -0.06 ft

+1.0

0

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NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

= Peak Fishing Period

7:45-9:40 AM

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

8 8

FRIDAY

9

SATURDAY

10

SUNDAY

11

12

Sunrise: 6:58a Moonrise: 4:52a

Set: 7:35p Set: 6:16p

Sunrise: 6:58a Moonrise: 6:02a

Set: 7:34p Set: 6:55p

Sunrise: 6:59a Moonrise: 7:10a

Set: 7:33p Set: 7:33p

Sunrise: 6:59a Moonrise: 8:18a

Set: 7:32p Set: 8:11p

Sunrise: 7:00a Moonrise: 9:27a

Set: 7:31p Set: 8:51p

AM Minor: 3:46a

PM Minor: 4:14p

AM Minor: 4:37a

PM Minor: 5:04p

AM Minor: 5:29a

PM Minor: 5:55p

AM Minor: 6:23a

PM Minor: 6:50p

AM Minor: 7:21a

PM Minor: 7:48p

AM Minor: 8:22a

PM Minor: 8:49p

AM Minor: 9:24a

PM Minor: 9:52p

AM Major: 10:00a

PM Major: 10:28p

AM Major: 10:51a

PM Major: 11:17p

AM Major: 11:42a

PM Major: 12:08p

AM Major: 12:10a

PM Major: 12:37p

AM Major: 1:07a

PM Major: 1:35p

AM Major: 2:08a

PM Major: 2:36p

AM Major: 3:10a

PM Major: 3:38p

Moon Overhead: 11:38a 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 1:25p

Moon Overhead: 12:32p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 2:18p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:00a Set: 7:29p Moonrise: 10:35a Set: 9:34p

Moon Overhead: 4:07p

Moon Overhead: 3:12p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:01a Set: 7:28p Moonrise: 11:42a Set: 10:22p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 5:04p 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

WEDNESDAY

7

6

12a

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: None +2.0

BEST:

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 1:52a BEST:

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 2:45a BEST:

7:30 – 9:30 AM

11:30A – 1:30P

Moon Underfoot: 3:39a BEST:

Moon Underfoot: 4:35a +2.0

BEST:

4:00 – 6:00 PM

5:00 – 7:00 PM TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 12:59a

TIDE LEVELS

5:30 – 7:30 PM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 12:05a

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:22 am 9:08 am 2:03 pm 9:24 pm

1.63 ft 1.29 ft 1.60 ft 0.06 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:38 am 9:45 am 3:26 pm 10:13 pm

1.57 ft 1.02 ft 1.64 ft 0.25 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:55 am 10:27 am 4:43 pm 11:01 pm

1.52 ft 0.73 ft 1.67 ft 0.52 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

5:12 am 11:13 am 5:59 pm 11:48 pm

1.49 ft 0.44 ft 1.68 ft 0.81 ft

High Tide: 5:30 am 1.49 ft Low Tide: 12:02 pm 0.21 ft High Tide: 7:18 pm 1.67 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:34 am 5:45 am 12:54 pm 8:43 pm

1.10 ft 1.52 ft 0.06 ft 1.65 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

1:21 am 5:56 am 1:51 pm 10:23 pm

1.35 ft 1.55 ft -0.01 ft 1.65 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


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NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

7:45-9:40 AM

= Peak Fishing Period

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

13

Set: 7:26p Set: None

Sunrise: 7:02a Moonrise: 2:38p

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

16

17

SUNDAY

18

19

Set: 7:25p Sunrise: 7:03a Set: 12:07a Moonrise: 3:24p

Set: 7:23p Set: 1:03a

Sunrise: 7:03a Moonrise: 4:05p

Set: 7:22p Set: 1:59a

Sunrise: 7:04a Moonrise: 4:42p

Set: 7:21p Set: 2:55a

Sunrise: 7:04a Moonrise: 5:14p

Set: 7:20p Set: 3:49a

AM Minor: 10:26a

PM Minor: 10:54p

AM Minor: 11:25a

PM Minor: 11:53p

AM Minor: ——-

PM Minor: 12:20p

AM Minor: 12:45a

PM Minor: 1:11p

AM Minor: 1:32a

PM Minor: 1:57p

AM Minor: 2:16a

PM Minor: 2:38p

AM Minor: 2:56a

PM Minor: 3:17p

AM Major: 4:12a

PM Major: 4:40p

AM Major: 5:11a

PM Major: 5:39p

AM Major: 6:07a

PM Major: 6:34p

AM Major: 6:58a

PM Major: 7:23p

AM Major: 7:45a

PM Major: 8:09p

AM Major: 8:27a

PM Major: 8:50p

AM Major: 9:06a

PM Major: 9:28p

Moon Overhead: 6:00p 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 7:49p

Moon Overhead: 6:56p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 8:40p 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 10:13p

Moon Overhead: 9:28p 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 10:56p 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

THURSDAY

115

14

Sunrise: 7:01a Set: 7:27p Sunrise: 7:02a Moonrise: 12:46p Set: 11:13p Moonrise: 1:45p

12a

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 5:32a +2.0

BEST:

0

-1.0

BEST:

Moon Underfoot: 8:15a BEST:

12:30 – 2:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:04a BEST:

1:30 – 3:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:51a BEST:

3:00 – 5:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 10:35a +2.0

BEST:

4:00 – 6:00 PM

4:30 – 6:30 PM TIDE LEVELS

+1.0

BEST:

11:00A – 1:00P

Moon Underfoot: 7:23a

TIDE LEVELS

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 6:28a

Low Tide: 2:12 am High Tide: 5:47 am Low Tide: 2:55 pm

1.54 ft High Tide: 12:40 am 1.68 ft 1.59 ft Low Tide: 4:07 pm 0.04 ft -0.01 ft

High Tide: 2:47 am Low Tide: 5:25 pm

1.73 ft 0.10 ft

High Tide: 3:27 am Low Tide: 6:38 pm

1.73 ft 0.16 ft

High Tide: 3:50 am Low Tide: 7:38 pm

1.69 ft 0.23 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:01 am 9:33 am 12:23 pm 8:27 pm

1.63 ft 1.41 ft 1.47 ft 0.32 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:07 am 9:32 am 1:39 pm 9:07 pm

1.57 ft 1.31 ft 1.50 ft 0.44 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


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 = New Moon  = First Quarter  = Full Moon  = Last Quarter  = Best Day

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010 MONDAY

TUESDAY

21

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

223

22

SATURDAY

 24

SUNDAY

25

26

Sunrise: 7:05a Moonrise: 5:45p

Set: 7:18p Set: 4:43a

Sunrise: 7:05a Moonrise: 6:13p

Set: 7:17p Set: 5:35a

Sunrise: 7:06a Moonrise: 6:42p

Set: 7:16p Set: 6:27a

Sunrise: 7:06a Moonrise: 7:11p

Set: 7:15p Set: 7:19a

Sunrise: 7:07a Moonrise: 7:42p

Set: 7:14p Set: 8:12a

Sunrise: 7:07a Moonrise: 8:16p

Set: 7:12p Set: 9:07a

Sunrise: 7:08a Moonrise: 8:54p

AM Minor: 3:33a

PM Minor: 3:54p

AM Minor: 4:10a

PM Minor: 4:31p

AM Minor: 4:48a

PM Minor: 5:08p

AM Minor: 5:28a

PM Minor: 5:48p

AM Minor: 6:10a

PM Minor: 6:31p

AM Minor: 6:56a

PM Minor: 7:19p

AM Minor: 7:46a

PM Minor: 8:10p

AM Major: 9:44a

PM Major: 10:04p

AM Major: 10:21a

PM Major: 10:41p

AM Major: 10:58a

PM Major: 11:18p

AM Major: 11:38a

PM Major: 11:58p

AM Major: 12:00a

PM Major: 12:21p

AM Major: 12:45a

PM Major: 1:08p

AM Major: 1:35a

PM Major: 1:58p

Moon Overhead: 11:37p 6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 12:17a

Moon Overhead: None 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 12:57a 12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 2:22a

Moon Overhead: 1:39a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Set: 7:11p Set: 10:04a

Moon Overhead: 3:07a 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

20

12a

WEDNESDAY

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 11:17a +2.0

BEST:

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Moon Underfoot: 1:18p BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Moon Underfoot: 2:00p BEST:

6:00 – 8:00 AM

Moon Underfoot: 2:44p BEST:

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Moon Underfoot: 3:31p +2.0

BEST:

1:00 – 3:00 AM

8:30 – 10:30 AM TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 12:37p

TIDE LEVELS

5:00 – 7:00 PM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 11:57a

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:11 am 9:38 am 2:41 pm 9:40 pm

1.52 ft 1.18 ft 1.53 ft 0.58 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:18 am 9:51 am 3:37 pm 10:08 pm

1.49 ft 1.03 ft 1.56 ft 0.72 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:27 am 10:11 am 4:30 pm 10:34 pm

1.49 ft 0.88 ft 1.58 ft 0.87 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:37 am 10:36 am 5:23 pm 10:59 pm

1.49 ft 0.74 ft 1.60 ft 1.02 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:46 am 11:05 am 6:16 pm 11:25 pm

1.50 ft 0.62 ft 1.62 ft 1.17 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:52 am 11:37 am 7:13 pm 11:53 pm

1.51 ft 0.52 ft 1.63 ft 1.31 ft

High Tide: 4:48 am 1.54 ft Low Tide: 12:13 pm 0.43 ft High Tide: 8:20 pm 1.64 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


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NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION BEST:

= Peak Fishing Period

7:45-9:40 AM

= FALLING TIDE = RISING TIDE = DAYLIGHT HOURS = NIGHTTIME HOURS

Fishing Day’s Best Good Score Graph Score Score

MONDAY

TUESDAY

27 SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

28

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

330

29

Set: 7:06p Set: 1:50p

AM Minor: 8:40a

PM Minor: 9:05p

AM Minor: 9:37a

PM Minor: 10:03p

AM Minor: 10:35a

PM Minor: 11:03p

AM Minor: 11:34a

PM Minor: ——-

AM Minor: 12:07a

AM Major: 2:28a

PM Major: 2:53p

AM Major: 3:24a

PM Major: 3:50p

AM Major: 4:21a

PM Major: 4:49p

AM Major: 5:19a

PM Major: 5:48p

AM Major: 6:16a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 5:41a

Moon Overhead: 4:47a 12a

6a

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Sunrise: 7:10a Set: 7:05p Moonrise: 12:22a Set: 2:40p

Moon Overhead: 6:37a 12a

6a

12p

6p

SATURDAY

OC T 1

Set: 7:10p Sunrise: 7:09a Set: 7:08p Sunrise: 7:10a Set: 7:09p Sunrise: 7:09a Set: 11:01a Moonrise: 10:27p Set: 11:59a Moonrise: 11:22p Set: 12:56p Moonrise: None

Moon Overhead: 3:56a

12a

WEDNESDAY

2

6a

3

Sunrise: 7:11a Moonrise: 1:27a

Set: 7:04p Set: 3:26p

Sunrise: 7:12a Moonrise: 2:33a

Set: 7:03p Set: 4:09p

PM Minor: 12:31p

AM Minor: 12:57a

PM Minor: 1:25p

AM Minor: 1:48a

PM Minor: 2:15p

PM Major: 6:45p

AM Major: 7:11a

PM Major: 7:39p

AM Major: 8:02a

PM Major: 8:29p

Moon Overhead: 8:29a

Moon Overhead: 7:33a 12a

SUNDAY

12p

6p

12a

6a

12p

6p

Moon Overhead: 9:25a 12a

6a

12p

6p

SOLUNAR ACTIVITY

Sunrise: 7:08a Moonrise: 9:38p

Tides and Prime Times for SEPTEMBER 2010

12a

FEET

FEET

Moon Underfoot: 4:21p +2.0

BEST:

-1.0

BEST:

BEST:

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 8:01p BEST:

11:00A – 1:00P

Moon Underfoot: 8:57p BEST:

12:30 – 2:30 PM

Moon Underfoot: 9:51p +2.0

BEST:

2:00 – 3:00 PM

3:00 – 4:00 PM

TIDE LEVELS

9:30 – 11:30 AM

Moon Underfoot: 7:05p

TIDE LEVELS

0

Moon Underfoot: 6:08p

BEST:

9:00 – 11:00 AM

+1.0

Moon Underfoot: 5:13p

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:20 am 4:32 am 12:54 pm 9:41 pm

84 |

1.46 ft 1.59 ft 0.37 ft 1.66 ft

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:44 am 4:19 am 1:43 pm 11:28 pm

S E P T E M B E R

1.59 ft 1.67 ft 0.31 ft 1.71 ft

Low Tide: 1:00 am High Tide: 4:18 am Low Tide: 2:40 pm

2 0 1 0

1.70 ft 1.75 ft 0.27 ft

T E X A S

High Tide: 4:21 am Low Tide: 3:47 pm

F I S H

1.81 ft 0.25 ft

&

High Tide: 2:22 am Low Tide: 4:58 pm

G A M E ®

1.83 ft 0.24 ft

High Tide: 2:25 am Low Tide: 6:08 pm

I N L A N D

1.82 ft 0.26 ft

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

2:37 am 8:24 am 11:18 am 7:13 pm

A L M A N A C

1.77 ft 1.52 ft 1.56 ft 0.34 ft

+1.0

0

-1.0


ALMANAC I.qxd:1002 Coastal

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8/3/10

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ring energy to the end of the blade and delivering an extra wallop as it twists and spins through the water. You can feel the vibration at each turn of the blades and big bass notice the extra action as well. STANLEY LURES HAS COMBINED TWO OF THEIR “What you have is a wedge that comes most innovative designs into a single spinthrough the water, with the vibration of an ner bait for maximum thump and vibraIndiana or Colorado blade and the flash of tion... the Vibra-Wedge. a willow leaf,” says Stanley. Two patents, Vibrashaft wire and “It pulls and moves Wedge blades, combined to produce more water than any Stanley Lures’ more water displacement than any other other willow blade on new spinnerbait spinnerthe market.” Stanley Jigs has been Vibra-Wedge building spinnerbaits and jigs for over 30 years and we build only what we know to be proven winners. We set the standard, you set the hook.

Stanley Spins a New Vibe

bait on the market. The blades are wedge-shaped — thin at the top and thicker at the base, transfer-

For more information please contact: kenchaumont@fishstanley.com, or visit www.fishstanley.com.

Guns Get the Royal Treatment ROYAL PURPLE HAS DEVELOPED HIGH performance synthetic gun oil. Royal Purple gun oil is specifically formulated to provide exceptional wear protection as well as protection against rust and saltwater corrosion. It also prevents fouling. According to World Champion Sporting Clay Shooter and Elite Shooting School Instructor Bobby Fowler, Jr., “I’ve tried every gun lube out there. None of them compare to Royal Purple (gun oil) ”. Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil works well in a variety of temperatures and will not thicken in cold weather. Its performance advantages come from Synerlec, Royal Purple’s propriety chemical technology that strengthens the oil for unmatched performance and protection. No other gun oil is available with Synerlec technology. In addition to gun applications, Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil can also be used for other applications such as fishing tackle, locks hinges and more. Contact: Royal Purple Inc., One Royal Purple Lane, Porter, TX 77365, 281-354-8600, www.royalpurple.com. High-performance oil for guns.

Royal Purple

86 |

S E P T E M B E R

2 0 1 0

T E X A S

F I S H

&

G A M E ®

I N L A N D

A L M A N A C

PHOTOS COURTESY MFG’S

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10:34 AM

Wicked Never Looked So Good WICKED RIDGE CROSSBOWS, A NEW BREED of crossbow designed and engineered by TenPoint, provides its customers with high quality, precision performance crossbows and accessories that are simple, reliable, and affordable. Wicked Ridge is committed to manufacturing superior products which outper-

form the competition at similar price-points. Customers can expect the same customer service that TenPoint Wicked Ridge Crossbow Technologies crossbow from has been notorious for TenPoint providing. The Wicked Ridge Wicked Bow product line consists of two crossbows and a few accessories. Leading the way is the Invader crossbow. Generating devastating speed and dead-center accuracy, the Invader sports a 180-pound draw weight creating shooting speeds of 305 fps. The package includes the new ACU-52 integrated, self-retracting rope cocking system, Ridge-Dot 40mm, multidot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The MSRP is $499.00. The second model, the Warrior, offers a lighter draw weight of 165-pounds while shooting an ideal speed of 285 FPS. This product provides a cost effective, yet precision performance alternative to its more powerful counterpart, the Invader. The Warrior package includes the RidgeDot 40mm, multi-dot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The bow is also designed to accept the addition of an ACU-52 integrated, self-retracting rope cocking system. The MSRP is $399.00. All Wicked Ridge Crossbows are covered by a 5-year warranty www.wickedridgecrossbows.com

I N L A N D

A L M A N A C

Page 87

Miss November Inflatable Deer Decoy EASY ON THE EYES AND HARD TO IGNORE, Tink’s new Miss November deer decoy is every buck’s and hunter’s dream come true. Miss November utilizes High-Definition printing technology to provide a realistic look and soft texture that feels real and is irresistible to those love sick bucks. Every detail is highlighted right down to the super-light tail that moves with the slightest breeze. This lightweight inflatable decoy is compact enough to be conveniently carried in a backpack. Once you reach your stand location, Miss November’s oversized air valve makes it quick and effortless to inflate. This inflatable system eliminates the hassle of noisy, molded plastic or foam decoys that are cumbersome to pack into

T E X A S

F I S H

&

G A M E ®

Tink’s new inflatable deer decoy.

those remote honey Miss November holes. You can enhance your decoy setup by applying Tink’s 69 Doe-In-Rut? to the free Tink’s Stretch Wicks?. The lightweight, compact size also makes it easy to carry in your luggage for those cross-country hunting trips. The system includes the doe decoy, four metal stakes, two Tink’s Stretch Wicks? and the decoy placement instruction sheet. All this comes at a value that cannot be matched by other decoys of this quality.

.223 Round Gets Shock Treatment EXTREME SHOCK IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE innovation of new .223 rifle round. This round embodies the reliability and safety of

S E P T E M B E R

2 0 1 0

|

87


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the handgun Air Freedom Rounds. Specifically designed for tactical entry teams in an urban environment, where it is crucial to contain the rounds within a limited space. The frangible characteristics of the new AFR make it a necessity when the situation requires a round with no ricochet, reduced over penetration, and will drop all the kinetic energy inside the target thereby reducing liabilities. This round is designed to fragment after passing through two ¾ inch sheetrock partitions, thus making your .223 rifle an ideal Extreme Shock’s home-defense

Page 88

Pocket-Sized Night Vision MINOX HAS ADDED TO THEIR WIDE RANGE OF optical equipment with introduction of a reliable new night vision device, the ultracompact NV mini II. It’s one of the smallest in the world, barely larger than a lip-

new .223 round.

Air Freedom

Minox NV mini II night vision device.

Night Sight

weapon. SPECIFICATIONS Cartridge: .223 30gr AFR Projectile: 30 grain Tungsten core, copper-jacketed, flat-base, round nose Velocity: 3,100 feet per second Energy: 816 ft lbs of energy Test Weapon: Colt M4 with a 14 inch barrel.

stick. Overall length is just 4-3/16”, the lens diameter is Iess than one inch and it weighs only 6.3 ounces. With its 2x magnification and ability to amplify available residual light, such as stars or horizon radiation not perceived by the human eye, the NV mini II is ideal for discreet orientation or observation on land or at sea, for hunting or protecting property in low-light situations, from twilight and into full night.

Contact: Extreme Shock Ammunition, Inc., 182 Camp Jacob Road, Clintwood, VA 24228-9657 Phone: (276) 926-6772 Fax: (276) 926-6092 Website: www.extremeshockusa.net 88 |

S E P T E M B E R

2 0 1 0

T E X A S

F I S H

&

G A M E ®

Night vision devices are needed when even the most powerful binoculars, with a high twilight factor, reach their optical limits. The multi-coated lens system on the new MINOX NV mini II provides a brilliant and clear image. And if the available light is not sufficient to provide a visible image, even when amplified, it has a connectible infrared illuminator. This additional light source, not seen by the human eye, provides perfect vision in complete darkness, such as on a moonless night or in a dense forest. With its ultra-compact size and minimal weight, the NV mini II can be used anywhere. Its ergonomic design and partially rubber armoring of the body, ensures silent, safe handling. It comes with a wrist strap and battery. Retail price is $649. Contact: Minox/USA Address: P.O. Box 123 City, State: Meriden, NH 03770; Phone: (866) 469-3080; Fax: (603) 469-3471 Email: usa@minox.com Website: www.minox.com/usa.

Looks Just Like a Bale of... ‘Hey!’ NEW FROM SPORTSMAN'S CONDO IS THEIR "Bale Condo,"designed to look like a bale of hay. This new design from the solid blind technology pioneer is a true "crossover blind," meaning it is a perfect fit for gun, bow, and crossbow hunters. The Bale Condo weighs Roomy new blind 300 designed to look pounds like a bale of hay. and measures 6Bale Condo 1/2 feet in length and 67 inches tall. I N L A N D

A L M A N A C


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There is plenty of room for two hunters, or a hunter and video camera. Built-in runners allow for easy transport. Special features include removable shoot through mesh screen, glass windows and bow holder. There is even enough room to spend the night to beat that big buck back to his bed. For more information contact Mark at Southern Outdoor Technologies,662-2955702 or visit www.sportsmanscondo.com

Keeping the King’s Guns Safe PENDLETON SAFES INTRODUCES THE NEW King Series Safes, built for the collector who demands the best. They include all standard gun management and security features offered on all Pendleton safes, as well as the premium features such as customization to secure up to 40 rifles and 54 pistols and is equipped with motorized Revolution Technology, which is a unique circular

Page 89

design with a modular shelving system that rotates 360° at the touch of a button to bring your guns directly to you. Other features include interior LED lighting, electronic moisture control, motorized rotation with outer shelf and the lock-bolt indicator LED. The King Series is 100% Steel Pendelton’s new King Series gun and a safes. solid, fully Castle Keep reinforced ¼” high-strength, low-alloy steel top and bottom, detouring burglars as they often turn a safe upside down, exposing the vulnerable area on the bottom of a safe. The bolt operates

on an innovative cam system that prevents tampering. If pushed on, the bolt will push back, making it impossible to retract the bolt by force. The specially designed ballbearing hard plate prevents drilling out of the lock and protects the relocking mechanism from tampering. All Pendleton Safes are pre-drilled for floor bolts, adding an extra layer of security and peace of mind. Visit www.pendletonsafes.com.


8/3/10

4:27 PM

Cor-Bon DPX Ammunition I RECENTLY RECEIVED A TEST SAMPLE OF THE new Cor-Bon handgun ammunition. It is a partnership between Cor-Bon and Barnes Bullets. It is called DPX and comes in all the standard handgun calibers. My samples are in .45 Colt and .44 Magnum. DPX (no, I don't know what it stands for) is intended as self-defense ammunition. It incorporates a cavernous, solid copper hol-

Page 90

penetration. The advertisement on the box says: “DPX provides excellent expansion and deeper penetration due to the solid copper bullet. It retains 100% of its weight even after going through hard barriers like steel and glass.” Another advantage is getting high energy self-defense ammo with relatively mild recoil. By lessening the bullet weight the recoil is lessened also. When I first shot the .45 Colt ammo I was prepared for a handjarring explosion. I got the explosion, but recoil was much milder than I expected. I shot the .44 Magnum ammo in a 4-

pain of recoil that was not there. The next 4 shots went where they belonged. I would like to use this new ammunition on a hog or deer before I make any bold statements about its performance as a selfdefense or hunting round, but I feel safe in saying that it really is very good stuff. In fact, 6 of the big, ugly hollow points currently reside in the chambers of my S&W Model 25 .45 Colt Mountain Gun, a gun I carry a lot. DPX is not cheap, selling for over $50.00 a box. But how much is your life worth? The official Cor-Bon website is www.dakotaammo.net. —Steve LaMascus

Sebile Spin Shad

low point, in a lighter than normal weight, and higher than normal velocity. The .45 Colt +P ammo is loaded with a 225-grain HP at a blistering 1200 feet per second. The normal velocity for the 250-grain 45 Colt is about 850 fps. The .44 Magnum is also loaded with a 225grain hollow point, but at 1350 fps. The idea with the big hollow point at high velocity is to give massive impact energy and tissue destruction, which equates to stopping power, while the tough, solid copper bullet will still provide deep, positive 90 |

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The author pulled his first shot low and left, expecting more recoil than he got from Cor-Bon’s new DPX load.

Cor-Bon DPX inch S&W Model 29 with the thin, Roper plain clothes grips. This is a carrying rig, not a shooting-a-lot rig. With heavy handloads it is not very pleasant. With the CorBon DPX it was surprisingly shootable. Recoil was there, but not enough to bother an experienced handgunner. You will notice in the photo, the first shot I pulled low and left, expecting the T E X A S

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EVERYTHING THAT IS OLD IS NEW AGAIN. I’M not sure who first coined that phrase but I bet it was a bass fisherman walking down the aisle of his local tackle shop. Just about every “new” lure I see looks like a simple variation of something already riding in my tackle box and that was my initial impression when I first saw the new Sebile Spin Shad. I thought it was just an updated version of Mann’s Little George tail spinner but as soon as I took it out of the box I knew this was not your average hunk of lead with a spinner on its backside. Just like all lures manufactured by Sebile, the Spin Shad has a finish that is one of the best in the business which sets it apart from the other tail spinners on the market. What also differentiates the Spin Shad from the rest of the field is the fact that the body is made from bismuth instead of lead. The main body has features that mimic real bait fish and the design of the spinner mimics the shape of the body, with a wide nose and small tail. This design allows the blade to spin, even when retrieved at very low speeds. The Spin Shad is offered in two differI N L A N D

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ent sizes, a Sebile’s Spin ¾ ounce Shad: a high-tech new twist on the version with old tail spinner. a single treble hook Spin Shad hanging from the belly of the main bait, and a 1 ¼ ounce size that also has a treble hanging off the back. Being heavy for their size, the Spin Shad can be cast a mile and the only thing limiting the distance you can chunk one is the amount of line you have on your reel. The weight lends one to believe that these baits are solely used for deep water applications but they can be used anywhere you would use a lipless crankbait or spinner bait including skinny water. As far as effectiveness, it takes just a few casts to realize that the Spin Shad is a flat out fish catching machine that catches just about anything that swims. The first fish I caught on one was crappie which was shortly followed up by both largemouth and white bass. A few weeks later this same lure (the exact same one, not just one similar) also caught speckled trout and Spanish mackerel in the surf. Anything that eats a baitfish, which is just about everything swimming, will hit a Spin Shad so an angler would be smart to add a few of both sizes to their arsenal. www.sebileusa.com —Paul Bradshaw

High UV Protection Buff THE VERY NATURE OF OUR HOBBIES (HUNTING, fishing, camping, etc…) leads us to spend more time outside than the average person. On any given weekend it’s likely that you and I will spend more time in the sun than some individuals get in a month. Because of this, outdoorsmen (and women) are more susceptible to skin cancer than most. It seems like each year I have more and more friends who have cancerous areas removed from ears, hands, or arms which are a direct result of over exposure to the sun. Since not going outside isn’t really an

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option, protecting your skin from sun exposure is imperative. In the past that meant slathering up with SPF50 but now there is light weight clothing that not only protects but stays cool enough for you to stay outside all day. The latest piece of protective clothing I started wearing is an Angler High UV Buff. Popularized by the reality television series Survivor, a buff is a flexible fabric sleeve (for lack of a better term) that can be worn around your neck and head or covering both the neck and head, or if you’re small enough (which I am not) around the torso. To test the Angler High UV Buff ’s claim of blocking 95% of the suns rays I spent a week on the beach without sunscreen, only using the buff to protect my face and neck. Not smart, but a great test. I spent over eight hours per day, for a week, surf fishing and never once got a sunburn on my face or neck. That’s impressive, but even more so is the fact that I often forgot I even had the Buff on, in spite of the odd looks the other people on the beach gave me. With temperatures in the mid to upper 90’s the Buff stayed cool and breathable. My Buff happens to be in a largemouth bass pattern but there many other colors and designs to choose from. So you can make a fashion statement while protecting your skin making it well worth the investment. www.buffusa.com. —PB

Bumper Stumper IN MY BOOK, SHOPPING FOR A SPINNERBAIT IS no different than shopping for a good bait caster. The first thing I look for is a bait that is made using high quality components. To wit: • Premium ball bearings for the blades to spin on. • A heavy-gauge wire frame stout enough to withstand lots of abuse without impeding the performance. • A "sticky" sharp hook with some length to it for grabbing short-striking fish. • Paint that resists chipping. • Premium silicone skirting. When Bumper Stumper Lures sent us a few of their "Pro Painted Series" spinnerbaits to check out earlier this year, we were impressed by the goods. Based in Flower

Mound, Tx., Bumper Stumper has a rich history in the spinnerbait/buzz bait business. They have been A few of Bumper custom Stumper’s many building colors lures in the USA since 1990s. Bumper Crop The Pro Painted Series is one of 10 different series in the company line up. What sets them aside from others in the stable are the blades. As the name suggests, they are custom painted in some exciting colors designed to get the bass' attention in water that is stained, muddy or clear. The blades are painted and glittered on one side to color coordinate with the head and skirt, while at the same time providing an alternating combination of color and flash that will sometimes produce strikes when the traditional nickel or gold blades just won't cut it. The baits are available in five sizes and 16 color combinations with double willowleaf, double Colorado and Colorado/willow models. If you see a color you like, just ask company owners Kerry Kiker and Richard Deatherage. They can mix and match to order. I put a 3/8-ounce white willowleaf model to the test last spring and it scored high marks in all the key arenas. Not only did it fool countless bass in shallow, muddy water. It caught them, thanks on part to a super sharp Mustad long shank hook. Equally impressive was the way the bait held up well to dozens of violent strikes dished out by bass up to up seven pounds. The .035 gauge wire got knocked out of whack multiple times, yet it continued to run true with some minor adjustments. If you are in the market for a premium spinnerbait, Bumper Stumper is certainly worth a look. To learn more about the Pro Painted Series or the entire family of Bumper Stumper baits, 972-757-5893, or www.bumperstumper.com. —Matt Williams PHOTOS COURTESY MFG’S

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Cor-Bon Named Manufacturer of the Year

PHOTO COURETSY COR-BON:

CORBON/GLASER AMMUNITION IS HONORED by the Black Hills Community Economic Development by being chosen to receive their Manufacturer of the Year award. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition was chosen to receive this honor due to its commitment to quality and excellence in manufacturing, located in the small community of Sturgis, South Dakota. The decision was unanimous by the board and selected from several other manufacturers within the surrounding communities of the Black Hills. Lt Governor Daugaard addressed the dinner and proceedings. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition started manufacturing 28 years ago in Detroit, Michigan, then moved to Sturgis in 1995 in search of a strong business climate and

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appeals to law enforcement agencies, specialty military units, private citizens, and hunters. Peter and Elaine Pi and their sons Pete and Dane, are primary owners and operators of the American family owned corporation. For information, call 800-6267266 or visit www.corbon.com

Minn Kota Receives ICAST Best of Show MINN KOTA’S INTRODUCTION INTO THE SHALlow water anchor market proved successful as it captured Best of Show honors in the Marine Category at the 53rd annual International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades (ICAST) show held in Las Vegas July 14-16. The new Talon was praised by show-goers for its innovative design and features that make it perform quietly, quickly, and built to last.

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“Talon proved to be a grand slam for us at ICAST,” Minn Kota Marketing Director Joe Brown said. “We wanted to come into the shallow water anchor market with a product that would be superior to anything else currently available. Buyers and media representatives were blown away by the innovative features offered on Talon.” T E X A S

- Auto-Drive for automatic anchoring - Rough Water Mode continues the anchoring sequence to assure a secure hold in any conditions - Built-in wireless remote comes standard - Built-in Wave Absorption provides a floating suspension system to keep spike anchored when boat rocks - Easy, less expensive installation - Vertical and tilt adjustments for mounting flexibility - LED indicator lights show when spike is deployed and at what depth - Deployment Notification Alarm can be wired to the ignition to sound an alarm when the key is turned and the spike is still deployed Talon comes with a comprehensive 2year warranty and lifetime guarantee on the spike. It is available with a 6-foot, 4-inch or 8-foot, 4-inch spike and choice of a black or white color scheme. The manufacturer’s suggested retail prices for Talon are $1299 with a 6-4 spike and $1449 with an 8-4 inch spike. All models can be used in freshwater or saltwater and come standard with two wireless remote controls. Talon will be available to consumers this fall. For more information, visit minnkotamotors.com or call 800-227-6433.

CORBON/Glaser’s staff show off their Manufacturer of the Year award.

top-grade workCORBON Honored force. The Sturgis area has created a reputation for becoming the new firearms and ammunition cluster in the Midwest due to its attractive economic development climate. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition manufactures proven, high quality ammunition. It offers a wide variety of ammunition that

The New Products Showcase competition drew 750 tackle and accessories entries. Entries were judged by buyers and media representatives based on innovation, execution, workmanship, and practicality. Key features of Talon include:

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Chewy’s Cove ARLIER THIS SUMMER, I HAD THE PLEASURE of guiding Brian Burton and his 14year-old son, Matthew, on a kayak fishing trip. It was Mathew’s first fishing trip in the salt. Raindrops tapped on the hulls of our kayaks as we raced the dawn to the coast and the crackle of lightning interrupted Captain Mickey’s radio show coming from the car’s speakers. “We have a weather system moving in from the Gulf.” I said. “Let’s hope it clears soon.” A nasty lightning storm had cleared the coast and was moving inland when we topped the bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. We offloaded our yaks, rigged backrests and tackle, and pushed off into the clear, green water. The game plan was to fish the shallows early, dropping back into deeper water as the heat of the day increased. Brian headed down the shoreline a bit while Matthew, called “Chewy” by his family, and I stopped at scalloped area of spartina grass. Chewy fingered the 12-pound-test and fired a cast toward the shoreline. The little topwater wiggled across the surface for a stretch, only to foul on some floating seagrass. Standing next to Chewy in the knee-deep water, I showed him how to leave a rod’s length of line out and then gently swing the lure into your hand to pick off the strands of grass. In just five or six casts, my young charge was looking like a seasoned wade-fisherman. Unfortunately, seagrass was all we were catching so we hopped back in the kayaks and spent the next hour hop scotching down the shoreline in search of fish, Brian stopping at one cove, Chewy and I probing the next. Each stop involved a little more coaching: “Remember to slide your feet. If you can hear

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yourself wading through the water, you are going too fast.” Already possessing good fishing skills, Chewy, a soccer player on the freshman team at Ft. Bend Austin High School, was able to hone his casting skills making repeated casts shoreward. The fish were holding tight to the grass and wouldn’t travel far to eat. Chewy dropped a cast several inches from the bright green spartina and worked it down the edge. A trout, using the grass to break up its silhouette, detonated on the surface plug and Chewy’s rod bent into a pleasing arch. I slid the landing net under it and Chewy’s first trout taped an honest 16 inches. His smile was contagious. The action slowed so we hopped back in the ‘yaks and drift-fished so we could prospect a larger area. A promising looking cove beckoned ahead, stretching way back into the shoreline, so we anchored and grabbed our tackle. The corners of several broad tails broke the water’s surface, periodically submerging and coming up again. The fire red color was highlighted by the sunlight and the turquoise strip on each tail was unmistakable. Redfish! Brian and I saw the tails at the same time and urged Chewy to slide into casting range. He dropped his topwater into the middle of the cove and it quickly became a maelstrom as the entire school of reds raced one another to get to the wiggling bait. Seconds later, he was hooked up and the spool of his spinning reel screeched like a scalded cat. The redfish headed for the open bay, abandoning the tight confines of the inlet. A game of tug-of-war broke out as the red refused to surrender. Chewy kept his rod tip high and line tight, playing the fish patiently until it began to tire. Obstinately, the big fish circled the young angler four times before sliding over on its side. A quick sweep of the net and Chewy added a redfish to his stringer. Easing back to the mouth of the cove, Chewy made fan casts to probe every inch of the small cove. The bulbous head of a red T E X A S

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plowed through the shallows as it followed the topwater bait for a full 10 feet then violently lunged for it, creating a huge swirl with its broad tail. Again, the red hightailed it out of the close quarters, hoping it could secure its freedom in the open bay. Chewy’s second redfish was an inch shy of keeper status and it quickly swam away after being unpinned. The cove went quiet for a while. The commotion of the hooked fish had spooked the remainder of the school. Rather than leave, we paused for some water and smoked pork tenderloin I had packed as a snack. Ten minutes later, Chewy landed red No. 3. Brian and I remained fishless but were having a great time watching Matthew enjoy success on his first saltwater outing. Chewy’s last fish from the cove was a solid customer, creating a severe arch in his rod. Again, the drag protested as the red charged through the shallows. Moments later the line went slack and the fish was gone. A quick inspection of the little plug revealed a missing branch on the rear treble hook. It was a new lure, right out of the package, but the hook broke. The wardrobe malfunction cost Chewy his fourth red of the day and he learned first hand why we call it fishing rather than catching. All we needed was a flounder to round out a saltwater grand slam, but it wasn’t meant to be. Several stingrays milling about the cove were the closest we came to nabbing a bottom dweller. The heat of the day became increasingly ignescent and we decided to call it a day. And it was a good day. Mathews tally: one trout and three redfish, all caught on topwaters. Chewy’s Cove has become both a landmark and a great memory of young Matthew’s first saltwater fishing trip. Hopefully he will return many times, as I have to my childhood stomping grounds.

Greg Berlocher can be reached for question or comment at kayak@fishgame.com. S E P T E M B E R

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Dove Guns & Loads OVE SEASON IS HERE! THE LONG, HOT summer is nearly over, and the soulcleansing smell of gunpowder once again drifts gently on the warm breezes. Makes me want to go out and shoot something. This time of year is when ammunition manufacturers make their largest profits. Every store you walk into will have cases of Federal Game Loads stacked all over the floors. More ammo is expended on dove than on any other game animal in America. The stores are full of discount ammo that dove hunters purchase by the truckload. Most of us will do well with a standard field load. In 12-gauge, that means a load that shoots 1-1/8 ounces of shot. If it says it has less than that, beware. Some loads of less than the standard 12-gauge payload are very good. In fact, my favorite handload consists of 1 ounce of shot at about 1150 feet per second. And beware if the load brags about its velocity. That might be a way to take your attention away from the fact that it uses less shot. You do not need high velocity for dove. Anything that produces above about 1100 feet per second is just fine. Also, try to find shotshells that use plastic shot cups. Some of the low-end shells use wads and some kind of plastic shims that are supposed to protect the shot from contact with the barrel. These shells never pattern as well as those that are loaded with the tried and proven one-piece shot cup. You can tell when you shoot them because a couple or three of the thin plastic shims will come floating down to the ground like leaves falling from a dying tree. Most adults shoot 12-gauge guns and that's just fine. However, dove are small, lightboned birds and any of the gauges will work

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just fine if kept within their limits. If you are shooting a .410 or 28-gauge, you need to keep your shots inside 35 yards, but both of these smaller gauges are a lot of fun. One of my favorite types of hunting is shooting dove around a water hole with my little .410 Browning Citori. The best gauge for children to learn with is not the .410. The wonderful little caliber (.410 is the bore size, not its gauge) is an expert's gun, not an entry-level tool for children. Instead, try a single-shot 28-gauge. The kids will hit more and have more fun. If they are too small to shoot a .28-gauge, they are probably too small to hunt flying birds. A .410 is so unforgiving that it should be reserved for shooters sufficiently talented and experienced that they are looking to put more zing in their hunting; rather like the fisherman who switches to an ultralight rig in lieu of his thunderstick and 20-pound line. If you don't believe me, look up the scores shot with the .410 in NSSA skeet competition. Some shoot the .410 as well as they do the larger gauges, but the vast majority think the .410 is an unforgiving, difficult gauge and a necessary evil, and shoot it poorly compared to 28- and 20-gauges. I was A and AA in competition with all the gauges except the .410, in which I never graduated from Class B. I can attest that many targets I shot at with the .410 that didn't break, would have broken when shot at exactly the same way with a larger gauge. You can do a bit better with 3-inch shells, but it still doesn't compare with the 28gauge. Keep that in mind when buying Junior's first shotgun. If you handload, you can still get No. 7 shot. This is my favorite shot size for dove and quail. I think No. 6 is a bit too big and No. 8 a little too small. Number 7 offers a wonderfully thick pattern, yet still has the mass to get the job done if only a couple of shot hit the bird. If you don't handload, No. 7-1/2 is great. Number 8 is okay, but I think I hit and lose (“feather” in the vernacular) a few birds with No. 8 that I would have killed instantly with No. 7 or 7-1/2. T E X A S

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Dove season launches a storm of ammo buyers into stores.

Dove Time!

For you handloaders, my experience is that if I keep my velocity down to 1200 feet per second or a bit less, I get better patterns. Since your shots are (if you are an ethical hunter) under 50 yards, there is no need for higher velocity. If anything, increase your shot payload, not the velocity. The thicker pattern will increase the number of hits on each bird, but it also increases recoil. I prefer to shoot 1ounce of shot and keep the shots closer. I still do very well out to around 40 yards with a 12gauge, using a modified choke. In all the other gauges, I use the standard loads: 7/8-ounce in 20-gauge, 3/4 in 28-, and 7/8- or 1-ounce in the 16-gauge. I really love the 16-gauge, by the way. If you are having trouble killing your dove or quail, try using a more open choke and shortening the range. A full or improved-modified choke will let you make shots a little farther, but they also produce smaller patterns. I prefer a modified or improved cylinder choke, and try to keep all my shots inside 35 yards. When I switch to a full choke, I seem to fringe more birds than I do with the open chokes, and I know I try to stretch the barrel a bit more. Fall is in the air and so are the dove. Get out there and burn some powder.

E-mail Steve LaMascus at guns@fishgame.com

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The Essence of a Bow Hunter F YOU ARE LIKE ME, THEN BY NOW YOU HAVE already read all about what new and improved equipment is available today for the modern archer. Every year there is a month that most magazines dedicate to this very subject. New technology that not too long ago offered us to view any deer in our area now has the “new and improved” version. No longer do you need to trek out to your hunting grounds to check the pictures on your scouting camera. Now, you simply inspect the pictures from the comfort of your living room right after you have checked your emails. Arrows have improved and are spinning faster than ever to keep up with the new bows that boasts about how fast it can shoot an arrow. New and improved fletching is available to accommodate the new bow speed. Carbon arrows of today are designed for speed. You can purchase a bow today that shoots an arrow 350 feet per second! Every single advertisement for any bow will claim to be the fastest, most accurate bow on the market. Have we become a society that is so dependent on gadgets and technology that we have lost some of the very reason we hunt in the first place? Leaving the pavement for a while and just enjoying the beauty of the outdoors seem to have taken a backseat to some of this new technology. I know what you are thinking…and you may be right. I am starting to sound a lot like my father. “Why back in our day, we used recurve bows and hunted using our knowledge of a deer’s habits and habitat…we got plenty of deer back in the day”.

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I think that we, as bow hunters, have taken away some of the primitive aspects of hunting with a bow. I am not so sure that is a good thing. A bow hunter used to have to be able to judge different distances in order to be successful. That took some practice. A bow hunter used to have to determine when to draw his bow and be able to hold it at full draw until a clean shot could be made. That took patience. A bow hunter used to have to learn the woodlot he was hunting in by foot leather express. He had to get off the couch and take a few hikes until he could figure out the habits of the animal he hunted. That took dedication to your sport. How far do we we allow technology to take us before our “primitive” sport can no longer be called “primitive”? I, for one, think we may be there already. The modern bow hunter of today has been duped to believe that a faster bow is the better bow. Oh… it will kill more deer, because at these new speeds, a 20yard shot is no different than a 30-yard shot. Our ability to be able to judge distance in the woods is not as important as it was in the past. I ask you, is that better? Or is part of being a bow hunter being able to judge distance? A bow that has an 80% let off at full draw can be held back for a much longer time than it’s predecessor. Once the bowstring is pulled back, upper body strength is no longer a necessity for the bow hunter to hold back the string for any length of time. A hunter can now pull his or her bowstring back while the deer is still 50 yards away and simply wait until the deer is in range. The ability to know when to pull back the bowstring so the deer does not see any movement is now less important and often eliminated completely. Is that a good thing? I understand that these technological improvements in bow hunting also make it much easier to harvest the animal we are hunting. I simply feel that these “improvements” have taken some of the primitive aspects of hunting in general out of the equation. For me, bow hunting is not just aim and pull the trigger. You need to take the time to T E X A S

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learn where the deer are. You need to locate different food sources. You need to find where the deer are bedding and find where their sanctuary is. Where are the rubs and scrapes? All of this knowledge will eventually lead you to your prize. Remember, Bow hunting means getting close to the game you are after for a clean ethical shot. It means remaining undetected as your game draws ever closer to you. Bow hunting means stealth and covering all traces of human scent in the vicinity. Doing all of these without the help of modern technology brings with it a sense of satisfaction that only a veteran bow hunter knows and feels. I should make it very clear that I myself am one of those modern bow hunters that use everything technology has to offer. So, you may ask, why do I question the use of such technology? Simply put, I cut my teeth in the bow hunting world with a recurve bow and wooden arrows. The compound bow was not invented yet. I had to learn whatever was needed to get close enough for a successful whitetail hunt. It was not easy. Many trips to the hunting woods came back with nothing but memories… and those I cherish more than the hunt itself. When a new and improved model of anything was made available to the public…I had to have it, but I learned the basics of bow hunting years before. That is something that the novice bow hunter does not have to do. I have to say that by sitting in your chair to check on the deer in your area or depending on such things as speed instead of understanding the trajectory of an arrow, may not be such an “improvement” after all. I can see that there would be many pros and cons on this subject. There are way too many to discuss in this column, but if this read sparks a healthy debate on this issue, then I think that is a good thing. Hunt safe and have fun out there.

E-mail Lou Marullo at lmarullo@fishgame.com S E P T E M B E R

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Disaster Story

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Can oil really the long term. Odamage your boat? rings, gaskets, and Plenty experts are neoprene impellers saying that the danmay also be susceptiTo state the obvious, you ger is minor, nut ble damaged by the should avoid visible oil there are also some oil, though the exact (including engine effects are as of yet slicks at all cost. manufacturers and unknown. boat builders) saying If you must run the opposite. As through oil or do so much as I hate to by accident, when even think about the possiyou return to the dock flush out your engine bility of running into a slick cooling system as thoroughly as possible. of goo, let’s run down the Some people are recommending you add a preventative measures and de-oiling proce- Dawn dishwashing liquid or another dures all Texas boaters need to know. degreaser to freshwater and run it through the cooling system, but the truth of the mat1. Engines: Your biggest worry should ter is that no one knows exactly what level of be about your power plant, because many effectiveness this will have, or if it will cause engines can be damaged if the raw water problems of its own. Engine manufacturers cooling system sucks in oil. It can coat and simply have not tested for this type of probclog the water passages and coat the water lem, so they are not entirely sure of the best jacket, leading to overheating problems in way to handle it themselves. The bottom the short term and cooling system failure in line: Lots and lots of freshwater flushing can only be a good thing.

S OF THIS WRITING, IT LOOKS LIKE TEXAS dodged a direct hit from the Deepwater Horizon bullet. But what about next time? To state the obvious, you should avoid visible oil slicks at all cost. But the problem of getting oiled when you are fishing or cruising is very real and present regardless of how hard you try to avoid it. You may leave the dock in the morning with clean water, and find oil blocking your way home as the sun sets. Or you may drive through suspended or mixed oil without even realizing it. In any case, if you do not know how to handle it, you could seriously damage your boat, your engine, or both.

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2. Mechanical Systems: Any system on your boat that uses raw water, such as livewells, raw water washdowns, marine heads, air conditioners, and refrigerators, can be damaged by thick oil. In some cases, the lines running to these systems go through areas of the bilge, transom, or inwales, which are difficult or impossible to access, and you will never be able to properly clean them out. Again, prevention is your best solution. If you find it necessary to go through a slick shut off all of your seacocks and through-hull fittings, and turn all of these accessories off. If you are getting oiled before you realize it and you can’t shut off these items in time to prevent contamination, flush them as best you can with a degreaser. Pay particular attention to livewells with roto-molded polyethylene liners, because the oil can degrade the plastic. 3. Gel Coat: Common sense tells you 96 |

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that oil will clean off of gel coat fairly easily, but common sense is wrong. Actually, gel coat is a porous material and it will soak that oil into its surface, discoloring it. Let it sit long enough, and the discoloration may become permanent. Start scrubbing, ASAP. Again, use a common degreaser like Dawn. Citrus-based cleaners also work well. If thick blobs of oil are present, wipe them away with a rag then use mineral spirits to remove any sticky tar-like substances. As an extra precaution, adding a few coats of wax around the waterline area of your boat prior to launching it (or ASAP, if it is kept in the water) certainly wouldn’t do any harm. It should help seal the gel coat’s pores, and make clean-up that much easier. Can the oil do any structural damage to the fiberglass? All reliable sources say no, at this time. In fact, at least one fiberglass boat manufacturer (Beneteau) sent a letter to its owners saying in part “there will be a permanent staining to the white gel coat,” but “this will not affect the structure of the boat.” 4. Paint: Even if your boat is merely sitting in a marina, bottom paint is still in danger’s way. Bottom paints can become coated with a film of oil and fail to leach out the biocides that prevent growth, or the oil may create a slick layer that prevents future coats of paint from adhering. Light coats of oil can be scrubbed away with a degreaser and elbow grease, but in tough cases, the only way to the contamination is to use a paint stripper and start from scratch. (Note: Sandblasting is not a good idea, because it can actually drive the oil deeper into the boat’s bottom.) 5. Other Parts of your Boat: Anchor ropes and lines can become fouled in oil, and will require a scrub-down with Dawn and water. You should be able to get oil off the surface, but be aware that your lines will probably never look the same. Canvass that gets oiled will require the same treatment, but will also end up permanently discolored in most cases. Swim platforms made of teak or other woods may be affected as well, and if the oil remains in place for long it can eat away at the glues holding the laminate together. (A common problem when diesel, oil, or gasoline spills onto a teak deck). Use an oil-lifting product like K2r (a dry cleaning spot remover) to pull

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the oil out of the wood. Then scrub off any remaining mess (always going with the grain on teak,) and re-treat it with teak oil. Will your insurance cover any damage caused by oil from Deepwater Horizon or any other spill? Time will tell. But it should be noted that in some areas, insurance companies are already sending out letters urging boaters to keep their boats on dry land for the time being. Should you go that far?

That’s your call, not ours. But we have faced disaster before and we will face it again. We are sure as heck not going to let it stop us from fishing and boating-and we doubt you will let it stop you, either.

E-mail Lenny Rudow at boating@fishgame.com


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Floating Worm OMETIMES ANGLERS MAKE THINGS TOO complicated and I’m speaking about myself as much as any of you when I say that. If you’re anything like me your tackle bag is full of lures with holographic images, laser lights, fish scents, bells, whistles, rattles and enough lead weights to sink a flat-bottom boat. Well, mine might not weigh that much but it’s at least as heavy as the average nine year old. We buy all this stuff in efforts to catch a single little green fish. Of course, we’re all hoping that little green fish weighs over 10 pounds, over 20 would be better, but if we each took a look at our personal arsenal we’d realize that even with all this stuff most of us fall back to one or two very simple rigs to catch most of our fish. So this month we’re looking at a very simple bass rig that has been around for decades, is very simple to tie, and should be on one of your rods most of the year. When anyone mentions worm fishing, most will automatically think of a Texas or

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Carolina rig since the common perception of plastic worms is that they are used to probe the bottom. Occasionally we’ll suspend them on a drop-shot, but for the most part, we tie them to a hunk of lead and drop them to the bottom to dig out big bass. The majority of anglers have forgotten about the floating worm, which is an outstanding way to get wary bass to hit when they won’t look at anything else. Floating worms have been a staple of professional angler’s arsenals for decades and have accounted for a few wins at major tournaments across the country. Plus they are easy to tie which makes them that much more appealing to the weekend angler. Start the floating worm by tying a barrel swivel to your main line; you’ll understand why this is necessary in a minute. Next, tie one a short leader, 12 to 18 inches, on the other side of the barrel swivel. As with most of the leaders we discuss, make this one out of line that has a slightly lower breaking strength than your main line (12-pound main line 10-pound leader). What you make your leader out of is completely up to you but there are a few things to consider when selecting leader material. Monofilament is more visible than fluorocarbon and stretches more at the hook

set but it has a slower sink rate keeping the worm close to the surface longer. Fluorocarbon is less visible and more sensitive but sinks faster. On the end of the leader tie on a 3/0 or 4/0 wide gap w o r m hook. Rig the worm on the hook by threading it through the tip of the nose, exiting the bottom of the worm about a quarter inch from the nose. Run the hook through the worm until the line eye rests at the nose then turn the hook pushing the point back into the body of the worm. Instead of making sure the worm is completely straight, put a small bend in it between the nose and where you pushed the hook point back into the body. This small bend will make the worm twist and jerk when you start to work it, which can cause a reaction bite even if the fish aren’t hungry. This bend in the worm is also the reason we’re using a barrel swivel, since it will keep the line from twisting as the worm spins. Fish the floating worm on a mediumaction spinning rod (to aid in casting since this is such a lightweight rig) and you can toss it near boat docks, standing timber, or grass. Skip it under a boat dock, let it sit for a minute, slowly sinking, then twitch it and let it sink again. Bass will normally hit it on the fall. Around grass, you can throw it in the middle and reel it back slowly with the worm spinning and twitching. Most of the time I’m not a fan of bright colored worms but when floating a worm choose a bright color since a lot of the bites are light and you’ll need to be able to see the fish hit as much as you feel it.

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PHOTO: BRYAN SLAVEN

your favorite sweet or dill pickles.

Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork HIS RECIPE MIGHT BE FAMOUS IN THE CARolinas and in Tennessee, but we enjoy it just as much here in the Lone Star State. It is easy to prepare and may be cooked the day before, then heated up for serving the next day at the picnic, fishing trip, or wherever your heart desires. Prep time: 30 minutes. Cook time: 6 hours. Yield 10-12 servings.

Texas Style Creamy Cole Slaw Prep time: 30 minutes. Yield: 8 to 10 servings.

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1 5- to 7-lb. pork shoulder roast (Boston Butt or picnic ham) 1/2 cup Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All* 10-12 sandwich buns 1/2 jar Texas Gourmet's Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce (this is a zesty blend; if you desire a mild flavor, substitute 1 cup of your favorite barbecue sauce 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 1/3 cup cider vinegar Remove the pork roast from the refrigerator and season on all sides with Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All. Wrap in plastic wrap and return to fridge for at least two hours, or overnight preferably. Pit Method: Place roast in preheated pit fat side up (using a combo of pecan and hickory wood) at 250-275 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from pit and set aside to cool slightly. Gas Grill Method: Place over low indirect fire, fat side up, and keep covered, cooking at 275-300 degrees for 3- to 3-1/2 I N L A N D

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hours, turning once. Transfer to foil, seal tightly, and cook for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from grill and set aside to cool slightly. Oven Method: Place in preheated oven fat side up in a foil lined baking dish at 300 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 2-1/2 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from oven and set aside to cool slightly. Regardless of cooking method, open the foil and pour all of the meat juices into a bowl (be careful, the liquid is very hot), then transfer the bowl to the refrigerator for a few hours to allow the fat to separate. You can speed this process in the freezer for about 45 minutes. Scrape the fat off the top and discard. Pour the reserved juices into a saucepot over medium heat, then add the Pineapple Chipotle Grilling Sauce, 1/2 cup of brown sugar, and 1/3 cup of cider vinegar. Set aside for the next step. Using two forks, or your hands (with kitchen latex gloves), shred the pork into bite-sized pieces, removing any excess fat from the roast as you go. Add the shredded meat to the Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce, brown sugar, and vinegar mixture, then serve hot on buns with Texas Style Creamy Coleslaw (recipe follows) and T E X A S

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5 cups shredded green cabbage 5 cups shredded red cabbage 1 cup shredded carrots 1 cup coarsely chopped purple onion 2 Granny Smith apples, cored, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 tsp lemon juice 1/2 cup cider vinegar 4 tsp Texas Gourmet's Jalapeno Kiwi Jelly 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup sour cream 1 Tbs Creole mustard or other coarsegrained mustard Combine the green and red cabbages, carrots, and purple onion in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, toss the cubed apples with the lemon juice and add to the cabbage mixture. In a small mixing bowl, combine the vinegar, jelly, salt, and pepper and whisk until the ingredients are well blended. Pour the seasoned vinegar mixture over the cabbage mixture and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover with plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator for 20 to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, and mustard and stir to combine. Add the mayonnaise mixture to the coleslaw and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to overnight before serving.

Contact Bryan Slaven, "The Texas Gourmet," at 888-234-7883, www.thetexasgourmet.com; or by email at texas-tasted@fishgame.com S E P T E M B E R

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Cassidy Lamiak Trout Rockport Redrunner

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TEXAS SALTWATER

TEXAS FRESHWATER

GALVESTON

LAKE TEXOMA

LAKE AMISTAD

ADVERTISERS, SEND IN YOUR PHOTOS TODAY!

Mark Gilbreath Stripers Striper Express

BAFFIN BAY

For Classified Rates and Information call Dennise at 1-800-750-4678, ext. 5519.

ADVERTISERS, SEND IN YOUR PHOTOS TODAY!

TEXAS SALTWATER

TEXAS SALTWATER

CORPUS CHRISTI

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White Oak Outfitters Hogs

Ken Ladd and Marvin Burgess Redfish Charters

TEXAS HUNTING

EAT ACROSS TEXAS

TEXAS TEXASHUNTING HUNTING

OUTDOOR SHOPPER

Marchan's White Sands Motel, Marina & Restaurant

established in 1952 in the Port Isabel, Texas area is family owned and operated. Marchan’s White Sands has a unique combination that offers a place to stay, fish and dine.

WHERE IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT ON THE TEXAS HIGHWAYS?

If you are a traveling tourist, winter visitor, fisherman, birdwatcher or local customer, you will find Marchan’s to be friendly, affordable and competitive. If you are not staying at their motel, stop by and eat at their famous seafood restaurant and be sure to check out their breakfast. Take advantage of beautiful Texas sunsets with their indoor waterfront dining. For more info. on Marchan’s White Sands Motel, Marina & Restaurant, and to view their restaurant menu and hours go to their website at www.the-white-sands.com or call 956-943-2414 ext. 0.

INTRODUCING TFG’S NEW EAT ACROSS TEXAS, PLEASE CALL 281.227.3001 X 5519 FOR ADVERTISING RATES AND INFO.

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Tarpon Catfish

Belize

Lake Conroe

Black Drum High Island

Texas, caught of Beaumont, drum at the k Chris Howard ac bl nd, 36-inch . He was this 22.5-pou at High Island ge id Br l ta rimp. sh ad Intracoas de th m tackle wi using mediu

tfish ht his first ca el, age 4, caug nroe. Co ke La on Justin Treich ily with his fam while fishing

Chealsea Altin ger caught an tarpon while d released th fishing with her dad, uncle is captain Hilly boo Laura in an San Pedro, Am d grise Cay, Be berlize.

Hybrid Striper Mangrove Snapper

Trinity River Faith Foster caught her fir st hybrid strip bass while fis er hing wither he ter, at the Tr inity River ou r dad, Barry Fost of Coleman Camp. The st ’s Bait riper was 13 inches.

Mixed Stringer

Offshore

Port Aransas

a ends went on cks and his fri th year. They Tommy Fran 18 e th r fo p avis ng tri 40-hour fishi th Captain Tr the Dolphin wi rt Aransas. were aboard Po in ck Do n lphi Kerr from Do

Speckled Trout

Chris Gonzale s caught his m of San Antonio, Texas, angr shore of Galve ove snapper 15 miles of fston. The sn apper was 7 pounds and 22 inches.

Redfish

Laguna Madre

Laguna Madre

Redfish Aransas Pass

this mpo caught age 9, of El Ca fishing with his Jared Cook, ile wh ut tro kled per Laguna 24-inch spec dparents in Up dad and gran Madre.

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Joel Soriano of tournament-s Corpus Christi caught th is ized redfish while chasin school of ab ga out 500 reds in the Upper na Madre. Lagu-

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cciaKimberly Pu pson, son of e Brendon Thom caught the biggest and th ia at Shoal p, tri rello of Victor ng hi fis his first most fish on oked! He is now ho Water Lodge.

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Redfish

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Catfish

Sabine Lake

Whitetail Deer

Lake Whitney

Harper

-inch caught this 22 4 years old, st Jake Carlin, caught his fir He . ke La bine redfish in Sa . ad sh ld co keeper red on

Bill Bryant, of Kopperl caug ht this mess catfish while of fishing on La ke cats ranged from 1 pound Whitney. The to 3 pounds size. in

ot his n Antonio sh e, age 6, of Sa rds. He was Walker Jenk ya 70 at a .270 first deer with rper. Ha hunting near

Black Drum Largemouth Bass

East Galveston Bay

Sam Rayburn Res.

Largemouth Bass Celeste Wolff of Houston, Texas, caught released this an 40-inch black drum while fis d ing with her parents and hfia ncé in East Galveston Ba y at the Boliv ar Peninsula.

Seguin

ught Huntington ca an, age 3, of d on da r he th Kylee Hickm wi while fishing her first bass ss weighed 3 yburn. The ba Lake Sam Ra nces. pounds, 8 ou

Todd Mcbrid e holds the la rgemouth ba that he caug ss ht in Seguin. The bass we 10 pounds, 1. ighed 1 ounces.

Carp

Flounder

Lake Whitney Galveston

Redfish Port O’Connor

is carp on caught th rn of Carrollt hitney W ke Glen Pensho La at on the pier the night fishing utes to land took ten min . el re ht lig State Park. It a pound-test on carp, with 8-

David Harris caught and re leased this bu redfish while ll fishing in the Port O’Conn Jetties. The or red was over 30 pounds an 47 inches of d pure fight!

ch pound, 23-in caught this 5This Julio Alderete Wolf Park in Galveston. a r ing live finge flounder at Se was caught us personal best mullet.

Flounder Whitetail Buck

Christmas Bay

Bedias

Mule Deer CJ Kizer, age 11, of Huntsv ille took his buck in Bedi fir as. The deer was an 8-poin st ter.

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f the biggest hey shows of Larry McGaug ever caught, at 8 pounds s n flounder he ha ng with his so . He was fishi and 24 inches y. Ba ristmas Nathan in Ch

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New Mexico Thomas Kahl de deer on a priv n of Caldwell shot this m ule at Eagle Nest, Ne e ranch while hunting in w Mexico.

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SEPTEMBER 2010

PHOTO CREDIT: © OSCAR1319 | DREAMSTIME.COM

Crossbows: 1 Year After Editor’s Note: One year ago this month, crossbows became legal to use during the archery-only white-tailed deer season. Crossbow opponents predicted dire consequences, from rampant wounding, more hunters pouring into the woods, and unsustainable increased harvest. We asked hunting editor Bob Hood to look into the aftermath of the first “crossbow season” to see if any of those dire predictions bore fruit in the real world. —Don Zaidle

say echoes so-called “conventional bowhunters” attitudes toward crossbows. Soon after the new bill was passed, several Texas retail sporting goods stores saw crossbow sales skyrocket. Bass Pro Shops reported a more than 50 percent statewide increase in crossbow sales just before and during last year’s archery season. The Cabela’s store in Fort Worth saw its crossbow sales triple from the previous year, and similar increases were reported by other Cabela’s stores as well as EW REGULATIONS ALLOWING CROSSBOWS DURING THE ARCHERY- Gander Mountain and other retailers. only hunting season have spurred increases in crossbow sales Does this mean hunters are harvesting more deer now that they at many retail stores since the law went into effect one year can use crossbows during the archery-only season? Or has the new ago. It also has prompted Texas Parks & Wildlife Depart- law simply provided more hunting opportunities for people with no ment officials to reformat how it significant impact on harvest numbers? collects harvest information from “After looking over last season’s Big Game Harvest Survey hunters. information, I see no evidence of an increase in harvest numbers Prior to last year’s archery-only due to the new crossbow regulations,” said Clay Brewer of • TF&G Hunting Editor season, Texas hunters could not Brownwood, Region II Wildlife director for TPWD. Brewer use a crossbow during the special season unless a disability made said information gathered on last year’s big game harvest survey does them physically unable to draw a conventional compound, recurve, not specifically ask if the game was taken with a crossbow or vertical or longbow. The Texas Legislature changed that last year by passing bow. a bill allowing crossbows during the archery-only season in all counMitch Lockwood, TPWD whitetail deer program coordinator, ties except Grayson, an archery-only deer hunting county that some said changes to this season’s harvest survey forms would address

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In This Issue HOW-TO SECTION

COVER STORY • CROSSBOWS: 1 YEAR AFTER | BY BOB HOOD

HOTSPOTS & TIDES SECTION

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SPORTSMAN’S DAYBOOK • Tides, Solunar Table, Best Hunting/Fishing Times | BY TF&G STAFF

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TEXAS HOTSPOTS • Texas’ Hottest Fishing Spots | BY TOM BEHRENS, CALIXTO GONZALES, & BOB HOOD

some questions that remain unanswered. “I have asked our data analysis people to reformat the Big Game Harvest Survey to give us more answers,” Lockwood said. “One thing we might do is split the Big Game Harvest Survey up between categories for conventional bows and those for crossbows. Right now, a hunter may have shot four deer and we don’t know if he shot two with a rifle, one with a conventional bow, and one with a crossbow, or all four with a rifle or whatever.” Asking specific questions on the hunter survey such as what type of weapon the hunter used might be the closest way the department can come to determining how many deer are taken by a particular type of weapon. Sales of $7 state archery stamps are not a good indication since those and all other stamps are included on the Texas Super Combo hunting and fishing license, purchasers of which might or might not hunt with a bow. The legalization of crossbows during the archery-only season likely has resulted in more hunters taking part in the special season, while having little if any effect on bringing new hunters into the sport. George Rule of Lake Tawakoni said he used to hunt with a conventional bow but quit after shoulder problems made it too difficult to draw. “Now that I can hunt with a crossbow, I will be able to hunt 58 |

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TEXAS TESTED • Cor-Bon, Sebile, Buff, Bumper Stumper | BY TFG STAFF INDUSTRY INSIDER • Cor-Bon, Minn Kota | BY TFG STAFF

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TEXAS KAYAKING • Chewy’s Cove | BY GREG BERLOCHER

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TEXAS GUNS & GEAR • Dove Guns & Loads | BY STEVE LAMASCUS

OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE SECTION

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BOWHUNTING TECH • The Essence of a Bow Hunter | BY LOU MARULLO

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TEXAS BOATING • Disaster Story | BY LENNY RUDOW

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BAITS & RIGS • Floating Worm | BY PAUL BRADSHAW

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SALTWATER TALES • Life on the Bottom | BY CHESTER MOORE

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TEXAS TASTED • Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork | BY BRYAN SLAVEN

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OUTDOOR CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY AND EAT ACROSS TEXAS • Classifieds/Eat Across Texas | BY TF&G STAFF

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PHOTO ALBUM • Your Action Photos | BY TF&G READERS

GEARING UP SECTION

78

NEW PRODUCTS • What’s New from Top Outdoor Manufacturers | BY TFG STAFF

during the archery-only season and not just during the regular season,” Rule said. Why were crossbows not allowed during Texas’ archery-only seasons prior to last year? The answer is simple yet not a very good one for all hunters: “Traditional” bowhunters who did not consider crossbows archery equipment lobbied the legislature and TPWD to prevent crossbow use during archery season. Those activists considered their compound bows “true” archery equipment, while failing to remember that just a few decades ago they faced similar resentment against compound bows from longbow and recurve proponents. Similar resentment has developed over the years in many states (including Texas) among black powder and muzzleloading season-only enthusiasts, ranging from pour-the-powderdown-the-barrel advocates to those who prefer black powder cartridges, cylinders, and discand-cap primers instead of flint and other more primitive charges. Fortunately for Texas hunters, truth and reason prevailed and sportsmen can now enjoy more hunting opportunities than ever before. Just like a compound bow, a crossbow is a short-range weapon. Either one can be shot accurately at distances of 50 to 100 yards, but those ranges for most hunters are not practical T E X A S

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www.FishGame.com for taking game animals with any type of bow. Like many of the fastest compound bows, most crossbows shoot a bolt (arrow) at 300 to 375 feet per second. When you consider the loud “whack” of a crossbow bolt leaving its rail and the importance of accuracy and penetration, a hunter with a crossbow still faces the same challenges as a vertical bowhunter, and that means getting within about 30 yards of a wild animal. Arrow and string-locking devices such as the Draw-Loc have been legal in Texas on vertical bows for several years, with little attendant controversy. Also, lighted pins, peep sights, and mechanical string releases for vertical bows do exactly what crossbow scopes and trigger releases do—improve an individual hunter’s ability to harvest an animal. Many wildlife officials and hunters do not expect the legalization of crossbows for archery season to have any significant impact on deer harvest. It has had an impact on compound bow retail sales, but more importantly, it has resulted in more hunting opportunities for all archery enthusiasts, not just an elite few.

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Tides and Prime Times

SEPTEMBER 2010

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

SEP 1  High Tide: 5:39 am Low Tide: 4:22 pm

6 High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME 4:22 am 9:08 am 2:03 pm 9:24 pm

1.63 ft 1.29 ft 1.60 ft 0.06 ft

5:30 — 7:30 PM

7 High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME 4:38 am 9:45 am 3:26 pm 10:13 pm

1.57 ft 1.02 ft 1.64 ft 0.25 ft

6:00 — 8:00 PM

1.58 ft 0.15 ft

THURSDAY PRIME TIME

2

8:00 — 10:00 PM

High Tide: 5:44 am Low Tide: 5:31 pm

PRIME TIME 1.65 ft 0.05 ft

12:30 — 3:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:12a Set: 8:01p Moonrise: None Set: 2:29p AM Minor: ——Set: 5:54a PM Minor: 12:07p Set: 6:21p Moon Overhead: 7:10a Moon Underfoot: 7:38p

Sunrise: 7:13a Set: 8:00p Moonrise: 12:46a Set: 3:27p AM Minor: 12:39a Set: 6:48a PM Minor: 1:03p Set: 7:17p Moon Overhead: 8:06a Moon Underfoot: 8:35p

8

9

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME 4:55 am 10:27 am 4:43 pm 11:01 pm

1.52 ft 0.73 ft 1.67 ft 0.52 ft

6:30 — 8:30 PM

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

5:12 am 11:13 am 5:59 pm 11:48 pm

PRIME TIME 1.49 ft 0.44 ft 1.68 ft 0.81 ft

7:30 — 9:30 AM

Sunrise: 7:15a Set: 7:55p Moonrise: 5:09a Set: 6:37p AM Minor: 4:05a Set: 10:19a PM Minor: 4:33p Set: 10:47p Moon Overhead: 11:57a Moon Underfoot: None

Sunrise: 7:16a Set: 7:54p Moonrise: 6:20a Set: 7:15p AM Minor: 4:55a Set: 11:09a PM Minor: 5:22p Set: 11:36p Moon Overhead: 12:51p Moon Underfoot: 12:25a

Sunrise: 7:16a Set: 7:52p Moonrise: 7:29a Set: 7:51p AM Minor: 5:47a Set: ——PM Minor: 6:14p Set: 12:27p Moon Overhead: 1:44p Moon Underfoot: 1:18a

Sunrise: 7:17a Set: 7:51p Moonrise: 8:39a Set: 8:28p AM Minor: 6:42a Set: 12:28a PM Minor: 7:08p Set: 12:55p Moon Overhead: 2:37p Moon Underfoot: 2:11a

13

14

15 

16

PRIME TIME

Low Tide: 2:12 am High Tide: 5:47 am Low Tide: 2:55 pm

1.54 ft 1.59 ft -0.01 ft

6:00 — 8:00 PM

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 12:40 am 1.68 ft Low Tide: 4:07 pm 0.04 ft

11:00A — 1:00P

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 2:47 am Low Tide: 5:25 pm

1.73 ft 0.10 ft

12:30 — 2:30 PM

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 3:27 am Low Tide: 6:38 pm

1.73 ft 0.16 ft

1:30 — 3:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:19a Set: 7:46p Moonrise: 1:10p Set: 11:27p AM Minor: 10:44a Set: 4:30a PM Minor: 11:12p Set: 4:58p Moon Overhead: 6:19p Moon Underfoot: 5:51a

Sunrise: 7:20a Set: 7:45p Moonrise: 2:09p Set: None AM Minor: 11:43a Set: 5:29a PM Minor: ——Set: 5:57p Moon Overhead: 7:15p Moon Underfoot: 6:47a

Sunrise: 7:20a Set: 7:43p Moonrise: 3:01p Set: 12:21a AM Minor: 12:15a Set: 6:25a PM Minor: 12:39p Set: 6:52p Moon Overhead: 8:08p Moon Underfoot: 7:42a

Sunrise: 7:21a Set: 7:42p Moonrise: 3:48p Set: 1:17a AM Minor: 1:04a Set: 7:16a PM Minor: 1:29p Set: 7:42p Moon Overhead: 8:59p Moon Underfoot: 8:34a

20

21 

22 

23 

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME 4:11 am 9:38 am 2:41 pm 9:40 pm

1.52 ft 1.18 ft 1.53 ft 0.58 ft

5:00 — 7:00 PM

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME

4:18 am 9:51 am 3:37 pm 10:08 pm

1.49 ft 1.03 ft 1.56 ft 0.72 ft

5:30 — 7:30 pm

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME

4:27 am 10:11 am 4:30 pm 10:34 pm

1.49 ft 0.88 ft 1.58 ft 0.87 ft

6:00 — 8:00 PM

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME 4:37 am 10:36 am 5:23 pm 10:59 pm

1.49 ft 0.74 ft 1.60 ft 1.02 ft

6:00 — 8:00 AM

Sunrise: 7:23a Set: 7:37p Moonrise: 6:05p Set: 5:00a AM Minor: 3:52a Set: 10:02a PM Minor: 4:12p Set: 10:23p Moon Overhead: 11:56p Moon Underfoot: 11:36a

Sunrise: 7:24a Set: 7:36p Moonrise: 6:33p Set: 5:53a AM Minor: 4:29a Set: 10:39a PM Minor: 4:49p Set: 10:59p Moon Overhead: None Moon Underfoot: 12:16p

Sunrise: 7:24a Set: 7:34p Moonrise: 7:00p Set: 6:46a AM Minor: 5:06a Set: 11:17a PM Minor: 5:27p Set: 11:37p Moon Overhead: 12:36a Moon Underfoot: 12:56p

Sunrise: 7:25a Set: 7:33p Moonrise: 7:29p Set: 7:39a AM Minor: 5:46a Set: 11:56a PM Minor: 6:06p Set: ——Moon Overhead: 1:16a Moon Underfoot: 1:37p

27

PRIME TIME

28

PRIME TIME

29

30 

9:00 — 11:00 AM

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

9:30 — 11:30 AM

Low Tide: 1:00 am High Tide: 4:18 am Low Tide: 2:40 pm

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

12:20 am 4:32 am 12:54 pm 9:41 pm

1.46 ft 1.59 ft 0.37 ft 1.66 ft

Sunrise: 7:27a Set: 7:28p Moonrise: 9:52p Set: 11:25a AM Minor: 8:59a Set: 2:46a PM Minor: 9:24p Set: 3:11p Moon Overhead: 4:15a Moon Underfoot: 4:40p

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S E P T E M B E R

12:44 am 4:19 am 1:43 pm 11:28 pm

1.59 ft 1.67 ft 0.31 ft 1.71 ft

Sunrise: 7:28a Set: 7:27p Moonrise: 10:41p Set: 12:23p AM Minor: 9:55a Set: 3:42a PM Minor: 10:22p Set: 4:08p Moon Overhead: 5:06a Moon Underfoot: 5:33p

2 0 1 0

T E X A S

PRIME TIME 1.70 ft 1.75 ft 0.27 ft

6:30 — 8:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:28a Set: 7:25p Moonrise: 11:36p Set: 1:20p AM Minor: 10:53a Set: 4:40a PM Minor: 11:21p Set: 5:07p Moon Overhead: 6:00a Moon Underfoot: 6:28p

F I S H

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High Tide: 4:21 am Low Tide: 3:47 pm

PRIME TIME 1.81 ft 0.25 ft

11:00A — 1:00P

3Sunrise: 7:29a Set: 7:24p Moonrise: None Set: 2:13p AM Minor: 11:52a Set: 5:38a PM Minor: ——Set: 6:06p Moon Overhead: 6:56a Moon Underfoot: 7:24p

N O R T H

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Tides and Prime Times

SEPTEMBER 2010

FRIDAY

3

SATURDAY PRIME TIME

High Tide: 4:27 am Low Tide: 6:37 pm

1.69 ft -0.04 ft

1:30 — 3:30 PM

4

SUNDAY PRIME TIME

High Tide: 3:57 am Low Tide: 7:37 pm

1.70 ft -0.08 ft

5

PRIME TIME

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

2:30 — 4:30 PM

4:07 am 8:48 am 12:20 pm 8:33 pm

1.68 ft 1.49 ft 1.56 ft -0.06 ft

4:30 — 6:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:14a Set: 7:59p Moonrise: 1:44a Set: 4:21p AM Minor: 1:28a Set: 7:43a PM Minor: 1:57p Set: 8:12p Moon Overhead: 9:04a Moon Underfoot: 9:33p

Sunrise: 7:14a Set: 7:57p Moonrise: 2:49a Set: 5:11p AM Minor: 2:22a Set: 8:36a PM Minor: 2:51p Set: 9:06p Moon Overhead: 10:03a Moon Underfoot: 10:32p

Sunrise: 7:15a Set: 7:56p Moonrise: 3:58a Set: 5:56p AM Minor: 3:14a Set: 9:28a PM Minor: 3:43p Set: 9:57p Moon Overhead: 11:01a Moon Underfoot: 11:29p

10 

11 

12

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 5:30 am 1.49 ft Low Tide: 12:02 pm 0.21 ft High Tide: 7:18 pm 1.67 ft

11:30A — 1:30P

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

PRIME TIME

12:34 am 5:45 am 12:54 pm 8:43 pm

1.10 ft 1.52 ft 0.06 ft 1.65 ft

PRIME TIME

Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide:

4:00 — 6:00 PM

1:21 am 5:56 am 1:51 pm 10:23 pm

1.35 ft 1.55 ft -0.01 ft 1.65 ft

5:00 — 7:00 PM

Sunrise: 7:17a Set: 7:50p Moonrise: 9:48a Set: 9:07p AM Minor: 7:39a Set: 1:26a PM Minor: 8:06p Set: 1:53p Moon Overhead: 3:31p Moon Underfoot: 3:04a

Sunrise: 7:18a Set: 7:49p Moonrise: 10:58a Set: 9:50p AM Minor: 8:40a Set: 2:26a PM Minor: 9:08p Set: 2:54p Moon Overhead: 4:26p Moon Underfoot: 3:59a

Sunrise: 7:19a Set: 7:47p Moonrise: 12:06p Set: 10:36p AM Minor: 9:42a Set: 3:28a PM Minor: 10:11p Set: 3:57p Moon Overhead: 5:23p Moon Underfoot: 4:55a

17

18

19

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 3:50 am Low Tide: 7:38 pm

1.69 ft 0.23 ft

3:00 — 5:00 PM

PRIME TIME

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:01 am 9:33 am 12:23 pm 8:27 pm

1.63 ft 1.41 ft 1.47 ft 0.32 ft

PRIME TIME

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

4:00 — 6:00 PM

4:07 am 9:32 am 1:39 pm 9:07 pm

1.57 ft 1.31 ft 1.50 ft 0.44 ft

4:30 — 6:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:21a Set: 7:41p Moonrise: 4:28p Set: 2:14a AM Minor: 1:51a Set: 8:03a PM Minor: 2:15p Set: 8:27p Moon Overhead: 9:47p Moon Underfoot: 9:23a

Sunrise: 7:22a Set: 7:40p Moonrise: 5:03p Set: 3:10a AM Minor: 2:34a Set: 8:45a PM Minor: 2:57p Set: 9:08p Moon Overhead: 10:32p Moon Underfoot: 10:10a

Sunrise: 7:22a Set: 7:38p Moonrise: 5:35p Set: 4:06a AM Minor: 3:14a Set: 9:25a PM Minor: 3:36p Set: 9:46p Moon Overhead: 11:15p Moon Underfoot: 10:54a

24 

25 

26

PRIME TIME

High Tide: 4:48 am 1.54 ft Low Tide: 12:13 pm 0.43 ft High Tide: 8:20 pm 1.64 ft

8:30 — 10:30 AM

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME

4:46 am 11:05 am 6:16 pm 11:25 pm

1.50 ft 0.62 ft 1.62 ft 1.17 ft

7:00 — 9:00 AM

High Tide: Low Tide: High Tide: Low Tide:

PRIME TIME

4:52 am 11:37 am 7:13 pm 11:53 pm

1.51 ft 0.52 ft 1.63 ft 1.31 ft

1:00 — 3:00 AM

Sunrise: 7:26a Set: 7:29p Moonrise: 9:09p Set: 10:26a AM Minor: 8:05a Set: 1:53a PM Minor: 8:29p Set: 2:17p Moon Overhead: 3:26a Moon Underfoot: 3:50p

Sunrise: 7:26a Set: 7:31p Moonrise: 8:32p Set: 9:29a AM Minor: 7:15a Set: 1:04a PM Minor: 7:37p Set: 1:26p Moon Overhead: 2:41a Moon Underfoot: 3:03p

Sunrise: 7:25a Set: 7:32p Moonrise: 7:59p Set: 8:33a AM Minor: 6:29a Set: 12:18a PM Minor: 6:50p Set: 12:39p Moon Overhead: 1:57a Moon Underfoot: 2:19p

PRIME TIME

PRIME TIME

PRIME TIME

SYMBOL KEY



New Moon

N O R T H



First Quarter



Full Moon

A L M A N A C



Last Quarter

T E X A S



PRIME TIME

Good Day

F I S H

BEST DAYS

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TIDE STATION CORRECTION TABLE (Adjust High & Low Tide times listed in the Calendar by the amounts below for each keyed location)

NOT FOR NAVIGATION PLACE SABINE BANK LIGHTHOUSE (29.47° N, 93.72° W) SABINE PASS JETTY (29.65° N, 93.83° W) SABINE PASS (29.73° N, 93.87°W) MESQUITE PT, SABINE PASS (29.77° N, 93.9° W) GALV. BAY, SO. JETTY (29.34° N, 94.7° W) PORT BOLIVAR (29.36° N, 94.77° W) TX CITY TURNING BASIN (29.38° N, 94.88° W) EAGLE POINT (29.5° N, 94.91° W) CLEAR LAKE (29.56° N, 95.06° W) MORGANS POINT (29.68° N, 94.98° W) ROUND PT, TRINITY BAY (29.71° N, 94.69° W) PT. BARROW, TRIN. BAY (29.74° N, 94.83° W) GILCHRIST, E. BAY (29.52° N, 94.48° W) JAMAICA BCH., W. BAY (29.2° N, 94.98° W) ALLIGATOR PT., W. BAY (29.17° N, 94.13° W) CHRISTMAS PT, CHR. BAY (29.08° N, 94.17° W) GALV. PLEASURE PIER (29.29° N, 94.79° W) SAN LUIS PASS (29.08° N, 95.12° W) FREEPORT HARBOR (28.95° N, 95.31° W) PASS CAVALLO (28.37° N, 96.4° W) ARANSAS PASS (27.84° N, 97.05° W) PADRE ISL.(SO. END) (26.07° N, 97.16° W) PORT ISABEL (26.06° N, 97.22° W)

S E P T E M B E R

HIGH

LOW

-1:46

-1:31

-1:26

-1:31

-1:00

-1:15

-0:04

-0:25

-0:39

-1:05

+0:14

-0:06

+0:33

+0:41

+3:54

+4:15

+6:05

+6:40

+10:21

+5:19

+10:39

+5:15

+5:48

+4:43

+3:16

+4:18

+2:38

+3:31

+2:39

+2:33

+2:32

+2:31

-1:06

-1:06

-0.09

-0.09

-0:44

-1:02

0:00

-1:20

-0:03

-1:31

-0:24

-1:45

+1:02

-0:42

2 0 1 0

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PINEY WOODS

Primos Conroe Cats by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Conroe HOTSPOT: Main Lake Channel GPS: N30 25.8903, W95 35.8932 (30.431505, -95.598220) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Primos dipping bait CONTACT: Richard Tatsch, admin@fishdudetx.com, 936-291-1277, www.fishindudetx.com TIPS: Pre-bait two or three areas in 1525 feet of water along the edge of the main channel with cattle cubes. Use a No. 4 treble hook. Ease the bait off the bottom occasionally while feeling for the slightest resistance. BANK ACCESS: Stowaway Marina LOCATION: Caddo Lake HOTSPOT: Main Lake Points GPS: N32 42.59028, W93 59.50452 (32.709838, -93.991742) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: plastic frogs, buzzbaits, flukes CONTACT: Paul Keith, Caddo Lake Guide Service, www.caddolakefishing.com, 318-455-3437 TIPS: Fish the main-lake pads and hydrilla beds with your surface baits. Usually, the closer to the main-lake creek channel the better. BANK ACCESS: Piers at the Texas State Park and Louisiana State Park sites. LOCATION: Lake Granger HOTSPOT: Main Lake Ridge GPS: N30 42.13896, W97 20.23698 62 |

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(30.702316, 97.337283) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: 1/2ounce slab spoons CONTACT: Tommy Tidwell, crappie1@hotmail.com, 512-365-7761 TIPS: The white bass are schooling on main lake humps and hit best during the middle of the day. Anchor directly over the humps and drop slab spoons to the bottom. The larger fish are on the bottom picking up injured shad. LOCATION: Toledo Bend HOTSPOT: Myrick’s Reach GPS: N31 45.04002, W93 50.21298 (31.750667, -93.836883) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, tail spinners, Road Runners, slabs, spoons CONTACT: Greg Crafts, gregcrafts@yahoo.com, 936-368-7151, toledobendguide.com TIPS: White bass are following the shad and schooling throughout the day all over the lake. During early morning and late evening hours, look for them to school in the same locations such as off main-lake points, road beds, and flats close to deep water.

PRAIRIES & LAKES

Jigs Take Texoma Stripers by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Mill Creek Flats GPS: N33 49.43568, W96 46.15392 T E X A S

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(33.823928, -96.769232) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: slabs and jigs CONTACT: Bill Carey, bigfish@striperexpress.com, 877-786-4477, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: Jig 1-ounce chrome, white and chartreuse slabs off the bottom in 10-30 feet of water. White and Glow Coho Minnow jigs with 3/4-ounce jighead and 4-inch tail are perfect. Cast the jigs and use a medium retrieve. BANK ACCESS: Mill Creek Campsites LOCATION: Lake Texoma HOTSPOT: Juniper Point East GPS: N33 51.892, W96 49.883 (33.864867, -96.831383) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: RipTide Curltailers, and topwaters CONTACT: Bill Carey, 903-647-4022 Cell, www.striperexpress.com TIPS: The big fish move onto the flats during September. Early mornings cast pencil poppers and chug bugs on the shallow banks. Mid-morning change your lures to Rip Tide Curltailers and Sassy Shad soft plastics. Concentrate on the flats that run about 20 feet in depth. Locate the creek channels and drop-offs; these are the routes that the fish use to move up from deep water to feed. The gulls have arrived, so pay close attention to the birds, as they are your best fish-finders. BANK ACCESS: East Juniper Point and Washita Point, watch for stripers chasing shad along bank LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Flat Creek Docks GPS: N32 11.77662, W95 30.51738 (32.196277, -95.508623) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: crankbaits, Shimmy Shakers, spinnerbaits, and buzzbaits CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-561N O R T H

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7299, www.rickysguideservice.com TIPS: Fish crankbaits and chartreusewhite Shimmy Shakers around the docks, and 1/4-ounce jigs, buzzbaits, and spinnerbaits in the back of Flat Creek and other creeks. LOCATION: Lake Fork HOTSPOT: Board Tree Branch GPS: N32 53.838, W95 40.320 (32.897300, -95.672000) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: spinnerbaits, topwaters; frogs in the pads and grass; weightless worms and flukes CONTACT: Michael Rogge, 903-3833406, microg@texascellnet.com, www.lake-fork-guides.com TIPS: September is topwater time on Fork. Fish each area thoroughly, taking your time. When fishing topwaters, get ready for a bone-jarring strike, but don't set

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the hook until you feel the fish. This is particularly true for buzzbaits. LOCATION: Lake Fork HOTSPOT: Five Fingers GPS: 32.842500, -95.572000 (N32 50.550, W95 34.320) BEST BAITS: soft plastic creature baits on a Carolina rig in watermelon colors. CONTACT: Gene Snider, 903-383-7668 TIPS: Old roadbeds are excellent spots to find concentrations of quality-sized bass in the summer months on Fork. Those in water 20-30 feet deep are ideal to probe with a Carolina rig. Work the edges and the top of the structure. LOCATION: Lake Whitney HOTSPOT: McCowan Flats GPS: N31 55.482, W97 24.858 (31.9247, -97.4143) SPECIES: striped bass

BEST BAITS: white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white ribbon tail trailers CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Stripers are scattered due to the heavy thermocline, making trolling the most productive pattern. Easy limits result from using white 3/4-ounce bucktail jigs with white trailers. Drag the lures anywhere from 19-22 feet in 26-35 feet of water. LOCATION: Lake Somerville HOTSPOT: Spillway South GPS: N30 18.09774, W96 31.5441 (30.301629, -96.525735) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: shad, worms, punchbait, chicken livers CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water drops off rapidly from the shore here. Chum the drop-off close to the boat. Fish straight down with the bait close to the bottom near the chum. Use a cork or fish with a tight line. Set the hook when the least bite is detected. LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: hybrid striped bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: Troll crankbaits in 25 feet of water off the flats for big hybrid striped bass. BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Highway 309 Flats GPS: N31 58.71798, W96 6.87798 (31.978633, -96.114633) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: DD22 crankbaits CONTACT: Royce Simmons, royce@gonefishin.biz, 903-389-4117, www.gonefishing.biz TIPS: White bass will be stacked up on

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the drop-offs and can be caught on slabs bounced off the bottom. BANK ACCESS: Fisherman’s Point Marina for catfish

TIPS: Fish around the pilings beneath the Highway 155 bridge as well as brush piles in 16 feet of water. White jigs usually work better than those of other colors.

LOCATION: Richland-Chambers HOTSPOT: Oak Creek Point GPS: N31 57.33714, W96 15.56028 (31.955619, -96.259338) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Steve Schmidt, steve@steveschmidtsbigbass.com, 817929-0675 TIPS: This point has numerous large boulders. Put your boat in 15 to 18 feet of water and cast a Carolina rig onto the point. Drag the rig across the boulders.

LOCATION: Fayette County HOTSPOT: Pekema Creek Channel GPS: N29 56.0946, W96 43.0308 (29.93491, -96.717180) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: punchbait, worms

CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103, www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The water is 15 feet deep here with submerged structure. Fish close to the bottom with a cork or tight line. Chumming will increase your chances of catching fish. Use a No. 6 or No. 8 treble hook. LOCATION: Gibbons Creek HOTSPOT: Eagle Point South

LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: Triplet Point GPS: N31 54.84978, W97 12.88818 (31.914163, -97.214803) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: Watch for early-morning schooling action on the point. Retrieve the lures just under the surface for fast action. LOCATION: Lake Aquilla HOTSPOT: The Bubbler GPS: N31 54.8709, W97 12.375 (31.914515, -97.20625) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges CONTACT: Randy Routh, teamredneck01@hotmail.com, 817-822-5539, www.teamredneck.net TIPS: After the sun becomes high, head to the bubbler and fish Rat-L-Traps, Little Georges or small chrome spoons in the heavily-oxygenated water that attracts tons of baitfishes and game fishes. LOCATION: Lake Palestine HOTSPOT: Highway 155 Bridge GPS: N32 8.74926, W95 28.3023 (32.145821, -95.471705) SPECIES: crappie BEST BAITS: Mister Twister / Mister Minnow jigs CONTACT: Ricky Vandergriff, ricky@rickysguideservice.com, 903-5617299, www.rickysguideservice.com N O R T H

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GPS: N30 37.92102, W96 2.79 (30.632017, -96.0465) SPECIES: catfish BEST BAITS: Shad, shrimp, worms, stinkbait CONTACT: Weldon Kirk, weldon_edna@hotmail.com, 979-229-3103,

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www.FishTales-GuideService.com TIPS: The fish are feeding out of Sulphur Creek into the more shallow water in the timber early mornings and after dark. Tie to a tree and put out chum around the boat. Use a No. 6 treble hook on punchbait just off the bottom.

PANHANDLE

Headline for Hotspot Region by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Possum Kingdom HOTSPOT: Costello Island GPS: N32 54.14196, W98 28.068 (32.902366, -98.467800) SPECIES: striped bass BEST BAITS: live shad, topwaters, jigging spoons CONTACT: Dean Heffner, fav7734@aceweb.com, 940-329-0036 TIPS: Fish the breaklines at 20-30 feet along the river channel from Costello Island to Broadway. Once you catch fish at a certain depth, use it to catch many more. White and red are good colors but fish chartreuse in deep or stained waters. LOCATION: Lake Palo Pinto HOTSPOT: Power Plant Outlet GPS: N32 39.30528, W98 18.51282 (32.655088, -98.308547) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: Jigs, slab spoons CONTACT: Dean Heffner, fav7734@aceweb.com, 940-329-0036 TIPS: Fish the water discharge early and then work the edges of the deep holes with slabs and jigs.

BIG BEND

Headline for Hotspot Region by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Amistad HOTSPOT: Marker 28 to the Dam GPS: N29 27.24582, W101 2.6502


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(29.454097, -101.04417) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Ribbit Frogs, buzzbaits CONTACT: Larry Scruggs, Amistad Lodge and Adventures, fisherofmenlrs@hotmail.com, 210-789-1645 TIPS: The bass are in the grass. Work buzzbaits and Ribbit Frogs over the grass beds. Expect 70 to 80 fish per boat.

HILL COUNTRY

Sunrise Bass at the Beach by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Lake Lyndon B Johnson HOTSPOT: Sunrise Beach

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GPS: N30 35.35584, W98 24.51102 (30.589264, -98.408517) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: buzzbait, Pop-R, mediumdiving crankbait, spinnerbait, jerkbait CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Start early with topwater lures and expect the bite to last longer at this time of the year. Texas and Carolina-rigged soft plastics also work well. Look for laydowns, docks, and grass beds. Up the river, bass will move to the corners of docks. LOCATION: Lake Granger HOTSPOT: Brush Piles Near Dam GPS: N30 41.70318, W97 20.229 (30.695053, -97.337150) SPECIES: crappie BEST BAITS: chartreuse 1/32-ounce jigs CONTACT: Tommy Tidwell, crappie1@hotmail.com, 512-365-7761 TIPS: The crappie are very fat after feeding all summer on shad. They are feeding heavily and are very willing to take a jig dropped over brush piles in 6-12 feet of water. LOCATION: Lake Medina HOTSPOT: Walton Island GPS: N29 33.897, W98 55.3851 (29.564950, -98.923085) SPECIES: white bass BEST BAITS: live minnows, small chrome or white jigging spoons, Rat-L-Traps, shad-colored grubs, shad topwaters CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: White bass fishing is best at night with floating or submersible fishing lights. Anchor off the points or next to a bluff along the main river channel. Position several lights around the boat. Baitfishes will move in first, then the white bass. LOCATION: Canyon Lake HOTSPOT: Tom’s Creek GPS: N29 52.38528, W98 15.47004 (29.873088, -98.257834) SPECIES: smallmouth bass BEST BAITS: Smoke/red flake, Watermel-

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on, Pumpkin, and silver fleck tubes, grubs, and worms rigged on 1/8-ounce to 1/4ounce jigheads; Zara Puppies, Pop-Rs, medium-diving lures CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Look for bushes and rocks in 1015 feet of water along breaklines and points. Fish topwater lures early and late. Swim grubs along the bottom to get strikes. Fish crankbaits and grubs along the bluffs. LOCATION: Lake Travis HOTSPOT: Anderson Bend GPS: N30 22.06998, W98 0.58998 (30.367833, -98.009833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Bone or shad-colored topwaters; purple, Watermelon-red and red shad plastic worms and tubes; chartreuse spinnerbaits; crawfish-patterned crankbaits CONTACT: David Burlington, dave@bassindave.com, 210-833-9417, www.bassindave.com TIPS: Topwater lures early. Once the surface bite is over, throw a spinnerbait or crankbait in the same areas; plastic worms catch less-active fish. Also focus on docks, a key cover on this lake. BANK ACCESS: Pace Bend Park for bass, catfish

SOUTH TEXAS PLAINS

Bass on the Border by BOB HOOD bhood@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Falcon Lake HOTSPOT: Big Tiger Creek GPS: N26 44.32602, W99 8.74998 (26.738767, -99.145833) SPECIES: largemouth bass BEST BAITS: Carolina-rigged soft plastics CONTACT: Robert Amaya, Robert’s Fish N’Tackle, robert@robertsfishntackle.com, 956-765-1442 N O R T H

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TIPS: Work the brush lines early with crankbaits, targeting those close to rock piles or rocky banks and then move out to 12 to 18 feet of water and work the underwater bushes along the main channel and other drop-offs with the Carolina-rigged worms. LOCATION: Calaveras HOTSPOT: Granny’s Cove GPS: N29 17.084, W98 18.293 (29.284733, -98.304883) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live shad, gold spoons; swimbaits in blue, purple, chartreuse CONTACT: Jeff Snyder, 210-649-2435 TIPS: The water is beginning to cool from summertime highs, and redfish take the cue as time to fee. Fish the east side of the cove. Live shad or small sunfish on a bottom rig are the best bet, but gold spoons or 1/2-ounce swimbaits such as Storm’s Wildeye Shad also work quite well. Use stout tackle, because these fish can run large and have plenty of stuff to run your line over.

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LOWER GULF COAST

South Bay Specks by CALIXTO GONZALES cgonzales@fishgame.com

LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Southeast Corner GPS: N26 1.548, W97 11.02302 (26.0258, -97.183717) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live pinfish, DOA tandem in Smoke, black/clear/glitter, Glow/pink CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Drift from the Southeast corner of the bay out into deeper water. Trout will be spreading out on the flats and holding in deeper pockets.

LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Center Channel GPS: N26 2.59398, W97 10.95198 (26.043233, -97.182533) SPECIES: flounder BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live finger mullet, Gulp! Shrimp in Glow, Rootbeer CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Fish the edges with fish-finder rigs and live bait or soft plastics on 1/4-ounce jigheads. Bounce the jigheads along the bottom around cuts in the grass beds. LOCATION: South Bay HOTSPOT: Center Channel GPS: N26 2.59398, W97 10.95198 (26.043233, -97.182533) SPECIES: black drum BEST BAITS: live shrimp, fresh shrimp CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Fish in the channel itself for cruising schools of black drum. Use live or fresh shrimp on a free-line rig with a 1/4-ounce split shot sinker. Anchor up on the edges


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and not in the channel. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Mexequita Flats GPS: N26 3.624, W97 11.523 (26.0604, -97.19205) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwaters early; Gulp! Jerk Shad and Shrimp in Rootbeer, Lime Glow CONTACT: Captain Eddie Curry, 956943-8301, www.currygishing.com TIPS: Schools of bigger redfish cruise these flats just prior to moving out to through Brazos Santiago Pass. Big topwaters in Bone, Chrome/blue are solid bets. If fish begin sitting in potholes, work a shrimp tail or jerkbait past them. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Brownsville Ship Channel GPS: N26 2.124, W97 13.10802 (26.0354, -97.218467) SPECIES: snook BEST BAITS: live shrimp, live mullet, SPI Lures tandems in glow/pink, chartreuse; topwaters CONTACT: Captain Allen Salinas, 956943-3474 TIPS: Fish around docks and riprap with topwaters and soft plastics early in the morning. There are some very big snook in the Ship Channel in late summer and early fall. Live bait works well, too. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Drum Boats GPS: N26 10.713, W97 11.10702 (26.17855, -97.185117) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwaters, gold spoons, Gulp! Shrimp and jerkbaits in New Penny, Rootbeer CONTACT: Captain Eddie Curry, 956943-8301; www.curryfishing.com TIPS: Redfish take off in September. Fish are very aggressive as they feed prior to migrating Gulf-ward. Use topwaters and gold spoons for best results. Don’t discount Gulp! baits, especially on windier days. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands 70 |

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GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: There won’t be as many trout as in past months, but the ones you find will be good solid 18 to 24-inch trout. Use larger baits to tempt them. A topwater like a Top Dog or Super spook are classic bit trout getters. LOCATION: Lower Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: East of Three Islands GPS: N26 16.95, W97 16.00002 (26.2825, -97.266667) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: soft plastics, topwaters, cut ballyhoo CONTACT: Captain Mike Knox, Blasttocast.com 956-243-0039 TIPS: This is the prime time of year to ambush herds of redfish as they start to move towards the passes. Early in the month, you will find the smaller groups of redfish developing. Look for groups of redfish moving south, fish soft plastics in white / chartreuse LOCATION: South Padre Island HOTSPOT: Andie Bowie Park (Bank Access) GPS: N26 8.90802, W97 10.17102 (26.148467, -97.169517) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live mullet, cut ballyhoo, cut mullet, silver spoons, soft plastics CONTACT: White Sands Marina, 956943-2414 TIPS: Surf-fishermen have a shot at a big bull redfish starting in September. A bottom rig with live or cut fish is tough to beat. Some anglers like to “run and gun” up and down the beach and stop to fish spots that look fishy. LOCATION: South Padre Island HOTSPOT: Boca Chica Beach GPS: N26 3.02802, W97 9.174 T E X A S

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(26.050467, -97.1529) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live finger mullet, cut mullet, ballyhoo; soft plastics in glow/chartreuse, red/white, chartreuse/white tail CONTACT: Captain Jimmy Martinez, 956551-9581 TIPS: Watch for changes in the surf shoreline and set up in the first gut early in the morning, and the second gut as the day progresses.

MIDDLE GULF COAST

Cavallo at Port O by TOM BEHRENS tbehrens@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Port O’Connor HOTSPOT: East Cavallo Hump GPS: N28 14.9778, W96 13.7052 (28.24963, -96.22842) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish grass lines and sand pockets LOCATION: San Antonio Bay HOTSPOT: Big Reef GPS: N28 22.2, W96 25.71 (28.370, 96.42850) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch or live croaker CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361.785.2986 TIPS: Key on oyster shell bottoms LOCATION: Mesquite Bay HOTSPOT: Rattlesnake Reef GPS: N28 7.92702, W96 52.06542 (28.132117, -96.867757) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Texas Tackle Factory Red Killers in white, Pumpkinseed, or chartreuse, with 1/8-ounce jigheads N O R T H

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CONTACT: Capt. Chris Martin, 361-7852686 TIPS: Fish the drop-off LOCATION: Redfish Bay HOTSPOT: Klondike Reef GPS: N27 54.468, W97 6.7662 (27.9078, -97.11277) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live piggy perch under a Mansfield Mauler CONTACT: Capt. Brent Hopkins, 361729-6911 TIPS: Keep your leader just long enough to keep the perch out of the grass LOCATION: Copano Bay HOTSPOT: Copano Reef GPS: N28 6.70698, W97 6.40398 (28.111783, -97.106733) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live shrimp under a popping cork CONTACT: Capt. Ed. Zielinski, 361-7292026 TIPS: The trout will stay shallow until

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the first cold front comes through.

to keep the perch above the grass.” Caserta

LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N27 54.28398, W97 6.00198 (27.904733, -97.100033) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or piggy perch CONTACT: Capt. John Filla, 361-2152332 TIPS: Towards the end of the month, big redfish should start to appear in 1-2 feet of water.

LOCATION: Upper Laguna Madre HOTSPOT: Intracoastal Canal GPS: N27 16.674, W97 23.82102 (27.2779, -97.397017) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: Check the deep water potholes along the canal

LOCATION: Corpus Christi Bay HOTSPOT: Causeway GPS: N27 51.89298, W97 21.13002 (27.864883, -97.352167) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: live piggy perch, mullet, or shad CONTACT: Capt. Michael Caserta, 361790-6374 TIPS: “When fishing over the flats, I put a bubble float on with a long enough leader

LOCATION: Port Aransas HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N27 50.61498, W97 3.44298 (27.843583, -97.057383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: live menhaden or crab CONTACT: Capt. Randy Filla, 361-2152332 TIPS: Redfish action should heat up along the jetties by the end of September. LOCATION: Sabine Lake


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HOTSPOT: Jetties GPS: N29 40.371, W93 50.25 (29.67285, -93.8375) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics such as the Big Nasty and Bomber Flukes with chartreuse tails

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CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Trout are in the transition period between summer and fall.

UPPER GULF COAST

Big, Nasty Specks by TOM BEHRENS tbehrens@fishgame.com

LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Beachfront GPS: N29 40.62744, W93 52.70766 (29.677124, -93.878461) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Catch 5 and Catch 2000 CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: The second week in September is when the main bull redfish run usually takes place. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: East Pass GPS: N29 58.92, W93 47.13498 (29.982, -93.785583) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in natural colors CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Look for working birds. LOCATION: Sabine Lake HOTSPOT: Green’s Bayou GPS: N29 49.68786, W93 48.99516 (29.828131, -93.816586) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: soft plastics in bright colors for off-colored water; natural colors in clear water CONTACT: Capt. Bill Watkins, 409-6739211 TIPS: Lots of rain in September could shove the shrimp from the marshes out into the lake; the trout will follow the shrimp. LOCATION: Trinity Bay HOTSPOT: The Wells GPS: N29 42.67398, W94 48.513 (29.711233, -94.80855) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: Bass Assassins in 10W40 72 |

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and Chicken on a Chain colors, using 1/8 or 1/4-ounce jigheads; Jig head size is based on wind and tide CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Good location for a lot of reds and some good trout in September

SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: She Dog topwater baits; soft plastics in Pumpkinseed CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: Look for rafting mullet. Good spot in late September

LOCATION: East Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Hannah’s Reef GPS: N29 28.6806, W94 45.6786 (29.47801, -94.76131) SPECIES: speckled trout BEST BAITS: Red Shad Bass Assassin with 1/8-ounce jigheads CONTACT: Capt. Steve Hillman, 409256-7937 TIPS: In September, you are not going to catch a lot of trout but the fish you catch will be big. If it’s a sunny day, try baits in Limetreuse color.

LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Cotton’s GPS: N28 30.60198, W96 12.603 (28.510033, -96.21005) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: crab or pink shrimp flies CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: September is a good time for the angler using a fly rod for redfish in West Matagorda Bay. The fish are starting to school; concentrate on grass beds.

LOCATION: Galveston Bay HOTSPOT: Seabrook Flats GPS: N29 33.306, W95 1.38498 (29.5551, -95.023083)

LOCATION: West Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Shell Island GPS: N28 37.65498, W96 3.80202 (28.627583, -96.063367) SPECIES: redfish

BEST BAITS: She Pups and SkitterWalks CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: Look for pods of redfish along the grassy shoreline. The fish will be chasing shrimp in the grass. LOCATION: East Matagorda Bay HOTSPOT: Hog Island GPS: N28 39.25398, W95 52.70298 (28.654233, -95.878383) SPECIES: redfish BEST BAITS: topwater lures early; Norton Bull Minnows in Black Magic color later in the day CONTACT: Capt. Tommy Countz, 281450-4037 TIPS: Look for working beds


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PHOTO: © CHRIS AUSTIN | DREAMSTIME

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PART TWO Two-Part Series

Life on the Bottom MAGINE GETTING TO LIE AROUND THE POOL, varieties, but dockside harvest surveys show concealed from everyone, watching the that southern flounder make up 95 percent world go by, and having fresh fish deliv- of the flatfish catch in the Gulf. All flatfishes, ered to you any time you want including the it. Then, once a year, you head out southern flountoward the Gulf to socialize and der, are lateral come back to the coast in the spring. • TF&G Executive Editor and spend That is essentially the life of the flounder. They lie camouflaged on the bot- most of their life on the bottom, where they tom, the tides bring fish to them, and then swim on their sides and lie in ambush for unsuspecting baitfishes. In the case of our make one big trip to mate once a year. Paralichthys lethostigma, the southern perennial favorite, the southern flounder, the flounder, is the largest of more than 25 left side is always the “up” side while in species of flatfishes found in Gulf coastal other species the opposite is true. The flounder is tailor made for life on waters. Anglers occasionally catch other

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the bottom. When the fish first hatch, they have eyes on each side of their head, one of which eventually migrates to the opposite side. Both eyes in adults are on the “up” side of the head and the coloration of the upper side of the body varies greatly to match the surrounding environment. The down or bottom side of all flounder is solid white. Anglers often catch flounder that look almost coal black, but spot up when held. That is the flounders attempt to match its new surroundings. No one ever said flounder were intelligent creatures, just adaptable. N O R T H

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Flounder can change colors more than most anglers might think. I once kept several flounder in a 400-gallon aquarium I created for fish behavior study in my workshop. The sand in the aquarium was fine white sand used for sandblasting. The flounder in this tank turned a very, very light shade of gray and their normally white spots were almost a luminescent white. It was interesting to see. There is some debate over the life history of these fish, but the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department gives a good explanation in a publication called The Southern Flounder in Texas: “Adult southern flounder leave the bays during the fall for spawning in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn for the first time when two years old at depths of 50 to 100 feet. The eggs are buoyant. “Females become sexually mature at two years of age in Texas waters. The youngest mature female southern flounder in northern Florida was four years old according to scientists there. Of the mature females collected in August, eight percent of the four year-olds, five percent of the five year olds, and 18 percent of the six-year-olds were developing eggs. “After hatching, the larval fish swim in an upright position and the eyes are located on opposite sides of the head. As the young fish grows, the right eye begins to “migrate” to the left side of the head. When body length reaches one-half inch or so, the eye migration is complete and the fish assumes its left-side-up position for life.”

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into estuaries is in February, when water temperatures are still low. Small flounder grow rapidly and might reach 12 inches in length by the end of their first year. As noted in my book, Flounder Fever, males seldom exceed 12 inches, but females grow larger than males and often reach a length of 25 inches. Most flounder caught by anglers are females between 12 and 16 inches long, weighing 1 to 1-1/2 pounds. This does not mean flounder cannot get huge though. The Texas state record is a 13-pounder caught by H. Endicott of Groves at Pleasure Island in 1976. The world record is a 22-pounder caught in Florida in the 1980s, and there have been reports of a number of other truly monstrous flounder caught throughout the years. Late author A.C. Becker caught a 17-pounder in a shrimp trawl in the mouth of Double Bayou near Anahuac in 1948. To attain such sizes, a flounder would have to be very old and it would have to be a supreme predator—which is exactly what flounder are.

Flounder do not put up impressive jumping displays like a tarpon nor make brutal, determined runs like a redfish, but they are certainly a challenge to catch. They do not chase and corral schools of baitfish like speckled trout, redfish, mackerel and sharks do. For the most part, flounder are ambush predators, lying camouflaged on the bottom and waiting for prey to come to them. It is a very effective way of making a living. Sometimes it is possible to encounter flounder chasing baitfish on a shallow flat or point, but that is rare, indeed. Understanding this dynamic is the key to catching these delectable, challenging fish. Editor’s Note: Chester Moore will be hosting a unique free event called “Flatfish University” on Saturday October 9. To learn more about the event, email cmoore@fishgame.com.

At this point, the young fish enter the bays during late winter and early spring. They are about 1/2-inch in length and seek shallow grassy areas near the Gulf passes. Southern flounder post-larvae show up all along the Gulf of Mexico coast during winter and early spring. According to studies in Aransas Bay, the peak movement of post-larvae flounders N O R T H

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transferring energy to the end of the blade and delivering an extra wallop as it twists and spins through the water. You can feel the vibration at each turn of the blades and big bass notice the extra action as well. STANLEY LURES HAS COMBINED TWO OF THEIR “What you have is a wedge that comes most innovative designs into a single spinthrough the water, with the vibration of an ner bait for maximum thump and vibraIndiana or Colorado blade and the flash of tion... the Vibra-Wedge. a willow leaf,” says Stanley. Two patents, Vibrashaft wire and “It pulls and moves Wedge blades, combined to produce more water than any Stanley Lures’ more water displacement than any other other willow blade on new spinnerbait spinnerthe market.” Stanley Jigs has been Vibra-Wedge building spinnerbaits and jigs for over 30 years and we build only what we know to be proven winners. We set the standard, you set the hook.

Stanley Spins a New Vibe

bait on the market. The blades are wedge-shaped —— thin at the top and thicker at the base,

For more information please contact: kenchaumont@fishstanley.com, or visit www.fishstanley.com.

Guns Get the Royal Treatment ROYAL PURPLE HAS DEVELOPED HIGH performance synthetic gun oil. Royal Purple gun oil is specifically formulated to provide exceptional wear protection as well as protection against rust and saltwater corrosion. It also prevents fouling. According to World Champion Sporting Clay Shooter and Elite Shooting School Instructor Bobby Fowler, Jr., “I’ve tried every gun lube out there. None of them compare to Royal Purple (gun oil) ”. Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil works well in a variety of temperatures and will not thicken in cold weather. Its performance advantages come from Synerlec, Royal Purple’s propriety chemical technology that strengthens the oil for unmatched performance and protection. No other gun oil is available with Synerlec technology. In addition to gun applications, Royal Purple’s synthetic gun oil can also be used for other applications such as fishing tackle, locks hinges and more. Contact: Royal Purple Inc., One Royal Purple Lane, Porter, TX 77365, 281-354-8600, www.royalpurple.com. High-performance oil for guns.

Royal Purple

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PHOTOS COURTESY MFG’S

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Wicked Never Looked So Good WICKED RIDGE CROSSBOWS, A NEW BREED of crossbow designed and engineered by TenPoint, provides its customers with high quality, precision performance crossbows and accessories that are simple, reliable, and affordable. Wicked Ridge is committed to manufacturing superior products which outperform the competition Wicked Ridge at similar price-points. crossbow from Customers can expect TenPoint the same customer serWicked Bow vice that TenPoint Crossbow Technologies has been noto-

rious for providing. The Wicked Ridge product line consists of two crossbows and a few accessories. Leading the way is the Invader crossbow. Generating devastating speed and dead-center accuracy, the Invader sports a 180-pound draw weight creating shooting speeds of 305 fps. The package includes the new ACU-52 integrated, selfretracting rope cocking system, Ridge-Dot 40mm, multi-dot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The MSRP is $499.00. The second model, the Warrior, offers a lighter draw weight of 165-pounds while shooting an ideal speed of 285 FPS. This product provides a cost effective, yet precision performance alternative to its more powerful counterpart, the Invader. The Warrior package includes the RidgeDot 40mm, multi-dot scope, and a 6 arrow quiver. The bow is also designed to accept the addition of an ACU-52 integrated, self-retracting rope cocking system. The MSRP is $399.00. All Wicked Ridge Crossbows are covered by a 5-year warranty www.wickedridgecrossbows.com

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Miss November Inflatable Deer Decoy EASY ON THE EYES AND HARD TO IGNORE, Tink’s new Miss November deer decoy is every buck’s and hunter’s dream come true. Miss November utilizes High-Definition printing technology to provide a realistic look and soft texture that feels real and is irresistible to those love sick bucks. Every detail is highlighted right down to the super-light tail that moves with the slightest breeze. This lightweight inflatable decoy is compact enough to be conveniently car-

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ried in a backpack. Miss November Once you reach your stand location, Miss November’s oversized air valve makes it quick and effortless to inflate. This inflatable system eliminates the hassle of noisy, molded plastic or foam decoys that are cumbersome to pack into those remote honey holes. You can enhance your decoy setup by applying Tink’s 69 Doe-In-Rut? to the free Tink’s Stretch Wicks?. The lightweight, compact size also makes it easy to carry in your luggage for those cross-country hunting trips. The system includes the doe decoy, four

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metal stakes, two Tink’s Stretch Wicks? and the decoy placement instruction sheet. All this comes at a value that cannot be matched by other decoys of this quality.

.223 Round Gets Shock Treatment EXTREME SHOCK IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE innovation of new .223 rifle round. This round embodies the reliability and safety of the handgun Air Freedom Rounds. Specifically Extreme Shock’s designed for tacnew .223 round.

Air Freedom

tical entry teams in an urban environment, where it is crucial to contain the rounds within a limited space. The frangible characteristics of the new AFR make it a necessity when the situation requires a round with no ricochet, reduced over penetration, and will drop all the kinetic energy inside the target thereby reducing liabilities. This round is designed to fragment after passing through two ¾ inch sheetrock partitions, thus making your .223 rifle an ideal home-defense weapon. SPECIFICATIONS Cartridge: .223 30gr AFR Projectile: 30 grain Tungsten core, 80 |

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copper-jacketed, flat-base, round nose Velocity: 3,100 feet per second Energy: 816 ft lbs of energy Test Weapon: Colt M4 with a 14 inch barrel. Contact: Extreme Shock Ammunition, Inc., 182 Camp Jacob Road, Clintwood, VA 24228-9657 Phone: (276) 926-6772 Fax: (276) 926-6092 Website: www.extremeshockusa.net

Pocket-Sized Night Vision MINOX HAS ADDED TO THEIR WIDE RANGE OF optical equipment with introduction of a reliable new night vision device, the ultracompact NV mini II. It’s one of the smallest in the world, barely larger than a lipstick. Overall length is just 4-3/16”, the lens diameter is Iess than one inch and it weighs only 6.3 ounces.

discreet orientation or observation on land or at sea, for hunting or protecting property in low-light situations, from twilight and into full night. Night vision devices are needed when even the most powerful binoculars, with a high twilight factor, reach their optical limits. The multi-coated lens system on the new MINOX NV mini II provides a brilliant and clear image. And if the available light is not sufficient to provide a visible image, even when amplified, it has a connectible infrared illuminator. This additional light source, not seen by the human eye, provides perfect vision in complete darkness, such as on a moonless night or in a dense forest. With its ultra-compact size and minimal weight, the NV mini II can be used anywhere. Its ergonomic design and partially rubber armoring of the body, ensures silent, safe handling. It comes with a wrist strap and battery. Retail price is $649. Contact: Minox/USA Address: P.O. Box 123 City, State: Meriden, NH

Minox NV mini II night vision device.

Night Sight With its 2x magnification and ability to amplify available residual light, such as stars or horizon radiation not perceived by the human eye, the NV mini II is ideal for T E X A S

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03770; Phone: (866) 469-3080; Fax: (603) 469-3471 Email: usa@minox.com Website: www.minox.com/usa. N O R T H

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floor bolts, adding an extra layer of security and peace of mind. Visit www.pendletonsafes.com.

Keeping the King’s Guns Safe Looks Just Like a Bale of... ‘Hey!’ PENDLETON SAFES INTRODUCES THE NEW King Series Safes, built for the collector who demands the best. They include all standard gun management and security features offered on all Pendleton safes, as well as the premium features such as customization to secure up to 40 rifles and 54 pistols and is equipped with motorized Revolution Technology, which is a unique circular design with a modular shelving system that rotates 360° at the touch of a button to bring your guns directly to you. Other features include interior LED lighting, electronic moisture control, motorized rotation with outer shelf and the lockbolt indicator LED. The King Series is 100% Steel and a solid, fully reinforced ¼” highstrength, low-alloy steel top and bottom, detouring burglars as they often turn a safe Pendelton’s new upside King Series gun down, expossafes. ing the vulneraCastle Keep ble area on the bottom of a safe. The bolt operates on an innovative cam system that prevents tampering. If pushed on, the bolt will push back, making it impossible to retract the bolt by force. The specially designed ball-bearing hard plate prevents drilling out of the lock and protects the relocking mechanism from tampering. All Pendleton Safes are pre-drilled for N O R T H

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NEW FROM SPORTSMAN'S CONDO IS THEIR "Bale Condo,"designed to look like a bale of hay. This new design from the solid blind technology pioneer is a true "crossover blind," meaning it is a perfect fit for gun, bow, and crossbow hunters. The Bale Condo weighs 300 pounds and Roomy new blind measures 6designed to look 1/2 feet in like a bale of hay. length and 67 inches tall. Bale Condo There is

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plenty of room for two hunters, or a hunter and video camera. Built-in runners allow for easy transport. Special features include removable shoot through mesh screen, glass windows and bow holder. There is even enough room to spend the night to beat that big buck back to his bed. For more information contact Mark at Southern Outdoor Technologies,662-2955702 or visit www.sportsmanscondo.com

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Cor-Bon DPX Ammunition I RECENTLY RECEIVED A TEST SAMPLE OF THE new Cor-Bon handgun ammunition. It is a partnership between Cor-Bon and Barnes Bullets. It is called DPX and comes in all the standard handgun calibers. My samples are in .45 Colt and .44 Magnum. DPX (no, I don't know what it stands for) is intended as self-defense ammunition. It incorporates a cavernous, solid copper hol-

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penetration. The advertisement on the box says: “DPX provides excellent expansion and deeper penetration due to the solid copper bullet. It retains 100% of its weight even after going through hard barriers like steel and glass.” Another advantage is getting high energy self-defense ammo with relatively mild recoil. By lessening the bullet weight the recoil is lessened also. When I first shot the .45 Colt ammo I was prepared for a handjarring explosion. I got the explosion, but recoil was much milder than I expected. I shot the .44 Magnum ammo in a 4-

pain of recoil that was not there. The next 4 shots went where they belonged. I would like to use this new ammunition on a hog or deer before I make any bold statements about its performance as a selfdefense or hunting round, but I feel safe in saying that it really is very good stuff. In fact, 6 of the big, ugly hollow points currently reside in the chambers of my S&W Model 25 .45 Colt Mountain Gun, a gun I carry a lot. DPX is not cheap, selling for over $50.00 a box. But how much is your life worth? The official Cor-Bon website is www.dakotaammo.net. —Steve LaMascus

Sebile Spin Shad

low point, in a lighter than normal weight, and higher than normal velocity. The .45 Colt +P ammo is loaded with a 225-grain HP at a blistering 1200 feet per second. The normal velocity for the 250-grain 45 Colt is about 850 fps. The .44 Magnum is also loaded with a 225grain hollow point, but at 1350 fps. The idea with the big hollow point at high velocity is to give massive impact energy and tissue destruction, which equates to stopping power, while the tough, solid copper bullet will still provide deep, positive 82 |

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The author pulled his first shot low and left, expecting more recoil than he got from Cor-Bon’s new DPX load.

Cor-Bon DPX inch S&W Model 29 with the thin, Roper plain clothes grips. This is a carrying rig, not a shooting-a-lot rig. With heavy handloads it is not very pleasant. With the CorBon DPX it was surprisingly shootable. Recoil was there, but not enough to bother an experienced handgunner. You will notice in the photo, the first shot I pulled low and left, expecting the T E X A S

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EVERYTHING THAT IS OLD IS NEW AGAIN. I’M not sure who first coined that phrase but I bet it was a bass fisherman walking down the aisle of his local tackle shop. Just about every “new” lure I see looks like a simple variation of something already riding in my tackle box and that was my initial impression when I first saw the new Sebile Spin Shad. I thought it was just an updated version of Mann’s Little George tail spinner but as soon as I took it out of the box I knew this was not your average hunk of lead with a spinner on its backside. Just like all lures manufactured by Sebile, the Spin Shad has a finish that is one of the best in the business which sets it apart from the other tail spinners on the market. What also differentiates the Spin Shad from the rest of the field is the fact that the body is made from bismuth instead of lead. The main body has features that mimic real bait fish and the design of the spinner mimics the shape of the body, with a wide nose and small tail. This design allows the blade to spin, even when retrieved at very low speeds. The Spin Shad is offered in two differN O R T H

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ent sizes, a Sebile’s Spin ¾ ounce Shad: a high-tech new twist on the version with old tail spinner. a single treble hook Spin Shad hanging from the belly of the main bait, and a 1 ¼ ounce size that also has a treble hanging off the back. Being heavy for their size, the Spin Shad can be cast a mile and the only thing limiting the distance you can chunk one is the amount of line you have on your reel. The weight lends one to believe that these baits are solely used for deep water applications but they can be used anywhere you would use a lipless crankbait or spinner bait including skinny water. As far as effectiveness, it takes just a few casts to realize that the Spin Shad is a flat out fish catching machine that catches just about anything that swims. The first fish I caught on one was crappie which was shortly followed up by both largemouth and white bass. A few weeks later this same lure (the exact same one, not just one similar) also caught speckled trout and Spanish mackerel in the surf. Anything that eats a baitfish, which is just about everything swimming, will hit a Spin Shad so an angler would be smart to add a few of both sizes to their arsenal. www.sebileusa.com —Paul Bradshaw

High UV Protection Buff THE VERY NATURE OF OUR HOBBIES (HUNTING, fishing, camping, etc…) leads us to spend more time outside than the average person. On any given weekend it’s likely that you and I will spend more time in the sun than some individuals get in a month. Because of this, outdoorsmen (and women) are more susceptible to skin cancer than most. It seems like each year I have more and more friends who have cancerous areas removed from ears, hands, or arms which are a direct result of over exposure to the sun. Since not going outside isn’t really an

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option, protecting your skin from sun exposure is imperative. In the past that meant slathering up with SPF50 but now there is light weight clothing that not only protects but stays cool enough for you to stay outside all day. The latest piece of protective clothing I started wearing is an Angler High UV Buff. Popularized by the reality television series Survivor, a buff is a flexible fabric sleeve (for lack of a better term) that can be worn around your neck and head or covering both the neck and head, or if you’re small enough (which I am not) around the torso. To test the Angler High UV Buff ’s claim of blocking 95% of the suns rays I spent a week on the beach without sunscreen, only using the buff to protect my face and neck. Not smart, but a great test. I spent over eight hours per day, for a week, surf fishing and never once got a sunburn on my face or neck. That’s impressive, but even more so is the fact that I often forgot I even had the Buff on, in spite of the odd looks the other people on the beach gave me. With temperatures in the mid to upper 90’s the Buff stayed cool and breathable. My Buff happens to be in a largemouth bass pattern but there many other colors and designs to choose from. So you can make a fashion statement while protecting your skin making it well worth the investment. www.buffusa.com. —PB

Bumper Stumper IN MY BOOK, SHOPPING FOR A SPINNERBAIT IS no different than shopping for a good bait caster. The first thing I look for is a bait that is made using high quality components. To wit: • Premium ball bearings for the blades to spin on. • A heavy-gauge wire frame stout enough to withstand lots of abuse without impeding the performance. • A "sticky" sharp hook with some length to it for grabbing short-striking fish. • Paint that resists chipping. • Premium silicone skirting. When Bumper Stumper Lures sent us a few of their "Pro Painted Series" spinnerbaits to check out earlier this year, we were impressed by the goods. Based in Flower

Mound, Tx., Bumper Stumper has a rich history in the spinnerbait/buzz bait business. They have been A few of Bumper custom Stumper’s many building colors lures in the USA since 1990s. Bumper Crop The Pro Painted Series is one of 10 different series in the company line up. What sets them aside from others in the stable are the blades. As the name suggests, they are custom painted in some exciting colors designed to get the bass' attention in water that is stained, muddy or clear. The blades are painted and glittered on one side to color coordinate with the head and skirt, while at the same time providing an alternating combination of color and flash that will sometimes produce strikes when the traditional nickel or gold blades just won't cut it. The baits are available in five sizes and 16 color combinations with double willowleaf, double Colorado and Colorado/willow models. If you see a color you like, just ask company owners Kerry Kiker and Richard Deatherage. They can mix and match to order. I put a 3/8-ounce white willowleaf model to the test last spring and it scored high marks in all the key arenas. Not only did it fool countless bass in shallow, muddy water. It caught them, thanks on part to a super sharp Mustad long shank hook. Equally impressive was the way the bait held up well to dozens of violent strikes dished out by bass up to up seven pounds. The .035 gauge wire got knocked out of whack multiple times, yet it continued to run true with some minor adjustments. If you are in the market for a premium spinnerbait, Bumper Stumper is certainly worth a look. To learn more about the Pro Painted Series or the entire family of Bumper Stumper baits,, 972-757-5893, or www.bumperstumper.com. —Matt Williams PHOTOS COURTESY MFG’S

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Cor-Bon Named Manufacturer of the Year

PHOTO COURTESY COR-BON

CORBON/GLASER AMMUNITION IS HONORED by the Black Hills Community Economic Development by being chosen to receive their Manufacturer of the Year award. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition was chosen to receive this honor due to its commitment to quality and excellence in manufacturing, located in the small community of Sturgis, South Dakota. The decision was unanimous by the board and selected from several other manufacturers within the surrounding communities of the Black Hills. Lt Governor Daugaard addressed the dinner and proceedings. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition started manufacturing 28 years ago in Detroit, Michigan, then moved to Sturgis in 1995 in search of a strong business climate and

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appeals to law enforcement agencies, specialty military units, private citizens, and hunters. Peter and Elaine Pi and their sons Pete and Dane, are primary owners and operators of the American family owned corporation. For information, call 800-6267266 or visit www.corbon.com

Minn Kota Receives ICAST Best of Show MINN KOTA’S INTRODUCTION INTO THE SHALlow water anchor market proved successful as it captured Best of Show honors in the Marine Category at the 53rd annual International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades (ICAST) show held in Las Vegas July 14-16. The new Talon was praised by show-goers for its innovative design and features that make it perform quietly, quickly, and built to last.

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“Talon proved to be a grand slam for us at ICAST,” Minn Kota Marketing Director Joe Brown said. “We wanted to come into the shallow water anchor market with a product that would be superior to anything else currently available. Buyers and media representatives were blown away by the innovative features offered on Talon.” T E X A S

- Auto-Drive for automatic anchoring - Rough Water Mode continues the anchoring sequence to assure a secure hold in any conditions - Built-in wireless remote comes standard - Built-in Wave Absorption provides a floating suspension system to keep spike anchored when boat rocks - Easy, less expensive installation - Vertical and tilt adjustments for mounting flexibility - LED indicator lights show when spike is deployed and at what depth - Deployment Notification Alarm can be wired to the ignition to sound an alarm when the key is turned and the spike is still deployed Talon comes with a comprehensive 2year warranty and lifetime guarantee on the spike. It is available with a 6-foot, 4-inch or 8-foot, 4-inch spike and choice of a black or white color scheme. The manufacturer’s suggested retail prices for Talon are $1299 with a 6-4 spike and $1449 with an 8-4 inch spike. All models can be used in freshwater or saltwater and come standard with two wireless remote controls. Talon will be available to consumers this fall. For more information, visit minnkotamotors.com or call 800-227-6433.

CORBON/Glaser’s staff show off their Manufacturer of the Year award.

top-grade workCORBON Honored force. The Sturgis area has created a reputation for becoming the new firearms and ammunition cluster in the Midwest due to its attractive economic development climate. Cor-Bon/Glaser Ammunition manufactures proven, high quality ammunition. It offers a wide variety of ammunition that

The New Products Showcase competition drew 750 tackle and accessories entries. Entries were judged by buyers and media representatives based on innovation, execution, workmanship, and practicality. Key features of Talon include:

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Chewy’s Cove ARLIER THIS SUMMER, I HAD THE PLEASURE of guiding Brian Burton and his 14year-old son, Matthew, on a kayak fishing trip. It was Mathew’s first fishing trip in the salt. Raindrops tapped on the hulls of our kayaks as we raced the dawn to the coast and the crackle of lightning interrupted Captain Mickey’s radio show coming from the car’s speakers. “We have a weather system moving in from the Gulf.” I said. “Let’s hope it clears soon.” A nasty lightning storm had cleared the coast and was moving inland when we topped the bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. We offloaded our yaks, rigged backrests and tackle, and pushed off into the clear, green water. The game plan was to fish the shallows early, dropping back into deeper water as the heat of the day increased. Brian headed down the shoreline a bit while Matthew, called “Chewy” by his family, and I stopped at scalloped area of spartina grass. Chewy fingered the 12-pound-test and fired a cast toward the shoreline. The little topwater wiggled across the surface for a stretch, only to foul on some floating seagrass. Standing next to Chewy in the knee-deep water, I showed him how to leave a rod’s length of line out and then gently swing the lure into your hand to pick off the strands of grass. In just five or six casts, my young charge was looking like a seasoned wade-fisherman. Unfortunately, seagrass was all we were catching so we hopped back in the kayaks and spent the next hour hop scotching down the shoreline in search of fish, Brian stopping at one cove, Chewy and I probing the next. Each stop involved a little more coaching: “Remember to slide your feet. If you can hear

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yourself wading through the water, you are going too fast.” Already possessing good fishing skills, Chewy, a soccer player on the freshman team at Ft. Bend Austin High School, was able to hone his casting skills making repeated casts shoreward. The fish were holding tight to the grass and wouldn’t travel far to eat. Chewy dropped a cast several inches from the bright green spartina and worked it down the edge. A trout, using the grass to break up its silhouette, detonated on the surface plug and Chewy’s rod bent into a pleasing arch. I slid the landing net under it and Chewy’s first trout taped an honest 16 inches. His smile was contagious. The action slowed so we hopped back in the ‘yaks and drift-fished so we could prospect a larger area. A promising looking cove beckoned ahead, stretching way back into the shoreline, so we anchored and grabbed our tackle. The corners of several broad tails broke the water’s surface, periodically submerging and coming up again. The fire red color was highlighted by the sunlight and the turquoise strip on each tail was unmistakable. Redfish! Brian and I saw the tails at the same time and urged Chewy to slide into casting range. He dropped his topwater into the middle of the cove and it quickly became a maelstrom as the entire school of reds raced one another to get to the wiggling bait. Seconds later, he was hooked up and the spool of his spinning reel screeched like a scalded cat. The redfish headed for the open bay, abandoning the tight confines of the inlet. A game of tug-of-war broke out as the red refused to surrender. Chewy kept his rod tip high and line tight, playing the fish patiently until it began to tire. Obstinately, the big fish circled the young angler four times before sliding over on its side. A quick sweep of the net and Chewy added a redfish to his stringer. Easing back to the mouth of the cove, Chewy made fan casts to probe every inch of the small cove. The bulbous head of a red T E X A S

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plowed through the shallows as it followed the topwater bait for a full 10 feet then violently lunged for it, creating a huge swirl with its broad tail. Again, the red hightailed it out of the close quarters, hoping it could secure its freedom in the open bay. Chewy’s second redfish was an inch shy of keeper status and it quickly swam away after being unpinned. The cove went quiet for a while. The commotion of the hooked fish had spooked the remainder of the school. Rather than leave, we paused for some water and smoked pork tenderloin I had packed as a snack. Ten minutes later, Chewy landed red No. 3. Brian and I remained fishless but were having a great time watching Matthew enjoy success on his first saltwater outing. Chewy’s last fish from the cove was a solid customer, creating a severe arch in his rod. Again, the drag protested as the red charged through the shallows. Moments later the line went slack and the fish was gone. A quick inspection of the little plug revealed a missing branch on the rear treble hook. It was a new lure, right out of the package, but the hook broke. The wardrobe malfunction cost Chewy his fourth red of the day and he learned first hand why we call it fishing rather than catching. All we needed was a flounder to round out a saltwater grand slam, but it wasn’t meant to be. Several stingrays milling about the cove were the closest we came to nabbing a bottom dweller. The heat of the day became increasingly ignescent and we decided to call it a day. And it was a good day. Mathews tally: one trout and three redfish, all caught on topwaters. Chewy’s Cove has become both a landmark and a great memory of young Matthew’s first saltwater fishing trip. Hopefully he will return many times, as I have to my childhood stomping grounds.

Greg Berlocher can be reached for question or comment at kayak@fishgame.com. S E P T E M B E R

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Dove Guns & Loads OVE SEASON IS HERE! THE LONG, HOT summer is nearly over, and the soulcleansing smell of gunpowder once again drifts gently on the warm breezes. Makes me want to go out and shoot something. This time of year is when ammunition manufacturers make their largest profits. Every store you walk into will have cases of Federal Game Loads stacked all over the floors. More ammo is expended on dove than on any other game animal in America. The stores are full of discount ammo that dove hunters purchase by the truckload. Most of us will do well with a standard field load. In 12-gauge, that means a load that shoots 1-1/8 ounces of shot. If it says it has less than that, beware. Some loads of less than the standard 12-gauge payload are very good. In fact, my favorite handload consists of 1 ounce of shot at about 1150 feet per second. And beware if the load brags about its velocity. That might be a way to take your attention away from the fact that it uses less shot. You do not need high velocity for dove. Anything that produces above about 1100 feet per second is just fine. Also, try to find shotshells that use plastic shot cups. Some of the low-end shells use wads and some kind of plastic shims that are supposed to protect the shot from contact with the barrel. These shells never pattern as well as those that are loaded with the tried and proven one-piece shot cup. You can tell when you shoot them because a couple or three of the thin plastic shims will come floating down to the ground like leaves falling from a dying tree. Most adults shoot 12-gauge guns and that's just fine. However, dove are small, lightboned birds and any of the gauges will work

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just fine if kept within their limits. If you are shooting a .410 or 28-gauge, you need to keep your shots inside 35 yards, but both of these smaller gauges are a lot of fun. One of my favorite types of hunting is shooting dove around a water hole with my little .410 Browning Citori. The best gauge for children to learn with is not the .410. The wonderful little caliber (.410 is the bore size, not its gauge) is an expert's gun, not an entry-level tool for children. Instead, try a single-shot 28-gauge. The kids will hit more and have more fun. If they are too small to shoot a .28-gauge, they are probably too small to hunt flying birds. A .410 is so unforgiving that it should be reserved for shooters sufficiently talented and experienced that they are looking to put more zing in their hunting; rather like the fisherman who switches to an ultralight rig in lieu of his thunderstick and 20-pound line. If you don't believe me, look up the scores shot with the .410 in NSSA skeet competition. Some shoot the .410 as well as they do the larger gauges, but the vast majority think the .410 is an unforgiving, difficult gauge and a necessary evil, and shoot it poorly compared to 28- and 20-gauges. I was A and AA in competition with all the gauges except the .410, in which I never graduated from Class B. I can attest that many targets I shot at with the .410 that didn't break, would have broken when shot at exactly the same way with a larger gauge. You can do a bit better with 3-inch shells, but it still doesn't compare with the 28gauge. Keep that in mind when buying Junior's first shotgun. If you handload, you can still get No. 7 shot. This is my favorite shot size for dove and quail. I think No. 6 is a bit too big and No. 8 a little too small. Number 7 offers a wonderfully thick pattern, yet still has the mass to get the job done if only a couple of shot hit the bird. If you don't handload, No. 7-1/2 is great. Number 8 is okay, but I think I hit and lose (“feather” in the vernacular) a few birds with No. 8 that I would have killed instantly with No. 7 or 7-1/2. T E X A S

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Dove season launches a storm of ammo buyers into stores.

Dove Time!

For you handloaders, my experience is that if I keep my velocity down to 1200 feet per second or a bit less, I get better patterns. Since your shots are (if you are an ethical hunter) under 50 yards, there is no need for higher velocity. If anything, increase your shot payload, not the velocity. The thicker pattern will increase the number of hits on each bird, but it also increases recoil. I prefer to shoot 1ounce of shot and keep the shots closer. I still do very well out to around 40 yards with a 12gauge, using a modified choke. In all the other gauges, I use the standard loads: 7/8-ounce in 20-gauge, 3/4 in 28-, and 7/8- or 1-ounce in the 16-gauge. I really love the 16-gauge, by the way. If you are having trouble killing your dove or quail, try using a more open choke and shortening the range. A full or improved-modified choke will let you make shots a little farther, but they also produce smaller patterns. I prefer a modified or improved cylinder choke, and try to keep all my shots inside 35 yards. When I switch to a full choke, I seem to fringe more birds than I do with the open chokes, and I know I try to stretch the barrel a bit more. Fall is in the air and so are the dove. Get out there and burn some powder.

E-mail Steve LaMascus at guns@fishgame.com

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The Essence of a Bow Hunter F YOU ARE LIKE ME, THEN BY NOW YOU HAVE already read all about what new and improved equipment is available today for the modern archer. Every year there is a month that most magazines dedicate to this very subject. New technology that not too long ago offered us to view any deer in our area now has the “new and improved” version. No longer do you need to trek out to your hunting grounds to check the pictures on your scouting camera. Now, you simply inspect the pictures from the comfort of your living room right after you have checked your emails. Arrows have improved and are spinning faster than ever to keep up with the new bows that boasts about how fast it can shoot an arrow. New and improved fletching is available to accommodate the new bow speed. Carbon arrows of today are designed for speed. You can purchase a bow today that shoots an arrow 350 feet per second! Every single advertisement for any bow will claim to be the fastest, most accurate bow on the market. Have we become a society that is so dependent on gadgets and technology that we have lost some of the very reason we hunt in the first place? Leaving the pavement for a while and just enjoying the beauty of the outdoors seem to have taken a backseat to some of this new technology. I know what you are thinking…and you may be right. I am starting to sound a lot like my father. “Why back in our day, we used recurve bows and hunted using our knowledge of a deer’s habits and habitat…we got plenty of deer back in the day”.

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I think that we, as bow hunters, have taken away some of the primitive aspects of hunting with a bow. I am not so sure that is a good thing. A bow hunter used to have to be able to judge different distances in order to be successful. That took some practice. A bow hunter used to have to determine when to draw his bow and be able to hold it at full draw until a clean shot could be made. That took patience. A bow hunter used to have to learn the woodlot he was hunting in by foot leather express. He had to get off the couch and take a few hikes until he could figure out the habits of the animal he hunted. That took dedication to your sport. How far do we we allow technology to take us before our “primitive” sport can no longer be called “primitive”? I, for one, think we may be there already. The modern bow hunter of today has been duped to believe that a faster bow is the better bow. Oh… it will kill more deer, because at these new speeds, a 20yard shot is no different than a 30-yard shot. Our ability to be able to judge distance in the woods is not as important as it was in the past. I ask you, is that better? Or is part of being a bow hunter being able to judge distance? A bow that has an 80% let off at full draw can be held back for a much longer time than it’s predecessor. Once the bowstring is pulled back, upper body strength is no longer a necessity for the bow hunter to hold back the string for any length of time. A hunter can now pull his or her bowstring back while the deer is still 50 yards away and simply wait until the deer is in range. The ability to know when to pull back the bowstring so the deer does not see any movement is now less important and often eliminated completely. Is that a good thing? I understand that these technological improvements in bow hunting also make it much easier to harvest the animal we are hunting. I simply feel that these “improvements” have taken some of the primitive aspects of hunting in general out of the equation. For me, bow hunting is not just aim and pull the trigger. You need to take the time to T E X A S

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learn where the deer are. You need to locate different food sources. You need to find where the deer are bedding and find where their sanctuary is. Where are the rubs and scrapes? All of this knowledge will eventually lead you to your prize. Remember, Bow hunting means getting close to the game you are after for a clean ethical shot. It means remaining undetected as your game draws ever closer to you. Bow hunting means stealth and covering all traces of human scent in the vicinity. Doing all of these without the help of modern technology brings with it a sense of satisfaction that only a veteran bow hunter knows and feels. I should make it very clear that I myself am one of those modern bow hunters that use everything technology has to offer. So, you may ask, why do I question the use of such technology? Simply put, I cut my teeth in the bow hunting world with a recurve bow and wooden arrows. The compound bow was not invented yet. I had to learn whatever was needed to get close enough for a successful whitetail hunt. It was not easy. Many trips to the hunting woods came back with nothing but memories… and those I cherish more than the hunt itself. When a new and improved model of anything was made available to the public…I had to have it, but I learned the basics of bow hunting years before. That is something that the novice bow hunter does not have to do. I have to say that by sitting in your chair to check on the deer in your area or depending on such things as speed instead of understanding the trajectory of an arrow, may not be such an “improvement” after all. I can see that there would be many pros and cons on this subject. There are way too many to discuss in this column, but if this read sparks a healthy debate on this issue, then I think that is a good thing. Hunt safe and have fun out there.

E-mail Lou Marullo at lmarullo@fishgame.com S E P T E M B E R

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Can oil really the long term. Odamage your boat? rings, gaskets, and Plenty experts are neoprene impellers saying that the danmay also be susceptiTo state the obvious, you ger is minor, nut ble damaged by the should avoid visible oil there are also some oil, though the exact (including engine effects are as of yet slicks at all cost. manufacturers and unknown. boat builders) saying If you must run the opposite. As through oil or do so much as I hate to by accident, when even think about the possiyou return to the dock flush out your engine bility of running into a slick cooling system as thoroughly as possible. of goo, let’s run down the Some people are recommending you add a preventative measures and de-oiling proce- Dawn dishwashing liquid or another dures all Texas boaters need to know. degreaser to freshwater and run it through the cooling system, but the truth of the mat1. Engines: Your biggest worry should ter is that no one knows exactly what level of be about your power plant, because many effectiveness this will have, or if it will cause engines can be damaged if the raw water problems of its own. Engine manufacturers cooling system sucks in oil. It can coat and simply have not tested for this type of probclog the water passages and coat the water lem, so they are not entirely sure of the best jacket, leading to overheating problems in way to handle it themselves. The bottom the short term and cooling system failure in line: Lots and lots of freshwater flushing can only be a good thing.

S OF THIS WRITING, IT LOOKS LIKE TEXAS dodged a direct hit from the Deepwater Horizon bullet. But what about next time? To state the obvious, you should avoid visible oil slicks at all cost. But the problem of getting oiled when you are fishing or cruising is very real and present regardless of how hard you try to avoid it. You may leave the dock in the morning with clean water, and find oil blocking your way home as the sun sets. Or you may drive through suspended or mixed oil without even realizing it. In any case, if you do not know how to handle it, you could seriously damage your boat, your engine, or both.

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2. Mechanical Systems: Any system on your boat that uses raw water, such as livewells, raw water washdowns, marine heads, air conditioners, and refrigerators, can be damaged by thick oil. In some cases, the lines running to these systems go through areas of the bilge, transom, or inwales, which are difficult or impossible to access, and you will never be able to properly clean them out. Again, prevention is your best solution. If you find it necessary to go through a slick shut off all of your seacocks and through-hull fittings, and turn all of these accessories off. If you are getting oiled before you realize it and you can’t shut off these items in time to prevent contamination, flush them as best you can with a degreaser. Pay particular attention to livewells with roto-molded polyethylene liners, because the oil can degrade the plastic. 3. Gel Coat: Common sense tells you 88 |

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that oil will clean off of gel coat fairly easily, but common sense is wrong. Actually, gel coat is a porous material and it will soak that oil into its surface, discoloring it. Let it sit long enough, and the discoloration may become permanent. Start scrubbing, ASAP. Again, use a common degreaser like Dawn. Citrus-based cleaners also work well. If thick blobs of oil are present, wipe them away with a rag then use mineral spirits to remove any sticky tar-like substances. As an extra precaution, adding a few coats of wax around the waterline area of your boat prior to launching it (or ASAP, if it is kept in the water) certainly wouldn’t do any harm. It should help seal the gel coat’s pores, and make clean-up that much easier. Can the oil do any structural damage to the fiberglass? All reliable sources say no, at this time. In fact, at least one fiberglass boat manufacturer (Beneteau) sent a letter to its owners saying in part “there will be a permanent staining to the white gel coat,” but “this will not affect the structure of the boat.”

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4. Paint: Even if your boat is merely sitting in a marina, bottom paint is still in danger’s way. Bottom paints can become coated with a film of oil and fail to leach out the biocides that prevent growth, or the oil may create a slick layer that prevents future coats of paint from adhering. Light coats of oil can be scrubbed away with a degreaser and elbow grease, but in tough cases, the only way to the contamination is to use a paint stripper and start from scratch. (Note: Sandblasting is not a good idea, because it can actually drive the oil deeper into the boat’s bottom.) 5. Other Parts of your Boat: Anchor ropes and lines can become fouled in oil, and will require a scrub-down with Dawn and water. You should be able to get oil off the surface, but be aware that your lines will probably never look the same. Canvass that gets oiled will require the same treatment, but will also end up permanently discolored in most cases. Swim platforms made of teak or other woods may be affected as well, and if the oil remains in place for

long it can eat away at the glues holding the laminate together. (A common problem when diesel, oil, or gasoline spills onto a teak deck). Use an oil-lifting product like K2r (a dry cleaning spot remover) to pull the oil out of the wood. Then scrub off any remaining mess (always going with the grain on teak,) and re-treat it with teak oil. Will your insurance cover any damage caused by oil from Deepwater Horizon or any other spill? Time will tell. But it should be noted that in some areas, insurance companies are already sending out letters urging boaters to keep their boats on dry land for the time being. Should you go that far? That’s your call, not ours. But we have faced disaster before and we will face it again. We are sure as heck not going to let it stop us from fishing and boating-and we doubt you will let it stop you, either.

E-mail Lenny Rudow at boating@fishgame.com


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Floating Worm OMETIMES ANGLERS MAKE THINGS TOO complicated and I’m speaking about myself as much as any of you when I say that. If you’re anything like me your tackle bag is full of lures with holographic images, laser lights, fish scents, bells, whistles, rattles and enough lead weights to sink a flat-bottom boat. Well, mine might not weigh that much but it’s at least as heavy as the average nine year old. We buy all this stuff in efforts to catch a single little green fish. Of course, we’re all hoping that little green fish weighs over 10 pounds, over 20 would be better, but if we each took a look at our personal arsenal we’d realize that even with all this stuff most of us fall back to one or two very simple rigs to catch most of our fish. So this month we’re looking at a very simple bass rig that has been around for decades, is very simple to tie, and should be on one of your rods most of the year. When anyone mentions worm fishing, most will automatically think of a Texas or

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Carolina rig since the common perception of plastic worms is that they are used to probe the bottom. Occasionally we’ll suspend them on a drop-shot, but for the most part, we tie them to a hunk of lead and drop them to the bottom to dig out big bass. The majority of anglers have forgotten about the floating worm, which is an outstanding way to get wary bass to hit when they won’t look at anything else. Floating worms have been a staple of professional angler’s arsenals for decades and have accounted for a few wins at major tournaments across the country. Plus they are easy to tie which makes them that much more appealing to the weekend angler. Start the floating worm by tying a barrel swivel to your main line; you’ll understand why this is necessary in a minute. Next, tie one a short leader, 12 to 18 inches, on the other side of the barrel swivel. As with most of the leaders we discuss, make this one out of line that has a slightly lower breaking strength than your main line (12-pound main line 10-pound leader). What you make your leader out of is completely up to you but there are a few things to consider when selecting leader material. Monofilament is more visible than fluorocarbon and stretches more at the hook

set but it has a slower sink rate keeping the worm close to the surface longer. Fluorocarbon is less visible and more sensitive but sinks faster. On the end of the leader tie on a 3/0 or 4/0 wide gap w o r m hook. Rig the worm on the hook by threading it through the tip of the nose, exiting the bottom of the worm about a quarter inch from the nose. Run the hook through the worm until the line eye rests at the nose then turn the hook pushing the point back into the body of the worm. Instead of making sure the worm is completely straight, put a small bend in it between the nose and where you pushed the hook point back into the body. This small bend will make the worm twist and jerk when you start to work it, which can cause a reaction bite even if the fish aren’t hungry. This bend in the worm is also the reason we’re using a barrel swivel, since it will keep the line from twisting as the worm spins. Fish the floating worm on a mediumaction spinning rod (to aid in casting since this is such a lightweight rig) and you can toss it near boat docks, standing timber, or grass. Skip it under a boat dock, let it sit for a minute, slowly sinking, then twitch it and let it sink again. Bass will normally hit it on the fall. Around grass, you can throw it in the middle and reel it back slowly with the worm spinning and twitching. Most of the time I’m not a fan of bright colored worms but when floating a worm choose a bright color since a lot of the bites are light and you’ll need to be able to see the fish hit as much as you feel it. E-mail Paul Bradshaw at freshrigs@fishgame.com

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ILLUSTRATION BY PAUL BRADSHAW

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PHOTO: BRYAN SLAVEN

your favorite sweet or dill pickles.

Pineapple Chipotle Pulled Pork HIS RECIPE MIGHT BE FAMOUS IN THE CARolinas and in Tennessee, but we enjoy it just as much here in the Lone Star State. It is easy to prepare and may be cooked the day before, then heated up for serving the next day at the picnic, fishing trip, or wherever your heart desires. Prep time: 30 minutes. Cook time: 6 hours. Yield 10-12 servings.

Texas Style Creamy Cole Slaw Prep time: 30 minutes. Yield: 8 to 10 servings.

T

1 5- to 7-lb. pork shoulder roast (Boston Butt or picnic ham) 1/2 cup Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All* 10-12 sandwich buns 1/2 jar Texas Gourmet's Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce (this is a zesty blend; if you desire a mild flavor, substitute 1 cup of your favorite barbecue sauce 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 1/3 cup cider vinegar Remove the pork roast from the refrigerator and season on all sides with Texas Gourmet's Sweet Chipotle Season All. Wrap in plastic wrap and return to fridge for at least two hours, or overnight preferably. Pit Method: Place roast in preheated pit fat side up (using a combo of pecan and hickory wood) at 250-275 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from pit and set aside to cool slightly. Gas Grill Method: Place over low indirect fire, fat side up, and keep covered, cooking at 275-300 degrees for 3- to 3-1/2 N O R T H

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hours, turning once. Transfer to foil, seal tightly, and cook for 3 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from grill and set aside to cool slightly. Oven Method: Place in preheated oven fat side up in a foil lined baking dish at 300 degrees for 4 hours uncovered, then wrap in foil and continue cooking for 2-1/2 more hours or until the roast is very tender and will pull apart easily with a fork. Remove from oven and set aside to cool slightly. Regardless of cooking method, open the foil and pour all of the meat juices into a bowl (be careful, the liquid is very hot), then transfer the bowl to the refrigerator for a few hours to allow the fat to separate. You can speed this process in the freezer for about 45 minutes. Scrape the fat off the top and discard. Pour the reserved juices into a saucepot over medium heat, then add the Pineapple Chipotle Grilling Sauce, 1/2 cup of brown sugar, and 1/3 cup of cider vinegar. Set aside for the next step. Using two forks, or your hands (with kitchen latex gloves), shred the pork into bite-sized pieces, removing any excess fat from the roast as you go. Add the shredded meat to the Pineapple Chipotle Barbeque Grilling Sauce, brown sugar, and vinegar mixture, then serve hot on buns with Texas Style Creamy Coleslaw (recipe follows) and T E X A S

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5 cups shredded green cabbage 5 cups shredded red cabbage 1 cup shredded carrots 1 cup coarsely chopped purple onion 2 Granny Smith apples, cored, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 tsp lemon juice 1/2 cup cider vinegar 4 tsp Texas Gourmet's Jalapeno Kiwi Jelly 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup sour cream 1 Tbs Creole mustard or other coarsegrained mustard Combine the green and red cabbages, carrots, and purple onion in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, toss the cubed apples with the lemon juice and add to the cabbage mixture. In a small mixing bowl, combine the vinegar, jelly, salt, and pepper and whisk until the ingredients are well blended. Pour the seasoned vinegar mixture over the cabbage mixture and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover with plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator for 20 to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, and mustard and stir to combine. Add the mayonnaise mixture to the coleslaw and toss to thoroughly combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to overnight before serving.

Contact Bryan Slaven, "The Texas Gourmet," at 888-234-7883, www.thetexasgourmet.com; or by email at texas-tasted@fishgame.com S E P T E M B E R

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Cassidy Lamiak Trout Rockport Redrunner

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TEXAS SALTWATER

TEXAS FRESHWATER

GALVESTON

LAKE TEXOMA

LAKE AMISTAD

ADVERTISERS, SEND IN YOUR PHOTOS TODAY!

Mark Gilbreath Stripers Striper Express

BAFFIN BAY

For Classified Rates and Information call Dennise at 1-800-750-4678, ext. 5519.

ADVERTISERS, SEND IN YOUR PHOTOS TODAY!

TEXAS SALTWATER

TEXAS SALTWATER

CORPUS CHRISTI

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White Oak Outfitters Hogs

Ken Ladd and Marvin Burgess Redfish Charters

TEXAS HUNTING

EAT ACROSS TEXAS

TEXAS TEXASHUNTING HUNTING

OUTDOOR SHOPPER

Marchan's White Sands Motel, Marina & Restaurant

established in 1952 in the Port Isabel, Texas area is family owned and operated. Marchan’s White Sands has a unique combination that offers a place to stay, fish and dine.

WHERE IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT ON THE TEXAS HIGHWAYS?

If you are a traveling tourist, winter visitor, fisherman, birdwatcher or local customer, you will find Marchan’s to be friendly, affordable and competitive. If you are not staying at their motel, stop by and eat at their famous seafood restaurant and be sure to check out their breakfast. Take advantage of beautiful Texas sunsets with their indoor waterfront dining. For more info. on Marchan’s White Sands Motel, Marina & Restaurant, and to view their restaurant menu and hours go to their website at www.the-white-sands.com or call 956-943-2414 ext. 0.

INTRODUCING TFG’S NEW EAT ACROSS TEXAS, PLEASE CALL 281.227.3001 X 5519 FOR ADVERTISING RATES AND INFO.

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Tarpon Catfish

Belize

Lake Conroe

Black Drum High Island

Texas, caught of Beaumont, drum at the k Chris Howard ac bl nd, 36-inch . He was this 22.5-pou at High Island ge id Br l ta rimp. sh ad Intracoas de th m tackle wi using mediu

Chealsea Altin ger caught an tarpon while d released th fishing with her dad, uncle is captain Hilly boo Laura in an San Pedro, Am d grise Cay, Be berlize.

tfish ht his first ca el, age 4, caug nroe. Co ke La on Justin Treich ily with his fam while fishing

Hybrid Striper Trinity River Faith Foster caught her fir st hybrid strip bass while fis er hing wither he ter, at the Tr inity River ou r dad, Barry Fost of Coleman Camp. The st ’s Bait riper was 13 inches.

Mangrove Snapper Mixed Stringer

Offshore

Port Aransas

a ends went on cks and his fri th year. They Tommy Fran 18 e th r fo p avis ng tri 40-hour fishi th Captain Tr the Dolphin wi rt Aransas. were aboard Po in ck Do n lphi Kerr from Do

Speckled Trout

Chris Gonzale s caught his m of San Antonio, Texas, angr shore of Galve ove snapper 15 miles of fston. The sn apper was 7 pounds and 22 inches.

Redfish

Laguna Madre

Laguna Madre

Redfish Aransas Pass

this mpo caught age 9, of El Ca fishing with his Jared Cook, ile wh ut tro kled per Laguna 24-inch spec dparents in Up dad and gran Madre.

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Joel Soriano of tournament-s Corpus Christi caught th is ized redfish while chasin school of ab ga out 500 reds in the Upper na Madre. Lagu-

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cciaKimberly Pu pson, son of e Brendon Thom caught the biggest and th ia at Shoal p, tri rello of Victor ng hi fis his first most fish on oked! He is now ho Water Lodge.

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Redfish

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Catfish

Sabine Lake

Whitetail Deer

Lake Whitney

Harper

-inch caught this 22 4 years old, st Jake Carlin, caught his fir He . ke La bine redfish in Sa . ad sh ld co keeper red on

Bill Bryant, of Kopperl caug ht this mess catfish while of fishing on La ke cats ranged from 1 pound Whitney. The to 3 pounds size. in

ot his n Antonio sh e, age 6, of Sa rds. He was Walker Jenk ya 70 at a .270 first deer with rper. Ha hunting near

Black Drum Largemouth Bass

East Galveston Bay

Sam Rayburn Res.

Largemouth Bass Celeste Wolff of Houston, Texas, caught released this an 40-inch black drum while fis d ing with her parents and hfia ncé in East Galveston Ba y at the Boliv ar Peninsula.

Seguin

ught Huntington ca an, age 3, of d on da r he th Kylee Hickm wi while fishing her first bass ss weighed 3 yburn. The ba Lake Sam Ra nces. pounds, 8 ou

Todd Mcbrid e holds the la rgemouth ba that he caug ss ht in Seguin. The bass we 10 pounds, 1. ighed 1 ounces.

Carp

Flounder

Lake Whitney Galveston

Redfish Port O’Connor

is carp on caught th rn of Carrollt hitney W ke Glen Pensho La at on the pier the night fishing utes to land took ten min . el re ht lig State Park. It a pound-test on carp, with 8-

David Harris caught and re leased this bu redfish while ll fishing in the Port O’Conn Jetties. The or red was over 30 pounds an 47 inches of d pure fight!

ch pound, 23-in caught this 5This Julio Alderete Wolf Park in Galveston. a r ing live finge flounder at Se was caught us personal best mullet.

Flounder Whitetail Buck

Christmas Bay

Bedias

Mule Deer CJ Kizer, age 11, of Huntsv ille took his buck in Bedi fir as. The deer was an 8-poin st ter.

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f the biggest hey shows of Larry McGaug ever caught, at 8 pounds s n flounder he ha ng with his so . He was fishi and 24 inches y. Ba ristmas Nathan in Ch

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New Mexico Thomas Kahl de deer on a priv n of Caldwell shot this m ule at Eagle Nest, Ne e ranch while hunting in w Mexico.

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September 2010  

Texas dove hunting, waterfowl forecast, walk-up saltwater fishing, bass in the Texas grasslands

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