Page 1

University Park Comprehensive Plan April 2014

Adopted April 22, 2014 - ORD. # 02014-18


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Acknowledgements Mayor Vivian E. Covington Board of Trustees Larry B. Brown Joseph E. Roudez III Oscar Brown Jr. Keith J. Griffin Milton C. Payton Elizabeth (Liz) Williams

The Comprehensive Plan was funded through a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) resulting from the impact of Hurricane Ike in September, 2008.

Steering Committee Vivian Covington, Mayor Lafayette Linear, Village Manager Johnna Townsend, Executive Liaison Dorothy Jones, Village Clerk Sue Sanfratello, Deputy Clerk Edward Bradley, Police Chief Chuck Exner, Fire Chief Ross Burgess, Public Works Director Keely Childress, Parks and Recreation Director La Verne Williams, Plan Commission Chair Nakia Hall, Crete-Monee District 201-U Board of Education President Tracy Duckworth, University Park Public Library Director David Hardin, Solvay-Rhodia Plant Manager Maureen Kelly, Governors State University Marilyn Payton, Real Estate Broker Vincent Sharma, Property Owner Devon Dillworth, Treasurer Plan Commission La Verne Williams, Chair Virnita Martin Bettie Wayne Chere’se Williams Paula Wilson Mark Thompson (alternate) Consultant Team Teska Associates, Inc. – Community Planning and Landscape Architecture Business Districts, Inc. – Economic Development Barron Chisholm, Inc. – Community Engagement and Housing Robinson Engineering – Transportation and Infrastructure *A special thanks to Mary Truss and Robert Travis (citizens) and Melissa A. Kahoun of Aqua Illinois for their input into the plan.


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Table of Contents 1

2

3

Introduction ..................................................................................................Page 1 What is a Comprehensive Plan? Location The Planning Area (map) The Village’s Story Unique Features The Planning Process Community Survey Summary Community Meeting Summary

Regional Context .....................................................................................Page 9 GO TO 2040 Will County Land Resource Management Plan Regional Improvements (map)

Demographics ...........................................................................................Page 13 Population Employment, Income and Poverty Age Race & Ethnicity Education

4 Community Vision .................................................................................Page 15 5 Economic Development ....................................................................Page 17 Current Conditions Retail Municipal Sales Tax Employment Real Estate Tax Increment Financing Economic Implementation Strategies

6 Land Use ........................................................................................................Page 29 Existing Land Use (map) Existing Zoning (map) Neighboring Communities (map) Future Land Use (map) Key Development Opportunities (map) New I-57 Interchange at University Parkway Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Town Center Southern Growth Area/Crete Monee Road Corridor

7 Housing ..........................................................................................................Page 45 Housing Age Housing Types & Styles Housing Density Affordability Housing Plan

8 Transportation .........................................................................................Page 51 Traffic Counts (map) Truck Routes (map) Public Transit (map) Existing Bicycle & Pedestrian Paths (map) Road Classification& Thoroughfares Plan (map) Future Bicycle & Pedestrian Paths (map) Transportation Improvements

9 Green Infrastructure & Sustainability .............................Page 63 Existing Green Infrastructure (map) Existing Sustainability Efforts Future Sustainable Strategies

10 Community Facilities ..........................................................................Page 69 Recreation(map) Forest Preserve Golf Courses Parks Parks & Recreational Needs Education (map) School District Public Schools Private Schools Governors State University Municipal Facilities (map) General Recommendations Village Hall & Other Village-Owned Facilities Fire Department Police Department Public Works Power Transmission Cable Studio Other Community Facilities University Park Public Library Private Utilities

11 Implementation .......................................................................................Page 81 Plan Monitoring and Updates Zoning Ordinance Review Staffing Boundary Agreements Intergovernmental Cooperation Annexation New Interchange Construction Funding Sources Implementation Matrix


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1

1

Introduction

What is a Comprehensive Plan? A Comprehensive Plan outlines the Village’s vision for the future and a clear path to achieve that vision. It is built based on understanding current conditions and trends, extensive community input and professional planning expertise. The Village should use this plan as a tool to guide its current development decisions and to prepare for the future. The plan is a long-term vision, looking out 10 to 20 years or more into the future.

Regional Map 290

94

Melrose Park !

Elmhurst !

294

! Chicago

BrookďŹ eld ! 55

! Downers Grove

Location Located about 31 miles south of downtown Chicago, the Village of University Park consists of 10.84 square miles of land primarily along the east side of Interstate 57. This interstate access offers residents and businesses excellent access to Chicago and the region as a whole. Also, Lincoln Highway (Route 30)to the north and Illinois Route 394 to the east offer citizens in the area access to the surrounding suburbs.

20

es

! Oak Lawn

mil

90 57

294

Homer Glen !

Orland Park !

Harvey !

355

94 ! Hammond

iles

ine ic L ctr Ele

Matteson ! ! Frankfort

57

!

30

University Park N

394

Chicago Heights !

Crete !

Schererville ! Illinois-Indiana State Line

University Park is a unique community that maintains its rural and residential beauty while its great accessibility allows for successful industrial business.

Joliet !

90

80 Me tra

University Park lies in the northeastern part of Will County and has a small portion of its boundaries located in southern Cook County. The Village is bordered by Richton Park and Park Forest to the north, Crete to the east, Monee to the southwest, and Frankfort to the west. Other than land within the Village of Monee, most of the area due south of the Village is unincorporated land. This is true for parcels directly west of Interstate 57 as well.

10 m

Page 1


Introduction

1

The Planning Area The state of Illinois allows municipalities to plan for future land uses outside of their incorporated boundaries. Land which is within one and a half miles of the current municipal boundary are considered within the planning jurisdiction. This area allows the municipality to identify key future land uses, review plans for unincorporated parcels, and preserve open spaces.

The blue hashed area on the map below shows the planning boundary for University Park. Since there are several municipalities within a mile and a half of the Village’s corporate limits, the land within the blue line will be considered the planning area for this plan. There are areas on this map which are within a mile and a half of the corporate limits and are not

part of the planning area. These parcels are in locations where they will most likely be incorporated into the surrounding communities and, if added to the planning area, would create confusing boundaries in the future.

South Chicago Heights

Richton Park

50

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Governors State University

University University Park Park

University Parkw ay

Crete

Dralle Road

Steger Mon ee

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

1

Monee Township

Planning Area

Monee

W Crete Monee Rd

Future South Suburban Airport (ultimate boundary) Goodenow Rd

Blackhawk Dr

50

Will Center Rd

Monee Township

Green Garden Township

Planning Boundary Map

Monee Manhattan Road

Page 2

Deer Creek Golf Club

Road

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

N

Planning Area

Future Crete Intermodal Nackle Rd

Ridgeland Avenue

Planning Area

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

CreteTownship

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

WILL COUNTY

Park Forest Steger Rd

Crete Township

Green Garden Township

57 S Crawford Avenue

COOK COUNTY

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

Frankfort


Introduction

1 The Village’s Story

Riegel Farm was a personal home and barn built in 1924 from a Sears Catalog Kit.

University Park’s beginnings start in the late 1950’s when Woodhill Enterprises, a real estate developer, purchased land south of Park Forest, Illinois to create a large subdivision. Building of the residential units began in the early 1960’s but did not develop as quickly as the plan projected. By the mid 1960’s, there were only 240 homes built in the area. The residents in these homes created a homeowners association which fostered a community identity and they named the area Wood Hill.

features such as the Manilow Sculpture Park and the Governors Gateway Industrial Park. In 1984, the Village changed its name to University Park to create a distinct identity from Park Forest. It chose this name because of the strong ties it had to Governors State University and its importance to the region. University Park still strives to be the diverse and exceptional community that it was originally planned to be.

In 1966 Nathan Manilow, a successful developer from Park Forest, started to purchase land around Wood Hill. He and his son, Lewis, had a vision for the area and wanted to build a whole new town. A year later, they supported the incorporation of the area to become Park Forest South. The town was established as a planned community and was projected to have 100,000 residents. One of the main goals of this new community was to promote racial integration and equality. In the early years of Park Forest South many amenities were established in the Village. Governors State University opened in 1969 and the Illinois Central Railroad extended commuter service to the area. With passion and creativity driving village leadership, there were high hopes for the town. Unfortunately due to an economic downturn and a lack of financial resources, development was postponed indefinitely in 1974. For the next few years, public and private interests worked to solve these problems and Park Forest South adapted to a slow growth model. The community was now projected to grow to around 20,000 residents.

The Village of University Park is a well planned community. The Village has consistently developed plans to guide future growth and development. This Comprehensive Plan replaces a plan adopted in 2007. The 2007 plan was a good document, but major shifts in the economy since that time suggested a need for this update. The Village also completed a Transit Oriented Development Study in 2002, which was funded by the Regional Transit Authority (RTA). This study looked at opportunities for mixed use development within walking distance of the University Park Metra Station. While many of the key concepts outlined in this plan area still valid, changing market conditions also suggest a fresh look which is addressed in this 2014 Comprehensive Plan.

Planning History

While this population has not been reached, the Village is still considered a success story for planned communities. It became a diverse community that offered its residents unique Page 3


Introduction Governors State University Entrance Feature

1 Unique Features University Park’s character and sense of place is derived from the distinct amenities the Village offers. The following features are a few of the things that make University Park special.

Governors State University Founded in 1969, the campus sits on 750 acres of land centrally located in the heart of University Park. The University’s original goal was to offer upper level undergraduate courses and masters programs to older adults and those underserved by other colleges. They provide on campus child care and offer classes during the day, night, and weekends. In 2014, Governors State University will welcome its first official freshman class as the school has now become a four year accredited college. The University houses its own performing arts center which presents more than 50 performances annually. The state of the art facility seats 1,171 patrons offering diverse, high quality and affordable cultural and arts education experiences.

Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park Set within the wild prairie swells of Governors State University lies the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park. The first sculptures were developed right after the foundation of the University and now the collection consists of 28 works of art. The park provides tours of the area and focuses on providing educational outreach programs to build appreciation for contemporary art. Page 4

Recreation University Golf Club and Conference Center This championship golf course is owned and operated by the Village. It is a symbol of community pride and offers 18 beautiful holes that wind around water, sand, and trees. Updated in 2004, it also includes the “Urban Room” restaurant and a banquet hall that can hold up to 200. Deer Creek Golf Club This privately owned golf course is located on the east side of town. This course offers 18 holes with views of natural vegetation and lakes. It also has a driving range, putting and chipping green, and an outdoor patio area that can hold up to 400 people. Forest Preserves Both Cook County and Will County offer extensive Forest Preserve holdings in University Park. Thorn Creek Nature Preserve is the main preserve within the Village. It offers a variety of walking/hiking trails for residents and there is a nature center which holds programs throughout the year. Riegel (petting zoo) Farm Operated by the Village Parks Department, the petting zoo has a diverse group of animals. Birthday parties, tours, and horserides are available. The farm is an ideal location for hosting company picnics, family reunions, birthday parties, and other events. Hickok Acquatic Center This newly renovated acquatic facility features a zero to five foot depth pool, water structures, and a 100 foot water slide.


Introduction

1 There is a sand volleyball court and concession stand at this facility as well. During the summer the center is open for public swimming, private lessons, parties, and promotional nights. Pine Lake A 10 acre site with beautiful views and open spaces for a multitude of activities. Pine Lake includes two bodies of water where fishing is encouraged and the grounds have several shelters for parties. During the summer Pine Lake is used to host many special events.

Interstate 57 Industrial Parks On the west side of town there are several Industrial areas which are home to offices, warehouses, and industrial centers that sit adjacent to I-57. The Governors Gateway Industrial Park has over 60 manufacturing and service businesses including Federal Signal Company, National Tube Supply, and Anvil International. The Commerce Center of University Park is a master-planned industrial center that boasts a number of businesses including the 910,000 square foot Solo Cup Regional Distribution Center. The University Park Rail Center is also located in this region and offers surrounding industries access to a Class A rail line.

other non-commercial. WUPC TV Channel 4 Cable Television Station is a non-profit organization that administers the use of the public access channel in the South Suburbs. The station teaches individuals the basics of the television industry while reporting community news and events.

“Paul� at the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park

Metra Train Station There is a Metra passenger train station located in University Park off of Governors Highway and it is a terminus for the Metra Electric Line. This line travels through other south suburbs such as Matteson, Homewood, and Olympia Fields. The other end of this line is located at Millennium Station in downtown Chicago. Ridership from the University Park Station has increased over the years with approximately 1,250 weekday boardings in 2006.

Cable Studio The Village is home to its very own cable television studio. This public access station was created to promote and develop community involvement in the use of cable television for cultural, educational, health, social service, community and Page 5


Introduction

1

The Planning Process

1

2

3

Steering Committee Formation

Project Website

Public Outreach

A Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee was formed at the onset of the project. This committee was a collection of Village Staff, Commissioners, and the Mayor and representatives from other local government agencies. Representatives of the business community were also invited to participate. After the initial meeting, the Steering Committee was joined with University Park’s Plan Commission to increase the amount of input involved. The formation of this joint committee was to get those with a vested interest in the community to discuss the plan on a regular basis during the plan’s development.

A project website was created to keep everyone in the community involved in the planning process. The website contained documents from meetings, a schedule of important events, and a comment section for residents to voice their concerns. The site was updated periodically throughout the process and gave updates on the process as it progressed.

The planning process included the following public participation components: Community Survey A community survey was distributed throughout the Village which asked residents what were some of the strengths and weaknesses of the community. It was mailed out to all residents and was available to be completed online. Community Meetings Two public workshop meetings were held for this plan. The meetings consisted of a presentation on the current progress of the plan and interactive mapping discussions on key topics. These topics included flooding issues, economic development, community character, and special area plans. Both meetings were taped and aired on the University Park cable station. Key Person Interviews People with knowledge of the Village’s current state and how growth would affect the community were interviewed during the process. These interviews gave insight to the most pressing issues for the community including, economic, safety, and growth issues. Community Events The plan utilized other public events to get input from residents. One of these events included a Martin Luther King celebration event at Governors State University where a table was set up to help promote the plan and the upcoming public meetings.

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Introduction

1 Community Survey Summary Public participation is vital to any successful planning process. A survey was created to discover the strengths and weaknesses of the community. This survey was distributed throughout the Village by mailings, special community events, and at religious institutions. There was also an online version linked from the project website where residents could complete the survey. The survey was targeted towards all 2,416 households in University Park. Out of those households, a total of 169 responded by hard copy and online. This total represents about a 7% response rate, which is good for this type of survey. When analyzing the results, it is important to understand how significant the results are and how accurately they represent the entire community. A confidence interval is used to indicate the reliability of the survey results, and the margin of error determines the sampling error. For this survey, with a confidence interval of 95% (meaning the results are 95% accurate) the margin of error for each result is ±7.5%. This means that actual results may be 7.5% higher or lower than the shown answer.

Survey Results

1

When asked about resident’s favorite things about University Park, those who completed the survey felt the geographical location was the Village’s best feature. Some other highly ranking features were the ability for residents to be close to friends/family and the proximity to Governors State University.

2

When asked about the biggest challenges facing the Village, the respondents expressed the lack of shopping opportunities as a major drawback. High taxes and the lack of good paying local jobs in the area were also discussed as challenging issues.

3

Regarding economic development a majority of the respondents felt that the Village should focus on bringing in shops and restaurants, which is consistent with the previous question. Many felt there should be a focus on creating a downtown near the current Village Hall as well.

4

A majority of people responded that they have not experienced flooding problems over the past five years (77.6%). Those who did have flooding issues usually described minor amounts of damage and low levels of water.

5

Some other issues that residents would like to see improved or added to the Village are: • Improving roads, water systems, and sewers • Improvements to parks and open spaces • More bicycling options • The addition of a recreational/community center (mainly for kids and teen use) • Expanding bus services at night and on weekends Page 7


Introduction Community Meetings Summary The community meetings were an opportunity for the consultants and steering committee to interact with the public and keep them up to date on the planning process. A presentation on the current state of the plan was given at both meetings.

1 Workshop Activities The following interactive activities were conducted at the community meetings: Community Mapping Exercises Large aerial maps of different key areas around the Village were shown to participating residents. Residents and consultants discussed future development opportunities, current issues, and key strategies for these areas. The areas included the Town Center, Metra Station region, and the industrial parks. The comments made during this exercise helped form the strategies and solutions documented in this plan.

Before, during, and after the presentation, audience members were encouraged to express their ideas and concerns. Several topics were covered and addressed including: • Housing issues (especially foreclosures) • Industrial Park and TIF issues • Safety issues (especially at University Parkway & Governors Highway intersection) • Development opportunities near new University Parkway interchange • Transportation issues (bike trails, roadway improvements)

University Park’s Implementation Priorities Participants were each given $20,000 in hypothetical “University Park Dollars” and were asked to invest their money on a number of key issues. This activity allowed participants to prioritize what they felt were the Village’s most pressing problems. The total amount was tallied and the results were as follows:

South Suburban Airport Land Use Impact Survey The proposed South Suburban Airport will be located directly south from the Village. The ultimate boundary for this airport will come within one mile of Crete Monee Road. This is adjacent to the comprehensive planning boundary for the Village and may cause some land use issues. At a community meeting participants were asked to decide what land use should be used near the airport boundary. Participants chose between agricultural, residential, and industrial. The results were equally divided among the three choices.

Item

Cost

Dollars Spent

% of Cost

$5,000,000

$42,000

1%

$300,000

$27,000

9%

$50,000

$26,000

52%

University Parkway trail upgrade

$100,000

$21,000

21%

Hickok Aquatic Center upgrades

$50,000

$19,000

38%

New planning staff member

$10,000

$16,000

160%

Enhancing Pace bus service

$10,000

$16,000

160%

$100,000

$9,000

9%

$75,000

$4,000

5%

Overpass over Governors Highway and railway A new community/recreational center Upgrades to Pine Lake

Improve existing trails Upgrade existing fire station Note: Costs listed are roughly proportionate, but actual costs are likely 10 times or more of given amount.

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2

2

Regional Context

University Park is just one community in the larger southland region and the planning that is done within its borders will affect the surrounding area. Likewise, the planning done outside of its borders will affect University Park. Regional plans and improvements will help keep the Village connected and consistent with the surrounding communities. This section covers the GO TO 2040 plan developed by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning and the Will County Land Resource Management Plan. Along with these plans, major regional improvements in the area are examined.

GO TO 2040 The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) has developed a master plan for the entire Chicago Metropolitan Region titled GO TO 2040. This plan aims to help all the counties and communities (including University Park) within the metropolitan region to plan for a sustainable future. CMAP believes implementing the GO TO 2040 plan is the region’s best chance to set the stage for economic prosperity through the mid-century. The plan draws upon several themes which relate to University Park: • Liveable Communities – Addresses the factors of what attracts people to a certain community • Human Capital – Focuses on workforce development and economic innovation

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

• Efficient Government – Addresses the need for an efficiently run government that is accountable and transparent • Regional Mobility – Focuses on how the transportation system increases the quality of life for residents

Land Resource Management Plan LRMP ELEMENTS

Policy Gateway Forms & Concepts Handbook Open Space Element Airport Environs Element Approved: April 18, 2002 Revised: January, 20, 2011

University Park already has many features that follow these themes. For example, the wide range of open spaces make the Village a very liveable community and the industrial parks offer the community a strong opportunity for local employment. While these factors are already in place, there is room for improvement pertaining to all the GO TO 2040 themes. The community could have better access to the region as a whole and needs to find a way to foster commercial growth. Also,

while the Village has a strong industrial base, there needs to be more emphasis on job training within the community to employ residents instead of people from outside the community. Adapting CMAP’s themes to the University Park Comprehensive Plan will help the Village grow and will allow the surrounding communities in the region prosper together.

Will County Land Resource Management Plan The Will County Land Resource Management Plan (LRMP) sets a framework for how development should occur within the county. This plan includes guiding principles, goals and implementation strategies for future growth. It also covers concepts on how future developments and opens spaces should be laid out throughout the region. Adopted by the County in 2002, the plan was updated in 2011 with a new section titled “The Airport Environs Element” to establish basic land use and design criteria for the South Suburban Airport (next page). This plan will be a guidebook when making decisions about future land uses and conceptual designs within University Park. For example, the plan gives detailed instructions on how new interstate access points should be designed and laid out. As discussed later in this document, there are opportunities and plans for new access points to be added along Interstate 57. The LRMP may be used as a resource when the area around the new interchange is developed. This will give the area the best opportunity for sustainable growth while keeping consistent design throughout the County. Page 9


Regional Context Regional Improvements Regional improvements are large scale projects which will impact the surrounding communities in several ways. There are currently three different regional improvements that will affect how the Village develops over time:

2 current proposed plan for the new expressway. Construction of the Illiana would provide enhanced access to industrial development in University Park near I-57.

The South Suburban Airport http://www.southsuburbanairport.com/

The Illiana Expressway www.illianacorridor.org The vision for the Illiana Expressway dates back to the early 1900’s when Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennet were planning the Chicago and northwest Indiana region. The plans called for an “outer circle� road to service those outside of Chicago. Since then, many studies and concepts have been designed over the years. The current study is examining the benefits and consequences of building this expressway to connect Interstate 55 in Illinois with Interstate 65 in Indiana. The main benefits it would provide the region, including University Park, would be to alleviate traffic on the Interstate 90/94 corridor and Interstate 80 corridor, as well as serve as a bypass for truck traffic around the more congested urban highways. If the South Suburban Airport is completed, this expressway will also help relieve traffic issues brought upon by that development. The study has examined several alternative routes and has identified the route that provides the best balance between serving transportation needs, minimizing environmental impacts, and incorporating community input and values. The route shown on the Regional Improvements Map is the Page 10

The idea for an airport in the region dates back several decades. Although it has always been a concept, it seems as if the construction of an airport in the area is becoming more of a reality. The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have worked with local stakeholders to prepare a master plan and an environmental impact statement for the development. The master plan contains information regarding existing conditions, forecasts, a demand and capacity analysis, facility requirements, layout plans, financial analysis, and an environmental review. The proposed airport will be located south of University Park with its northern most boundary ultimately being located along Olendorf Road. IDOT has already acquired many of the necessary parcels it needs to build the initial facility. Presently, the airport is being designed to support mainly cargo shipping planes. This may have a positive impact on current industrial companies and may bring more businesses to the area.

Studies being conducted for both improvements


Regional Context

2

Regional Improvements Map Sauk Trail

Frankfort

Legend

Park Forest

Existing Road

Steger

Railroad Existing Full Interstate Access Point

St John

University Parkway

394

Future Full Interstate Access Point

Proposed Illiana Expressway Initial Airport Boundary

1

University Park

Proposed Access Point

Exchange Street

Monee Manhattan Rd

Crete Monee Rd Blackhawk Dr

Crete Illinois - Indiana State Line

Monee

Projected Final Airport Boundary

57 Goodenow Rd S Kedzie Ave

Cicero Ave

Goodenow Rd

50

Ashland Ave

Offner Rd

Offner Rd

1 Eagle Lake Rd

Proposed South Suburban Airport

Eagle Lake Rd

Church Rd

Joliet Rd

Beecher Indiana Ave

Peotone Beecher Rd S Kedzie Ave

Crawford Ave

Peotone

55

S Will Central Rd

Continues to

Continues to

Proposed Illiana Expressway

65

Kennedy Rd

N

Kennedy Rd

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Regional Context

2

R

Will County

Round Eight – Data Current as of June 30, 2013

Will County Broadband

(excluding Satellite and Cellular Data)

Aurora

As technology changes and shapes the future, it is becoming vital to be well connected to the internet. It is important to connect everyone in the Village to the global community. It provides opportunities for businesses to connect to a larger market, for industries to run more efficiently, and for residents to stay informed. Currently, University Park has excellent broadband service. As shown on the map to the right, a majority of the Village has access to 1 gigabit per second internet speeds. This is a very fast fiber speed which is good for economic development as well as residential users. In addition to the already excellent connections, there is a South Suburban Mayors and Management Association fiber optic line along Interstate 57 that will be active within the near future. This will offer the community even greater access than it already has to the world wide web.

Darien

Woodridge

34

Bolingbrook

Evergreen Park Oak Lawn Chicago Ridge

12

355

83

Lemont 171

43

Plainfield

Orland Park

7

Homer Glen

Lockport Fairmont

59 Shorewood

Alsip Dolton

Robbins

Harvey Markham

Tinley Park

Lansing

Thornton

Mokena

Joliet

Matteson

New Lenox

Rockdale

Frankfort

30 South Chicago Heights

University Park

Minooka

53

Channahon

Crete

Manhattan

Elwood

Willowbrook 394

Monee

45 52

55

50 Beecher

Peotone 57

Coal City

Wilmington

Diamond

129

Braidwood

Grant Park

113 Manteno

Godley

17 1

Braceville GardnerSouth Wilmington

Page 12

Calumet City South Holland

Riverdale Oak Forest

80

6

90

94 294

Romeoville

126

41

Burbank

Justice

102

Essex

Momence

Greater than or equal to 1 Gbps

Greater than or equal to 6 Mbps and less than 10 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 100 Mbps and less than 1 Gbps

Greater than or equal to 3 Mbps and less than 6 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 50 Mbps and less than 100 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 1.5 Mbps and less than 3 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 25 Mbps and less than 50 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 768 kbps and less than 1.5 Mbps

Greater than or equal to 10 Mbps and less than 25 Mbps

No Broadband Service

Partnership for a Connected Illinois November 11, 2013

0

4.5

9 Miles

ILLINOIS


3

Demographics

Knowing the characteristics of the population within University Park is integral in the long term planning process. The following section will cover how the population has changed over the years as well as how employment, income, and poverty has affected the community. Alsom this section covers the typical age range is for residents and what race and ethnicity they belong to. Finally, the education of citizens will be examined.

Population University Park has not seen much fluctuation in its population over the past 30 years. Since 1990, the community has only grown by about 400 people every decade. While this is the case, CMAP predicts that the Village will grow to hold around 35,000 people by 2040 (see chart). This drastic change can be contributed to many factors. The population growth for the entire region is inevitable, University Park’s vast amount of ready to develop land inside and outside the community make it a strong candidate for growth. The Village’s access to Interstate 57, the Metra passenger train station, and the expansion of Governors State University are also key factors in the future population growth. While the predicted number may seem high, University Park is definitely in the position to grow.

this figure is higher than the 8.1% rate for the United States as a whole in 2012. Not surprisingly given this unemployment information, 21% of University Park residents were living below the poverty line in 2012 compared to 13.7% in Illinois overall (ACS)l. A little over 25% of University Park households had less than a $25,000 income in 2012 (compared with approximately 13% in Will County). Given these issues, it will be important for the Village to work closely with local employers, Governors State University, Prairie State College, and School District 201-U to identify skills gaps and appropriate training to reduce the local unemployment rate.

projections from the U. S. Census Bureau and Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) are shown in the population change graph.

Employment, Income, and Poverty Despite a well-educated work force, University Park suffers from a relatively high unemployment rate. According to the American Community Survey (ACS), in 2012 unemployment was at 21.2% in University Park vs. 9.1% in Will County and 10.5% in the CMAP region. The ACS data is based on survey samples. Perhaps a more accurate measure of unemployment would be information from the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Unfortunately, they do not track unemployment for communities of less than 25,000. For smaller communities, they suggest using the County wide statistics, which was 9.1% in 2012. Whichever figure is used,

Age Understanding the age of the citizens is important when making decisions on future housing developments, services and other amenities. The population median age has slightly

Population Change 40,000

35,634

35,000 30,000 25,000

CMAP Prediction

3

20,000

With the extension of the Illinois Central’s commuter rail line in the 1970s, University Park’s population was expected to reach 100,000. This larger figure was modified to an estimated 25,000 by the late 1970s. Current projections reflect more modest growth but also ensure that University Park’s strengths, such as open space and recreational uses, can be sustained as the Village grows over time. Current population

15,000 10,000

6,204

6,662

7,037

7,368

1990

2000

2011

2018

5,000 0 2040

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 1990-2000, 2011 American Community Survey five-year estimates, CMAP ‘s GO TO 2040

Page 13


Demographics

3

decreased from 29.8 years in 2000, to 27.5 years in 2011. This compares with a median age of 35.5 in Will County overall. It is possible that the population might become even younger due to the expansion and growth of Governors State University which is likely to bring in a younger demographic. Overall, University Park’s population is young. U. S. Census data indicate that 39% of the Village population is under 20 years of age while only 6% of the population is over the age of 65. As illustrated in the charts below, the age of the population has been consistant over the past decade.

Race & Ethnicity Change 3.8% 3.9%

Other

0.2% 0.0%

Asian

84%

Black/African American White

12%

6.1%

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

Race & Ethnicity

2000

With respect to race and ethnicity, University Park is predominately an African American community and has become less diverse over time. Over the past decade, the community has seen a drop in Caucasian residents by 6% and has seen an equal rise in African American residents. All other races, including the Hispanic population (2.5%), are limited within the Village.

65 to 79 5%

Page 14

5,000

University Park

Illinois

0.9%

5.8%

High School (no Diploma) 3.3%

7.3%

High School Graduate 21.6%

27.2%

Some College (no Degree) 39.3%

21.3%

Associate's Degree

11.2%

7.4%

Bachelor's Degree

16.7%

19.3%

Graduate or Professional Degree 7.0%

11.8%

20 to 34 20% 80 and older 1%

19 and Under 39%

2011 35 to 49 19% 20 to 34 20%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2000, 2011 American Community Survey five-year estimates,

Less than 9th grade

35 to 49 22%

50 to 64 16%

7,000

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2000, 2011 American Community Survey five-year estimates,

19 and Under 37%

65 to 79 5%

6,000

Educational Attainment

2000

Age Change

The type of education residents have received is important due to the impact it has on the job market. It will determine where people are qualified to work and where companies may choose to locate. Almost all adults in the Village have attained at least a high school education. The majority have some type of experience in college but do not have a degree. This compares well with State of Illinois averages, with over 74% of University Park residents having completed at least some college compared with only about 60% for the State as a whole.

2011

4,000

80 and older 2%

50 to 64 14%

Education

90%


1

4

Community Vision

Founded in 1967 as a planned community, University Park was designed for quality of life. University Park boasts a championship golf course, a 30-acre lake, a community pool, a petting farm, a TV/Cable Studio, variety of churches, hiking trails, a thriving industrial park, and is home to Governors State University. With a new interchange, a growing student population, and a wonderful natural environment, University Park has much to be enthusiastic about. And in the more distant future, the potential for the South Suburban Airport and the Illiana Expressway just south of the Village offer even more reasons to anticipate good things in University Park’s future. Based on input from residents provided through a community survey and through participation in public meetings, the following vision statement summarizes how the Village wants to be viewed in the future.

University Park... ... is an exceptionally pleasant place to live. We feature broad mix of housing including single family residential, condominiums, townhomes, and apartment complexes. University Park features hiking trials, parks and open space in a relaxing and tranquil environment. ... is business-friendly, offering clear policies and regulations, a streamlined development review process, and excellent communication and coordination between the private and public sector. ... is home to major corporations that enjoy proximity to Chicago via I-57, 394, and Metra commuter rail, and access to the world through fiber optic connections to high speed broadband. ... is the gateway to the new South Suburban Airport, providing an ideal location for logistics and other industrial users and quality hotels, restaurants, and services for travelers. ... is well connected by a series of bike trails both within the community and throughout the region connecting homes, businesses, parks, schools and the train station. ... is a community offering residents quality education, affordable homes, and a close-knit, active community ... is home to a top-notch park and recreation system with well-maintained facilities, a community center, and park space within an easy walk of every resident. ... is known for quality public services like water, sewer, garbage, etc. ... is home to a thriving transit oriented development near the Metra station that provides opportunities to live, learn, work, shop and dine without having to set foot in a car. ‌.is a safe and quite community, and a perfect place to raise a family. ... is a community that takes pride in its environmentally sustainable practices.

Page 15


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5

5

Economic Development

University Park has multiple economic opportunities that can increase the Village’s economic strength incrementally over time. In building on existing strengths and actively pursuing local and regional partnerships, University Park can supplement its resources to both grow and sustain the community’s current quality of life.

Retail

This section will cover economic issues related to current conditions in retail, municipal sales tax, employment, real estate, tax increment financing and economic implementation strategies.

• Community, or Affiliated: Successful retail centers, regardless of size or mix, often define the character of a

Current Conditions University Park’s opportunities for growth are both shortterm and longer term. Residents and officials appreciate the community’s open spaces and family orientation and note both attributes as important to local quality of life. University Park’s history places it among America’s most important planned communities of the 1960s. From a commercial perspective, University Park’s large industrial sector near Interstate 57, the growth of Governors State University (GSU), and the impending interchange at Stuenkel Road/University Parkway and Interstate 57 represent competitive strengths, now and in the future. They also present opportunities for growth in local employment, population, and ultimately, increased interest for retail and restaurant development that will serve University Park residents and enhance the community’s quality of life. Broader regional development projects, such as the proposed airport in nearby Peotone, can only serve to accelerate University Park’s local growth opportunities.

Demographics and consumer expenditures for selected retail categories for University Park markets are shown below. The center point for these markets was University Park’s Village Hall address (698 Burnham Drive). The markets shown below include:

community. These retail centers naturally attract local residents. The resulting relationship between residents and the center businesses makes residents an important market for those retailers and restaurants. Residents Identify with their community businesses and routinely patronize them. • Pedestrian, or 1-Mile Radius: Residents living within onemile of any retail center are particularly active users and can walk to that area. Their proximate location results in

Demographics and Consumer Expenditures University Park

1 Mile Radius

3 Miles Radius

5 Minutes Drive

15 Minutes Drive

Population

7,172

4,661

39,683

7,162

116,626

Households

2,476

1,704

16,051

2,404

43,643

Average Household Size

2.90

2.74

2.47

2.98

2.67

Median Age

31.6

30.6

36.4

31.5

38.0

1,112.28

2,044.35

1,574.82

1,273.45

804.7

2,572

680

7,774

1,251

36,994

1.04

0.40

0.48

0.52

0.85

Average Household Income

$65,622

$61,741

$62,212

$65,692

$71,827

Median Household Income

$54,305

$50,283

$49,3288

$55,244

$56,451

Per Capita Income

$22,737

$22,612

$25,287

$22,066

$27,027

% with Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

26.3%

26.4%

24.5%

25.8%

25.9%

Estimated Consumer Expenditures: Total

$60,506,631

$38,557,004

$356,293,678

$59,762,959

$1,108,660,947

Estimated Consumer Expenditures: Groceries

$8,932,789

$5,884,662

$60,231,538

$8,734,549

$172,597,044

Estimated Consumer Expenditures: Eating a& Drinking

$5,574,209

$3,635,119

$36,670,564

$5,464,600

$107,562,974

Population Density (per Sq. Mi.) Employees Jobs per Household

© 2013, by Experian, © 2013 Alteryx, Inc.

Page 17


Economic Development frequent trips, which in turn, adds vitality to that retail area. Consequently, this market is more important to the success of retail centers than its spending power often suggests. • Traditional Developer, or 3-Mile Radius: The demographics for this 3-mile market have been traditionally used by the retail development community as an important indicator of a suitable trade area for a successful business location, particularly for regional or national chain retailers. As these larger retailers increasingly use data analytics to precisely target new and existing customers, the importance of these market characteristics will likely diminish. • Convenience (also Bicycle Convenience), or 5-Minute Drive: When a consumer can drive to make a needed purchase within five-minutes, that location becomes the routine choice to meet every day needs, assuming the quality and variety of goods. Convenience shoppers represent the core market for most retail centers or clusters. This five-minute drive time market also represents a ten-minute bike ride by local residents to the retail center. • Destination, or 15-Minute Drive: Businesses gaining smaller percentages of their sales from the local or convenience market are typically considered a destination business. For retail centers, destination retailers and restaurants offer unique goods or services that attract shoppers and diners from a larger geography. Customers from this larger destination trade area generate sales for adjacent businesses. Those businesses attracting destination customers also give the retail center a distinctive character that differentiates that center from other shopping and dining options. Overall, University Park’s markets are thin in both population and employee numbers. Markets with sufficient population Page 18

5 and daytime employment attractive to retail or restaurant developers are the developer and destination markets, as described above. The 3-mile radius and the 5-minute drive time, include areas with greater population and density to the north. The southern area within these same markets lack density and population. Incomes and education levels are generally satisfactory and consistent across markets. The average household size exceeds 2.5 in most markets, reflecting the presence of younger families with young children. Related to this household size is the low median age of the population in the smaller markets, at 30 and 31, respectively. Consumer expenditures estimates, including groceries and the eating and drinking category, again reflect the thin markets noted. The 3-mile market indicates just over $60,000,000 in grocery spending. A typical grocery store in the Chicago area market has gross annual sales of $20-$25,000,000. Eight major grocers, regional and national, are located along the higher traffic corridors to the north and east, on Sauk Trail, Cicero Avenue, Chicago Road, 14th Street/Lincoln Highway, and in Crete. All are located between 3 and 5 miles from University Park’s Village Hall, and all are outside of the existing Village limits. Using data obtained from the U. S Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service (ERS), certain census tracts near University Park’s Village Hall meet the department’s original criteria for a ‘food desert’ (defined as 1 mile from an accessible supermarket for urban residents and 10 miles for rural residents). This is shown in the illustration below. This definition has evolved to include census tract level data about family incomes, poverty rates, household access to a vehicle, and distance in miles from a supermarket. For University Park, identifying interim strategies to assist residents with food access issues will provide greater understanding of the Village’s evolving retail needs. These strategies should

include working with local social agencies and neighboring communities to support transport, grocery deliveries, or healthier food options at convenience markets. This kind of strategy can be incorporated into any future update to the businesses and small retail center at University Parkway and Western Avenue. University Park’s traffic counts are shown in the illustration on the following page. The Average Daily Traffic (ADTs) on Interstate 57 north of Monee-Manhattan Road is 40,400. On University Parkway, east of the planned new interchange and approaching Governors State University, ADTs increase to 8,450 from 100 to the west on Stuenkel at Harlem Avenue. ADTs on Cicero Avenue are 17,200. Governors Highway counts increase from 6,700 in the northern section of University Park to 9,250 approaching the municipal boundary with Monee. With the exception of the interstate counts, the ADTs in and near University Park would be generally perceived as adequate to low by retail developers. In addition to vehicular traffic, University Park’s commuter station on the Metra-Electric Main line has exhibited strong and growing ridership in past data. (The station is the terminus for the line and attracts commuters from surrounding communities without commuter rail stations. The most recent available Regional Transit Authority Mapping and Statistics (RTAMS) ridership statistics (2006) shows weekday boardings and lightings of 1,243 and 1,217, respectively for the University Park station. These numbers represented a 23.8% increase in ridership from the previous survey (2002). Metra ridership surveys will again be conducted within the next two years. Governors State University represents one of University Park’s most important traffic generators. GSU currently has nearly 7,800 students, including about 5,200 graduate and


Economic Development

5 Road Railroad

Sauk Trail

Existing Interchange

Richton Park

Proposed Interchange

S Cicero Avenue

ort

South Chicago Heights

57

Park Forest

6,700 S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

17,200

University Golf Club

University Parkway

rnors

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

Governors State University

10,900

University Park

7,950

University Parkwa y

Crete 9,250

12,700

6,650 Blackhawk Dr

1,350

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

N

50

Page 19 d

Monee Manhattan Road

ee Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mo n

Harlem Avenue

Traffic Count Map

Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

40,400

7,100

8,450 High way

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50


Economic Development doctoral students. As of 2014, GSU moves from an upper division university to a four-year with the admission of its first freshman class. This expansion will ultimately add 4,000 new students to GSU’s current student body. Part of this transition includes the opening of GSU’s first resident halls. These initial 296 units of student housing with the likely addition of future student housing will bring a new population to University Park. In addition, GSU’s Center for the Performing Arts maintains a full schedule of music, dance, and theater events, attracting patrons from throughout the region. Given overall market characteristics, larger retail development will likely occur over the long-term as University Park’s populations-resident, and employee, or daytime—grow. The Village’s most recent retail success was the opening of Family Dollar, just east of Village Hall. Village officials have approved a TIF district encompassing the current Town Center. Any significant retail development at Town Center remains unlikely, given the lack of traffic, visibility, and nearby population density. A small number of businesses supplementing a successful Family Dollar’s product offering presents a potential intermediate opportunity to create a minor neighborhood serving cluster. With an interchange at University Parkway, retail and restaurant development could occur between the interchange and GSU. University Park has the opportunity to affect the type and quality of future development in this location in response to the community’s desire for greater access to retailers and restaurants. For this future development east of the interchange, GSU could prove to be an important partner to the Village. Retail or restaurant options appealing to both University Park residents and to GSU’s faculty, staff, and growing student population may provide increased market support for these new uses.

5 Municipal Sales Tax

business sales generated by University Park’s commercial and industrial businesses.

University Park’s municipal sales tax history is shown in the table below. This table combines sales tax data from Cook and Will Counties. Data was obtained from the Illinois Department of Revenue. The figures for 2013 include the first three (3) calendar quarters for that year.

Employment The most common industries employing University Park’s residents are located outside of the Village and include: Educational Services; Health Care; Public Administration; and Finance and Insurance. (Sources: U. S. Census Bureau, citydata.com) Few of these office-based industries are located in University Park.

The Automotive and Filling Station category is the strongest producer of sales tax for the Village. Sales tax generated in retail categories, specifically food, eating and drinking, and drugs and miscellaneous retail categories, have declined over the period shown and continue to reflect the community’s market characteristics. In addition to Automotive, sales tax revenues generated by two categories, Agriculture and Manufacturers, are have increased dramatically since 2009. Both categories represent taxable business-to-

University Park’s employment base consists of about 2,600 employees, representing 1.04 jobs per household (see Demographics and Expenditures Table). GSU currently employs just under 1,000 (413 faculty and 569 staff members), according to the GSU website. City-data.com indicates 171 of University Park’s residents work in the Village--about 7%.

Municipal Sales Tax Year

Municipal 1% Tax

Total Taxable Sales

Food

Drinking & Eating Places

Drugs & Misc. Retail

Automotive & Filling Stations

Business Related

2013

$361,467

$36,146,714

$5,951,936

$1,499,864

$1,261,336

$17,436,362

$9,392,569

2012

$479,774

$47,977,370

$7,434,173

$1,538,927

$1,758,807

$23,514,848

$13,351,256

2011

$436,557

$43,655,687

$7,975,558

$1,610,317

$2,172,851

$22,269,827

$9,073,462

2010

$400,217

$40,021,707

$6,353,792

$1,792,127

$2,235,665

$20,768,541

$8,071,478

2009

$322,564

$32,256,397

$3,549,698

$1,430,186

$2,547,268

$18,015,297

$5,540,320

Illinois Department of Revenue. 2013 sales tax data is for first three (3) calendar quarters of the year.)

Page 20


Economic Development

5 In addition to GSU, other major employers include: Employer Governors State University

# of Employees 1,000

Federal Signal Corporation

750

Applied Systems

600

Commonwealth Edison

375

Continental Refrigerated

200

Bimba Manufacturing

160

Bluelynx

150

Solo Cup

125

Reinhart Foods

120

Source: Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Community Profile for University Park 2012.

Future industrial and related employment growth remains an important opportunity for University Park. All three (3) existing TIFs are located within the Village’s industrial area. Local officials have indicated a desire to increase the numbers of residents employed by the Village’s commercial and industrial businesses. Partnerships between the Village, its employers, and regional resources, such as Prairie State College, can initiate workforce development programs offering and developing the necessary industrial training and skills to increase the local workforce numbers at University Park’s employers.

economic downturn. The median sales price for a University Park home was about $75,000. This represents an increase of 10.3% over the previous year. Overall sales prices have appreciated by 15.8% over the last five (5) years. An estimated 163 homes, or 11.3% of the Village’s 1,441 owner occupied housing units, are bank-owned or in foreclosure. Greater participation in regional housing initiatives, as described elsewhere in the Plan, will allow University Park to mitigate some of the negative consequences of the recent housing market crash. Listings for residential rental properties were limited; most properties available for rent were single-family homes. Other rentals, mostly in Brittney Woods apartments and Thornwood House apartments, were available at $1.10-$1.25 PSF. Commercial and Industrial The overall view of the industrial market in the Chicago region is positive. Third quarter 2013 data from CBRE Global Research indicates the market current has an availability rate of 8.5% (the sum of the vacancy rate and sub-leasing vacancy). This rate is the lowest since the same quarter in 2007. Larger leasing deals were fewer in 2013, but renewals by major industrial tenants throughout Chicago’s regional market have increased by 1/3. Overall net absorption was nearly 4,000,000

Square Feet (SF), with 5,500,000 SF under construction. In the South Suburbs market (including University Park), the availability rate is 10.1%. Average asking rents are in the $2.85-$3.50 range in this same market. According to LoopNet and Co-Star, industrial space available for lease in University Park generally ranges from $3.75 to $4.50 per Square Foot (PSF) on a net rent basis. Several properties are currently available for sale or lease. The listed sales prices are typically $35-$40 PSF; the current rents noted for these same listings are in the $2.00-$4.00 PSF range. In general, current asking rents in University Park are slightly higher than the South Suburbs market. This market strength indicates that fostering industrial growth through the addition of new businesses and future annexations west of Interstate 57. Structuring any future incentives to enhance growth to benefit both the Village and these new businesses will ensure that one of University Park’s major advantages remains competitive. Available retail space for lease is limited, given what currently exists in University Park. The current asking rents for retail space is $12.00 PSF. CBRE Global Research indicate that third quarter retail average asking rents range from $10.78 to $16.50 PSF.

Real Estate Housing Like many south suburban communities, University Park’s residential market was adversely affected by the recent Page 21


Economic Development

5

Tax Increment Financing

Approximate TIF Locations

To promote economic development, the Village of University Park has created several Tax Increment Financing Districts (TIF). These special districtsFrankfort capture the property tax from a defined redevelopment area and reinvest those funds into encouraging development through assistance with specific development related costs (defined in Illinois Statutes) including such things as land acquisition, public infrastructure, building renovation, and job training. TIF is one of the more widely used incentives to partner with the private sector to spur new development. There are over 1,000 such districts in the state.

Richton Park

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

TIF III

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

TIF V

TIF IV

Town Center TIF

University Park

University Parkw ay

Dralle Road ee Road

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mo n

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

Goodenow Rd

Nackle Rd

Will Center Rd

Blackhawk Dr

50

N Page 22

Governors State University

Dralle Road

Harlem Avenue

• Town Center TIF, which expires in2037. The purpose of this TIF is to facilitate the rehabilitation of existing properties, encourage the construction of new commercial, civic/ cultural and recreational facilities and to foster the replacement, repair and construction of public infrastructure.

Stege

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50

• TIF III which expires in 2017 and consist entirely of Applied Systems;

• TIF V which expires in 2024 and consist of Commerce Center, Reinhart Food Service, Dart Container Company (formerly Solo Cup Co.), Midwest Custom Case, the Exeter Property Group, (which consist of three properties between 300 Central and 500 Crossing), the Avatar Corporation, Principle Financial, and the Clorox Company.

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

There are four active tax incremental financing (TIF) districts.

• TIF IV, which expires in 2019 and consist of Blue Lynx and the McIntyre Group;,

Sout Chica Heigh


Economic Development

5 Economic Implementation Strategies A key component in the effective implementation of the Comprehensive Plan over time is the implementation of an effective economic development plan. The University Park Comprehensive Plan identified three key priority areas which will shape the economic development initiatives and opportunities in University Park in future years. These key priority areas are: • Capitalizing on economic development opportunities which are available in the short (1-3 years), intermediate (3-6 years) and long term (6+ years):

- The Industrial Park

- Governors State University

corridor in Will County which significantly lowers the tax burden on businesses relative to Cook County to the north.

Capitalizing on economic development opportunities which are available in the short term (1-3 years), intermediate term(3-6 years) and long term (6+ years)

• The proximity of the Monee-Manhattan interchange to the Industrial Park.

• Ongoing municipal policies, procedures and outreach to embrace potential emerging economic development opportunities

• Again in the case of University Park, the willingness to develop a public-private partnership to develop the park particularly with the establishment of a TIF (Tax Increment Financing) district to support development.

University Park has two very strong economic development assets which are performing very well at present and which represent growth opportunities in the short, intermediate and long term. The Industrial Park

• Capitalizing on economic development opportunities which are available in the intermediate (3-6 years) and long term (6+ years):

University Park has helped develop a very successful Industrial Park at the western border of the community along I 57. The success of the Industrial Park is due to a variety of factors:

- Retail/Commercial and TOD Development

- Development of New Housing

• The geographic positioning of the south suburb region overall with proximity to interstate transportation corridors, rail and in many areas barge traffic. • The recognition of the I-57, I-55, I-80 and I-88 corridors as the four strongest distribution/manufacturing transportation corridors in the region. • The immediate proximity of rail corridors to I-57. • The long term acceptance of industrial development in the south suburbs. • The quality of the regional labor force to service this industry. • The availability of vacant land along the corridor for industrial development. • In the case of University Park, the location of the I-57

The Industrial Park is viewed as a success at the present time. Major industries are located in the park, thousands of jobs are involved, and the primary TIF is very successful with another 10 years of TIF life remaining. However, multiple discussions with industrial developers, brokers, and regional economic development entities (South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA)and Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation (CSEDC)) indicate that additional success can be achieved in the immediate future: • Industrial development runs in cycles. Following the depressed times during the recent Great Recession, developers and brokers predict a five year cycle of development with emphasis on high asset corridors such as I- 57. • The development community has noticed the success of the University Park’s industrial parks and the successful public-private partnership which has been developed. Their interest will be further focused on University Park. • The University Parkway interchange is estimated to be opened in 2015 and this interchange will draw traffic from the Monee-Manhattan interchange and enhance the function of the park overall. • The broadband initiative of SSMMA/CSEDC along I-57 will be completed in the second quarter of 2014 providing Page 23


Economic Development enhanced broadband/fiber optic access to businesses along the corridor. • While a more intermediate and long term opportunity, it is estimated that the primary function of the South Suburban Airport (if developed) in the early years will be cargo oriented and therefore Cargo Oriented Development (COD) will be a prime opportunity. Given that the southern edge of University Park is only a mile north of the northern edge of the proposed South Suburban Airport and given the aforementioned assets of the I-57 corridor and University Park’s industrial parks, University Park should be very well positioned to attract COD sites should the airport become a reality. • The current head tax is viewed by the development community as a major hindrance to attracting new industrial development. As soon as other revenue sources can be identified, this tax should be eliminated. Given these growth opportunities, University Park can take a variety of initiatives to protect and enhance the village’s opportunity to capitalize on this economic development initiative: Applied Systems

5 • Closely monitor the TIF and the funds available in the TIF. Assure that the funds used in partnership are well underwritten with an objective of a satisfactory return to the village for the use of its funds. Excess funds could be very valuable to the village’s overall operating funds and the TIF funds will be a significant boost to the village once the TIF has expired. • Closely monitor the development of the University Parkway interchange with IDOT in order to be fully prepared once it is on-line. • Learn more about the broadband initiative in order to understand how it may enhance the park. • Aggressively reach out to SSMMA/CSEDC which has become the center point of all regional economic development issues in the southland. SSMMA/CSEDC represents a resource, potential grant funds, potential access to key decision makers and perhaps even staff support for special projects which should be capitalized on. • Develop a marketing package relative to the current and future park and develop a strategy to aggressively reach out with this package to potential developers, brokers

and tenants as well as public sector entities that would be involved with the South Suburban Airport. • Consider annexation of the unincorporated land west of I-57 to expand the size and long term impact of the Industrial Park. • Communicate the performance and strategy of the Industrial Park to University Park citizens and stakeholders in order that the overall value of the park to the long term success of the village will be well understood. Governors State University Few communities have an educational institution of the size of Governors State University within their borders. Governors State has demonstrated steady growth over the years and the recent announcements concerning becoming a four year institution and the addition of housing units for students suggests continued growth in the future. Governors State represents many things for University Park: • A steady and growing stream of students and staff who will enter and leave the community on a daily basis. While “commuters” focus on a more limited set of daily purchasing potential they nevertheless represent an asset for retail/food and beverage growth for the village. • A recognized center of culture and learning which will draw other visitors to the community through concerts, events, forum’s, etc. • A proximate “people center” to the University Park TOD which will enhance the ongoing ridership at the Metra station. • An opportunity for new uses related to the mission of the university which would also bring more people with spendable income to University Park.

Page 24


Economic Development

5 • As the university’s role as a four year university matures, it is likely that demand for proximate housing will increase although how much and at what pace is difficult to predict.

the new interchange to Governors Highway which may become available in the years after the interchange is opened.

• The university has expertise in various areas which could assist the village in other areas of economic development such as the SBDC International Trade Center and the university’s workforce training.

• Work with IDOT relative to signage which clearly identifies University Parkway in order to enhance the brand represented by Governors State/University Park.

• Finally, the mere presence of the university could be helpful to the village when seeking various grants which may be available. Grant decision makers who see that grant funds can impact a community overall as well as a four year university may determine that the “bang for the buck” is a strong reason to invest in University Park. Given the asset represented by Governors State University, University Park should conduct a variety of initiatives to capitalize on this asset: • Conduct regular meetings with the university to communicate village priorities and activities and to learn the same about the university. • Stay advised relative to student and staff population growth as well as annual events which bring people to the campus. • Understand land ownership along University Parkway such that when retail commercial growth may become possible it can be coordinated with the growing asset at the university. • If a unique university priority were ever to become a reality consider working with the university to partner in the retail/food and beverage opportunities that may also become available. • Keep the university advised relative to the changes/ opportunities on the University Parkway/corridor from

• Seek specific university partnering opportunities in areas of mutual interest such as workforce development (i.e. high tech manufacturing), broadband and other synergies which may exist with Industrial Park companies. • Encourage the university to get as involved as their resources will allow in the regional initiatives of SSMMA/ CSEDC. Metra Train Station

Capitalizing on economic development opportunities which are available in the intermediate (3-6 years) and long term (6+ years) There are two areas of economic development which due to a variety of market conditions are not ready to become a reality in the short term but which should receive much attention over the near term to prepare for opportunities which may come in the future: Retail/Commercial and TOD Development Four areas have been discussed in University Park relative to retail/commercial development: • The Town Center next to the municipal center. • The small cluster on the eastern edge of the community at University Parkway and Western. • The area around the Metra station both on the west side of Governors highway and the east side of Governors Highway. • University Parkway corridor once the new interchange is opened at I-57 from the interchange west to Governors Highway, particularly the University Parkway/Cicero intersection. Town Center The village owned Town Center is an older facility with poor contemporary retail space and a very limited number of rent paying tenants. In addition, the Center is located far off the road (University Parkway) and the traffic counts (7,950/day) along the road are very low by retailer standards. In addition, the population densities in proximate drive times are also very low by retailer standards. Page 25


Economic Development All of these factors suggest that any significant retail/ commercial development at this site will be very difficult in the foreseeable future. Also, in terms of the return on the investment of time and money, it does not appear that this site represents the best short-intermediate return to the village for retail/commercial development. Other options may be available as discussed later. The Small Cluster at University Parkway and Western Avenue This cluster consists primarily of a small convenience food store on the northwest corner and a strip center on the southwest corner which is hard to see due to the pitch of the terrain. The strip center exhibits some vacancies and relatively undercapitalized tenants. As discussed later, efforts to improve the appearance of the strip center and possible retenanting are the best approaches to this site. The Area Around The Metra TOD Both East And West Of Governors Highway Plans for retail/commercial and housing as part of the TOD area have been developed for land primarily on the western side of Governors Highway and in the last few years a developer proposed a potential development on the eastern side of Governors Highway on land near the Metra parking facilities. Neither plan has moved forward due to multiple market realities that preclude new housing coming out of the Great Recession (housing is discussed later) and many of the same market factors which preclude retail/commercial development at the Town Center as discussed earlier. However, the growth of Governors State in future years, the ongoing increase in ridership of the Metra and, most importantly, the opening of the University Parkway interchange to the west make this site a possible secondary development site in the mid to long term. Page 26

5 The University Parkway Corridor Once the interchange at I 57 is opened in 2015 it is expected that, over time, the interchange and the University Parkway corridor may represent the best opportunity for some retail/ commercial/food and beverage development. • The Monee-Manhattan exit is relatively congested and it is expected that some traffic will begin using the University Parkway interchange. • It is expected that the Industrial Park will continue to grow adding to the traffic at the interchange. • It is expected that many Governors State University students and staff will begin using the new interchange as their primary avenue to the university. • Moving east from the interchange it is only a short distance to the north-south traffic counts on Cicero Avenue and then a similar short distance to Governors Highway where the traffic from the Metra Commuter Station is located as well as the traffic counts on Governors Highway. • This corridor of increased traffic from the interchange to Governors Highway represents increased opportunity and probably the best opportunity for the village in the intermediate and long term. The pace of potential development will be dependent upon the marketplace. It is probable that the first type of development along the corridor will reflect the potential customers representing the traffic counts (gas/convenience/food and beverage). • It is also possible the highly visible pads on the west side of the interchange will also be viable for auto oriented development and perhaps a “mid-priced” hotel site. The following implementation strategies are suggested relative to these four areas with the early emphasis on the area with the highest potential (University Parkway interchange):

• Work closely with IDOT concerning the timing and land use issues associated with the interchange. • Develop a land use/control plan for the opportunities around the interchange and then on the University Parkway corridor to the east. This could include annexation plans for pads on the west (as part of the overall annexation plan for the Industrial Park as discussed earlier) as well as developing a full understanding of the land use/control issues on the north and south side of University Parkway/ Stuenkel Road. • Develop a preliminary marketing piece which discusses the interchange’s potential opportunities in the future and be able to put the marketing piece side-by-side with the existing TOD plan in order to provide developers/ brokers/tenants with a long term “birds eye” look at this sector of the community. • As a secondary priority, understand the land use/control issues east of Governors Highway primarily just east of the Metra parking facility in the event another developer views this area as a potential development site. • As mentioned earlier, stay in close communication with Governors State University relative to the University Parkway corridor in order to find areas for mutual benefit. • Concerning the cluster at University Parkway and Western Avenue, work with ownership in three separate areas: - Reasonably enforce codes and regulations to maintain an acceptable appearance and safety level. - Determine if the ownership may be open to a public-private façade improvement initiative and whether adequate funding from both ownership and the village is appropriate and available.


Economic Development

5 - Work with ownership to determine if a retenanting initiative driven by ownership with some village support could be conducted over the next 6-12 months. • Concerning the Town Center before an extensive retenanting or façade improvement program is pursued the following should be considered: - Improvements to the site for retail/commercial use would be very expensive and there are legitimate concerns about the market viability of the center. It may be a very worthwhile effort to retain an experienced broker to do an analysis of the utility of investing in this property for retail/commercial use. - While it is not clear that another unique use such as the Dollar Store can be duplicated it may be productive to determine what caused the Dollar Store to locate at this location and whether Dollar Store has other “co-tenant” examples at their other sites which may apply to this site. At the very least, it would be good to understand why (no matter how successful Dollar Store may appear to be) Dollar Store located in a new building along University Parkway as opposed to leasing space in the existing Town Center. - The Dollar Store appears to be also functioning as a very limited convenience grocery outlet. A prior “co-op” grocery store in the Town Center was unsuccessful. Currently, residents drive to a smaller independent chain in Crete or larger chain outlets in Matteson or elsewhere. It is difficult to predict success in recruiting a grocery store at this site. The best option in the short term would be to reach out to some independent chains to learn more about their site selection criteria.

- The village has discussed the need for a community center. A large percentage of the current Town Center is municipal use. The village has also suggested that there have been some conversations with two hospitals relative to a satellite facility in the village. As a side-by-side review with the broker analysis of the Town Center, the village should do an analysis as to its municipal needs or potential health care delivery needs. Both uses would seem to be appropriate to consider for this location given proximity to residents and availability of space. - Before any significant funds are invested in this site, a full analysis should be completed and a strategy should also be developed. - It is important to note that if any element of a retail/ commercial strategy is considered, marketplace analysis is clear that the center cannot be successful without an anchor that draws customers and then in-line tenants can benefit from the traffic. The failed co-op grocery store was to fill this role. It is not clear at all that an independent or chain grocery store would choose this site due to all the market reasons cited earlier. In any event, the center cannot be successful without an anchor. Development of New Housing The Great Recession has devastated the housing market over the last 6-7 years and only recently is a small amount of recovery being noticed. The majority of this recovery relative to new construction has been in highly dense areas which can support “market rate rental” and the young professionals who support this market. Limited multi-family equity development (condo and townhome) has been almost solely in highly urban areas with proximate public transportation, jobs and high levels of entertainment resources with a heavy

emphasis on multiple food and beverage selections. The market describes this as places where “there is a lot of there, there.” Single family home development is still an extremely thin market if it exists at all. Finally, the best markets for development are where the majority of the foreclosure and short sale issues have been worked through and where property taxes (while high throughout the entire Chicago metropolitan area) are a reasonable value relative to the market value of the housing unit. At the present time, none of these factors work to the benefit of University Park. In the long term, the beauty of the community, the park resources, the schools, the proximity to expressways, Metra and Governors State University will be the best supportive selling points for University Park. These selling points would be on top of the obvious long term benefit of available land compared to “land-locked” communities. To begin planning for long term opportunities, the village should consider the following: • Work closely with SSMMA/CSEDC relative to the various regional programs that have been developed relative to foreclosures. • Continue to enforce codes and regulations to maintain the existing housing stock. • Closely monitor Aqua Illinois, the private company that provides water to the community, such that adequate and quality resources will be available when the market allows. • Closely monitor multiple transportation infrastructure issues (roads and rail) such that this infrastructure will continue to progress over the years. • Continue to partner with Governors State University in Page 27


Economic Development support of programming which will be an attraction to future homeowners. • Pursue the highest potential retail/commercial opportunity (University Parkway Interchange) in order to begin developing a “there, there.”

5 Ongoing Municipal Policies, Procedures and Outreach to Embrace Potential Emerging Economic Development Opportunities

• Continue to work with Metra in order to develop the best possible train service/infrastructure.

land owners where residential development would most likely be in the long term.

• Maintain existing park and recreation facilities while also pursuing outreach strategies relative to a community center and a satellite health facility.

In addition to the government led initiatives that have already been outlined, the following on-going government initiatives are suggested in the overall implementation of the Comprehensive Plan:

• Reach out to regional housing developers on an annual basis to assess their level of activity and their overall interest in University Park. • Reach out to understand the goals and objectives of the

• Utilize the Comprehensive Plan to develop a year-to-year action plan that requires elected officials and staff to work together on behalf of the community. Consider a consultant/team builder to facilitate this process. • Examine the performance of each TIF. In particular, analyze the performance of the TIF V Dralle Industrial Park TIF. Determine cash flows and also determine the future role of incentives vs. the overall positive outlook for the park. A potential goal is to drive as much surplus revenue as possible to the general operating fund of the village and other taxing bodies in advance of the TIF termination in 2014. • Assure that any future TIF’s (i.e. Town Center) have a reasonable and predictable opportunity to drive increment based upon the proposed business model. • Consider training or consulting assistance relative to the proper underwriting of the use of municipal funds when the private sector requests TIF subsidies. • Review the performance of the golf course. Consider a consultant review if appropriate. Set a goal to make the golf course as marketable and profitable as possible.

Page 28

• Maintain the positive image of community security. • Develop a communication program with University Park residents relative to the contemporary employer demands for entry level employment with emphasis on the type of positions located in the Industrial Park. Work with Governors State University and other regional initiatives (SSMMA/CSEDC) which are developing training programs in this regard. • Continue to work with the railroad and IDOT relative to the transportation/safety issues associated with the rail/ Governors Highway corridor. • Keep current on the proposed high speed rail corridor and determine if there is any significant impact on University Park. • Continue researching the option of creating a 501 c 3 foundation for the sole purpose of facilitating funding options for Parks and Recreation in University Park. • In addition to University Park priorities, continue to be part of “regional priorities” as outlined in the CMAP 2040 Plan. • Communicate the results of Comprehensive Plan implementation to citizens and stakeholders in a formal manner on an annual basis. • Continue to jointly promote regional opportunities, such as the joint effort University Park is doing to promote retail opportunities in the South Suburbs (www. SelectChicagoSouthland.com).


6

6

Land Use

Long term planning for University Park requires an understanding of how the land within its borders is currently being utilized and how the land is being used regionally by surrounding municipalities. Like many of its neighboring communities, University Park is a smaller community with lots of unincorporated land surrounding it for potential growth. Unlike many adjacent municipalities, the Village supports a large industrial zone along Interstate 57, a centrally located University, and many high density housing options for its residents. These features separate the Village from other communities which gives University Park a unique identity and it should be the basis on how future land use decisions are made. The following section describes the existing land uses within the Village’s corporate limits and the comprehensive planning boundary. It also describes existing zoning regulations and how neighboring communities are planning the region for future growth. Finally, this section will describe strategies for future land use and key development opportunities.

Outside of the Village boundaries, there are single family detached homes located near the eastern edge of the Village (east of Western Avenue and north of University Parkway). Also, there is a subdivision of large single family home located to the west of the Village along Ridgeland Avenue.

developments have great connections to the region with access to Governors Highway, Cicero Avenue, and Interstate 57. The industrial land uses make up approximately 16% of University Park’s total land area.

Commercial

There is a large amount of land dedicated to agricultural uses inside and outside the community. The majority of farms and crops within the Village are located near the industrial parks and Governors State University. About 36% of the land within University Park’s planning boundary is used for agriculture.

Commercial businesses are sparse inside University Park and in nearby areas. There are a few commercial developments located along University Parkway on the east side of town.

Agricultural

Industrial The majority of University Park’s industrial land uses are located on the west side of the Village. These industrial

Existing Land Use Understanding existing land use patterns is vital when making decisions for the future. The following descriptions are a brief overview of what types of land uses are found in the Village and within the planning area.

Residential Within the Village, most of the residential options are located on the east side of town. There is a balanced mix between single family detached housing, apartments, condominiums and townhomes. Page 29


Land Use

6

Institutional

Open Space & Parks

Vacant

The institutional land use includes publicly and privately owned facilities that serve the public good. Some examples include Village Hall, schools, police stations, fire stations, airports, and cemeteries. Governors State University is the largest institutional use which is centrally located within the Village. Other institutional land uses, like churches, are spread throughout the community.

There are a variety of open spaces and parks located throughout the community. The Thorn Creek Nature Preserve gives residents access to wooded hiking trails. The two golf courses are assets that provide entertainment to everyone within the region. There are also many parks with playgrounds, playfields, and unique recreational attractions such as Riegel Farm which has its own petting zoo and Pine Lake which offers fishing.

There are a few non-agricultural vacant parcels located within the Village. These areas are mainly located in the industrial parks and around the town center area. Vacant lots have no current function and these parcels provide opportunities for future development.

Existing Land Use Percentages

The following data is for parcels within the University Park planning boundary:

Land Use

Percentage

Low Density Residential

3.9%

Medium Density Residential

0.2%

High Density Residential

1.7%

Commercial

0.3%

Industrial

16.2%

Agricultural

36.1%

Institutional

12.3%

Open Space & Parks

24.9%

Vacant (not farmed) Page 30

4.4%


Land Use

6 South Chicago Heights

Frankfort

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50

Governors State University

University Park

University Parkw ay

Village Limits

Crete

Dralle Road ee Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Low Density Residential (0 to 6 units per acre)

Deer Creek Golf Club

Medium Density Residential (7 to 15 units per acre)

Steger Mon

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

High Density 1 Residential (16 or more units per acre)

Monee Manhattan Road

Commercial

Monee

Industrial

W Crete Monee Rd

(ultimate boundary)

Future Crete Institutional Intermodal Nackle Rd

Future South Suburban Airport

Blackhawk Dr

Agricultural

Will Center Rd

Existing Land Use

50

N

Legend

Parks & Open Space Vacant

Goodenow Rd

Page 31


Land Use

6

Existing Zoning

These districts include six residential districts (nothing currently zoned R1A or R5), four commercial districts (nothing currently zoned B-1), one industrial district, one open space district, and one public facilities district. Generally, districts with a high number allow more intense use of the property. See the zoning ordinance for specific zoning categories. The code can be accessed from the economic development tab on the Village’s website (www. university-park-il.com).

Zoning is used as a tool by communities to develop orderly growth. Also, it is used to separate conflicting uses from one another and to control densities of certain types of uses. It ensures residents that the nearby areas will remain stable over the course of time. The Zoning Map shows University Parks individual zoning districts.

Zoning differs from the existing land use because it does not actually show what type of use is located on the property but what uses are permitted to be developed based on the Village’s current zoning regulations. For example, there are many parcels on the west side of University Park which are zoned for industrial use, but there are actually agricultural uses on site. The zoning shows that if these properties change or develop, they must become an industrial uses by regulation.

South Chicago Heights

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest

Legend

S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger Detached Residence R-2 Single Family Detached

University Golf Club

W Stuenkel Road

R-1 Singla Family

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50

B-2 Community Shopping

University Park

University Parkw ay

B-3 Commercial B-4Crete Outdoor Commercial

Dralle Road

ee Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

I Industrial P Public Private and Conservation Land

Steger Mo n

Existing Zoning Map

R-4 Multiple Family Residence

Governors State University

Dralle Road

F Public Facilities

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee

N

W Crete Monee Rd

50

Page 32 Dr

Harlem Avenue

R-3 Single Family Detached

Future Crete Intermodal

1


Land Use

6 Neighboring Communities Future land use and annexation decisions will be influenced by the surrounding communities future plans. A review of comprehensive plans from the surrounding municipalities show that each community has an idea for how the unincorporated land around them should be developed. Park Forest The Village of Park Forest finalized their strategic plan in 2009. This plan outlines a key growth area along Western Avenue. If annexed into Park Forest, the area is planned to contain a mix of commercial, employment/business and both low and high density residential uses (see illustration). Crete Crete’s last comprehensive plan was completed in 1997. The Village plans to update their plan in 2014. Since the plans for the South Suburban Airport were in the preliminary stages, Crete made two separate land use plans depending on if the airport was ever built. The plan which involved the airport being a reality involved the Village expanding its borders to the west to about University Park near the Deer Creek Golf Course. The plan calls for mainly commercial uses surrounded by residential homes.

The Village of Frankfort’s comprehensive plan was recently updated in 2010. The plan indicates that most of the land to the west of University Park should be industrial uses along Interstate 57 which then transitions into business parks and residential uses. The plan incorporates a large amount of land within University Park’s planning boundary.

Park Forest Strategic Plan

Frankfort

Page 33


Land Use

6

Monee

employment opportunity area. The updated western sector plan indicates how to use the land to the west of University Park along Interstate 57. This plan overlaps land planned by the Village of Frankfort but shows a similar development pattern for the area.

The Village of Monee’s growth plan was developed in 2004 with an updated west sector plan in 2009. The original plan calls for the unincorporated land south of University Park to be mainly low density residential and transition into an

FRANKFORT

Rose Hill Cemetery

St. Peter’s Cemetery

WEST SECTOR

9

10

11

12

Cr

r Fo

Ed

8

d ke

k ee

m Co

¤ £ 45

Richton Park is currently in the process of updating their Comprehensive Plan. Once completed, this section of the plan should be updated and amended to reflect their planned development.

FRANKFORT

Co m

Ed

Stuenkel Road

Richton Park

FRANKFORT

Village of Monee

FRAMEWORK PLAN MAP

Dralle Road

DRAFT

October 6, 2009

DRAFT

Prairie Creek

LEGEND

17

15 1 5

16

14

13 1 3

Estate / Conservation Residential (Low Density) Residential / Traditional Neighborhood Opportunity (Medium to High Density)

Green Garden Elementary School

Manhattan - Monee Road

Green Garden Township

21 2 1

Employment / Business Opportunity Institutional

Fire Protection District

Green Garden Country Club

22

23 2 3

Agricultural

MONEE

24 2 4

Public Open Space Private Open Space Proposed Airport

ComEd

20 20

Baptist Church

Commercial Retail Development Centers

Radio Tower

Bruns Road

¦ ¨ § 57

Open Space Buffer / Transition Area

Proposed Metra Station

Municipal Boundary

Pauling Road

28 2 8

27 2 7

26 2 6

ComEd Right-of-way

25 2 5

Collector Road Arterial Road

For ked Cre ek

29

Highway Proposed Illiana Expressway (AC3 option)

k

Railroad

ut

h

Proposed I-355 Interchange

Monee Reservoir Raccoon Grove Forest Preserve

Bike Path

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

36 6

Harlem Avenue

Branch

Fo rke d

35 3 5

80th Avenue

Cr ee

ComEd or Gas Pipeline

So

Peotone Township

88th Avenue

34 Green Garden Township

Offner Road

Township Boundary Proposed Annexation Expanded Planning Area (Belle Meade Annexation)

Monee Township

Existing 1.5 - Mile Planning Area

Will Township

Boundary Agreement (Peotone)

Proposed South Suburban Airport

19

Eagle Road

Page 34

33 3

Center Road

32 2

104th Street

LaGrange Road

2009 Monee West Sector Framework Plan

Waterway

Peotone Boundary Agreement

0 North

1/2 Mile

1 Mile


Land Use

6 South Chicago Heights

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

Frankfort

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger Legend

University Golf Club

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50

General Residential

Governors State University

Open Space

University Park

University Parkw ay

Employment/Business Opportunity

Crete

Dralle Road

Commercial

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mon ee Road

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

Industrial

1

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

Future Crete Intermodal Nackle Rd

Future South Suburban Airport

Blackhawk Dr

50

Will Center Rd

Neighboring Communities Future Land Use

Low Density Residential

(ultimate boundary)

N

Goodenow Rd

Page 35


Land Use

6

Future Land Use The Future Land Use Plan accommodates a range of uses that meet the needs of residents and businesses in a pattern which is both economically viable and functionally compatible. While reviewing this plan, it is important to note that the uses shown are general in nature. On certain parcels, it may be appropriate for exceptions to be made to this plan. In addition to the basic overall land use plan, there are 5 separate key development areas which will be discussed in this section.

Future Land Use

The Future Land Use Map shows the desired arrangement of land uses within the planning boundary. The following is a short description of what is expected in each land use category: Agricultural Land reserved for farming operations including raw crops and farm animals. Residential Single Family

The single family land use category is designed for detached housing. The Village has 3 separate zoning districts to accommodate this land use depending on the size of the structure and parcel. Medium Density

This land use category is ideal for attached residence units such as townhouses and small apartment complexes. It may also accommodate detached housing on smaller lots. This

Page 36

denser form of residential use should also be accompanied by shared open spaces.

The purpose of this category is to provide residence an opportunity to live, work, and shop all in the same place.

High Density

Institutional The Institutional Use land use category encompasses the lands which benefit the public including properties owned by the federal, state, or local governments. Uses such as public or private schools, churches, and cemeteries are also included in this category.

This land use category provides housing options in the form of multi-family structures. Large apartment complexes and condominiums are ideal for high density uses. Opportunities for shared parking and shared open spaces should be taken advantage of in this category. Commercial The Commercial land use category is intended to provide for retail, office and service related business. Industrial The Industrial land use category includes areas where manufacturing and warehousing are appropriate. This area may also include business parks for industrial companies. Mixed Use The mixed use category is designed to provide buildings and areas with a mix of residential, commercial, and civic uses.

Parks This land is designated for private and public recreational uses. This may include but is not limited to parks, pools, golf courses, and recreational centers. Conservation & Open Space This land use category is intended to provide open space around natural areas. It is important to keep these spaces undeveloped to maintain the communities natural beauty and to mitigate stormwater runoff.


Land Use

6 South Chicago Heights

Frankfort

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger Legend

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

Low Density Residential (0 to 6 units per acre)

S Western Avenue

50

S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Medium Density Residential (7 to 15 units per acre) High Density Residential (16 or more units per acre)

Governors State University

Commercial

University Park

University Parkw ay

Industrial

Crete

Dralle Road

Agricultural

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mon ee Road

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

Institutional Parks Open Space

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee

2,600 acres 411 acres 130 acres

Utilizing current census data and local average density data, this plan is designed to contain a maximum population of about 38,000.

Future South Suburban Airport

Future Crete Intermodal Nackle Rd

Low Density Residential: Medium Density Residential: High Density Residential:

50

Blackhawk Dr

Future Land Use

This map illustrates the following planned acreages:

N

W Crete Monee Rd

Will Center Rd

Future Land Use Population Projections

1

(ultimate boundary) Goodenow Rd

Page 37


Land Use New I-57 Interchange

Future Future Industiral Industiral District District

New I-57 Interchange at University Parkway

Steger Road

As the adjacent diagram shows, Hickory Creek runs on a diagonal through the interchange, limiting development in some areas given the associated flood plain. This creek provides some natural buffers to future retail/commercial properties to the north and west. Page 38

Inters y kor

ek Cre

Hic

Open Open Space Space Corridor Corridor

Future Future Commercial Commercial District District

Future Future Signal Signal

Future Future Commercial Commercial District District

University Parkway

Stuenkel Road

Future Future Signal Signal

Ridgeland Avenue

As can be seen at the existing Monee-Manhattan Road exit to the south, interchanges offer obvious opportunities for highway oriented businesses such as restaurants, gas stations and truck stops, and hotels. All of these uses would be appropriate in this area, generally along University Parkway between and adjacent to Central Avenue to the east and Ridgeland Avenue to the west. Retail uses may also be appropriate in this area, particularly large scale ‘big box’ uses, which typically require the excellent access and visibility offered by an interchange location.

Existing Existing Industiral Industiral District District

tate 5 7

As noted in the transportation section, the Illinois Department of Transportation is in the process of constructing a new interchange on I-57 in University Park. This interchange will become the Village’s front door offering new commercial opportunities (both retail and industrial), more convenient Interstate access to both residents and businesses, and the opportunity for the Village to enhance its identity. In interviews with commercial brokers in the area, it is clear that the market is excited about the opportunities offered by this new interchange.

Current Village Boundary

Future Future Industiral Industiral District District

Future Future Gatway Gatway Feature Feature

Enhanced Enhanced Streetscape Streetscape Corridor Corridor Central Avenue

The Village has several key potential development sectors that warrant additional discussion. These areas address areas that either have significant market potential within the next 10 years, or are strategically located at prominent locations within the Village.

Current Village Boundary

Key Development Opportunities

6

Existing Existing Industiral Industiral District District


Land Use

6 University Park Urban Design Framework

rnors

Hwy

W 34th St

Central Ave

Crawford Ave

I- 57

Gove

Home Ave

Steger Rd

S Western Ave

S Crawford Ave

Unive

rsity P

kwy ham Dr

W Exchange St Circle Dr

W Loves Ln Western Ave

W Dralle Rd

Madisen Ln

y

S Cicero Ave

S Gov erno rs Hw

S Central Ave W Leg Dan Ryan Expy

Govenors State University

Burn

S Ridgeland Ave

Monee Rd

W Stuenkel Rd

W University Pkwy

Stuenkel Rd

W Stuenkel Rd

W University Pkwy

Dralle Rd

Bridge Enhancements: Ornamental Railings, Decorcative Panels, Welcome Signage

LEGEND Commercial Landuse Industrial Park Landuse

Proposed Streetscape Corridor Enhanced Intersection -proposed

Town Center- TOD Plan Conservation-Open Space Existing TIF

Bridge Enhancements: Ornamental Railings, Decorcative Panels, Welcome Signage Gateway and Identity Elements

University Park Urban Design Framework

Proposed Traffic Light Existing Traffic Light Metra Station Existing Pedestrian Route from Metra to Govenors State University Proposed safety enhancements to pedestrian crossing.

Gateway Monument

Gateway Landscaping

Streetscape Corridor

Page 39


Land Use In addition to the retail/restaurant potential, the new interchange should also help to spur additional industrial park development. This includes both additional development on the west side of I-57 as well as opportunities to the west along Ridgeland Avenue. Urban Design Framework The Urban Design Framework illustration highlights how to capitalize on this new ‘front door’ to the Village. Highlights of this concept include: • Creating an attractive, landscaped streetscape along University Parkway with new lighting, street trees, and a bike path along University Parkway • Creation of a gateway/identity feature near between Central and the new off-ramp. • Working with IDOT on the Stunkel Road/University Parkway bridge to provide a clear identity through signage and rail/embankment treatments Transit Oriented Development (TOD) near Metra Station

The Village completed a detailed plan for the area around the Metra Station in 2002. This plan featured a dense, walkable design with buildings pushed to the street, realignment of Governors Highway, and a central park. While many of these elements are desirable today, the realities of the market, recognition of the environment, and sound traffic planning principals suggest some modification to these concepts. The updated concept for the TOD area includes: • Big Box commercial use at the key Cicero/University Parkway intersection • Potential realignment of Governors Highway to intersect Page 40

6 with Cicero Avenue, eliminating the difficult intersection where University Parkway crosses both Governors Highway and the CN Railroad within a few feet of each other. The prior plan had this realignment occurring, with a connection to x Street. However, this would increase traffic on the existing roadway to the south, and would not provide adequate spacing of a major intersection on University Parkway. • Mixed Use areas in proximity to the train station that could include a variety of medium to high density residential, office, and retail/restaurant uses. Original TOD Land Use Plan (2002)

• Areas for townhome development that would provide housing options near the commuter station, GSU, and future shops and restaurants. • Opportunities for single family homes, particularly north of the golf club. Open space corridors connect future residential areas with the station and providing for stormwater management needs.


Land Use

6 New TOD Land Use Plan

Legend

Steger Road

Steger Road

Existing Road Proposed Local Road hwa y

Existing Rail

Townhomes

Gov ern

Crawford Avenue

Single Family

S Cicero Avenue

Existing Metra Station

ors

Hig

Proposed Traffic Circle

Mixed Use Commercial

University Park Golf Club

Recreation Conservation & Open Space Proposed Governors Highway Route Proposed Traffic Signal Current Governors Highway Route

University Parkway

Governors State University

Page 41


Land Use

6

Town Center

The Town Center area is located along University Parkway near Village Hall and the Town Center Shopping Plaza. This area is just north of University Park’s main residential areas. Western Avenue is the areas eastern boundary, with Old Monee/ Steger Road serving as the western limits. Thorn Creek Nature Preserve forms the areas northern boundary. The area features a new Family Dollar Store, Thornwood Towers, the Village Hall/Main Fire Station and the Police Department. The Town Center Shopping Center, which is owned by the Village, currently contains a variety of small restaurants, a daycare business, and meeting space used by the Village for a variety of function including Village Board meetings. The Village recently created a new Tax Increment Financing District (TIF) within this area. The goal of the TIF Redevelopment Plan is to “establish the area as a vibrant commercial mixed-use district.” The plan promotes a mixture of commercial (retail/office/service), institutional (public facilities, hospitals, social services), and residential uses. Given relatively low traffic counts (approximately 8,000 vehicles per day), this area currently has limited commercial potential. The plan shows additional opportunities for new housing in the area in a range of densities. This increased population will help to build support for future businesses that could take advantage of the walkable population within the area (similar to what the Family Dollar Store has done). The plan suggests maintaining this area as the civic core of the community, with Village Hall and the Police Station. As noted in the community facilities section, the Village Hall will need to be expanded or replaced at some point given limited space for meetings and offices. Another need expressed by a number of residents was for a community center. This area would be ideal for such a facility. Page 42

All new development should be designed with the pedestrian in mind, with good sidewalk connectivity, integration of transit (Pace Route 367 runs through this area), and bicycle accommodations (bike racks and perhaps a bike repair station with air and tools).

Town Center TIF Boundary


Land Use

6 Southern Growth Area/ Crete Monee Road Corridor

South Surban Airport Ultimate Land Use

The proposed South Suburban Airport has been a topic of conversation within the region for a number of years, and remains so today. The airport is proposed just south of the Village, with the ultimate border proposed approximately one mile south of Crete Monee Road. The airport, if developed, will limit University Park’s future growth to the south. Primary access into the airport will be from the west, initially from Cicero/Route 50 and ultimately from a new interchange at I-57.

0.5 miles

0.75 miles

FUTURE RUNWAY 8L-26R 7,500' x 150' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

POTENTIAL RUNWAY 8C-26C 10,000' x 150' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

2.25 miles FUTURE RUNWAY 8R-26L 12,000' x 200' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

The challenge for University Park is what land use to plan along Crete Monee Road given the uncertainty of the airport and its future expansion potential. The initial runway will be 3.5 miles south of Crete Monee Road, with an ultimate northern runway approximately 1.25 miles south of the roadway. All proposed runways run east-west, which should be good for University Park as it will limit, and perhaps completely avoid, airplanes flying over the community.

FUTURE RUNWAY 9L-27R 2,500' EXTENSION FUTURE RUNWAY 9L-27R 12,000' x 200' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

POTENTIAL RUNWAY 9C-27C 10,000' x 150' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

Given the unknown resolution of the airport, it is recommended that the Village plan for agricultural use south of Crete Monee Road at this time. This will: • Promote compact, contiguous growth of existing and future residential neighborhoods to the north. • Keep the land open for future development should the airport ultimately come to pass.

Initial Runway

Main Access

LAND USE CATEGORY

FUTURE RUNWAY 9R-27L 10,000' x 150' (N 90° 0' 0.00" E TRUE)

LEGEND

AGRICULTURAL

FUTURE PROPERTY BOUNDARY SCHOOL

INDUSTRIAL

TOWNSHIP BOUNDARY EXISTING RAILROAD FUTURE RAIL

COMMERCIAL

PARK

RESIDENTIAL

HOUSE OF WORSHIP

INSTITUTIONAL

EXISTING ROADS CEMETERY

OPEN SPACE

PROPOSED ROADS POLICE STATION

TRANSPORTATION / UTILITIES / WASTE

EXISTING ROADS (REMOVE) FUTURE RUNWAYS AND TAXIWAYS

NOTES: 1. SEE SHEET 4 FOR GENERAL NOTES. 2. SOURCE OF LAND USE INVENTORY: -CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AGENCY FOR PLANNING (CMAP), DIGITAL GEOSPATIAL REPRESENTATION OF LAND USE IN NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS, VERSION 1.0, 2005 LAND USE INVENTORY 3. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: WILL COUNTY, DATED 2008. SAME AS EXHIBIT "A" PROPERTY LINE MAP FOR SOUTH SUBURBAN AIRPORT, JUNE 30, 2012.

FIRE STATION

ROADWAYS / UNDER CONSTRUCTION

POTENTIAL AIRFIELD DEVELOPMENT

VACANT LAND

INAUGURAL PAVEMENT

WETLANDS

FUTURE PAVEMENT DEMOLISHED PAVEMENT INAUGURAL FACILITIES

DRAFT

FUTURE FACILITIES

TRANSPORTATION AECOM TECHNICAL SERVICES, Inc. 303 EAST WACKER DRIVE, SUITE 900 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60601 TEL 312.373.7700 F 312.938.1109 www.aecom.com

DK/CA LAH/SAU EDL

South Suburban Airport FUTURE AIRPORT LAND USE DRAWING

1"=1000' 9-27-2012

LTB 60181525.M2.2

22

• Help to preserve the open space/rural nature of the Village. • Provide a buffer to potential noise from aircraft related operations. • Once plans for the airport are confirmed, this plan should be re-examined and adjusted as appropriate. Page 43


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7

7

Housing

It is important to understand the types of housing options within a community in order to make appropriate decisions for the future. This section will cover the typical housing age, housing types and styles, housing densities, and affordability of all the residential uses within the Village as well as provide a housing plan which will provide specific policies the Village should consider enacting.

Housing Types & Styles

Housing Age

The majority of homes in the community are built on smaller lots (under 1/4 acre) ranging from one-story ranch houses to split-level or two-story homes. These homes are built with a variety of materials and usually offer a driveway that connects to either an attached or detached garage. In smaller pockets throughout the Village, such as homes adjacent to Deer Creek Golf Course, there are larger homes on larger lots. These homes are typically brick and have attached multi-car garages.

Housing in the community is somewhat older than housing options in the county. As shown in the chart below, about 85% of the homes built in University Park were constructed over 15 years ago with the median year built being 1976. Homes in the surrounding Will County communities have a tendency to be built more recently with over 27% of homes being built since 2000. Since the community has been growing very slowly over the past decades, there has not been a high demand for new housing options. University Park 14.6% Built 2000 or Later

Will County 27.1%

The type and style of housing options within a municipality help establish the character for the community. The following residential opportunities are available to University Park citizens: Single Family Homes

Townhomes & Duplexes Most of the existing townhomes and duplexes are typically two story buildings built out of brick with shingled mansard roofs and no garages. There are a few parcels which contain new modern town homes, which are two stories with attached garages.

Built 1970 to 1999

59.2%

46.0%

Built 1940 to 1969

22.8%

19.4%

Apartments & Condominiums

Built before 1940

3.4%

7.5%

The apartment and condominium complexes within the Village vary in the way they are built and the amenities they offer. There are no “typical� complexes due to this variety. The only consistent feature of these housing types is they are usually grouped together and have separate subdivision labels assigned to each group.

University Park Median Year Built

1976

Will County Median Year Built

1990

Source: 2011 American Community Survey, five-year estimates

Page 45


Housing

7

Housing Density Housing density refers to the number of dwelling units on an acre of land. The following are the types of housing densities located in University Park:

Low Density Residential

Medium Density Residential

High Density Residential

0 to 6 units per acre

7 to 15 units per acre

16 or more units per acre

Low density housing options within the Village are typically single family detached homes. The majority of these homes are located on the east side of the Village south of University Parkway. These homes are primarily built on lots under one quarter (1/4) of an acre. The low density residences are adjacent to several open spaces and are near parks and schools.

Page 46

Medium density housing options within the Village include multi-family townhomes and duplexes. These buildings usually house 2 to 4 families and are located on the east side of town south of University Parkway. These types of structures have a tendency to be spread out on larger lots and utilize surrounding open space. The townhomes and duplexes tend to have shared parking lots and other facilities to accommodate the larger number of residents in the area. It is unusual for any of these buildings to be more than two stories tall.

High density housing options within the Village include multi-family apartment complexes and potentially condominiums. Like all the other housing options in the Village, the majority of high density housing is located on the east side of the Village. Almost all of these housing options are between three to five stories and one apartment complex even rises to fourteen stories. All of these structures are accompanied by shared parking lots for residents.


Housing

7 The Illinois General Assembly passed the Affordable Housing Planning and Appeal Act (AHPAA) (310 ILCS 67) in 2003 to address the lack of moderately-priced housing that exists in many communities. Growth in home values continues to outpace growth in household incomes throughout the Chicago region and many people who are vital to local economies and who provide critical community services cannot afford to live in or around the places they work. This act establishes a minimum threshold of 10% of the housing units in a community should be affordable. Communities that do not meet this minimum threshold must prepare an affordable housing plan. As used in the act, "affordable housing" means housing that has a value or cost or rental amount that is within the means of a household that may occupy moderate-income or low-income housing. In the case of owner-occupied dwelling units, housing that is affordable means housing in which mortgage, amortization, taxes, insurance, and condominium or association fees, if any, constitute no more than 30% of the gross annual household income for a household of the size that may occupy the unit. In the case of dwelling units for rent, housing that is affordable means housing for which the rent and utilities constitute no more than 30% of the gross annual household income for a household of the size that may occupy the unit. The 2013 Report on Statewide Local Government Affordability prepared by the Illinois Housing Development Authority notes a 56.2% affordable housing share for University Park. These relatively high number suggests that University Park is not required to prepare an Affordable Housing Plan. However, housing costs are only one part of the affordability picture. The Center for Neighborhood Technology has developed the H+T Index to help evaluate the affordability of

living in a particular area. The “H” represents housing costs (including mortgage and taxes), while the “T” represents transportation costs. The following table compares University Park to the rest of Will County and to the greater Chicago Metropolitan Area (7 County CMAP region). The standard threshold of affordability is equal to 30 percent for housing costs and 45 percent for housing and transportation costs combined. From this table, it appears that University Park’s housing costs are generally affordable for most residents, but the higher transportation costs are likely putting a strain on household budgets. University Park

Will County

CMAP Region

Housing Cost

26.1%

33.1%

29.3%

Transportation Cost

25.3%

25.2%

21.5%

Total Cost

51.4%

58.3%

50.8%

Source: CMAP calculations of Center for Neighborhood

Technology DataPublic transportation typically has a lower cost than the use of private automobiles. By promoting transit oriented development including new housing near the existing University Park Metra Station, the Village can provide opportunities for future residents to reduce their transportation costs. In addition, continuing to expand the local employment base can help to provide jobs closer to home for residents – thus also reducing transportation cost.

Housing Plan The Housing Plan provides guidance to the Village of University Park in developing appropriate plans and policies which demonstrate the Village’s commitment to meet identified and projected deficits in the supply of housing. In addition, this Plan intends to develop alternative housing policies and strategies for coordinating a wide range of public and private

sector programs to meet the Village’s current and future housing needs. According to the Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA), as of 2013 56% of the housing in University Park was deemed affordable. In 2013, affordable per the IHDA definition would result in a home in the Chicagoland region of $147,000 or less for a 3 person family or a two bedroom apartment for $994 a month or less (these numbers are based on a household income of $53,000 or 80% of Area Median Income). Illinois communities with less than 10% affordable housing must prepare an affordable housing plan.

Housing Goal To facilitate the provision of decent, safe, sanitary, healthy and affordable housing in suitable neighborhoods to meet the needs of the present and future residents of the Village, while preserving and enhancing the community’s physical and social fabric, and cultural diversity.

Affordability

Page 47


Housing

7 Policy 3: Stimulate the production of new housing for all incomes, ages, and family types, including mid and upper incomes Policy 4: Promote safe, attractive, livable neighborhoods that will attract new homeowners Policy 5: New subdivisions should be interconnected by open spaces, sidewalks, and roadways.

Housing Conservation & Rehabilitation

Housing Quantity The Village has identified housing needs for the residents of University Park. The Village must diligently work with the private sector and provide sufficient incentives to encourage the delivery of the varied housing residents need. Objective 1 The Village shall provide technical and financial assistance to the private sector to provide dwelling units of various types, sizes and costs to meet existing and future housing needs. Policies Policy 1: Provide information, technical assistance, and incentives to the private sector to maintain capacity sufficient to meet the required production. Policy 2: Develop working relationships with developers and home builders to improve the efficiency and expand the capacity of the housing delivery system. This includes pro-active outreach to the residential development community to explore market opportunities. Page 48

Policy 3: Review ordinances, codes, regulations and the permitting process for the purpose of eliminating excessive and overlapping requirements and resolving conflicting requirements, and amending or adding other requirements in order to increase private sector participation in meeting housing needs, while continuing to insure the health, welfare and safety of the residents. Objective 2 The Village shall provide new housing opportunities that area consistant with the Village’s overal vision. Policies Policy 1: Encourage medium density residential development, including combinations of new construction, in-fill development and rehabilitation. Policy 2: Provide strategic Village investments in public infrastructure to promote residential development, e.g., parks, streetscape improvements, sidewalks, and utilities.

The majority of the Village’s housing stock is in sound condition requiring only minor maintenance. It is critical to ensure that the Village’s housing remain in a sound condition. Strategies and programs need to be developed, implemented and coordinated to conserve and rehabilitate the Village’s housing. Objective 1 The Village shall help conserve and extend the useful life of the existing housing stock and shall implement neighborhood planning programs. Policies Policy 1: The Village shall review and amend where necessary the Village housing and health codes and standards relating to the care and maintenance of residential and neighborhood environments and facilities. Policy 2: The Village shall schedule and concentrate public infrastructure and supporting infrastructure and supporting facilities and services to upgrade the quality of all existing neighborhoods. Policy 3: The Village shall encourage individual


Housing

7 homeowners to increase private reinvestment in housing by providing information on technical and financial assistance program.

Objective 3 Ensure coordinated, effective planning and management of housing programs and development issues

Policy 4: The Village shall maintain the Certificate of Inspection (CI) Program to promote housing code compliance.

Policies Policy 1: Improve certainty in development regulations to the extent they are consistent with the public health, safety, and welfare.

Objective 2 Upgrade and maintain public services. Policies Policy 1: Maintain a leadership attitude which delivers responsive public actions in ensuring personal security, code enforcement, and other public services • • • • •

Maintain a strong code enforcement program Establish programs to protect personal security Maintain effective crisis response Improve neighborhood/police relations Develop effective neighborhood crime defense mechanisms

Policy 2: Provide an expedited permit process. Policy 3: Promote intergovernmental cooperation to achieve Village Housing Goals • Seek to enter into an intergovernmental agreement with Will County to foster implementation of affordable housing goals • Seek cooperative relationships with other agencies such as SSMMA to encourage appropriate housing development.

Policy 2: Improve the visual quality of residential areas where needed. • Accent viewsheds in the design of residential areas • Identify and establish view corridors along residential street • Advocate for the undergrounding of utilities Policy 3: Promote social interaction as well as neighborhood identity and initiatives Policy 4: Encourage walk-ability within neighborhoods Page 49


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8

8

Transportation

A well rounded transportation network can improve a municipality’s environmental and economic sustainability. Allowing the people within the Village to move to, from, and through the community efficiently can improve the quality of life for all.

Traffic Counts For successful commercial retailers, daily counts over 20,000 are considered ideal for development. The highest counts in the Village are located on Interstate 57 and Cicero Avenue. The new University Parkway and Interstate 57 interchange will increase traffic along University Parkway and increase opportunities for commercial development.

Daily traffic counts are used to determine which sections of the Village have the most exposure to automobile traffic. The traffic count data is used to analyze where there could be traffic issues and where commercial business is likely to succeed.

This section will cover how University Park’s transportation system works by evaluating the traffic counts, truck routes, With the exception of Interstate 57, the traffic counts are public transit, existing bicycle and pedestrian routes. not particularly high in any area around University Park. This section will then address how University Park should handle transportation issues in the future by incorporating the road classifications and thoroughfares plan, a future bicycle and pedestrian plan, and transportation Frankfort Richton improvements. Park

South Chicago Heights

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest

6,700 S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

17,200

University Golf Club

rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Governors State University

10,900

University Park

7,950

University Parkw ay

Cr 9,250

Monee Manhattan Road

12,700

ee Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

6,650

1,350

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

50

Page 51 d

Proposed Interstate Access Point

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

Blackhawk Dr

Full Interstate Access Point

Traffic Count Map

Railroad

40,400

Harlem Avenue

Road

7,100

8,450 High way

W Stuenkel Road

Steger

Steger Mon

Legend

University Parkway

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50


Transportation

8

Truck Routes

Truck Route Map

Truck routes are designed to direct trucks to roads designed to accommodate their weight and more limited turning movements. These routes attempt to keep large and slow moving vehicles off residential streets. There are two types of truck routes:

Frankfort

Richton Park

• Class I Are made to handle the largest trucks and are designed to only be on limited access divided highways.

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

• Class II Can also handle the largest trucks but are used to connect industrial regions to the Class I routes.

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

50

In University Park, the only existing truck routes are located on Interstate 57 and Cicero Avenue. These routes run through the industrial parks on the west side of town completely avoiding residential areas.

University Golf Club

Full Interstate Access Point Proposed Interstate Access Point Page 52

rnors

High way Gove

University Park

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

ee Road

Dralle Road

Steger Mo n

Class II Truck Route

Governors State University

Dralle Road

Harlem Avenue

Class I Truck Route

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Legend

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

50

oad

ee R

Mon


Transportation

8 Public Transit

PACE Bus Route 367

Public transit is essential to the long term health and growth of University Park. A strong transit plan is key in developing an environmentally sustainable community. University Park is served by two forms of public transit:

This is the only bus route that runs through University Park. There are several nicely maintained bus stops throughout the residential areas of the Village and stops at several key spots around town. The route connects residents to the following locations:

This route also links to other regional routes in Pace’s network which allow residents to travel all over the Chicagoland region. This route has had a consistent ridership amount of about 2,500 riders annually for over 10 years. While the ridership number may seem low, the purpose of this route is to connect residents to local features. Residents have expressed two concerns regarding existing bus service:

Metra Electric Line

• Metra Station

There is a Metra passenger train station located in University Park off of Governors Highway and University Parkway which is a terminus for the Metra Electric Line. This line travels through other south suburbs such as Matteson, Homewood, and Olympia Fields. The other end of this line is located at Millennium Station in downtown Chicago. Ridership from the University Park Station has increased over the years with approximately 1,250 weekday boardings in 2006.

• Governors State University

• Lack of service at night and on the weekend

• Town Center/Village Hall

• Lack of service to jobs in the industrial park

• Orchard Park Plaza in Park Forest (with connections via Pace Route 366 to the Pace Route regional hub in Chicago Heights) Orchard Park Plaza

South Chicago Heights

Frankfort

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest Metra Electirc Line Station

r

Legend

University Golf Club

Gove

Governors State University

University Park

University Parkw ay

Crete

Dralle Road

PACE Bus Stop

Blackhawk

Dr

ee Road

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mon

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

50

Page 53 r Rd

Metra Train Station

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

Public Transit Map

r

rnors

High way

Metra Electric Line

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

PACE Bus Route 367

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

oad

ee R

Mon

S Western Avenue

50

S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd


Transportation

8

Existing Bicycle & Pedestrian Paths

Existing Bicycle & Pedestrian Path Map

Bicycle trails, lanes, and multi-use paths offer residents another mode of transportation and can be used for recreation. The following is a description of the current conditions and proposed improvements for bicycle trails in the Village: Existing Trails

South Chicago Heights

• University Parkway - This trail runs along University Parkway Frankfort from Governors State University to Western Avenue.

Park Forest

University Golf Club

• Riegel Farm Park - This trail is unpaved and connects the W Stuenkel Road park with Blackhawk Drive and Western Avenue.

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

• Applied Systems - There is a private system of looping trails within the Applied Systems campus.

ad

e Ro

e Mon

S Western Avenue

50

• Herritage Park - This trail runs through residential areas and connects to Herritage Park, Hickok Aquatic Center, and Coretta Scott King Magnet School.

Proposed Improvements

S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Governors State University

University Park

University Parkw ay

Dralle Road

• There is a plan to improve the trail along University Parkway. The 2 mile stretch from Western Avenue to Monee Road will be upgraded to a fully paved 10 foot wide multi-use path. Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

• There is another plan which will add a bike lane along Cicero Avenue going north from UniversityMonee Parkway. The Manhattan Road plan for this trail is currently in Tier 1 research.

Monee

N

Deer Creek Golf Club

ee Road

• Governors State University - This path connects the University with the Metra train station.

57

Steger Mo n

• Thorn Creek - This trail runs through the Thorn Creek Forest Preserve and is unpaved.

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

Existing Trail

W Crete Monee Rd

Proposed Improvement

50

wk Dr

r Rd

Page 54


Transportation

8 Road Classifications & Thoroughfare Plan

Minor Arterial

Local Streets

Identifying and classifying routes throughout the community will allow the Village to understand where traffic flow is expected and to keep the roadways less congested. These five roadway classifications will direct traffic into, out of, and through University Park:

Minor arterial routes accommodate shorter trips with lower speed limits and traffic volume. Since these routes are meant to supplement the principal arterial system, they tend to offer more access to fronting properties.

All other routes in the Village are considered local streets. These streets are meant to have direct access to fronting properties and connect to the other roadways within the system. Local streets offer the lowest speeds and mobility of all the classified roads and discourage through traffic.

Some of the main minor arterial routes in the community include:

Interstate

• Western Avenue - gives residents a route to go north

Interstate routes are divided highways which may only be accessed by a limited number of interchanges. With its higher speed limits and regional connections, the interstate is typically used for long range trips and accommodates the highest amount of traffic.

• Governors Highway - accommodates access to the Metra Station

Interstate 57 along the Village’s west side is the only interstate route that travels through the community. Presently, the only access points to this road are at Monee-Manhattan Road in Monee and Sauk Trail in Richton Park. There are currently plans to add a full access interchange in 2015 at University Parkway which will be discussed later in this chapter.

Principal Arterial Principal arterial roads are designed to carry a large amount of traffic and service long distance trips within the Village and to neighboring communities. These routes primarily serve the Village’s industrial districts. The parts of Cicero Avenue and Governors Highway which are labeled as principal arterials are established truck routes. Monee-Manhattan Road is another principal arterial in the region which is meant to direct traffic onto Interstate 57.

• University Parkway - gives residents access to the town center area • Steger Monee Road - travels through the geographical center of town

Collector Streets Collector streets serve as a link between the arterial system and access points in the residential, commercial and industrial areas. The primary purpose of these routes is to accommodate trips within the community. Speed levels and traffic counts are typically low on these roads as they are meant to support local traffic circulation and not regional trips. A majority of the main collector streets in the community are located near the industrial uses on the west side of town. These streets allow industrial traffic to get to designated trucking routes.

Page 55


Transportation

8

Master Thoroughfare Plan

Legend South Chicago Heights

Richton Park

Principal Arterial

57

Park Forest

3

University Golf Club

University Parkway High way rnors

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

4

Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

5

oad

ee R

Mon

Existing Access Point New Interchange

Governors State University

University Park

University Parkw ay

Roadway Crete

Dralle Road Dralle Road ee Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

Improvements

1 Realign Harlem/Steger intersection

Steger Mon

Harlem Avenue

Collector

S Western Avenue

50

W Stuenkel Road

Minor Arterial

2

Steger Rd

S Crawford Avenue

1

Interstate

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

Frankfort

1

2 Steger Road extension

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee

3 Realign Governors Highway

W Crete Monee Rd

(ultimate boundary)

N Page 56

Goodenow Rd

Future Crete Intermodal Nackle Rd

Future South Suburban Airport

Blackhawk Dr

Will Center Rd

50

4 Construct grade separation at rail crossing

5 Dralle Road extension with I-57 overpass


Transportation

8 Future Bicycle & Pedestrian Paths

Existing Multi-use Paths

Proposed Multi-use Paths

Bicycle and pedestrian paths can be used for two main purposes: transportation and recreation. Having a well connected network of trails and paths can help a municipality improve the mobility of its residents. The following plan outlines how University Park can connect its resources and encourage non-motorized transportation from home to work and other community facilities.

These paths represent a complete and fully functional multi-use path. The only path that is complete and in good condition is located around the Applied Systems property on University Parkway. This path travels around the building and connects to its own parking lot.

These paths have been laid out in a way to eventually allow everyone in the community close access to a multi-use path. They travel through every type of district in town and attempt to follow natural features. These paths should be developed with in the following order:

Existing Multi-use Paths (needs improvement)

Phase 1 The paths around the residential areas on the east side of the Village are the highest priority. Upgrading the existing paths and building these new paths will connect residents to each other and to the local schools and parks.

Due to the large amounts of open space and undeveloped land in the community, all of the proposed improvements suggest to develop 10 foot wide, paved, multi-use paths. These paths offer the best quality of service for pedestrians and bicyclists. They accommodate two way traffic and create a safe environment for users by keeping them off the roads. The following describe the features shown on the Bicycle & Pedestrian Path Map (next page):

These are paths that already exist in University Park but are not considered full two way paths. Most of these paths are paved but are not currently in good condition. Since these paths are already in key locations around the Village, it is recommended that these be upgraded to the preferred 10 foot wide path. As previously mentioned, the path along University Parkway is already accomplishing this strategy.

Phase 2 The next paths should connect the residential area with Governors State University, the new Transit Oriented Development area, and the existing industries on the west side of the Village. This will also include the paths along Old Monee Steger Road and other open space areas. It will give residents an opportunity to ride around the area and enjoy the existing natural areas. Phase 3 The paths located on the west side of Interstate 57 should be constructed as development occurs in that area. This includes the two overpasses over Interstate 57 which is a long term solution to connecting that side of the interstate with the rest of the community. Phase 4 Any other route that ends in an arrow is meant to show a connection to a neighboring community. As the region grows, there may be new paths created which are out of the control of University Park. This plan may be modified to connect to surrounding municipalities to create a well connected regional network. Page 57


Transportation

8 South Chicago Heights

nkfort

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest

Metra Electirc Line Station

r

oad

Steger

ee R

Mon

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Golf Club

University Parkway

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Potential Trail Overpass

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

High way

W Stuenkel Road

Governors State University

University Park

University Parkw ay

Existing Multi-use Path Existing Multi-use Path (needs improvement) Proposed Multi-use path

Crete

Dralle Road

Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Connection to Neighboring Trail

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mo nee

Harlem Avenue

Conservation & Open Space Parkland Institutional Uses

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee W Crete Monee Rd

N

(ultimate boundary) Goodenow Rd

Future Crete Intermodal Nackle Rd

Future South Suburban Airport

Blackhawk Dr

50

Will Center Rd

Future Bicycle & Pedestrian Path Map

Legend

Crete

Dralle Road

Page 58

S Western Avenue

50

S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

1


Transportation

8 Bicycle Facilities Providing durable parking facilities for bicycles is important for schools, parks, libraries, commercial areas and public transit stops. Bicycle parking should be located in a visible, well lit and well signed area close to building or park entrances. For long term parking areas, such as parking near the University, covered parking should be provided to protect the bikes from the weather and other elements.

Bicycle Signage Denoting where bicyclists should be traveling will help keep riders and drivers safe. Posting informational signs will help direct bicycle and automobile traffic. While all the paths in this plan are separate trails, there will be times when bicycles will share the road with motor vehicles. Some streets may be used to connect multi-use paths in between construction phases. When this occurs signs should be posted to keep everyone informed and safe.

While not shown specifically on the map, the following locations are ideal for long term bicycle parking facilities: • Governors State University • Metra Train Station • Town Center • Thorn Creek Nature Center • All parks & schools

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Transportation Transportation Improvements Interstate 57 & University Parkway Roadway Improvements The project consists of the complete construction of a new full access interchange along Interstate 57 at University Parkway in Will County. The project includes construction of the interchange ramps, signalized ramp terminals as well as replacement of the existing University Parkway bridge over Interstate 57 which will accommodate the future additional auxiliary lanes for the northbound and southbound Interstate 57, reconstruction widening of the of the roadway from approximately 800’ west of Harlem Avenue to approximately 1800’ east of Central Avenue. Roadway lighting, traffic signal, and drainage improvements are also included in the project. The proposed I-57 at University Parkway Interchange Project First Step: University Parkway Bridge Replacement

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8 is divided into the following four major contracts: University Parkway over I-57 Bridge

• Permitting and drainage improvements associated with the above noted improvements.

• Opened for bids on June 15, 2012

Interchange Construction

• Removal and replacement of the University Parkway bridge structure over I-57.

(West of Ridgeland Avenue to east of Central Avenue)

• Construction is currently complete. Roadway Reconstruction

• Bids scheduled for June of 2014 • Construction of new I-57 Interchange ramps for all movements to and from University Parkway.

• Opened for bids on January 18, 2013.

• Widening and resurfacing of the roadway along University Parkway from west of Ridgeland Avenue to east of Central Avenue.

• Widening and resurfacing of the roadway along Stuenkel Road from Harlem Avenue to west of Ridgeland Avenue

• Construction of turn lanes along University Parkway at the cross streets and interchange entrances.

• Construction of turn lanes along University Parkway at the cross streets.

• Construction of a sidewalk and bike path (or grading to allow future placement) along the north and south side of University Parkway, respectively.

(Harlem Avenue to west of Ridgeland Avenue)

• Cross street improvements at Harlem Avenue.


Transportation

8 • Cross street improvements at Ridgeland Avenue and Central Avenue.

• Accommodation of projected increased traffic demand for one of the fastest growing areas within the State of Illinois.

• Removal and replacement of existing culverts along I-57 and University Parkway.

• Redistribute projected traffic demand, thereby easing congestion on adjacent I-57 interchanges and local roads.

• Permitting, roadway lighting, traffic signal, and drainage improvements associated with the above noted improvements. Roadway Reconstruction (University Parkway from Central to Cicero) • Bidding tentatively scheduled for April 25, 2014. • Full roadway reconstruction along University Parkway from just east of Central Avenue to west of Governors Highway. • Intersection and Traffic Signal improvements at Cicero Avenue. • Permitting and drainage improvements associated with the above noted improvements.

Benefits Some of the anticipated benefits from this project include: • Aid in residential, commercial, and industrial development of undeveloped properties in the interchange area. • Reduced travel time to and from I-57, thereby reducing energy consumption. • Improved access between the regional job centers of Chicago, Kankakee, and far south suburbs and affordable suburban residential housing to the south.

• Improved access to desired destinations such as Governors State University, the industrial parks, and the University Park Metra station. • Aid in economic development of the area.

University Parkway Rail Overpass

Proposed Actions The approval, design, and construction of a grade separated rail structure can take considerable time. It is important to begin discussions with the railroad and the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) about the need for this overpass. As part of the process, it will be necessary to document potential safety benefits that would be achieved from the construction of the rail overpass. This type of improvement could potentially be eligible for funding from the Grade Crossing Protection Fund (GCPF) administered by the ICC. Plans for constructing an overpass should be closely coordinated with the planned I-57/ University Parkway interchange. Once a new interchange is constructed, it will enhance access to the Village and increase traffic along University Parkway.

Description of Planned or Conceptual Improvements The existing University Parkway at-grade rail crossing (CNIC rail line) consists of two tracks and approximately 75 feet between tracks and the existing all-way stop at Governors Highway. This location has been previously identified as a location that would benefit from the construction of a grade separated structure. Potential Impacts The construction of a rail overpass would eliminate the existing at-grade rail crossing along University Parkway. This would improve east-west connectivity, enhance traffic operations, reduce travel delays, improve traffic safety, and improve existing freight rail operations. Future Metra operations would also benefit should they extend services to the south including the proposed South Suburban Airport. This project would also improve accessibility to the Metra station and GSU. Page 61


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9

9

Green Infrastructure & Sustainability

Developers, policy-makers, and residents are encourage to incorporate sustainable practices into their short and long term plans. The purpose of implementing any sustainable practice is to promote a healthier and longer lasting lifestyle. This section will cover the Village’s existing green infrastructure and existing sustainability efforts, as well as provide suggestions for future sustainable strategies the Village could pursue.

Existing Green Infrastructure The Village of University Park has three major creeks and at least three minor creeks which have associated mapped floodplain or flood zones within its corporate boundaries. By mapped floodplain, it is meant that maps published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as part of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) have identified various flood zones associated with these creeks, and these boundaries are shown on maps known as Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs). FEMA uses the terminology Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) to refer to these flood zones and the terms are often interchangeable. SFHAs are those areas that are subject to inundation (flooding) by what has been commonly called the 100-year flood. A 100-year flood should more appropriately be referred to as the “1% Annual Chance Flood,” which is how FEMA refers to it. This means that in any given year there is a 1% chance of equaling or exceeding a flood event of this magnitude. As was noticed with the 2008 flood event and others, “100-year flood events” can occur more frequently than the misleading phrase “once every 100 years” implies. For this reason, the more appropriate reference is the 1% annual chance flood.

The 1% annual chance flood is also known as the “base flood” or “base flood event.” When speaking of 100-year flood elevations or 1% flood elevations, these are also interchangeable with and commonly called “base flood elevations” or BFEs. A BFE is simply the 1% annual chance event flood (water-surface) elevation at a particular location along a watercourse or adjacent to a lake or ponding area. BFEs are used for regulation and insurance purposes. For example, when a new building is to be constructed near or adjacent to a mapped (or unmapped) floodplain within the Village, the building must be constructed at least two (2) feet higher than the BFE. This is referred to in the Village codified ordinances as the Flood Protection Elevation (FPE). Most municipalities in the area have FPEs that are one or two feet above the BFE. This is for the protection of all concerned.

mile. Areas outside the 0.2% annual chance floodplain are shown as Zone X with no shading. Another component of floodplains is the floodway. The floodway is an artificial boundary that is determined by a computer model and includes the channel of a stream and any adjacent floodplain areas that must be kept free of encroachment (blockages or earthen fill) so that the 1% annual chance flood can be carried without “substantial” increases in flood heights. Within the State of Illinois, the allowed increase is only one tenth (0.1) of a foot. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources – Office of Water Resources (IDNR-OWR) has jurisdiction over and regulates all activities within the floodway portions of floodplains. A permit process has been long-established for proposed activities within floodways. While many floodways are shown on FEMAs maps,

For the major and minor creeks within University Park where the floodplains have been mapped, there are two types of flood zones that are predominant: 1) Zone A and 2) Zone AE. A Zone A floodplain is one for which no BFEs have been determined. And a Zone AE is one where the BFEs have been determined and stream has been studied. BFEs are usually determined through a modeling process that is not described here. However, it should be noted that some computer models are calibrated or measured against actual flood events such as the 2008 event to improve the accuracy of the BFEs. Other flood areas exist within University Park and are shown as a lighter shaded (or dotted) Zone X. These areas are associated with the 0.2% annual chance flood (500-year flood) or areas where the 1% annual chance flood has average depths less than one foot or with drainage areas less than one (1) square Page 63


Green Infrastructure & Sustainability not all floodways are shown. Zone A flood zones do not show floodways. For Zone A flood zones associated with streams, a floodway is considered present even though it is not shown on the map when the tributary drainage area of the stream is one (1) square mile or greater. For such cases, the permit process with the IDNR-OWR must be followed. For all proposed activities in or near the mapped (and in some cases unmapped) floodplain areas within University Park, the Village has a responsibility and obligation under its codified ordinances and the Will County Stormwater Management Ordinance to review and approve these activities. This is for the benefit of all concerned and is meant to prevent adverse impacts to adjacent property owners. For proposed activities that involve floodplain fill or structures within the floodplain, the Village ordinance requires a corresponding excavation volume (known as compensatory storage) at least equal to one and one-half (1.5) times the volume of floodplain storage lost due to the fill or structure. This provides a safety factor for these activities and also serves as a partial deterrent to unnecessary filling of the floodplain. Will County County-Wide All Hazard Mitigation Plan In 2008, Will County adopted a Hazard Mitigation Plan for the entire County, including University Park. This plan is currently being updated, and should be adopted in 2014. As an AllCounty Plan, any flooding issues that may arise in University Park may be eligible for funding assistance since the Village is covered by an approved plan. The Will County All Hazard Mitigation Plan is designed to meet the requirements of the Federal Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (PL 106-390) and provide a useful document to reduce the impact of hazards County-wide. The plan meets the Act’s hazard mitigation planning regulations that require jurisdictions to have an adopted and Federal Emergency Page 64

9

A brief description of each of the three major and three minor creeks in University Park follows in their order of prominence:

Major Creeks Deer Creek Deer Creek is located within the southeast portion of the Village and generally flows in a southwest to northeast direction before exiting the Village in a more easterly direction. Within the corporate limits, a floodway boundary and BFEs have been determined and the stream has been studied. Thorn Creek Thorn Creek flows through the central portion of the Village in a southwest to northeasterly direction. The creek gives its name to the Thorn Creek Forest Preserve. Most of Thorn Creek has been studied with a floodway boundary and BFEs determined. A portion of the creek within the corporate limits has not been studied. Parts of the Villages of Monee and University Park form the headwaters (or beginning) of the Thorn Creek. Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve is owned by the Forest Preserve District of Will County. It is composed of 426 acres in Monee Township and primarily consists of agriculture land and wetlands located along Thorn Creek. Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve is the largest undeveloped tract located in the headwaters area, and is located at the upstream end of a 5,865-acre high-quality natural corridor along Thorn Creek. The preserve is situated within an ice-margin glacial lake basin. It is one of the few local examples of an ice-margin lake basin with an intact “soil-scape”, since most others have been developed, built-over and/or filled, Over one-half of the preserve consist of hydric soils; the original wetlands were drained in the mid to late 1800s to make way for agriculture.

Hickory Creek Tributary A Hickory Creek Tributary A flows through the west central portion of the Village in a southeast to northwesterly direction and then westerly after crossing under Interstate 57 just north of Stuenkel Road. The proposed new interchange at University Parkway and Interstate 57 was required to meet typical floodplain requirements in regard to this creek. The headwaters of Forked Creek, currently located outside the corporate limits, is located just to the southwest of the proposed interchange.

Minor Creeks Butterfield Creek East Branch Butterfield Creek East Branch forms within the north-central portion of the Village near the Cook-Will County line. It flows from south to north and has been studied up to approximately one-half (½) mile south of Steger Road. Butterfield Creek East Branch Tributary The Butterfield Creek East Branch Tributary is located a little more than one-half (½) mile west of Butterfield Creek East Branch and also forms within the same area of the Village near the Cook-Will County line. It also flows from south to north. This tributary has been studied, but the study limit ends at the county line. Black Walnut Creek The headwaters of Black Walnut Creek form partially within the Village at the far southeastern corner of the corporate limits. This creek has not been studied within the Village or adjacent unincorporated area.


Green Infrastructure &

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Hic

kor y

Cre ek

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

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Mon

S Western Avenue

50

Governors State University

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University Parkwa y

Cret

Dralle Road

Forked Creek

De

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Cre ek

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Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

Deer Creek Golf Club

Steger Mo n

Harlem Avenue

Dralle Road

Monee Manhattan Road

Monee

Legend

Park/Open Space

W Crete Monee Rd

50

CMAP Identified Greenway

Will Center Rd

National Wetland Inventory

Blackhawk Dr

Flood Zone (100 year)

Goodenow Rd

Nackle Rd

Forest Preserve

Natural Features Map

fort

9

South Chicago Sustainability Heights

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Green Infrastructure & Sustainability Management Agency (FEMA) approved Hazard Mitigation Plan to be eligible for mitigation grant funding. Although the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA2K) requires local governments to only address natural hazards, the Will County Emergency Management Agency thought it was imperative to address all hazards, including technological and societal (including terrorism) hazards. The 2013 update to the Will County County-wide All Hazard Mitigation Plan provides a first step towards identifying strategies and actions to prepare the community for natural, technological, and societal hazards. To ensure the integration of the County-wide All Hazard Mitigation Plan into existing emergency management operations and systems, the 2013 Will County Risk Assessment was updated and incorporated.

Existing Sustainability Efforts University Park is currently utilizing the following sustainable projects: Community Gardens Community gardens allow residents within the community to grow their own organic food on small communal pltos. These gardens help promote a healthier lifestyle by getting citizens outside gardening and eating non processed foods. Gardens can also encourage interaction between everyone in the community and solve some of the issues raised by not having a grocery store within the Village. Presently, the Village has two community gardens: Riegel Farm - The Village is responsible for the operation and maintenance of a community garden located on the Riegel Farm property. Governors State University - This garden is run by the University Page 66

and offers 52 plots for gardening. Ten of the plots are reserved for classes held at the school while the others are rented out to anyone else in the community. Town Center Parking Lot Infiltration Project The Village has initiated a project to replace the asphalt parking stalls in the Town Center shopping center parking lot with permeable pavers. This will help limit stormwater runoff into the nearby tributaries. Since the shopping center is the location of the Village’s Board Meetings, a Will County Health Department office, the Monee Township Assessor’s office, a Trustee’s and Mayor’s office, and a Pace bus stop, the site is a highly visible location in the community, and a great opportunity for educational outreach as a demonstration project for future development within the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4).

9 compared to predevelopment conditions. The impervious area also accelerates the transport of land-borne pollutants. The completion of this development is the first step into alleviating the problems the parking lot creates and to be an example of sustainable practices in the future.

The project generally includes upgrading portions of the existing parking lot from asphalt to permeable pavers. The locations of pavement replacement were determined to optimize the treatment of runoff from the existing parking lot; however, the area of the parking lot to be upgraded was limited by the Village’s financial constraints. The existing site of the Town Center was developed without stormwater management for volume control or pollutant control, which negatively impacts the water quality of the Thorn Creek Watershed, whose aquifer provides drinking water to area residents. The existing parking lot is drained by inlets and storm sewer that outlet to the northwest corner of the site with little to no infiltration or stormwater volume control. There is not a detention basin, settlement basins, or any infiltration areas on the current site and therefore the direct runoff from impervious area to the downstream ditch negatively impacts the water quality of Thorn Creek by reducing baseflow and exaggerating peak flows and volumes

The Town Center Parking Lot Infiltration Project will include the removal of four portions of the existing parking lot asphalt and replacement it with permeable pavers. Permeable paver manufacturers recommend replacing parking stall areas (rather than drive aisles) when replacing a portion of the asphalt.


9 Future Sustainable Strategies University Park has started its path towards a more sustainable future with the projects previously mentioned. The Village should continue to promote these types of projects throughout the community to be an example for future development. The following are strategies to incorporate so the Village may become a more environmentally conscious and healthier community. General Recommendations Implement Future Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan The Future Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan discussed earlier in this plan offers residents connections to businesses, parks, and municipal facilities without the use of an automobile. Implementing this plan will reduce residents’auto dependency and promote exercising. Stormwater Management Stormwater pollutants are negatively affecting the creeks and preserves in many communities, including University Park. Green infrastructure provides low energy stormwater management tools to reduce the presence of pathogens, nutrients, sediment, oil, grease, toxic chemicals, road salts, and heavy metals in the stormwater runoff reaching habitats and drinking water sources. Green infrastructure uses vegetation, soils, and natural processes to manage rainwater where it falls. Several examples and brief descriptions of green infrastructure include the following: Rainwater Harvesting Rerouting rooftop drainage to locations other than storm sewers and harvesting that water for other uses is an ideal way to handle stormwater onsite. For University Park, the

Green Infrastructure & Sustainability best way to utilize this tool is to use rain barrels. Rain barrels are containers that collect rain water which can be used to for a variety of outdoor purposes such as watering a lawn. The Village should consider developing a program to encourage users to buy or rent rain barrels to use at their homes. Most rain barrels can be connected directly to a house’s gutter to collect the water and contain a spout for a hose connection. While these barrels are not used year round, it is a good way to reduce residents’ water usage during the spring and summer months. Bioswales & Raingardens Bioswales and raingardens are both vegetated swales that slow stormwater runoff and allow water to infiltrate back into the ground instead of into storm sewers or detention ponds. Bioswales are typically located adjacent to parking lots or within parking lot islands while raingardens may be located near buildings and in parkways. Both should be planted with native materials which will allow for the longest lasting and most durable swale. Permeable Pavers As mentioned before, the Village should look for more opportunities to install permeable pavers in existing or new parking facilities. These pavers help manage stormwater on site by reducing the runoff while filtering out pollutants and other debris. Planter Boxes Urban rain gardens adjacent to sidewalks, streets, and parking lots. Constructed Wetlands or Wetland Detention Facilities Increase filtering, infiltration, and evapotranspiration compared to traditional detention facilities.

Preserve Floodplain, Wetlands, Buffers Eliminate or minimize disturbance of existing green infrastructure when sites are developed or other projects are done. These areas capture and slow runoff, improve water quality, and provide habitat. Native Landscaping While planting any type of plant for either a large development or a single parcel, the use of native grass, shrubs, and trees is strongly encouraged. Native species can withstand a wide range of temperature extremes, use less water, require less maintenance, and use less fertilizers. Page 67


Green Infrastructure & Sustainability The Village of University Park has previously requested funding to start incorporating green infrastructure into their stormwater management toolbox. The Village understands that green infrastructure is currently not the traditional stormwater management technique, it requires specific management and that it also often has higher upfront costs but the costs can be outweighed by the stormwater quality and environmental benefits. Since some green infrastructure provides the secondary benefit of flood mitigation, it is especially important to the Village. In contrast to grey infrastructure, green infrastructure further reduces peak runoff flows and volumes that ultimately reach streams and rivers. In order to restore, preserve, mimic, or enhance hydrologic function of the natural environment from the predeveloped region, new developments are encouraged to use green infrastructure as part of their site plans. Similarly, projects by existing businesses, including those by the Village, are also encouraged to incorporate green infrastructure into previously developed sites, for example, at the Village’s Town Center property. Many studies and sources are available to guide green infrastructure efforts (USEPA, FEMA, IEPA, CMAP, CWP, CNT, AICS, etc.).

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Energy

9 Wind Power

Alternative Energies When discussing alternative energies there existing many options including geothermal, solar, and wind energy systems. These systems should be encouraged in new developments and when residents decide to update their existing homes. While there are large alternative energy systems that can power an entire home, these systems may also be used on a much smaller scale. For example, a small solar array may be used to heat your water and lessen your dependency on natural gas. A project like this will not completely wipe out your utility bills, but it is a stepping stone for future sustainability and will save money over the course of time. These smaller projects are also useful for structures which are not set up for certain alternative energies, such as a building with no clear southern facing roof will not support a large solar panel array.

Solar Power Smart Energy Design Assistance Center For businesses and Village owned buildings, the State of Illinois has a program run by the Smart Energy Design Assistance Center (SEDAC) that provides free energy audits to help effectively reduce the use of energy in buildings. SEDAC is a great place to start when deciding what needs to be fixed or improved with respect to sustainable practices.


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10

Community Facilities

This section will cover a wide variety of community resources including recreation, education and municipal facilities.

Recreation Offering a community a wide variety of recreational activities and opportunities is a great way to improve the residents’ quality of life. Whether it’s a place for adults to relax or a park for kids to play in, all recreational features help create community character.

Forest Preserve A portion of the Thorn Creek Woods Nature Preserve is located within University Park’s borders. The entire preserve consists of 997 acres of wooded land and is part of the larger Thorn Creek preservation system which covers approximately 1,600 acres of land across the region. University Park is a joint member of the Thorn Creek Woods Management Commission which also includes the Forest Preserve District of Will County, Park Forest, and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. The preserve maintains almost two and a half miles of natural surface hiking and walking trails. It is also home to the Thorn Creek Nature Center. The Nature Center is an old converted church and is managed by Park Forest. While this amenity is not located within University Park, it can be considered a local feature which is accessible to residents of the Village. The preserve holds a variety of events, such as nature hikes and workshops, to get the local population involved with nature.

Golf Courses Golf courses are a unique feature that provide the local population recreation and entertainment. University Park is home to two eighteen hole courses: Deer Creek Golf Club This privately owned golf course is located on the east side of town. This course offers 18 holes with views of natural vegetation and lakes. It also has a driving range, putting and chipping green, and an outdoor patio area that can hold up to 400 people. University Golf Club and Conference Center This championship golf course is owned and run by the Village of University Park. It is a symbol of community pride and offers 18 beautiful holes that wind around water, sand, and trees. The club house, The Urban Room, is a full service restaurant and bar, with live entertainment, weekend brunch, banquet and meeting facility that provides custom design for special event.

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Community Facilities Parks All of the parks within the Village are located near residential districts which keeps them within walking distance for a majority of citizens. Other than the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park, which is controlled by Governors State University, University Park’s Parks and Recreation Department manages and maintains all off the parks in the Village. There are five parks which serve a multitude of purposes. There are playgrounds for children, a pool to cool off in the summer, and even a petting zoo for those who love animals.

Playground at Heritage Park

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10 Legend Name

Description

Features

1

Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park

Set within the wild prairies of Governors State University, the collection consists of 28 works of art. The park provides tours of the area and focuses on providing educational outreach programs to build appreciation for contemporary art.

• Trails • Sculptures • Sitting Areas

2

Pine Lake

This area offers open space around two lakes which offers great views. A great place to fish and hold special outdoor events.

• Fishing • Rentable Shelters • Sitting Areas

3

Heritage Park

This is one of the oldest parks in the Village and is surrounded by residential uses. The lighting allows this facility to be open during the night and contains a concession stand for the hungry.

• • • • •

Baseball Field Basketball Courts (2) Concession Stand Playground Tennis Courts (2)

4

Hickok Aquatic Center This family oriented aquatic center offers fun for adults and children. The pool offers swim lessons, hosts private parties, and has a concession stand.

• • • •

Pool Sand Volleyball Zero Depth Pool Water Slide

5

Riegel Farm Complex

Built in 1924, this farm now serves as a museum and petting zoo. This complex also includes sporting fields and can hold private parties. The Farm runs programs at its community garden which teaches residents how to grow fresh food.

• • • •

Petting Zoo Baseball Field (1) Tennis Courts (2) Sand Volleyball (1)

6

Palmer Park

25 acres of large playfields and playground. This park offers rentable shelter areas and a concession stand for the hungry.

• • • • •

Football Field (1) Baseball Field (1) Soccer Field (1) Basketball Courts (2) Playground (1)


Chicago Heights Community Facilities

Richton Park

10

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

University Golf Club

High way rnors Gove

Central Avenue

Ridgeland Avenue

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway Governors State University

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e Mon

S Western Avenue

50

1

University Park 2

University Parkw ay

3

Dralle Road

Crete Deer Creek Golf Club

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Steger Mo n

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ttan Road

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Parks Map

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Community Facilities

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Parks & Recreational Needs Park Land The Park Land Table compares University Park to the typical standard for park space established by the National Recreation and Park Association of 10 acres per 1,000 population. Per this standard, University Park is short approximately 22 acres from the suggested standard. However, the Village’s existing parks are well located to serve the community. Given limited budgets, it is suggested that the focus for the near term should be on enhanced park maintenance and adding or upgrading facilities as funds permit rather than additional land acquisition. However, the Village should have a land/cash dedication ordinance in place that would require future developers to set aside park space for new development areas. Park Facilities

Regarding park facilities, Recreational Facilities Table provides a comparison of existing recreational facilities in University Park to standards established by the State of Illinois. This analysis shows that University Park is generally

doing a good job of providing needed recreational facilities. Deficiencies are highlighted in darker blue, and include: • An additional playground (Village is currently accepting bids to have a park built in Fairway Estates by the Deer Creek Golf Course which will negate the playground deficiency)

Facility

Average # in Illinois per 1,000 population (1)

Facilities Needed in University Park to match State Averages

Number in University Park

Surplus/ Deficit

Water-Based Facilities

• 2 tennis courts (although this would appear to be a low priority given the limited use of existing courts)

Fishing Piers & Docks

0.0408

0.2856

1

0.7144

Aquatic Centers/Pools

0.0282

0.1974

1

0.8026

• Additional bike trails (the Village is currently seeking funding for a new bike trail along Cicero Avenue)

Spray Grounds

0.0292

0.2044

0

-0.2044

A community center which includes space for a variety of activities including classroom and meeting space, recreational space, and other components has been identified as a desirable addition to the offerings of University Park. Such a facility would meet a lot of potential programmatic needs, and should be considered as funding becomes available. A location along University Parkway near Village Hall would seem an ideal area given proximity to the Village’s residential population.

Trails (Miles)

0.163

1.141

1.5

0.359

Bike Trails (Miles)

0.1058

0.7406

0

-0.7406

Nature Trails (Miles)

0.0547

0.3829

1

0.6171

Baseball Fields

0.2552

1.7864

2

0.2136

Softball Fields

0.1425

0.9975

1

0.0025

0.25

1.75

4

2.25

Soccer Fields

0.1779

1.2453

1

-0.2453

Skate Parks

0.0163

0.1141

0

-0.1141

Golf Course (18 holes)

0.0081

0.0567

2

1.9433

Golf Course (9 holes)

0.0051

0.0357

0

0.0357

Golf Course (disk or frisbee)

0.008

0.056

0

-0.056

Tennis Court

0.87

6.09

4

-2.09

0.19

1.33

2

0.67

Park Land Table Acres

Recreational Facilities Table

NRPA Standard (ac./1,000)

Recommended Acres

Acres Surplus/Deficit

Community

Trails

Sports Facilities

Basketball Courts

Hickok Aquatic Center

7.0

Volleyball Court

Pine Lake Park

10.0

Day-Use Facilities

Palmer Park

25.0

Picnic Shelters

0.206

1.442

4

2.558

Subtotal

42.0

Playgrounds

0.4035

2.8245

2

-0.8245

Dog Parks

0.0074

0.0518

0

-0.0518

7.5

52.5

-10.5

Neighborhood Heritage Park

6.0

Subtotal

6.0

2.5

17.5

-11.5

Total

48.0

10

70

-22.0

Estimated Population: 7,000

Page 72

Notes: (1) Source: Illinois Recreational Facilities Inventory, 2008, except Tennis & Volleyball Court Standards which are from 1994 Inventory ‘(2) Assumes 7000 population


Community Facilities

10 Education

Having a variety of educational options can create an attractive atmosphere for any community.

School Districts A majority of University Park is located within the CreteMonee School District 201-U. This school district covers 80 square miles of south suburban land and is a pre-kindergarten through 12th grade unit school district. The district serves Crete, Monee, Park Forest, and University Park. The only residents who do not attend all of the schools within this district are those located on the small selection of parcels north of Steger Road. These residents attend Rich South High School in Richton Park which is part of the Rich Township High School District 227.

Public Schools The following schools are attended by the students of University Park: Coretta Scott King Magnet School This elementary school was the first school in the State of Illinois to receive authorization for the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program. The school emphasizes development on an internationally minded level. It admits a proportional number of students from the district and holds classes from kindergarten to 6th grade. Crete-Monee Middle School This school serves the District as the bridge for students in between elementary school and high school. It focuses on creating a team atmosphere and teaching students how to work together. Crete Monee High School This is the main high school that University Park students

attend. Opened in 2007, the school offers a variety of facilities to develop well rounded students including a state-of-the-art 600-seat performing arts center, field house, and classrooms filled with the most up-to-date components in educational technology. Crete Monee Sixth Grade Center This school was opened in 2006 and brings the students from the four elementary schools together. There are preliminary plans for this school to expand to hold grades 6 to 8. Talala Elementary School This elementary school serves some of residents in the northern part of town. The school’s Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports system allows students to learn productive and acceptable ways in which to conduct themselves and interact with others.

Balmoral Elementary School Children from University Park may attend this elementary school. The school’s Bulldog Block Program allows each child to work at their reading level for a portion of each school day. Each grade level is committed to informing parents of their child’s progress toward meeting state standards. Crete Elementary School Children from University Park may attend this elementary school. The school-wide Response to Intervention System supports all three tiers for reading and math through the use of myriad interventions. The interventionist team meets with each grade level team once a month to discuss individual student and small group progress.

Private Schools

Rich South High School This high school serves the population on the northwestern part of town in Cook County and is located in School District 227.

The following are nearby private institutions which provide educational serves to University Park students:

Monee Elementary School This school does not serve many residents in the Village. There are preliminary plans to expand this school to create extra space for Special Education and computer labs.

This school is a private religious institution that teaches students from pre-kindergarten to 8th grade.

Monee Education Center This center is used as an alternative learning environment for students in the region. It offers an Alternative Program, Truancy Alternative Program, Special Education Program, and a Transitional High School Program. The students attending this center are generally enrolled here for a semester or school year before they can be transitioned back into their original school.

Deer Creek Christian School

Mother Teresa Catholic Academy This school is a private religious institution that teaches students from pre-kindergarten to 8th grade and is a division of the Faith Movers Church. South Suburban Christian Academy This school is a private religious institution that teaches students from kindergarten to 3rd grade.

Page 73


Community Facilities Governors State University Governors State University has been offering a higher education to residents since 1969. The campus sits on 750 acres of land centrally located within University Park. The University’s original goal was to provide upper level undergraduate courses and masters programs to older adults and those underserved by other colleges. They provide on campus child care and other classes during the day, night, and weekends to accommodate working adults. In the fall of 2014, Governors State University will welcome its first official freshman class as the school has now become a four year accredited college. This expansion includes new on campus housing (Prairie Place), designed to accommodate 296 students. The University offers a wide variety of programs through its four colleges: • College of Arts & Sciences

10 days a year. The Center for Performing Arts offers programs throughout the year, including plays, musicals, comedy groups like The Second City, and a wide variety of concerts. GSU also offers a community garden, with plots available for residents or groups to raise their own vegetables. Another major resource provided to both the Village and the region is the Illinois Small Business Development Center at GSU http://www.centerpointgsu.com/ . The Center offers a variety of seminars and programs and provides direct counseling to entrepreneurs in a variety of areas including business plan development, financing, and marketing. The Center is funded through a unique combination of sources, including GSU, the Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). The University is currently implementing Strategy 2015, a 5-year strategic plan designed to implement the GSU Mission. Goals are centered on six key principals:

• College of Business & Public Administration

• Academic Excellence

• College of Education

• High Quality Faculty and Staff

• College of Health & Human Services

• Continuous Process Improvement

GSU also offers a dual degree program in conjunction with a number of area community colleges, including Prairie State, Joliet Junior College, South Suburban College, and the City Colleges of Chicago. The dual degree program offers guaranteed admission, a tuition rate lock, and other benefits. In addition to their many academic programs, the University is home to important regional cultural resources like the Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park and the Center for Performing Arts. The Sculpture Park has grown to include 29 works set within a natural prairie environment. It is open free to the public 365 Page 74

• Visibility, Outreach, and Economic Catalyst • Social, Ethical, and Environmental Responsibility • Financial Growth and Sustainability. The University has set a goal of growing from 4,475 full time equivalent students in 2007 to 7,000 in 2014. As a public state operated facility, GSU must rely on the State of Illinois for the majority of its funding. Given the State’s current financial situation, funding for facilities expansion or improvements has been challenged. Current efforts are focused on renovation and upgrades to existing facilities rather than major expansions. There is a need for a large multi-purpose facility

that can accommodate a variety of events and activities. Currently, graduation ceremonies are held off campus due to space limitations. GSU currently offers the lowest tuition rate of any state university. The University is very interested in working with the Village to see University Parkway improved between Governors Highway and Crawford. This roadway provides the main access to campus. In addition to safety issues related to the railroad crossing noted in the transportation chapter, pot holes and the limited capacity of the roadway are major concern of the University.

The GSU Mission Governors State University is committed to offering an exceptional and accessible education that imbues students with the knowledge, skills and confidence to succeed in a global society. GSU is dedicated to creating an intellectually stimulating public square, serving as an economic catalyst for the region, and being a model of diversity and responsible citizenship.


Community Facilities

10 1 8

Sauk Trail

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Frankfort

South Chicago Heights

57

Park Forest S Crawford Avenue

Steger Rd

Crete-Monee School District 201-U

50

Public Schools Coretta Scott King Magnet School

2

Crete-Monee Middle School

3

Balmoral Elementary School

4

Crete Monee High School

5

Crete Monee Sixth Grade Center

6

Crete Elementary School

7

Talala Elementary School

rnors

High way

South Suburban Christian Academy

2

Mother Teresa Catholic Academy

3

Deer Creek Christian School

4

Road

50

5

Crete

Deer Creek Golf Club

1

2

Monee

Private Schools

N

Gove

Ridgeland Avenue

Central Avenue

9

1

3 W Crete Monee Rd

10

Blackhawk Dr

Public & Private School Map

Dralle Road

Monee Education Center Monee Manhattan Road

1

3

Dralle Road

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

6

University Parkw ay

Steger Mon ee

Monee Elementary School

2

Will Center Rd

9

Governors State University

University Park

Harlem Avenue

Rich South High School

Steger

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

8

10

University Golf Club

oad

ee R

Mon

Goodenow Rd

Nackle Rd

1

7

S Western Avenue

Legend

Page 75


Community Facilities Municipal Facilities Community facilities provide important services and necessary utilities that significantly to the overall “quality of life” of the community. These facilities include schools, fire and police protection, libraries, utility providers, administrative facilities and meeting spaces, religious facilities, and other public and semi-public uses. The Community Facilities Plan is intended to help the Village plan for sufficient community facilities to be available to local residents and businesses in the future. It should be used by the Village and other organizations to ensure that appropriate sites are reserved for community facilities that will be needed in the future. It is important to emphasize that this Plan presents general policies and guidelines for community facilities. This Plan is not intended to pre-empt or substitute for the more detailed planning and programming which should be undertaken by the Village and other service agencies and organizations.

General Recommendations The Village will promote continued cooperation, interaction, and collaboration among the various agencies and organizations that serve University Park, including CreteMonee School District 201-U, Will County Forest Preserve, University Park Library, and others. The Village should also keep abreast of the plans, policies, and projects of these other agencies and organizations.

Page 76

10 Community facilities will be compatible with surrounding uses and should enhance the character of the neighborhoods in which they are located. Sites should be attractively landscaped with screening and buffering provided if necessary. Traffic generated by community facilities should not adversely impact surrounding areas. Adequate and attractively designed off-street parking should be available at all community facility sites. The Village and other service districts will be attuned to the changing needs and requirements of local residents and businesses, and new facilities and services should be provided if they become necessary or desirable in the future. As nearby agricultural areas are more intensely developed, community facility and service needs may change dramatically. In general, University Park is currently well-served by community facilities. However, the Village’s population has

the potential to grow dramatically. This growth will have a major impact on the provision of services within the Village. Using typical benchmarks that examine the relationship between projected growth and related impact on services, such as police, fire and parkland, the Village should use the table below as a general guideline. Provided in this section is an overview of the community facilities within the Village and an assessment of each facility’s existing condition and future needs. Understanding that the Village does not have jurisdiction or control over a majority of the community facilities within its municipal limits, but by identifying and understanding the needs of each community facility, the Village is better able to gauge its role in working with the different service providers to improve the overall level of service to University Park residents.

Projected Needs for Community Facilities Facility Park Land 10 acres per 1,000 residents Fire Personnel 1.59 personnel per 1,000 residents Fire Stations 0.077 stations per 1,000 residents Fire Engines 0.083 engines per 1,000 residents Police 2.3 personnel per 1,000 residents

2010 Population 7,000

2040 Population 35,000

70 acres

350 acres

11 personnel

56 personnel

1 station

3 stations

1 engine

3 engines

16 personnel

81 personnel Page 76


Community Facilities

10 Village Hall and Other Village-Owned Facilities Currently, the Village Hall accommodates the Finance Department, Village Manager, Village Clerk, a fire station, and the Code Enforcement Department. The building is not large enough to meet current space needs. Village Board and other community meetings are currently conducted at 90 Town Center in the shopping center owned by the Village. A plan to build a new facility was completed, but funding has not yet been allocated. The Village also maintains a cable television studio that is in need of major improvements, and the Town Center Shopping Center, which needs painting, ongoing maintenance, and landscaping around the outlot building. The Community Facilities Plan identifies a “municipal center.� Two potential locations for this facility should be considered; either near the existing Village Hall along University Parkway or in the TOD area. When the Village builds a new Village Hall, it should be located in the municipal center. A Village Hall can be a good civic anchor for the development of this area drawing in residents and visitors. The municipal center could also include a community recreational facility, such as multi-use gymnasium/health club. The Village should explore opportunities to partner with GSU, the YMCA, area hospitals, and other organizations to build such a facility.

Fire Department The Fire Department operates two fire stations. Station #1 at 698 Burnham Road (adjacent to Village Hall) responds mainly to residential service calls, and Station #2 at 995 Central Avenue responds mainly to industrial service calls. Station #1 was renovated in 2009 and is adequately sized to meet needs in this portion of the community. Station #2 is an older facility that is either in need of major renovation or reconstruction to meet future community needs on the west side of the Village.

A concern of the Fire Department is provision of adequate services to GSU as they expand their programs and services, including the addition of new student apartments. The Village and the University should work closely to ensure that the Fire Department is well equipped to handle any increased demands caused by this expansion. Another concern is with regard to aging equipment and the need for replacement engines. Like any vehicle, as fire equipment ages costs of repairs and downtime increase. It is important to establish a regular system of vehicle replacement to maintain the high level of service that residents expect. The following table provides a summary of existing vehicles and needs. It will be important for the Village to budget for equipment replacement, including identifying funding sources. While these vehicles can certainly be funded through general revenue, it may also be possible to fund equipment replacements through impact fees (annexation), and fire facility fee (building permit), TIF, grants, or some combination of these sources.

The Department has a full-time staff of one chief, one deputy chief, and 15 fire fighters/paramedics, and a team of paid-oncall staff available on an as-needed basis. The Fire Department and the Deputy Chief assists with building permits. Currently, this level of full-time staff meets the community’s needs. The department has no plans to increase staffing but will reassess staffing if rapid growth increases calls for service. A public safety issue for both the fire and police department is crossing the CN railroad. The Village currently has two atgrade crossings of the railroad at University Parkway and at Dralle Road. The University Parkway crossing is particularly problematic given the close spacing of the railroad with Governors Highway and the volume of traffic this roadway carries during peak Metra commuter or GSU student/faculty periods. When a train is blocking the crossing, emergency vehicles are forced to wait or find alternative routes which can significantly increase response times. The transportation section of this plan addresses this issue and explores solutions to improve these conditions through grade separation or other intersection improvements.

Fire Department Equipment Type

Existing Vehicles

Ambulance

2 ambulances, purchased new in 2009

Ladder Trucks Engines

Notes

Ambulances are heavily used. It would be appropriate to replace these existing vehicles within the next 3 to 5 years (2017-2019) 2, including a 2009 ladder truck acquired through As funding allows, the smaller ladder truck should be a grant and a 2000 smaller ladder truck (bought replaced used) 2 engines, one a 1984 and one a 1988 Both engines are nearing the end of their useful life and should be replaced as funds are available Page 77


Community Facilities

10

Police Department

The Department has a staff of 22 sworn police officers, two commanders and the police chief. The Police Department is assisted by the Will County Sheriff’s Department when necessary. The County has jurisdiction over the unincorporated areas located within the Village. GSU has their own police/ security force and coordinates with the University Park police department for special events or as needed throughout the year. Current staff levels are appropriate to serve the current population. As the community grows, proportional expansion of the police force and facilities will be needed. This may include consideration of a satellite facility when

The Police Department is located on Burnham Drive, adjacent to the Village Hall. The current facility is generally in good condition and was constructed in 2004 with a state-of-the art gun range. This facility is used for training not only for local staff, but as a regional training facility for other departments. However, some improvements are needed to enhance overall operations and efficiency, including updating of the evidence room and completion of a downstairs classroom for training. A security fence around the rear parking lot is also recommended.

the population exceeds 30,000 on the west side of University Park, perhaps near the west fire station. The department’s vehicular fleet is a major concern. While two new vehicles were recently added, the department is still operating with roughly half the optimal number of vehicles given the age of the existing fleet and maintenance issues. It is recommended that the Village create a capital improvement program that provides for a regular cycle of replacement for police vehicles. South Chicago Heights

Richton Park

S Cicero Avenue

Sauk Trail

Frankfort

Legend

57

Educational Facility

Park Forest

Municipal Facility

Steger Rd

Mo

University Golf Club

High way

3

6

rnors Gove

Central Avenue

4

University Park

7

9

11

Dralle Road

12

Thorn Creek Headwaters Preserve

2

ee Road

Dralle Road

Monee Elementary School

3

Governors State University

4

Pilgrimage Protestant

5

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness

6

University Park Police Station University Park Village Hall/Fire Station

8

Willow House

9

Miller Chapel AME Church

Crete

11 Faith Movers Church 14

12 AQUA Illinois Treatment Plant

1 13 Coretta Scott King Magnet School

15

14 University Park Public Library

17

W Crete Monee Rd

15 University Park Parks and Recreation Department

Blackhawk Dr

Monee

16 University Park Public Works 17 Crete-Monee Middle School

Nackle Rd

50

Will Center Rd

University Park Fire Station 2

2

10 WUPC TV Channel 4 Cable Television Station

16

Monee Manhattan Road

Page 78

Deer Creek Golf Club

13

1

University Parkw 7 ay

10

5

Steger Mon

Ridgeland Avenue

8

1

Institutional Facilities Map

Harlem Avenue

Religious Institution

Thorn Creek Nature Preserve

University Parkway

W Stuenkel Road

Steger S Western Avenue

S Crawford Avenue

50

ad

Ro nee


Community Facilities

10 Public Works The public works department is located along Western Avenue near the southwest corner of Deer Creek Golf Club. The department is responsible for the roads and infrastructure which are not under the jurisdiction of the state, county, or private company (Aqua). The local roads within the community are considered to be in poor condition. The department is currently working with the Village’s engineering firm to create a 5 year improvement plan for local roads. This plan will identify which roads will need improvement the most and will allow the Village Board to prioritize improvements when budgeting for roadway maintenance. This plan should also include infrastructure needs along roadways, such as street lights, many of which are considered in poor condition or damaged. The Public Works Department Vehicle fleet includes two tandem trucks for hauling large items and plowing snow, and two 1-ton pickup trucks. Some other equipment the department uses outside its fleet are hand tools, an air compressor, and an auger. It has been expressed that most of the vehicles and equipment within the department are old and not working properly. It is recommended that a plan such as the road improvement plan be implemented to provide a prioritized list of which equipment should be replaced.

Transmission lines supplying new development should be located underground wherever possible. Existing transmission lines currently located above ground should be relocated underground as streets are repaired and/or widened, as infill development occurs, or when repairs or upgrades are made to the lines.

Cable Studio The Village is home to its very own cable television studio. This public access station was created to promote and develop community involvement in the use of cable television for cultural, educational, health, social service, community and other non-commercial. WUPC TV Channel 4 Cable Television Station is a non-profit organization that administers the use of the public access channel in the South Suburbs. The station teaches individuals the basics of the television industry while reporting community news and events.

The library is located at 1100 Blackhawk Drive on a six acre site. There is potential on-site to expand the library as needs arise in the future. The library is funded by a separate taxing district that primarily serves the geographical boundaries of University Park. Residents in nearby unincorporated areas may purchase a library card at the same tax rate applied to University Park residents. Residents of other communities who have library cards in good standing may use most services. The library is a part of the Reading Across Illinois Library System (RAILS) which provides library patrons in University Park access to materials at over 100 libraries throughout the state. University Park Public Library

Other Community Facilities The Village is also home to a number of churches, including Pilgrimage Protestant, Miller Chapel AME Church, First Baptist Church of University Park, Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness, and Willow House, a social service organization.

University Park Public Library Power Transmission ComEd provides electric service to residents and businesses in the Village. In addition to the ComEd power service, there are two peaker power plants located in the industrial area of the Village. Peaker power plants generally run only when there is a high demand for electricity. Peaker power plants provide another reliable source of electricity within the Village.

The University Park Public Library District provides services to all members of the community. The Library is open six days per week and provides materials in a variety of formats, public access to computers, public meeting rooms, and programs for all ages. The library is located in the community for convenient access to residents, and is adequately sized to serve the current population. The library’s current needs are focused on technology. Page 79


Community Facilities Private Utilities The Village’s water and sewer services are provided by Aqua Illinois, Inc. Water System University Park, as well as most communities in eastern Will County, utilizes the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer for its water supply. Aqua’s University Park water system has four active wells and one standby well which are open to the Silurian Dolomite for a firm capacity of 4.3 million gallons per day. Aqua’s University Park Water distribution system and storage facilities assets consist of approximately 48 miles of distribution mains ranging in size from 3” to 24” in diameter, 600 hydrants, and 3.3 million gallons of combined elevated and ground storage. In addition to the purification and distribution facilities, the Company has a booster pumping station within the Village of University Park.

10 On an average day the Village uses about 1.3 million gallons of water and on a peak day the Village uses about 3.3 million gallons of water. The current water supply meets all Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) standards but residents and customers within the region complain about water hardness and iron. Aqua is currently petitioning the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) to expand its certified area. This will allow Aqua to install a pipeline from their Kankakee division to the University Park division which will supply softened, filtered water to the Village.

around 1.2 million gallons of waste. There are currently no plans to expand the sewer system as it exceeds the needs of the community. The treatment plant is located along Western Avenue just south of University Parkway. Aqua maintains its sewer lines by conducting quarterly “jet outs” in certain areas. Jet outs use high pressure water to remove build up in pipes and prevent future replacement. In 2014, Aqua will spend approximately $1.7 million in capital investment which will be spent mostly on infrastructure improvements.

Sewer System The Village’s sewer system is also owned and maintained through Aqua Illinois. The system is designed to handle a daily average of 2.43 million gallons of sewage with a maximum of 6.44 million gallons. On an average day the system handles

Eastern Will County Wastewater Planning Study Will County commissioned an Eastern Will County Wastewater Planning Study which was completed by the Farnsworth Group in November, 2008. This study examined existing capacity and future needs for a six township area in eastern Will County which included all of the University Park planning area. Highlights of this study relative to University Park include: • University Park (including both annexed and unincorporated areas to the west and east of the existing municipal boundary) is in the Deer Creek Facilities Planning Area (FPA). • The plan split the Deer Creek FPA into two sections, using I-57 as the dividing line. The plan notes “the wastewater treatment for this area is currently provided by Aqua Illinois at the University Park Waste Water Treatment Plant. The current facilities are not adequate to provide collection and treatment for the projected ultimate wastewater flows within the entire FPA. Most of the area east of I-57 drains to the north and east as part of the Great Lakes/Calumet River Watershed, while the portion west of I-57 drains southwest into the Kankakee River Watershed. Although interim plans have been developed by others to serve areas on both sides of I-57 with existing facilities operated either by Aqua Illinois or by Thorn Creek Basin Sanitary District for approximately the next 20 years, it appears that portions lying west of I-57 would eventually need to be served by new facilities located future south or west.” • For more information, this plan is available on the County’s web site at: http://willcountylanduse.com/resource/document/eastern-will-county-wastewater-study This study highlights some of the challenges faced by University Park in providing sanitary sewer service to areas west of I-57. It will be critical for the Village to work closely with Aqua Illinois, and neighboring communities, to develop both short and long range plans to provide water and sewer service to this potential economic development area. Ideally, water and sewer piping would be incorporated into the planned University Parkway interchange to facilitate future growth and development in this area. Page 80


11

Implementation The following implementation strategies are designed to serve as a starting point when prioritizing and budgeting for improvements designated in this plan. Each section in this plan has corresponding implementation strategies to allow each goal to be accomplished. This section is a guideline and may be modified as more specific developments and projects are planned. The following recommendations will help the Village grow as a whole and meet the development goals in this Comprehensive Plan: • Plan monitoring and updates • Staffing • Boundary agreements • Annexation • Funding Sources

Plan Monitoring and Updates This Comprehensive Plan is based on currently available data regarding community conditions, development trends, and an understanding local issues. Over time, certain conditions or events may alter the information and recommendations in this document. As a result, this Comprehensive Plan should be reviewed and updated periodically.

This Implementation section should be reviewed annually by the Village staff and Plan Commission and updated as appropriate. Specifically, completed projects and action steps should be crossed off the list to signify progress. New projects may be added as community issues arise. The Future Land Use section and Transportation section of this document should be reviewed at least once every three years by the Village staff and Plan Commission. Depending on the development rate around the intersection at Stuenkel Road and Interstate 57, it may be advantageous to review and update this plan annually. The entire Comprehensive Plan should be reviewed with appropriate amendments at least once every five years by the Village staff and Plan Commission. This will ensure the plan remains a relative and effective tool in guiding growth in University Park.

Zoning Ordinance Review The Village’s Zoning Ordinance should be reviewed and updated so it is consistent with this Comprehensive Plan. The alterations made to the ordinance should include but is not limited to improving the efficency of the development review

Every

Every

Every

1 year

3 years

5 years

Review and update the:

Review and update the:

Review and update the:

Implementation Section

Future Land Use Section

Entire Comprehensive Plan

Transportation Section Page 81


Implementation process, incorporating sustainable requirements within the zoning districts, and performance standards. The review and update should be done initially after this plan is approved and should be continually update as conditions change within the Village.

Staffing Staffing in smaller communities like University Park is always challenging, with limited budgets and multiple needs regarding growth and development. This plan outlines a vision and specific strategies to achieve that vision. However, without appropriate staff resources the ability of the Village to achieve that vision will be constrained. While the Plan Commission can assist in some of the efforts to implement the plan, it will take the dedicated leadership of a trained and motivated planner/economic developer to see the plan through to fruition. As funds permit, it is recommended that the Village hire a staff planner/economic development specialist. The responsibilities of this new position would be to establish and maintain strong relationships with existing businesses, design and implement strategies to attract new businesses, manage the existing TIF Districts, and work with developers to review plans and expedite project approval if consistent with the vision established in this Comprehensive Plan.

Boundary Agreements

Boundary agreements are often developed between neighboring municipalities to define the outer extent of each community’s future growth. Such agreements also make it clear to developers which municipality will have jurisdiction over their property. Without any agreements, developers

Page 82

11 will often propose annexation to adjacent municipalities to create competition for their development and try to obtain “the best deal.” Typically, the best deal for the developer is not the best deal for the municipality and having to compete with neighboring communities is a huge disadvantage when trying to maintain community standards.

Governors State University GSU is one of the Village’s major assets, and a close relationship with the University is critical. Understanding the University’s growth plans, transportation needs, and opportunities for partnership will be a key to implementing this Comprehensive Plan.

At the moment, University Park does not have any boundary agreements with its surrounding neighbors. It is recommended the Village come to an agreement with Monee, Frankfort, and Richton Park as soon as possible. These communities all have their current boundaries located within close proximity to Interstate 57. With the addition of the new interchange at Stuenkel Road, the surrounding land will be prime for new development. It will be beneficial for all the communities to come to an agreement to help the south suburbs profit together as opposed to fighting with one another.

Neighboring Municipalities The plan recommends development of boundary agreements with neighboring communities to jointly plan for and develop land in a way that is both efficient and beneficial for all parties. By developing clear boundary agreements, municipalities can avoid competing for development and better plan for capital improvements. Cooperation with neighboring communities is also recommended to enhance efficient provision of services and potential joint purchasing. For example, it may be possible to share certain staff positions (building inspection is one example), or to cooperatively purchase supplies to create larger orders which often have reduced unit costs.

Ultimately, it is also advised to reach agreements with Park Forest and Crete. The amount of developable land between University Park and these communities is much smaller than the previously mentioned towns, and these unincorporated areas do not currently have the same potential for large growth in the near future.

Intergovernmental Coorperation

Monee and Crete Township Townships provide multiple social services, and maintain roads in rural areas. University Park should coordinate with both townships to coordinate services and look for opportunities to share resources.

Crete-Monee School District 201-U The Village should partner with the School District in efforts to prepare students for future careers.

Will County Will County has zoning authority for areas around University Park that are not already annexed into an adjacent municipality. The Will County Health Department plays a key role in inspecting food operations to ensure the safety of Village and County residents. The County Highway Department is also a key agency for coordination of major roadway improvements. The Forest Preserve District has major land holdings in and around University Park. Given

One of the keys to implementation of the overall community vision is intergovernmental cooperation. University Park will need to partner with many local, regional, and state agencies to accomplish the goals of this plan. Some of these key partners in plan implementation include:


Implementation

11 these key County roles, it is critical that University Park work closely with all County departments to coordinate planning and implementation activities. South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA)/Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation (CSEDC) Both organizations play a vital role in coordinating and supporting municipalities in the south suburbs. They provide a wealth of information regarding potential grants, maintain and operate a regional Geographic Information System, and have a very active economic development program. Will County Center for Economic Development (CED) The CED is a very active organization, primarily focused on expanding employment in the County with new industrial, intermodal, and warehouse facilities. The organization has been instrumental in expanding employment in the County, and given University Park’s major industrial base this will be an important partner – particularly in expanding industrial uses on the west side of I-57. Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) IDOT controls major roadways in the area like I-57 and Cicero (Route 50). In addition, they provide funding for many other roadway projects. A close partnership with IDOT is essential in maintaining and expanding the Village’s roadway system. Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning CMAP provides regional coordination and leadership in the areas of planning, transportation, and the environment. They also provide technical assistance to local municipalities. Establishing and maintaining a good relationship with CMAP will be beneficial to University Park from an educational and financial perspective.

Transit Agencies (RTA, Metra, Pace) The plan highlights the community desire to expand the hours of Pace service in the Village. In addition, the potential for additional development in and around the commuter train station is a key plan recommendation that should be closely coordinated with RTA and Metra.

Annexation The Village should focus its annexation efforts on properties west of Interstate 57. It is essential for the Village to ensure that any land considered for annexation will be able to be serviced by water and sewer systems, and has significant development potential for non-residential uses that could greatly increase the Village’s tax base. To address future annexations, it is recommended for the Village establish and maintain an open line of communication with property owners of potential annexed land.

New Interchange Construction The new interchange at Stuenkel Road/University Parkway and Interstate 57 will lead to many opportunities. With construction of the new interchange starting this year it would be an ideal time to add a water main under Interstate 57. There is currently a line running along the east side of Interstate 57 but most of the developable land is located on the west side of the interstate. Installing a line to connect to the existing pipe would be the most cost efficient if it is done while the interchange is being constructed. It is difficult for anyone, including Aqua, the Village, and developers, to invest a large amount of money on a project that does not yet have any existing water users. The Village should seek out the current property owners on the west side

of Interstate 57 and form a partnership to try and fund this water line as soon as possible. The development of that land will be beneficial for all of the parties involved and will save everyone money in the long run if utility planning is done collectively.

Funding Sources Property taxes and sales taxes are the most common funding sources to support operations and improvements within a municipality. However, there are several other channels which provide partial or complete funding for certain projects and improvements. The following is a summary of these potential funding opportunities that the Village may explore: Development Impact Fees Impact fees are paid by developers to offset the cost of additional public facilities such as roads, water lines, and parks needed to accomodate their developments. The revenue from these fees can be used to purchase land or construct new facilities. These fees are typically established as part of the annexation process. Public/Private Partnership The concept of a public/private partnership has become popular for municipalities. The basic approach is for a public agency to enter into an agreement with a private company or entity (Governors State University, for example) to help fund, build, or operate a facility. There are three primary incentives a public agency can offer: • A free site • Tax advantages • Access to the facility This approach may be used for the creation and operation of a recreation/community center in University Park. An example Page 83


Implementation of a public/private community center is the River Forest Community Center. For information visit: www.rfcc.info Tax Increment Financing (TIF) TIF is another approach to promoting a public/private partnership that has been effectively used in many communities throughout Illinois to encourage private development. University Park has experience using this technique and recently approved a new TIF around Town Center. TIFs are generally used to promote business and not residential development. Public/Non-Profit Partnership A public/non-profit partnership allows a public agency to utilize the specialized knowledge and resources of a non-profit organization (the Conservation Foundation, for example). Non-profit organizations can offer expertise without being paid by the public agency. These partnerships can be a fiscally efficient way to initiate programs within the Village. Government Grant Programs Certain federal, state, and local governmental grant programs relevant to University Park include the following: Open Space Lands Acquisition and Development (OSLAD) OSLAD is a state financed grant program that provides funding assistance to local government agencies. The funds may be used to acquire and/or develop land for public parks and open space. Projects can vary between small public parks to large community and nature areas. The program is financed by a percentage of the state’s Real Estate Transfer Tax. For information visit: www.dnr.state.il.us/ocd/newoslad1.htm Page 84

11 Park and Recreation Facility Construction Act (PARC) PARC was created to provide grants to eligible local governments for park and recreation unit construction projects within the state of Illinois. The funds may be used to for land acquisition, development, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, and other improvements to new or existing recreational areas. It is important to note that permanent funding for the program has not yet been established, unlike the OSLAD program (above). For information visit: www.dnr.state.il.us/ocd/newparc1.htm

Illinois Transportation Enhancement Program (ITEP) The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) administers ITEP program funding for stand alone pedestrian and bicycle projects. Projects may include bike lanes, bike paths, pedestrian and bicycle structures, river crossings, railroad crossings, bicycle parking, signage, and other similar improvements. University Park may pursue this program to initiate the bicycle and pedestrain plan. For information visit: www.dot.il.gov/opp/itep.html Illinois Bicycle Path Grants Program Another way to fund the bicycle and pedestrian plan would be to pursue a grant from the Illinois Bicycle Path Grant Program. This grant program provides funding to local governments to acquire, construct, and rehabilitate bicycle paths and related facilities. For information visit: www.dnr.state.il.us/ocd/newbike2.htm Illinois Green Infrastructure Grant Program for Stormwater (IGIG) IGIG is administered by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to provide funding for local governments to improve the sustainability of their storm water management systems. The grant supports projects that use best management practices (such as permeable pavers) to better control storm water runoff and improve water quality in the community. For information visit: www.epa.state.il.us/water/financialassistance/igig.html Community Service Block Grant Program (CSBG) CSBG program is designed to provide a range of services which assist low-income people to attain skills and to offer immediate life necessities. The grants are administered by the


Implementation

11 Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and put an emphasis on self sufficiency efforts. This grant may provide funding for a number of services, but for University Park the most likely funding will come from the nutrition service category. These funds may be used to construct and maintain community gardens and other educational nutrition initiatives.

Implementation Matrix The implementation matrix on the following pages is a guide on how to accomplish key suggestions in this Comprehensive Plan. The matrix includes the following details: • Action Step A general description of the strategy • Phasing Frequency or timing of action steps to properly allocate resources. There are four types of phasing ranges: - Ongoing - Short Term (1 to 3 years) - Intermediate Term (4 to 6 years) - Long Term (7+ years)

• Lead Partner The Village department, agency, or organization primarily responsible for the action step • Partners A department, agency, or organization that may be importnant to collaborate with • Resources Physical, financial, or human resources needed to complete the action step • Plan Reference Sections in the Comprehensive Plan that provide more detailed descriptions

Economic Development The strategies for economic development implementation are located in the Economic Development section on pages ##-##.

Housing ID

Action Step

H.01

Involve all appropriate Village departments and Ongoing programs in the housing planning process to ensure a coordinated planning and implementation effort. Partner with the Housing Authorities of Cook and Will Ongoing Counties, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), the South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA), Will County Community Development Division – Land Use Department to evaluate options available to deal with and prevent blighted and foreclosure properties Ongoing Require, permit and/or provide incentives for “open space” or “cluster” development to preserve green space within new subdivisions.

H.02

H.03

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

Village

All Village Departments

Staff Time

Plan Page References pg. 49

Village

Housing Authorities of Cook and Will Counties, CMAP, SSMMA, Will County Community Development Division – Land Use Department

Staff Time

pg. 49

Village

Plan Commission

Staff Time

pg. 48

Page 85


Implementation

11

Housing (cont.) ID

Action Step

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

H.04

Require applicants for rezoning and special use permits to prepare and submit with their applications an impact analysis addressing such issues as: projected increase in population and demand for school facilities and other public facilities, impacts on vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle traffic and circulation, water and sewer service needs, storm water run-off quantity and quality impacts, visual impacts, impacts to historic and environmental resources, etc. The analysis should address proposed measures to mitigate impacts of the above. The level of analysis required should reflect the size and potential impact of the project Meet with active residential developers to discuss the market and opportunities for new housing in University Park. Develop a zoning approach to require, permit and/ or create incentives for the development of new residential neighborhoods that contain a mix of housing types Include in the Village’s codes and manuals design provisions and performance standards improvements in the design quality of all residential development; provisions may include setback, orientation, street design, sidewalk, trail, and parking standards Implement a rental housing inspection and/or registration program to ensure that such housing is decent as well as affordable and to enforce occupancy restrictions and maintain records on approved rental units

Ongoing

Village

Plan Commission

Staff Time

Plan Page References pgs. 47-49

Ongoing

Village

Staff Time

pg. 47

Short Term

Village

Plan Commission

Staff Time

pg. 47

Intermediate Term

Village

Plan Commission

Staff Time

pgs. 48-49

Long Term

Village

-

Staff Time

pg. 47

H.05

H.06

H.07

H.08

Page 86


Implementation

11 Transportation

Plan Page References pgs. 57-59

ID

Action Step

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

T.01

Pursue federal and state grant programs, such as the Federal Recreational Trails Program, the Illinois Bike Path Grant, and the Illinois Transportation Enhancement Program (ITEP) to provide funding and development assistance to upgrade existing trails and installing new trails Improve and resurface University Parkway between Governors Highway and Crawford Avenue Coordinate with PACE to add services at night and on the weekends Coordinate with PACE to provide stops near the industrial park Install a traffic signal which operates in parallel with the railway signal at the intersection of University Parkway and Governors Highway to alleviate immediate safety issues Petition the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) and Canadian National (CN) to perform a feasability study for the construction of an overpass for University Parkway and Governors Highway/railroad intersection Pursue study on the feasability for a Dralle Road extension and overpass over Interstate 57 to Ridgeland Avenue Realign Governors Highway to merge with Cicero Avenue to eliminate the intersection at University Parkway and Governors Highway Build an overpass over Governors Highway and railway to eliminate all safety concerns and traffic flow issues

Ongoing

Village

Parks and Recreation Department, Village Engineer

Staff Time, possible consultant assistance

Short Term

Village

Staff Time

pg. 59-60

Short Term

Village

Village Engineer, GSU, SSMMA, IDOT PACE

Staff Time

pg. 53

Short Term

Village

PACE

Staff Time

pg. 53

Short Term

Village

IDOT

Staff Time, funding for improvement

pg. 61

Intermediate Term

Village

IDOT, CN

Staff Time

pg. 61

Intermediate Term

Village

IDOT

Staff Time, possible consultant fees

pg. 57-59

Long Term

Village

IDOT, Will County Highway Department

Staff Time, funding for improvement

pgs. 40-41

Long Term

Village

IDOT, Will County Staff Time, funding for Highway Department, CN improvement

T.02 T.03 T.04 T.05

T.06

T.07

T.08

T.09

pg. 61

Page 87


Implementation

11

Transportation (cont.) Plan Page References pg. 56

ID

Action Step

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

T.10

Pursue study on the feasability of Harlem Avenue and Steger Road intesection realignment Work with developing property owners along the Steger Road extension to construct the roadway.

Long Term

Village

IDOT, Village of Frankfort

Long Term

Village

IDOT

Staff Time, possible consultant fees Staff Time, Funding from pg. 56 developers

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

GS.01 Continue to pursue grants from programs such as Ongoing the Illinois Green Infrastructure Grant Program for Stormwater (IGIG) to construct green infrastructure like permeable paved parking lots GS.02 Encourage preservation of natural areas and green Ongoing development practices during development and site review processes GS.03 Work with organizations such as the Conservation Short Term Foundation to implement a rain barrel program

Village

Public Works Department, Parks and Recretion Department

Staff Time

Plan Page References pg. 66

Plan Commission

Staff Time

pg. 67

Staff Time

pg. 67

GS.04 Enlist the services of the Smart Energy Design Assistance Center (SEDAC) to audit current energy consumption in municipal facilites GS.05 Add sections to the zoning ordinance that will encourage and incentivize alternate energy systems

Short Term

Village

Village, Public Works Department, Parks and Recreation Department Public Works Department, Parks and Recretion Department SEDAC

Staff Time, funding for facilty improvements

pg. 68

Intermediate Term

Village

Plan Commission

Staff Time, possible funding for a consultant

pg. 68

T.11

Green Infrastructure & Sustainability ID

Page 88

Action Step

Village


Implementation

11 Recreation

Plan Page References Staff Time; Funding from pg. 72 developers or other sources to design and construct new parks Staff Time pg. 72

ID

Action Step

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

R.01

The Village should ammend the subdivision ordinance to require adequate space for parks, using a standard ratio of 10 acres of park space per 1,000 residents

Ongoing

Village

Parks and Recreation Department

R.02

Pursue state grant programs, such as the Illinois Open Space Land Acquisition and Development Grant (OSLAD), to provide funding and development assistance for new park sites and recretional facilities

Ongoing

Village

Parks and Recreation Department

R.03

Pursue federal and state grant programs, such as the Ongoing Federal Recreational Trails Program and the Illinois Bike Path Grant to provide funding and development assistance to upgrade existing trails and installing new trails Intermediate Term Pursue state grant programs, such as the Park and Long Term Recreational Facility Construction Grant Program (PARC) to provide funding for a new recreation center and sports facility

Village

Parks and Recreation Department

Staff Time

pgs. 57-59

Village

Parks and Recreation Department; possible partnerships with local organizations

Staff Time

pg. 72

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

Crete-Monee School District 201-U

Village

Staff Time

Plan Page References pg. 73

Crete-Monee School District 201-U

Village, GSU

To be determined

pg. 73

R.04

Resources

Education ID

Action Step

E.01

Coordinate with Crete-Monee School District 201-U Ongoing periodically to assess the facility, staffing, and resource needs of the schools serving the community Support District 201-U efforst to exceed state standards Ongoing

E.02

Phasing

Page 89


Implementation

11

Education (cont.) ID

Action Step

Phasing

E.03

Collaborate with Governors State University periodically Ongoing to assess the school’s plans for future growth and development

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

Governors State University

Village

Staff Time

Plan Page References pg. 74

Municipal Facilities ID

Action Step

Phasing

Lead Partner

Partner(s)

Resources

CF.01

Establish a regular system of vehicle replacement for the fire department; possibly fund through annexation impact fees, fire facility fee building permt, TIF, or grants Establish a capital improvement program to provide a regular system of vehicle replacement for the Police Department Develop a schedule for Police Department facility updates; evidence room, classroom, fencing Assess the potential for a new Village Hall and Municipal Center located near the TOD area as development grows Assess the potential to upgrade and renovate the Fire Department’s Station #2; possibly fund through annexation impact fees, fire facility fee building permt, TIF, or grants Assess the poptential to consruct a new police station facility on the west side of town; this should only be pursued after the population reaches arounf 30,000 As the population grows, assess the potential for additions to the library

Ongoing

Village

Fire Department

Staff Time

Plan Page References pg. 77

Short Term

Village

Police Department

Staff Time

pg. 78

Intermediate Term

Village

Police Department

pg. 78

Long Term

Village

-

Staff Time, funding for structure improvements Staff Time, funding for new facilities

Long Term

Village

Fire Department

Staff Time, funding for structure improvements

pg. 77

Long Term

Village

Police Department

Staff Time, funding for new facility

pg. 78

Long Term

Village University Park Public Library

Village

Staff Time

pg. 79

CF.02

CF.03 CF.04

CF.05

CF.06

CF.07

Page 90

pg. 77

University Park Comprehensive Plan