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Village of Dolton

Comprehensive Plan 2013

Village of Dolton, IL A Community Working Together

June 2013 Draft


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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Village Board

Mayor Riley H. Rogers Sabrina G. Smith Cathern L. Bendell Rober E. Hunt Tiffany Henyard Stanley Brown

Steering Committee Participants

Carthern L. Bendell, Trustee James Bendell, District #148 School Board Denise Riley, Commissioner Woodrow Jackson, Commissioner Helaine Yates, Commissioner Earl Weaver, Commission Bob Johnson, Commission Annita Thompson Garrett Ghezzi Mike Wolski Mary Casey Pastor Kevin

Village Clerk

Mary Kay Duggan

Consultants

Teska Associates, Inc. - Lead Consultant, Planning and Landscape Architecture Business Districts, Inc. - Economic Development Robinson Engineering - Transportation and Infrastructure Barron-Chisolm Planning - Housing and Community Engagement

The Village of Dolton is extremely appreciative of the financial support of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) to help make this plan possible. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Table of Contents

Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 Purpose of the Comprehensive Plan 1-1 Study Area 1-2 History of Dolton 1-2 Planning Process 1-5 Chapter 2: Existing Conditions.............................................................................................................2-1 Demographics 2-1 Land Use and Zoning 2-7 Environmental Conditions 2-11 Chapter 3: Community Vision ........................................................................................................... 3-1 Goals and Objectives 3-2 Chapter 4: Future Land Use ............................................................................................................... 4-1 Future Land Use Plan 4-1 Chapter 5: Housing Plan..................................................................................................................... 5-1 5-2 Goals and Objectives 5-5 Implementation Strategies Chapter 6: Transportation...................................................................................................................6-1 6-1 Existing Transportation 6-7 Future Transportation Plan Chapter 7: Community Facilities.........................................................................................................7-1 7-1 Schools 7-3 Municipal Facilities 7-5 Parks and Open Space Chapter 8: Economic Development Strategy....................................................................................... 8-1 8-1 Industrial Strategy 8-3 Retail Strategy 8-4 Comparison Communities Economic Development Tools 8-12 Chapter 9: Northern Industrial Corridor............................................................................................. 9-1 Issues 9-2 Opportunities 9-3 Market Analysis 9-4 Policies and Initiatives 9-4 Concept Plans 9-5 Prior Plans and Studies 9-7

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Table of Contents

Table of Contents Chapter 10: Sibley Boulevard Corridor............................................................................................ 10-1 Issues 10-2 Opportunities 10-3 Market Analysis 10-3 Policies and Initiatives 10-4 Sibley Corridor Footprint and Site Potential Summary 10-5 Concept Plans 10-5 Urban Design 10-7 Design Guidelines 10-14 Public-Private Partnership 10-16 Chapter 11: Downtown Dolton........................................................................................................ 11-1 Issues 11-2 Opportunities 11-3 11-4 Market Analysis Prior Plans and Studies 11-5 11-6 Policies and Initiatives Concept Plans 11-7 Urban Design 11-9 11-12 Design Guidelines Chapter 12: Sustainability..................................................................................................................12-1 12-1 Sustainable Design 12-4 Smart Energy Design Assistance Program Chapter 13: Implementation.............................................................................................................13-1 13-1 Monitoring & Updates 13-1 Development Regulations 13-2 Annexation 13-3 Housing Programs Transportation, Beautification,and Infrastructure 13-6 13-6 Funding Appendix.......................................................................................................................................... A-1 Review of Dolton Zoning Ordinance A-1

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 1 2 | Introduction Existing Conditions

Chapter 1

Introduction Purpose of the Comprehensive Plan A comprehensive plan is an inclusive approach to addressing the issues of change, future growth and the overall quality of life for residents. The 2012 Comprehensive Plan for the Village of Dolton outlines a community vision for the future development and redevelopment of existing neighborhoods and areas throughout the community. This plan takes into account existing conditions as well as planning issues facing the community in order to address residents’ needs. Included in the plan are recommendations for specific focus areas including the Sibley Boulevard Corridor, North Industrial Corridor, and Downtown area. Also addressed in the plan are recommendations for future lands use, housing, transportation, and community facilities. Located directly to the south of Chicago, the Village of Dolton is often known as ‘The Gateway to the South Suburbs’. The Village's geographic location is bounded by the Village of Riverdale to the west, Interstate 94 to the east, the Little Calumet River to the South, and its larger counterpart, the Calumet River to the north. Creating the Comprehensive Plan is an important tool to address the changing conditions in Dolton. The 2012 Comprehensive Plan works to enhance the strategic position of Dolton by capitalizing on its unique characteristics including available sites for future development, close proximity to the City of Chicago, available labor force, and supportive government.

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The 2012 Comprehensive Plan was the result of approximately a year of work between the Village of Dolton and their planning consultants. The development of the Comprehensive Plan followed the creation of the Dolton Park District’s Park and Recreation Plan, which worked to create an outline for the future growth of the parks system and related programming. The Comprehensive Planning process began in March 2011 and collected residents’ concerns and ideas through a series of interviews, public workshops, surveys, and meetings. The formation of a steering committee, comprised of various community members, also helped to guide the planning process. The Comprehensive Plan will serve as a guide for decision-making on issues related to future growth and redevelopment throughout the community. It will identify the challenges currently facing the community and opportunities for improvement and should continue to be updated to address new and emerging issues. By proactively taking these topics into consideration, the Village of Dolton can continue to make decisions that are aligned with community goals. The comprehensive plan should be reviewed annually and updated every five years to ensure that the goals outlined in the document continue to align with the community’s vision for the future.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 1 2 | Introduction Existing Conditions

The Village of Dolton is located in the South Suburbs of Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, approximately 22 miles south of downtown Chicago and is referred to as the ‘Gateway to the South Suburbs’. The Village consists of 4.57 square miles of land and is bordered by Chicago to the North, South Holland to the South, Harvey and Riverdale to the West, and Calumet City to the East as shown in Figure 1.1. The current population of Dolton is 23,153 (U.S. Census Bureau 2010 Census). The Village has convenient access to Interstate 94 to the east (approximately 1.5 miles) and Interstate 80 to the south (approximately 4 miles).

FIGURE 1.1:

Location Map Justice

Burbank Bridgeview

Hometown

Hickory Hills

Lake Michigan

Evergreen Park Oak Lawn

Palos Hills

Chicago Ridge

Chicago

Worth Marionette Park Palos Park

Alsip

Calument Park

Palos Heights

Blue Island Crestwood

Robins

Midlothian Orland Park

Riverdale

Dixmoor Posen

DOLTON

Burnham Calument City

Harvey Phoenix

Oak Forest Markham

South Holland

Orland Hills Hazel Crest

Tinley Park

Country Club Hills

Matteson

Frankfort

Lansing

Homewood

Flossmoor

WILL COUNTY

Crest Thornton

INDIANA

Study Area

Olympia Fields

Glenwood

Chicago Heights

Lynwood

Ford Heights

Park Forest South Chicago Heights Steger University Park

Sauk Village

Richton Park

History of Dolton The Village of Dolton, once an area of natural prairie and home to Potawatomie, Sac, Illini, and Miami Indians, has now grown into a bustling suburban community of over 23,000 residents. Dolton is located in the south suburbs of Chicago and is bordered by the Calumet River and Interstate 94. The village was founded by George Dolton who settled in the area with his family in 1835 and began running a ferry company with another

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resident of the area, J.C. Matthews. Additional families, many from Germany and Holland, continued to settle in the area throughout the mid1800s. In 1866, the village built its first post office and Andrew Dolton, son of George Dolton, served as its postmaster. After a contentious debate, the Village of Dolton became incorporated on December 28, 1892.

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Chapter 1 2 | Introduction Existing Conditions

Industry and Railroads Early industries in the Village of Dolton included a distilling company and a lumber company located along the Calumet River. Due to its close proximity to the City of Chicago, Dolton became home to many railroad companies, which further increased the growth of the village. In 1852, the Illinois Central Railroad became the first railroad company to settle in Dolton and began laying tracks for the Chicago and Great Eastern Railroad in 1865. The railroad system in Dolton, both passenger and freight, continued to expand throughout the mid-1800s and into the early-1900s extending into Chicago and to cities throughout Illinois and Ohio. In 1900, the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad yard was moved to Dolton at 144th Street near Indiana Avenue, bringing many new residents to Dolton. By the 1890s, Dolton had become an agricultural production center for Chicago, a role which led to the village’s packing and canning industries. Ultimately, ten different railroad lines ran throughout the village and created an industrial

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character for Dolton. In order to help mitigate the congestion caused by the excessive number of train lines running throughout the village, the first bridge was built along Sibley Street and 147th Street in 1936. Although the train activity began to decline in the mid-1900s, there has been a major resurgence in recent years. Today, the Village’s access to major rail line and railyards is a major economic development asset.

Schools and Churches Although farming played a crucial role in the lives of early Dolton residents, social life revolved around schools and churches. As more residents came to the area, more schools opened throughout the community. The first school opened in 1854 and was located in a log cabin along the south side of Sibley Boulevards and Meadow Lane, next to the present-day Berger Cemetery. The original school continued to expand and improvements were made to the building until the school was ultimately moved to a new brick building across Sibley Boulevard in 1917. Another school was

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 1 2 | Introduction Existing Conditions

opened in 1859 at Park and Lincoln Avenues. Because the noise from the trains was too disruptive to the Park Avenue school, a new school was built in 1911 on Lincoln Avenue. The old Park Avenue school building serves as the Dolton municipal building. The first high school opened in 1892 and the first junior college opened in 1927. Today, the Village of Dolton has six elementary schools, two junior highs, and one high school.

Parks and Recreation Residents of Dolton held many public events including dances and sporting events throughout the village. The Berger Camp Ground, located along Sibley Avenue, included an assembly hall and cabins for families to use for recreation. These buildings were demolished in 1962 to accommodate the growing business corridor along Sibley Boulevard. The first public library opened on September 26, 1954 on the second floor of the Village Hall. After overwhelming support for the establishment of a bigger library, a new public library was constructed and opened on January 24, 1964.

New Life Celebration Church of God is one of many churches located within Dolton.

The first churches in Dolton began as early as 1886. Churches of all different affiliations, from Catholic to Lutheran to Methodist, continued to emerge throughout the years to serve the diverse population of the city. As the number of people moving from the cities into the suburbs increased in the 1950s, so did the number of churches throughout the village. These churches served as a place for social gathering and offered residents hope and guidance.

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The Dolton Park District was established in July 1927. Today, the park district consists of 11 parks totaling 144 acres. Dolton Park, located on Engle Street just west of Greenwood Road, is the village’s most popular park and is a hub of community activity.

Dolton Park, one of eleven parks in Dolton, is highly utilized by residents.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 1 2 | Introduction Existing Conditions

Planning Process Throughout the planning process, a Steering Committee comprised of Village staff, public officials, local residents, and others provided guidance and feedback during each phase of the planning process. To ensure that the final plan has a broad level of support and understanding, the planning process has included a substantial public participation component designed to involve community stakeholders and residents in creating a plan that represents a vision for the community that is representative of the goals and aspirations of Dolton residents and businesses. This process includes: Project Website: www.TeskaAssociates.com/Dolton/

• Key Stakeholder Interviews provide select community members with the opportunity to share insights and ideas for the Village and visions for how they would like the Village to develop in the future. • Community Survey provides residents of the Village the opportunity to provide input without having to attend meetings, and provides the Village with valuable insight into which issues are important to the community. • Public Open Houses provide an informal public review process for community members to review draft plans and share their ideas. • Project Website provides an online resource and forum to keep the public informed and engaged in the comprehensive planning process. 2-5 1-5

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Chapter 2

Existing Conditions The following chapter provides an inventory of existing conditions within the Village of Dolton including demographics, existing land uses and zoning classifications, community facilities, environmental conditions, and current market conditions and trends. This information was collected during the initial phases of the comprehensive planning process in order to provide a foundation for the community vision, development strategies, transportation plan, and future land use plan presented in the subsequent chapters of the Comprehensive Plan.

Demographics The following demographic analysis provides an overview of the current demographic makeup of residents of the Village of Dolton, and current demographic trends throughout the area. Demographic data is taken from the most recent census data (2010) from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Population The Village of Dolton has experienced fluxuations in their population throughout the past several decades as shown in Figure 2.1. Although Dolton experienced 6.6% growth from 1990-2000, reaching a population over 25,000, the population declined 9.6% from 2000-1010, taking their total population to 23,153 residents. It is anticipated that Dolton’s population will continue to decline an additional 3.6% over the next several years resulting in a total population of 22,884 residents by the year 2014 (projected population from www.claritas.com). These growth trends are similar to those within Cook County but are contrary to those of the State of Illinois. However, the neighboring city of Chicago, also in Cook County, grew by nearly 9,000 people in the last year alone. This boom in city population may be 2-1

due to the “generation rent”, the recent surge of young adults choosing to live in the city rather than commute from the suburbs. These statistics demonstrate that Cook County’s population decline is due to the declining populations of the suburbs, which may have to work harder in upcoming years to retain and attract residents. Dolton, as an inner ring suburb, could capitalize on this trend by marketing their proximity to big city amenities while also offering a distance from big city problems. The Comprehensive Plan will identify potential development opportunities and outline a housing plan that will work to reverse the current population decline of Dolton, making it a destination for both businesses and families.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

FIGURE 2.1:

Population

22,884

25,614

23,153

20,000

24,035

25,000

24,766

DOLTON POPULATION

30,000

2010

2014 (Projected)

15,000 10,000 1980

1990

2000

DOLTON

COOK COUNTY

ILLINOIS

Year

Population

% Change

Population

% Change

Population

% Change

2010

23,153

-9.6%

5,194,675

-3.4%

11,430,602

8.6%

2000

25,614

6.6%

5,376,741

5.3%

12,419,293

3.3%

1990

24,035

-3.0%

5,105,067

-2.8%

12,830,632

12.3%

1980

24,766

---

5,253,655

---

11,426,518

---

Source: U.S. Census 1990-2010

Population By Age Dolton’s population by age, as shown in Figure 2.2, follows similar trends with Cook County and the state of Illinois. For each of these census groups, the largest percentage of the population is between the ages of 35 and 64 while the second largest population group are those under 20 years of age. These percentages indicate that Dolton’s population is primarily comprised of older families as well as youth and teenagers. Although there is a smaller percentage of 20 to 34-year-olds in Dolton (17.8%), the percentage is still comparable to Cook County (23.2%) and Illinois (20.7%). This may indicate that Dolton is having trouble retaining and attracting young adults and younger families to the Village. 2-2

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

The percentage of residents 65 years and older in Dolton (9.2%) is also lower than in Cook County (12%) and Illinois (12.5%). There was no increase in the percentage of senior citizens in Dolton from 2000 to 2010. The percentage of male to female residents in Dolton is also comparable to Cook County and Illinois with a higher percentage of the population

being female. However, the percentage of the female population of Dolton (54.4%) is higher than that of both Cook County (51.6%) and Illinois (51%). Dolton having higher percentages for both middle-aged residents (24-36 years) and a higher female population is an indicator that there is a significantly higher percentage of female-headed households in Dolton (28.9%) than in Cook County (15.2%) and Illinois (12.5%).

FIGURE 2.2:

Population by Age (2010 Census) DOLTON Age Under 20 years 20 to 34 years 35 to 64 years 65 years & older TOTAL COOK COUNTY Age Under 20 years 20 to 34 years 35 to 64 years 65 years & older TOTAL ILLINOIS Age Under 20 years 20 to 34 years 35 to 64 years 65 years & older TOTAL

Male 3,776 1,927 3,989 873 10,565

Male 699,032 596,585 966,432 252,265 2,514,314

Male 1,787,345 1,338,182 2,715,727 451,022 6,292,276

Female 3,660 2,180 5,508 1,240 12,588

Female 675,064 607,481 1,029,752 368,064 2,680,361

Female 1,709,177 1,316,739 2,354,249 1,158,191 6,538,356

Total 7,436 4,107 9,497 2,113 23,153

Median Age: 35.1 % of Total 32.1% 17.7% 41.0% 9.2% 100.00%

Total 1,374,096 1,204,066 1,996,184 620,329 5,194,675

Median Age: 35.3 % of Total 26.4% 23.2% 38.4% 12.0% 100.00%

Total 3,496,522 2,654,921 5,069,976 1,609,213 12,830,632

Median Age: 36.2 % of Total 27.3% 20.7% 39.5% 12.5% 100.00% Source: U.S. Census 2010

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Population By Race When Dolton first began developing in the mid1800s, it grew as a community with a range of ethnic diversity, drawing immigrants from across Europe. Today, Dolton is predominantly an African American community (90.9%) as shown in Figure 2.3. The white population makes up 6.21% of Dolton’s population and all other minorities including American Indian, Asian, and Pacific Islander are each less than 0.2% of the population.

also decreased from 0.9% in 1980 to 0.3% in 2010. These figures vary significantly from Cook County and Illinois where the percentage of the African American population is lower than the percentage of white population. Both Cook County and Illinois also have a higher percentage of Asian population. The percentage of Hispanic population is also significantly less in Dolton (2.7%) than in Cook County (24%) and Illinois (15.8%).

In the past several decades, the African American population has increased exponentially from 2% in 1980 to 82.4% in 1990, and has continued to increase to 90.9% in 2010. The percentage of white population dropped from 96% in 1980 to only 6.2% today. The Asian population has

These figures indicate that while Dolton works to attract new residents to increase the overall population, the Village should also consider creating greater diversity throughout the community.

FIGURE 2.3:

Population by Race (2010 Census) Race White Black/African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Other Race Two or More Races TOTAL Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic or Latino

DOLTON COOK COUNTY ILLINOIS Population % of Total Population % of Total Population % of Total 1,438 6.2% 2,877,212 55.4% 9,177,877 71.5% 21,046

90.9%

1,287,767

24.8%

1,866,414

14.5%

28

0.1%

1,724

0.0%

43,963

0.3%

68

0.3%

322,672

6.2%

586,934

4.6%

3

0.0%

1,299

0.0%

4,050

0.0%

259 311 23,153 622

1.1% 1.3% 100.0% 2.7%

551,971 131,770 5,194,675 1,244,762

10.6% 2.5% 100.0% 24.0%

861,412 289,982 12,830,632 2,027,578

6.7% 2.3% 100.0% 15.8%

22,531

97.3%

3,949,913

76.0%

10,803,054

63.7%

Source: U.S. Census 2010

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Households Dolton has experienced a decline in the number of households in the past decade. As shown in Figure 2.4, the number of households in Dolton declined from 8,512 in 2000 to 7,834 in 2010. This change is consistent with the pattern of Dolton’s declining population over the past decade. Although Cook County also experienced decreases in the number of households from

2000 to 2010 (-0.4%) it was much less than that experienced by Dolton (-8.0%). The average household size in Dolton decreased minimally from 2.98 in 2000 to 2.92 in 2010, and exceeded the average household size in both Cook County and the state of Illinois.

FIGURE 2.4:

Households DOLTON Households % Change 7,834 - 8.0% 8,512 2.1% 8,337 ---

2010 2000 1990

COOK COUNTY Households % Change 1,966,356 - 0.4% 1,974,181 5.0% 1,879,488 ---

ILLINOIS Households % Change 4,836,972 5.3% 4,591,779 9.3% 4,202,240 ---

7,834

8,000

8,512

8,500 8,377

DOLTON HOUSEHOLDS

Source: U.S. Census 1990-2010

7,500 7,000

Dolton Cook County Illinois

Average Household Size, 2010 2.92 2.60 2.59 Source: U.S. Census 2010

1990

2000

2010

Household Occupancy As shown in Figure 2.5, there are a total of 8,720 housing units within the Village of Dolton, with 89.8% of the units being occupied. Therefore Dolton’s percentage of vacant housing (10.2%) is slightly higher, but very similar to that of Cook County (9.8%) and the state of Illinois (8.7%). The percentage of occupied housing in Dolton has 2-5

decreased since 2000 (95.2%), a trend that has also occurred in Cook County and Illinois. Dolton’s combined vacancy rate for both rental and owner-occupied housing (7.6%) is much lower Cook County (12.6%) and very similar to Illinois (7.6%). Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

FIGURE 2.5:

Household Occupancy (2010)

7.6%

Illinois Cook County

12.6% 7.7%

Dolton 0.0%

3.0%

6.0%

9.0%

12.0%

VACANCY RATE

DOLTON

COOK COUNTY

ILLINOIS

Number

% of Total

Number

% of Total

Number

% of Total

886

10.2%

214,003

9.8%

459,743

8.7%

Occupied Housing Units

7,834

89.8%

1,966,356

90.2%

4,836,972

91.3%

Total Housing Units

8,720

100.0%

2,180,359

100.0%

5,296,715

100.0%

Vacant Housing Units

Source: U.S. Census 2010

Household Income Income earnings in Dolton are slightly lower than those in both Cook County and Illinois. As shown in Figure 2.6, Dolton’s median household income in 2010 was $51,090, making it 5.3% less than Cook County ($53,943) and 8.3% less than the state of Illinois ($55,735). Although lower than county and state, Dolton’s household median income did increase from $48,020 in 2000 to $51,090 in 2010, an increase of 6.4%.

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FIGURE 2.6:

Median Household Income (2010)

Dolton Cook County Illinois

Median Household Income, 2010 $51,090 $53,942 $55,735 Source: U.S. Census 2010

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Land Use and Zoning Existing Land Use The foundation for formulating land use decisions is a sound understanding of existing land use patterns. The analysis of existing land use - the distribution of various land uses, and opportunities for future development - begins with a land use survey.

Low density residential neighborhoods occupy the largest percentage of developed land within the Village of Dolton. Together with medium density and high density, residential land uses make up approximately 38% of Dolton’s total land area.

As shown in Figure 2.7, the Village of Dolton comprises multiple land uses, ranging from low density residential to industrial districts. The following descriptions provide a brief overview of each type of land use within the Village of Dolton.

Commercial/Mixed Use

Residential The majority of the Village consists of low density single-family residential neighborhoods, which are distributed throughout the Village, predominantly built around a grid street network. Medium density and high density residential areas (including townhouses, condominiums and apartments) are scattered throughout the Village in small pockets along the boarders of the lower density residential neighborhoods.

Medium and high density residential units are scattered throughout Dolton.

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Commercial land uses are scattered throughout Dolton. The Village’s largest commercial area is located along the eastern portion of Sibley Boulevard, next to I-94, with smaller commercial developments located along Lincoln Avenue and Greenwood Road. Downtown commercial area

The majority of commercial development within Dolton is located within strip malls along these corridors. The downtown area, located in the northwestern portion of the Village, contains a number of small shops and services, including a number of restaurants and bars.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Parks/Open Space Playground equipment has been upgraded in many of Dolton’s parks

Institutional/Public Facilities Institutional land use includes publicly owned facilities such as the Village Hall, fire station, police station, schools and hospitals. These facilities are located throughout the Dolton. More detailed information on each of these facilities is provided in the Community Facilities section of this chapter. Industrial

There are a variety of open space and parks located throughout the community. Needles Park, the largest park in Dolton, is currently underutilized and is identified as a potential site for future industrial development. Dolton park, which is centrally located, is actively used by the Village residents and contains a variety of amenities and activities. More detailed information on each of the parks is provided in the Community Facilities section of this chapter.

Dolton currently has several industrial land use areas throughout the Village. Located near the western boarder of Dolton along Indiana Avenue, the Union Pacific Yard occupies a significant tract of land to serve the large amount of railroad lines that run through the Village. Another major industrial area is located along the northeastern border and includes a landfill and marina, with plans to expand this industrial use into surrounding areas. Three smaller industrial areas, located on the western boarder and near the Sibley Boulevard commercial corridor, contain light manufacturing facilities.

The Union Pacific Intermodal Terminal is a key component of Dolton’s industrial base.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

FIGURE 2.7:

Rail road

Existing Land Use Map

nal atio

Cal -

Can a

da N

Dolton Cottage Grove Avenue

RIVERDALE

IHB Railroad Village Hall

Library

Lincoln Jr. H.S.

Lake Cottage Grove

Sag

Beaubien Forest Preserve Ch

ann

el

EXISTI Needles Park 142nd Street

Woodlawn Avenue ue

dR

149th Street

d

oa

Lake Victory

La Salle Street

Av en

oo nw

Country Park

co ln

ee Gr

EXISTINGTownLAND USE MAP and 148th Street

Blackstone Park

Lin

Dolton Park

Dolt on A venu e

Bishop Ford Freeway

Union Pacific Intermodal Yard

Chicago Road

144th Street

146th Street

Berger Vandenberg Elem. School

Diekman Elem. School

Oakland Memory Lanes

Thornridge High School

Dolton Boundary 154th Street

Major Roads

Dorchester

Railroad PHOENIX

SOUTH HOLLAND

Low Density Residential (Single family)

Countryside Healthcare

New Beginings Learning Acadamy

Medium Density Residential

(Two or four flats, duplex, townhome)

High Density Residential

(Apartments or condominiums)

South Suburban College

Commercial

Little Calumet River

0

Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Mixed Use (Downtown) Industrial/Utility Institutional/Public Facilities Parks/Open Space

abonna Woods Forest Preserve

Vacant

2-9

Shabonna Woods Forest Preserve

Cottage Grove Avenue

Irving Avenue

LEGEND

Union Pacific Railroad

HARVEY

ET

CALUMET CITY

Sibley Boulevard Indiana Avenue

Sibley Boulevard Station

Ellis Avenue

Ivanhoe Station

Dorchester Avenue

Post Office

e

nings ng my

CHICAGO

138th Street

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013

750


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Zoning Zoning helps communities bring about orderly growth and change. It controls population density and helps create attractive, healthful residential areas. In addition, zoning helps assure property owners and residents that the characteristics of nearby areas will remain stable.

Dolton’s zoning map includes thirteen different districts, as shown in Figure 10. These districts include six (6) residential, four (4) business, two (2) manufacturing and one (1) municipal.

FIGURE 2.8:

Existing Zoning Map

Legend

V

R

R

R

R

R

R

L

B

G

P

G

L

P

LEGEND Legend Village Boundary R-1 Single-Family R-2 Single-Family R-3 Single-Family R-4 Two-Family R-5 Multi-Family R-6 Multi-Family Limited Retail Business Service General Business

Âľ

Planned Business Center General Manufacturing Limited Manufacturing Public Schools, Parks, Buildings and Other

2-10

Source: GIS Data from Robinson Engineers, map by Teska Associates, Inc.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Environmental Conditions Since the topography of Dolton is predominantly flat, the primary environmental features within the Village include major water elements - the Little Calumet River and the Cal-Sag Channel - and two small lakes - Lake Cottage Grove and Lake Victory.

Water Features The primary water features within the Village of Dolton include parts of the Calumet River system, including the Cal-Sag Channel and the Little Calumet River branch. The name “calumet” refers to an elaborate pipe that served as a sign of peace to the native Illiniwek Indians, and which was presented to Pere Marquette in 1673. The area is very flat and the course and direction of the river system has changed several times. The Village’s primary water features include: Cal-Sag Channel Also known as the Calumet-Saganashkee Channel, this is a navigational canal linking the Little Calumet River and the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, and was constructed between 1911-1922. The Cal-Sag Channel primarily serves barge traffic for heavy industry as well as a conduit for wastewater from Cook County into the Illinois Waterway. The Channel is located in the northeastern corner of the Village.

Illinois. Significant flooding problems have been documented, including a major flooding event in 2008. The United States Army Corps of Engineers has been undertaking a $200 million flood control and recreation project, including a flood warning system, 22 miles of levees and floodwalls, 17 miles of hiking trails, and partial relocation. Lake Cottage Grove This 35-acre lake is the larger of two lakes within the Village. It is located southeast of 142nd Street and Lincoln Avenue, to the east of the downtown area and west of Needles Park. The lake is owned and operated as a private fishing club called Piscateers, Inc. Lake Victory This lake, the smaller of two, is located North of Sibley Boulevard and east of Chicago Road, near the Union Pacific International Yard. It is owned and operated privately by the Izaak Walton League. Lake Victory, located near Dolton Park and the Intermodal Yard, is privately owned.

Little Calumet River Located in the southwestern portion of Dolton, this river flows into the Cal-Sag Channel and the Calumet River. It flows approximately 109 miles through Lake County Indiana and Cook County

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 2 | Existing Conditions

Flood Plain

Wetlands

The 100-year flood plain areas within the Village, as shown in blue on Figure 2.12 are defined by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (http:// illinoisfloodmaps.org/). The principal existing flood plain areas within the Village generally follow the banks of the Cal-Sag Channel and the Little Calumet River, as well as two smaller areas located along the banks of Lake Victory and Lake Cottage Grove.

The wetland areas within the Village of Dolton, as shown in green on Figure 2.13, are defined by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory (http://www.fws. gov/wetlands/). The principal existing wetland areas within the Village are located predominantly at the north edge of the Village near the Cal-Sag Channel. A number of smaller isolated wetland areas are scattered throughout the Village.

FIGURE 2.12:

FIGURE 2.13:

Existing Flood Plains

Existing Wetlands Calumet Sag Channel

Calumet Sag Channel

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142nd Street

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Park

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LEGEND

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Dolton Boundary

Freshwater Emergent

Flood Plains

Freshwater Forested River Lake Dolton Boundary

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 3 | Community Vision

Chapter 3

Community Vision The Village of Dolton has already made significant strides in becoming “A Community Working Together.� In these days of strained government finances and tight budgets, the need to work together with local governments within (Park District, Schools, etc.) and around (neighboring municipalities, Cook County, CMAP, etc.) is easily apparent. However, it all starts with at home with neighbors talking to neighbors, neighborhoods talking to each other, and creation of an open dialog with Village government to identify concerns and work cooperatively towards achieving the following vision, goals and objectives:

The vision for Dolton

is to preserve and continuously improve the quality of its neighborhoods, the quality of education, and the diversity of leisure time activities. The community is dedicated to fostering an easilyaccessible center of activity for the Dolton area, maintaining a prosperous economic base, protecting its extensive natural resources, and promoting public participation and communication.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 3 | Community Vision

Goals and Objectives The following information highlights key Village Goals and Objectives to be accomplished through implementation of the Comprehensive Plan. More detailed and specific strategies to achieve these objectives are outlined within the individual chapters of the plan.

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Diversity of Leisure Time Activities

Quality of Neighborhoods

Quality of Education

Maintain and enhance housing stock (see Housing Chapter)

Partner with Dolton-Riverdale School District 148

Champion completion of the Cal-Sag Trail

Work with Park District to expand and enhance neighborhood parks

Partner with Dolton School District 149

Work with Park District to enhance neighborhood parks and ensure all residents have access to a park within 1/4 mile of home

Conduct active capital improvement program with focus on local streets, enhanced neighborhood lighting, and flooding prevention

Partner with Thornton Township H.S. District 205

Retail and Job Attraction

Protect Natural Resources

Pursue public access to one of Dolton’s existing lakes

Promote Public Participation and Communications

Enhance the Sibley Retail Corridor (see Sibley Corridor Chapter)

Implement sustainability guidelines as noted in the Sustainability chapter and in the Green River Pattern Book

Maintain and enhance Village website

Pursue Intermodal and Green manufacturing opportunities (see Northern Industrial Corridor Chapter)

Work with Army Corps and others to manage flooding along the Little Calumet River

Conduct biannual Town Hall meetings

Promote Downtown and TOD redevelopment (see Downtown Chapter)

Protect and enhance Lake Victory and Lake Cottage Grove

Coordinate with local and regional governments to promote efficient use of tax payer dollars

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

Chapter 4

Future Land Use Future Land Use Plan The principal aim of the Future Land Use Plan is to achieve a high quality of life through the balanced arrangement of land uses providing residential, commercial, employment, civic, and recreational opportunities. When reviewing the Future Land Use Plan, it is important to understand its generalized nature. Given the scale at which municipal comprehensive planning occurs, only broad areas of land use are indicated. On specific parcels of land, certain exceptions may be appropriate. For example, a daycare center located within a residential neighborhood may be permitted even though the Future Land Use Plan does not strictly indicate a commercial use in the neighborhood; such exceptions should be addressed on a caseby-case basis in accordance with all municipal ordinances.

medium-density housing areas are also proposed throughout the Village including several areas near the downtown and Sibley Boulevard commercial areas in order to serve as transitional areas between lower density housing and higher intensity residential and commercial uses.

Land Use Categories The future land uses illustrated on the Future Land Use map provide recommendations for future growth and redevelopment. The future plan provides a diversity of land uses necessary to ensure the development of a balanced community.

Future Land Use Plan Map The Future Land Use Plan Map, which is provided in Figure 3.1, depicts a desired arrangement of land uses within the current Village boundaries considering existing land uses and proposed development patterns. There are several major changes proposed on the Future Land Use Map including a large focus on the conversion of the commercial downtown into a predominantly mixed-use area. More

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The future land use categories are described on the following pages, along with corresponding images to provide visual examples of development types and general design elements that fit the character of Dolton. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

FIGURE 3.1:

al R ailro ad

Village of Dolton Future Land Use Map

a Na tion

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Dolton Riverdale Park IHB Railroad

FUTURE LAND USE MAP Village Hall

Library

Village Boundary

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Village Boundary

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April 5, 2012

Mixed Use (Downtown) 0

Cottage Grove Avenue

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Irving Avenue

Countryside Healthcare

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Industrial/Utility

FUTURE LAND USE MAP

Sibley Boulevard Station

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142nd Street

Medium Density Residential 144th Street High Density Residential

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750 1,500

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013

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Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

Low Density Residential The Low Density Residential land use category provides for low density residences at densities between 0 and 6.9 dwelling units per acre. This category is primarily designed to accommodate single family detached housing. A majority of Dolton’s existing residential uses were developed at this density. This land use category includes the following zoning districts: R-1, R-2, and R-3, all of which are one family dwelling districts. Medium Density Residential The Medium Density Residential land use category Identifies areas including both single family detached and attached homes at densities between 7.0 and 11.9 dwelling units per acre. Duplexes, townhomes, and similar housing products are anticipated in medium density residential areas. This land use category includes the following zoning districts: R-4 two-family dwelling district and R-5 three family dwelling district.

density residential areas and more intensive nonresidential areas, such as commercial or mixeduse. The R-6 multiple family dwelling district, is the only zoning district where this type of land use can occur. Mixed Use (Downtown) The Mixed Use land use category identifies areas with a mix of residential, commercial and municipal use, mostly located in the historic downtown area of the Village. This area should be an identifiable area to both residents and visitors, and create a “sense of place� for the Village. Future potential for Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is anticipated in this area when Metra Southeast service becomes available. The only existing mixed-use development is located downtown.

High Density Residential The High Density Residential land use category is intended to include all forms of multiple family or attached housing, such as condominiums and apartments, with densities greater than 12 dwelling units per acre. This land use category may also act as a transition between lower

The majority of neighborhoods in Dolton are low density residential.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

Mixed use development is currently allowed in the following zoning districts where residential units are allowed above first floor retail businesses: B-2A restricted retail business district, B-3 general business district, and B-4 business services and wholesale district.

Sibley Boulevard corridor serves as Dolton’s main commercial center.

Institutional/Public Facilities The Institutional/Public Facilities land use category encompasses those lands owned and operated by federal, state, or local governments as well as public and private educational facilities. These uses include schools and associated school grounds, municipal buildings, post offices, churches, and other similar government-owned land and facilities. These land uses are allowed in all zoning districts with one exception that churches are not allowed in any manufacturing district.

This land use category includes all zoning districts listed in Chapter 6 of the zoning ordinance including: B-1 planned business center district, B-2 limited retail business district, B-2A restricted retail business district, B-3 general business district, and B-4 business services and wholesale district.

Commercial

Industrial

The Commercial land use category is intended to provide for retail, office and service-related facilities. These areas are primarily located along major roadways to provide convenient access and visibility. Given access and proximity to I-94, the Sibley Boulevard Corridor will continue to be Dolton’s primary commercial corridor. While this corridor is mostly developed, there are opportunities to add new infill developments and redevelop underutilized or vacant sites to continue to expand Dolton’s commercial base.

The Industrial land use category includes areas where manufacturing, research facilities, production plants, warehousing, and wholesale businesses are appropriate. This land use is permitted in all manufacturing districts listed in Chapter 7 of the zoning ordinance including: M-1 limited manufacturing district and M-2 general manufacturing district.

Dolton has several large industrial areas located within the Village.

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Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

Parks/Open Space The Parks/Open Space land use category includes land used for parks and forest preserves, along with other areas owned by public agencies, that are intended for recreational and/or conservation purposes. The overall intent is for permanent public and private parks and recreational facilities to be used for active and passive recreational and educational purposes. Parks and open space areas are permitted in all residential and manufacturing zoning districts.

Future Land Use vs. Zoning It is important to note that the Future Land Use Plan is not a zoning map. Zoning regulates specific aspects of development, such as yard dimensions and building height, in addition to the location of certain types of land uses within districts. Thus, zoning is a very useful tool for protecting the enjoyment of property and community character, even if the zoning map does not exactly agree with the land use map. On the other hand, the Future Land Use Map is intended to guide where certain types of development are to be located and is not intended to restrict the use of land. A land use map indicates, in a general manner, the location of current and future uses of land for various types of development. It is meant to be a guide for establishing more finelytuned regulations such as zoning and to guide decision making which may involve public or private investment in property development.

Residential Density The Residential land use categories cover a broad range of housing densities. In order to provide an understanding of the desired densities described in the Future Land Use Map, the following information provides examples of existing residential neighborhoods within Dolton that demonstrate these different housing densities. Each area is described using both the housing density and zoning code designation. A location for each of these neighborhoods is shown in Figure 3.2. R-1 One-Family Dwelling District (Low Density Residential) The R-1, Single Family Residential zoning district is demonstrated by the block located west of Indiana Avenue, bound by 146th and 147th Streets, Dearborn and Clark Streets. The minimum lot size in the R-1 District is 10,000 square feet. In the selected area, this is also the average lot size, which translates to roughly 3.3 single-family dwelling units per acre (including right-of-way). R-1 Single Family Neighborhood

The degree to which a zoning map will conform to a land use map depends on two factors: (1) how finely-tuned the land use map is in terms of dividing land uses into those which conform to districts, and (2) how often the zoning map is amended. Typically, a land use map is changed much less frequently than a zoning map because it is intended to encompass a longer time frame, embody a broad community vision, and provide a more general guide to development. 4-5

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

R-2 One-Family Dwelling District (Low Density Residential) The R-2, Single Family Residential zoning district is demonstrated by the neighborhood bounded by 153rd and 152nd Streets, and Donte and Dorchester Avenues (just south of Diekman Elementary School). The minimum lot size in the R-2 District is 6,000 square feet. However, the average lot size in the sample area averages to 5,113 square feet. This seeming inconsistency was likely due to the minimum lot size standard being established after the area was developed, resulting in a legal non-conforming status for these lots. The built density of this area is approximately 6.4 dwelling units per acre. However, given the minimum lot size requirement of the zoning district the expected density would be closer to 5.0 units per acre. R-2 Single Family Neighborhood

R-3 Single Family Neighborhood

R-3 One-Family Dwelling District (Low Density Residential) The R-3, Single Family Residential zoning district is demonstrated in the lots located south of Village Hall, bounded by Jackson, Adams, and Jefferson Streets and Park Avenue. This block has an average lot size of 5,287 square feet., which translates to roughly 5.6 single-family dwelling units per acre (including right-of-way). The minimum lot size in the R-3 zoning district is 4,800 square feet. R-4 Two-Family Dwelling District (Medium Density Residential) The R-4, Two-Family Residential zoning district is demonstrated in the block located east of Greenwood Road between 151st and 152nd Streets and University and Woodlawn Avenues. This block has an average lot size of 5,258 square feet., which translates to roughly 11.2 two-family dwelling units per acre (including right-of-way).

R-4 Multiple Family Neighborhood

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 4 | Future Land Use

FIGURE 3.2:

Example Residential Housing Densities 1 R-1 Single Family (Low Density Residential)

3.3 units per acre 142nd Street

3

2 R-2 Single Family (Low Density Residential)

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6.4 units per acre

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Sibley Boulevard

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5.6 units per acre

4 R-4 Single Family (Medium Density Residential)

11.2 units per acre

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

Chapter 5

Housing Plan The strength of a community like Dolton is directly attributable to the quality of the housing stock and the stability of long-standing neighborhoods. While the affordability and quality of the single-family housing stock and established neighborhoods are identified strengths, the Village currently faces two major issues related to the housing stock: 1. Property maintenance and upkeep of the housing stock 2. Lack of housing options appealing to “emptynesters� seeking high quality living without the maintenance requirements of traditional homes Maintaining a quality housing stock is essential for the Village. Much of the Village housing stock is 40 years or older, with little new housing development. Many of the 40+ year old homes require significant and subsequent ongoing maintenance. Property maintenance is a multifaceted issue relating to Village code enforcement,

financial capability, general economic conditions, local attitudes regarding homeownership, neighborhood, and community. The second issue the Village must address is the lack of housing diversity, particularly the limitation of housing options for young professionals, empty nesters, and older families, many of which are most attracted to condominium and townhouse housing. In order to address the lack of housing diversity, the Village should assert more influence over the amount and type of housing that is attracted to and developed in Dolton by removing barriers and providing the appropriate zoning and other incentives. As a built-out community with only 1,151.4 acres of land dedicated to residential development, Dolton is limited in development of new land that would allow denser housing. As such, the Village should find creative ways to ensure high quality, higher density housing by encouraging

Dolton’s housing stock is primaily older single-family homes. Increasing the diversity of housing options in the Village could help attract new residents.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

the redevelopment of lower quality existing multifamily, and new development within the Village Center. High quality, high density projects are also dependant upon establishing standards that address design, materials and function of multifamily housing through the adoption of Design Guidelines. The purpose of the Housing Plan is to provide an approach to address key housing issues and opportunities, including diversifying the Village’s housing stock, and requiring adequate property maintenance. Enhancing the diversity and quality of Dolton’s housing stock will insure that the Village remains a desirable place to live by providing different housing types to meet varying budgets and life-cycle situations, including new families and an aging population. These steps are aimed at improving the community’s overall quality of life and strengthening Dolton’s ability to be economically strong in an every increasing competitive region.

Vision Dolton will develop strong neighborhoods that provide a safe and well-maintained ambiance.

Goals and Objectives Goal 1: Enhance the diversity of

housing options to meet varying income levels, ages, and desires. Dolton is a diverse community with diverse housing needs that requires a diverse housing stock. Although reinvestment in the existing housing stock is essential, there is also a significant need to increase housing options. With the thousands of people that pass through the Village to reach their place of employment everyday, Dolton is well positioned to capture new residents, particularly in the age of increasing gas prices and congestion on area roads, by providing new and innovative housing styles. Objectives: »» Encourage the development of more senior housing in the Village, and in proximity to business districts where there is more convenient access to shopping, services, and transportation. Provide the necessary zoning to allow a mix of residential unit types.

Additional senior living facilities could help to provide a mix of housing options for Dolton’s older residents. The Village-owned Dorchester Senior Living Facility is pictured above.

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Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

»» Encourage infill residential development on vacant properties and redevelopment of under-utilized or run-down properties in order to revitalize neighborhoods and commercial areas by integrating new housing and to encourage development that will diversify both the housing stock and enhance property values. Redevelopment of run down and under-utilized properties will help to enhance property values.

»» Encourage the development of housing options in the higher price ranges appealing to those seeking higher quality homes with more amenities in order to provide housing opportunities for all Dolton residents. »» Require quality multi-family residential products through the adoption of Design Guidelines. »» Develop new 3 to 5 story multi-family units, possibly with ground floor commercial use, along Chicago Avenue with views to Lake Victory.

Goal 2: Encourage the conservation

and enhancement of the Village’s established residential neighborhoods. »» Promote residential densification, particularly in and contiguous to business districts where there is more convenient access to shopping, services, and transportation. »» Encourage higher density, mixed-use, residential developments, such as townhomes, apartment and condos, around the Village’s Proposed Metra station and emerging Village Center, and as a component to underperforming commercial areas.

As the Village’s present housing stock continues to age, the community’s physical appearance alters accordingly. With appropriate property maintenance, aging structures can again contribute to attractive and stable neighborhoods. However, neglected or sub-standard property maintenance can have an adverse impact of the community’s physical appearance and quality of life. Thus it is imperative that the Village encourage and require reinvestment in neighborhoods. This includes requiring property maintenance as an expectation of individual property owners and a goal of the community. Objectives: »» Promote housing reinvestment in established neighborhoods and eliminate substandard housing.

The Village should encourage the development of higher density housing units near the downtown and commercial areas.

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»» Promote neighborhood development that encourage pedestrian, bicycle, and nonvehicular travel within and to adjacent neighborhoods. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

Streetscape character and design could be enhanced by creation of design guidelines addressing landscaping and creative architecture and integrating the Village’s transportation network (bike, pedestrian, etc.) into residential neighborhoods, especially near public parks and higher density housing complexes.

»» Create Village programs or promote Federal, State, and County loan or grant programs that help low and moderate income homeowners fund needed improvements. Such program can include low interest loans, home improvement grants, access and disability grants, lead paint abatement programs, weatherization programs, and energy efficiency upgrade programs.

»» Promote schools, parks, and other amenities as central elements where opportunities or needs exist in every neighborhood.

»» Encourage the formation of neighborhood organizations to monitor quality-of-life issues and to establish regular communications with the Village. Establish strong relationships with home owners associations and property management companies.

»» Utilize the existing Code and Code Enforcement Officers to require the maintenance and upkeep of structures and properties. Create public education pamphlets to encourage property maintenance.

»» Integrate the Village’s transportation network (bus, pedestrian, bicycle, automobile, greenways) into neighborhood design that minimizes traffic impacts on a neighborhood by allowing alternative modes of transportation. »» Improve public safety in order to encourage reinvestment in neighborhoods. 5-4

»» Ensure that new housing construction is compatible with the pattern of the surrounding neighborhood context. »» Preserve mature trees and landscaping.

»» Conduct periodic neighborhood inspections to identify property maintenance issues. »» Create recognition program to highlight wellmaintained properties. Recognition programs should highlight all types of development including single-family, multi-family, institutional and commercial.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

Implementation Strategies Strategy 1 Involve all appropriate Village departments and programs in the housing planning process to ensure a coordinated planning and implementation effort. Strategy 2 Partner with the Housing Authority of Cook County (HACC), Cook County Bureau of Economic Development, Cook County Tax Reactivitation Program (CCTRP), and the South Suburban Mayors’ and Managers’ Association (SSMMA) to evaluate options available to deal with and prevent blighted properties. (Many of these partnerships opportunities are highlighted in the Implementation Chapter.) Strategy 3 Develop policies to limit rezoning and special use permits for conversion of single family homes. Such policies should contain criteria regarding the locations and neighborhoods and building conditions that warrant permission of conversion.

Consider corner bump-outs at key intersections to slow traffic and enhance pedestrian safety within neighborhoods

Strategy 4 Train Village staff to be vigilant in the approval of kitchen and bath additions that might lead to apartment conversions and to obtain affidavits from homeowners making such additions as to their intentions. Strategy 5 Develop creative incentives for the development of new residential neighborhoods that contain a mix of housing types. Strategy 6 Implement a rental housing registration and/or inspection program to ensure compliance with the Building Code and promote safe, decent and sanitary housing.

Consider enhanced colored pedestrian crossings, particularly near neighborhood schools

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Strategy 7 Include in the Village’s codes and manuals design provisions and performance standards improvements in the design quality of all residential development. Such provisions and standards may address:

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 5 | Housing Plan

• Building setback and orientation standards that enhance social interaction. • Street system design that promotes connectivity and addresses traffic calming measures to reduce speeding. • Requirements for sidewalks and trails that facilitate and encourage walking and bicycle use. • Streetscape planting requirements. • Standards for the placement of parking areas and garages to avoid streetscapes dominated by parking lots and garage doors. Strategy 8 Require applicants for rezoning and special use permits to prepare and submit with their applications an impact analysis addressing such issues as: projected increase in population and demand for school facilities and other public

facilities, impacts on vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle traffic and circulation, water and sewer service needs, storm water run-off quantity and quality impacts, visual impacts, impacts to historic and environmental resources, etc. The analysis should address proposed measures to mitigate impacts of the above. The level of analysis required should reflect the size and potential impact of the project. Strategy 9 Require, permit and/or provide incentives for “open space” or “cluster” development to preserve green space within new subdivisions. Strategy 10 Implement a rental housing inspection and/or registration program to ensure that such housing is decent as well as affordable and to enforce occupancy restrictions and maintain records on approved rental units.

By taking these goals and strategies into consideration, Dolton can create a strong system of neighborhoods that create a safe and well-maintained atmosphere for residents.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Chapter 6

Transportation Exisiting Transportation The Village of Dolton is situated in a highly advantageous position, with direct access to I-94 (The Bishop Ford Freeway), close proximity to I-80 and directly adjacent to the City of Chicago. This position provides Dolton with the opportunity to attract new residents and businesses that seek a small town atmosphere with direct links to the big city. Dolton’s location along the southern border of Chicago, together with its proximity to multiple transportation networks, provides the Village with good connectivity and economic growth potential.

Road Network

These two major highways serve as the regional connections for Dolton while the remaining street system consists primarily of a traditional grid system. Major north/south thoroughfares include Indiana Avenue, Chicago Road, and Cottage Grove Avenue and major east/west thoroughfares include 135th Street, 142nd Street, 144th Street, Sibley Boulevard, 154th Street and 159th Street. Lincoln Avenue and Greenwood Avenue bisect the Village diagonally running northwest to southeast. The majority of these roads extend beyond the borders of Dolton into the neighboring Villages, offering connectivity among the south suburbs.

The Bishop Ford Freeway/I-94 is situated along Dolton’s eastern border with interchanges along Sibley Boulevard and Dolton Avenue. In addition to this major highway connection, access to I-80 is approximately four miles to the south. Sibley Boulevard is Dolton’s only major arterial road and is predominantly comprised of retail businesses.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Railroad Network Dolton’s transportation system features a number of railroad lines that run throughout the northern and eastern portions of the Village. Due to Dolton’s proximity to the City of Chicago, the Village was an attractive location for many railroad companies who began developing in the mid1800s. As the Village grew, additional railroad companies continued to build railroad tracks and facilities within Dolton, the largest of which is the Union Pacific (UP) Intermodal Facility located along Indiana Avenue. This facility, shown in Figure 6.1, includes several railroad tracks as well as areas for truck traffic in order to allow for easy transfer of both domestic and international freight.

Dolton has only one grade separation between automobile and train traffic, located along Sibley Boulevard, but many of the tracks remain at the street level causing delays and safety concerns for automobile traffic. The high amount of train traffic and lack of grade separations within Dolton is a significant transportation issues and will be addressed in the Future Transportation Plan.

FIGURE 6.1:

Railroad Network

Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

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Riverdale Station

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The Metra Electric District Line, currently the closest Metra line for Dolton residents, runs along the Canada National Railroad tracks, located to the west of Dolton. A new Metra line, which will run through Dolton along the Union Pacific Railroad line, is being proposed for future years.

PHOENIXDolton Boundary

Roads

SOUTH HOLLAND

Metra Station 0

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750 1,500

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Road Improvements To ensure safe and efficient travel, roads must be well maintained and improved as repairs and renovations are needed. Currently, the majority of Dolton’s streets are well-maintained and provide safe and efficient travel for automobiles. Several streets are identified in the Infrastructure Improvement Plan for anticipated street improvements, but these are limited to minor collector roads and residential streets. Within Dolton’s commercial districts, many of the streets are marked with basic pedestrian crosswalks, thereby offering a degree of safety for pedestrians. However, this system of crosswalks could be improved and expanded in order to promote more walkability among Dolton’s commercial and residential districts and assist in the implementation of complete streets initiatives throughout the Village. The largest transportation issue within the Village of Dolton, however, is the volume of train traffic that causes backups in the automobile and pedestrian traffic due to the lack of grade separations. In order to deal with this issue, the Village should evaluate these key intersections, many of which are located in and around the downtown areas, by performing

grade separation studies. The potential study areas are identified in the Infrastructure Improvement Plan in Figure 6.2. These studies could help to inform decision-making for allocation of Capital Improvement funds in future years.

Public Transportation Due to its close proximity to Chicago, Dolton has access to a number of public transportation options including the Pace bus system and Metra train system. These transportation systems offer residents and visitors a range of alternative options for traveling in and around Dolton. Train (Metra) Dolton is currently served by the Metra Electric District (ME) line located along the western border of the Village as shown in Figure 6.2. The ME line runs from Downtown Chicago to University Park with three stops located directly outside Dolton’s western boundary at Sibley Boulevard, Ivanhoe station, and Riverdale station. The Rock Island District Line is also located in close proximity to the west of Dolton.

Crosswalks, such as those at the Sibley Boulevard/Greenwood Road intersection, could be enhanced in order to provide more safety and walkability for pedestrians.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

FIGURE 6.2:

Additionally, there is a new 33-mile Southeast Service (SES) Metra line proposed to run along existing freight and passenger railroad tracks, enhancing Metra’s commuter rail service between the south suburbs and downtown Chicago. The SES line would link close to 20 communities in south Suburban Cook and Will counties, providing new opportunities for travel to downtown Chicago and economic growth and development for the south suburbs. One of the proposed stops for this new line would be located in Dolton, close to downtown, near the intersection of 142nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue.

Commuter Rail Proposed

Metra SES Line

UP-W

Millenium Station La Salle St Station 290

F BNS

35th St LAKE MICHIGAN

34

HC

CHICAGO ME

55

Gresham 294

SW

12

S

94

115th St 43

41

SS

Riverdale Station

RI

912

DOLTON

Dolton

Ivanhoe Station 83 Sibley Boulevard

12 90

A new Metra stop in Dolton could promote economic growth and transit-oriented development in the nearby areas.

South Holland

6

80

ME

Thornton

94

1

Glenwood 394

57

41 30

Chicago Heights South Chicago Heights

30

Steger

University Park Station

Metra Electric District (ME) Line

Crete

Rock Island District (RI) Line 0

Connecting the south suburbs to the city of Chicago offers residents improved access to downtown jobs, schools, shopping, entertainment and other regional attractions. Dolton could capitalize on this opportunity through the expansion of business and real estate opportunities around the new Metra station, as developers look to take advantage of transit-oriented development and greater access to the region’s labor pool. The new Metra station will also provide local Dolton employers with new ways to get their employees to work.

6-4

1

Proposed Southeast (SES) Line 2

4

231

Balmoral Park

Miles

Pace Bus System Pace’s fixed-route bus service serves more than 220 communities around the Chicagoland area including the Village of Dolton. Currently, Dolton has three Pace bus routes that run through the Village - Routes 348, 353 and 350 - as shown in Figure 6.4. Route 348 (Harvey - Riverdale - Blue Island) Provides hourly service connecting Calumet Park, Riverdale, Dolton and Phoenix with Downtown Blue Island, South Suburban College and the Harvey Transportation Center. Route 353 (95th - River Oaks/ Homewood) connects the CTA Red Line Station at 95th Street with residential areas of Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

far southeast Chicago, Riverdale, Dolton, South Holland, Thornton, Homewood and Calumet City. This route serves Chicago State University, Roseland Hospital, State Street Metra Electric Station, Riverdale Bus Turnaround, Thornwood High School, Homewood Park-n-Ride and River Oaks Shopping Center. Route 350 (Sibley) Eastwest cross-town route serves commercial and residential areas operating between the Hammond Transit Center and Harvey Transportation Center. This route also serves the 147th Street Metra Station and Thornridge High School.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Paths Dolton currently has a limited pedestrian and bike trail system, with only one fitness trail located in Dolton Park. This 3,200 foot trail is in good condition and is extremely popular with residents, but does not connect to other trail systems in neighboring communities.

To expand the Village’s currently limited path system, the Dolton Park District adopted the Parks and Recreation Master Plan in 2012. This plan outlines a proposed system of community-wide trails that works to reduce roadway congestion by providing an alternative means of transportation and create additional opportunities for recreation. The proposed system includes trails, pedestrian bridges and bikes lanes on existing roads and will create links between the Village’s parks. This new path network will also provide regional linkages through connections with the existing paths in South Holland and the proposed Cal-Sag Trail, a trail which runs throughout Cook County and is anticipated for completion in 2014. Figure 6.3 shows the proposed path system within Dolton (outlined in more detail in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan) as well as the alignment for the proposed Cal-Sag Trail.

The fitness trail located in Dolton Park is Dolton’s only existing trail, but the Village is planning for future trail expansion.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation FIGURE 6.3:

Proposed Bike Plan Source: Dolton Parks and Recreation Master Plan 2012

Cal-Sag Trail

Source: Friends of the Cal-Sag Trail Website

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Future Transportation Plan The purpose of the Future Transportation Plan is to ensure that, as Dolton continues to develop, the transportation system will continue to meet the needs of the community, providing safe and efficient access and circulation throughout the Village and regionally outward. This will require the improvement of existing roadways and potential additions to the existing road network to further enhance access and mobility. In addition to continually improving the road network, the Village of Dolton would benefit from enhancements of other elements of the transportation system such improvement of railroad and traffic intersections.

Roadway Classification System The Master Transportation Plan shown in Figure 6.4 depicts the locations of all the classified streets throughout the Village. The following hierarchy of streets is based on the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) functional highway system in urban areas:

Major Arterial Many of the trips on a major arterial roads are trips that span an entire community and beyond to neighboring communities. However, they are meant to serve all types of trips. In many cases, properties fronting major arterials have limited access so as to not impede the traffic flow. Major arterials typically connect to other regional arterials and expressways to link cities and counties. Often under the jurisdiction of the State or County, these streets typically require a minimum of two lanes in each direction plus turn lances. Traffic volumes greater than 15,000 vehicles per day can be expected. Sibley Boulevard, which runs east to west through Dolton, serves as the only Major Arterial Road within the Village. This road serves as Dolton’s main commercial corridor and has an average daily traffic (ADT) count ranging from 30,000 to 37,000 along the corridor. Traffic along Sibley Boulevard can reach up to 37,000 ADT.

Interstate Expressway Typical uses are for regional and national trips. These routes are divided highways with no direct access to fronting properties. Direct access is limited to periodic interchanges. Interstate 94 is located along the eastern border of Dolton with direct access from Sibley Boulevard and Dolton Avenue. This road carries almost 147,000 vehicles per day.

Secondary Arterial Secondary arterial roads also serve all types of trips. The primary use for secondary arterials are trips within the community, although they can also service trips to and from neighboring

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

communities. This street type is not meant to carry a significant amount of regional trips, however, they do often connect major arterials. The main purpose of the secondary arterial is to provide efficient traffic flow and increase the traffic capacity of the community. These roads also service adjacent land-uses with more access points than a major arterial. Secondary arterials do not normally penetrate residential neighborhoods. The majority of these streets are under the jurisdiction of the County or Village and typically carry fewer than 15,000 vehicles per day. Dolton has four secondary arterial roads including two north/south roads (Indiana Avenue and Chicago Road), one east/west road (142nd/ Dolton Avenue), and one northwest/southeast road (Lincoln Avenue). The majority of remaining retail within Dolton (those businesses not located along Sibley Boulevard) are located along these roads. Two of the roads, Chicago Road and Lincoln Avenue, provide direct access into Dolton’s downtown area, which could be used as an advantage in redevelopment and attracting new customers downtown. In addition, each of these roads connect to neighboring communities, creating links with the surrounding Villages and increasing the potential to attract new customers. Within Dolton, these secondary arterial roads carry around 7,000 vehicles per day but have traffic counts reaching up to 12,700 ADT in neighboring communities.

not carry many regional trips. Access points to residential, commercial, and industrial areas are found on these streets. Traffic volumes can vary depending on the community and continuity of the street. In the Village of Dolton, most of these streets are under jurisdiction of the Village and carry between 2,000 and 10,000 vehicles per day. Minor Collector Also known as neighborhood collector, these streets typically are meant to serve only vehicletrips generated to and from residential subdivisions, business developments, or industrial parks in the community. Minor collectors fuse traffic to the major collectors and eventually arterials. They are not meant as through streets and normally are no longer than one mile. Minor collectors are under Village jurisdiction and typically carry less than 2,000 vehicles per day. Residential Streets in the Village are considered as residential unless designated as arterials or collectors. These streets are only meant to connect residences within a neighborhood to collector roadways. The majority of roads within Dolton are categorized as residential and provide access from neighborhoods to collector roadways.

Major Collector The primary use for major collector roads are trips within the community similar to the secondary arterial, but typically do not provide the connectivity to neighboring communities. The major collector provides connections between arterials but should

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation Riverdale Station

FIGURE 6.4: Village of Dolton, Illinois

138TH ST

53

FAU 1597

Master Plan Master Transportation Transportation Plan

Chicago

1900

58

Minor Collector

PACE Bus Route Dolton Village Limits

Route MetraState Station Highway TrafficCounty Signal 9200

Water Bodies

Traffic Counts

Railroad

State Route

Major Collector

PACE Bus Route

County Highway

Minor Collector

Dolton Village Limits

9200

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158TH ST

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6-9

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CHICAGO RD

7700

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Secondary Arterial

58

8200

South Holland

LIN CO LN FA

CLYDE AVE

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD

PARK AVE

Major Arterial

FAP 397

154TH ST FAU 1607

Class II Truck Route

00 24

Railroad Interstate Expressway

Major Collector

AV E

SIBLEY BLVD

RD

Secondary Arterial

Water Bodies

LEGEND Interstate

35 93

Calumet City

83

D OO NW

Traffic Signal

83

FAP 397

EE GR

Metra Station

Major Arterial

LI NC FA OL U N

94

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R

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37000

83

00

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12700

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6

SH EP A R D 60

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83

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LA SALLE ST

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1900

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DORCHESTER AVE

138TH ST

llage of Dolton, Illinois

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a lu m et

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013

A


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Roadway Improvements The Infrastructure Improvement Plan shown in Figure 6.5 shows the locations of proposed transportation improvements within Dolton. These improvements are categorized by roadway improvements, grade separation studies, and interchange improvements and can be seen in the list below. Due to the high volume of train traffic within Dolton, especially near the downtown area, the most significant improvement that could be made to the transportation system would be to create grade separations between train and automobile traffic, thereby eliminating the delays and risks associated with the trains. Additionally, interchange improvements would mitigate the backup issues that occur along Sibley Boulevard and the I-94 exit ramp due to the proximity of traffic signals to the I-94 interchange.

The improvements illustrated on the Infrastructure Improvements Plan are a current assessment of the Village’s present transportation needs and issues. As a result, the map should be viewed as a document that maintains flexibility in order to integrate future transportation improvements. This map should be updated as new issues and needs arise. The recommendations shown in the Infrastructure Improvement Plan can be used to make recommendations for future funding and allocation of funding for Capital Improvement projects. The Village should provide opportunities for periodic reviews of the Infrastructure Improvement Plan to suggest additions or revision, monitor new issues and needs, and assess the availability of resources.

Potential Roadway Improvements Street Improvements: 1. Ellis Avenue 2. Dorchester Avenue 3. Woodlawn Avenue 4. Wabash Avenue 5. Michigan Avenue 6. Edbrooke Avenue Grade Separation Studies: 7. Indiana Avenue/CSX & IHB Railroad 8. Lincoln Avenue/Union Pacific Railroad 9. 144th Street/Union Pacific Railroad 10. 142nd Street/Union Pacific Railroad 11. Lincoln Avenue/CSX & IHB Railroad 12. Cottage Grove Avenue/CSX & IHB Railroad Interchange Improvements: 13. Reconfigure Interchange/I-94 off-ramp on Sibley Boulevard to enhance traffic flow and safety 14. Work with IDOT on conversion to a full interchange on Dolton Avenue/142nd Street 6-10

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

FIGURE 6.5:

ectr ic

Dist

rict

Proposed Metra SES Station

Proposed Metra SES Station

Union Pacific (UP) Railroad

Union Pacific (UP) Railroad

Met

ra E l

Dist ectr ic ra E l Met

OCT and IHB Railroad OCT and IHB Railroad

rict

Line

Line

Infrastructure Improvement Plan

Future Southeast (SES) Metra Line (SES) Metra Line Future Southeast Existing Metra Station Existing Metra Station

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 6 | Transportation

Complete Streets Streets have traditionally been designed to accommodate cars and trucks, with little attention to other forms of transportation. However, a new concept coined “Complete Streets” is gaining popularity throughout the country. In fact, Cook County and neighboring communities such as Blue Island and Tinley Park have recently adopted Complete Street policies. What are Complete Streets? According to the National Complete Streets Coalition (www. completestreets.org) , “Complete Streets are streets for everyone. They are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities must be able to safely move along and across a complete street. Complete Streets make it easy to cross the street, walk to shops, and bicycle to work. They allow buses to run on time and make it safe for people to walk to and from train stations.”

6-12

Complete Street principals should be used in the design of future roadway improvements in Dolton, particularly along Sibley Boulevard and within downtown. It is recommended that Dolton adopt a Complete Streets policy that documents the Village’s intent to consider all forms of transportation when making improvements within existing and future road rights-of-way.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 7 | Community Facilities

Chapter 7

Community Facilities Community facilities are generally comprised of services, resources, and institutions that meet the civic, cultural, social, recreational, educational, and spiritual needs of the community. Dolton’s system of community facilities includes municipal services, public safety, schools, library, and parks and recreation.

Park Plaza located across the street from the Village Hall

Schools The Village of Dolton is served by nine (9) public schools, with six (6) elementary schools, two (2) junior high schools, and one high school. These schools are located within two elementary school districts including Dolton-Riverdale School District #148, Dolton School District #149. There is only one High School District, Thornton Township High School District #250, which covers the entire Village of Dolton.

Franklin Elementary School

7-1

In addition to these schools, Dolton also has one University, Trinity International University, and one alternative High School, Pace Alternative High School. The location for each school, as well as the school district boundaries within the Village, is shown in Figure 2.9. South Suburban College is located just south of Dolton on Indiana Avenue in neighboring South Holland.

Lincoln Junior High

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


ad ailro

dian Nat iona lR

Chapter 7 | Community Facilities

Cottage Gr

Elementary & Junior High

Harriot Tubman School

Pace Alternative High School

FIGURE 2.9:

Can a

Dolton Schools

142nd Stre

Li

nc ol

n

CHICAGO

Av en

ue

Chicago Road

Cottage Grove Avenue Li

nc ol

n

Av en

ue

Dorchester Avenue

142nd Street Woodlawn Avenue

UP Railroad

Indiana Avenue

iona l Ra ilroa d Nat ian

ad

Trinity International

University Elementary

Ro

Pace Alternative High School

Can ad

148 Franklin

d

Lincoln Elementary & Junior High

oo nw

Roosevelt Harriot Elementary Tubman & Junior HighSchool

ee Gr

RIVERDALE

School District

IHB Railroad

Sibley B

Chicago Road

ad

UP Railroad

Franklin Elementary

Ro

Indiana Avenue

d

oo nw

ee Gr

HARVEY

Roosevelt Elementary & Junior High

Diekman Elementary Sibley Boulevard

Thornridge High School

BergerVandenberg Elementary

HARVEY

School Distric

Thornridge High School

LEGEND

Schools

Schools

CALUMET CITY

School District

SOUTH HOLLAND

149

SOUTH HOLLAND

149

School District 148

School District 148 School District 149

School District 149 Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Elementary Schools »» Berger-Vandenberg Elementary School »» Diekman Elementary School »» Franklin Elementary School »» Lincoln Elementary School »» Harriet Tubman Elementary School »» Roosevelt Elementary School

»» Roosevelt Junior High School High Schools »» Thornridge High School »» Pace Alternative High School Colleges and Universities »» Trinity International University »» South Suburban College (in South Holland)

Junior High Schools »» Lincoln Junior High School 7-2

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 7 | Community Facilities

Municipal Facilities Village Hall Located downtown at 14014 Park Avenue in the northwest area of Dolton, this 138 year-old building houses many local municipal services, including the Mayor and Village Board offices, the Village Clerk, Housing Department, Building Department and Economic Development Department. The Village Hall building originally served as the Park Avenue School, but was replaced by Lincoln School in 1911 due to the noise from the nearby trains. This facility is currently in need of major remodeling.

The Library building is located at 14037 Lincoln Avenue in the downtown area of Dolton and operated by the independent Dolton Public Library District. The Library works on many programs throughout the year, and provides many computer stations and free Wi-Fi. The District is currently working on a Master Plan to evaluate future improvements. Dolton Public Library

Village Hall

Police Station

Dolton Public Library The Dolton Public Library was originally established in 1953 on the second floor of the Village Hall. As local groups continued to advocate for the continued growth of the library, it eventually grew to need a new building. The new library was built in 1966 on the site of the old Dolton House that was razed in 1965. A 16,000 foot addition was made to the library in 1975 and an additional modernization and remodeling was completed in 1991.

7-3

The Village of Dolton Police station, is located at 14030 Park Avenue, south of the Village Hall and next door to the Fire station in Downtown Dolton. The department is responsible for the safety of Village residents and law enforcement through the community.

The Dolton Police Station is housed inside the Patterson Police Station in Downtown Dolton. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 7 | Community Facilities

Fire and Emergency Rescue

Public Works Building

The Fire Department provides fire fighting, fire prevention and paramedic medical service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It is a full-time department housed in the firehouse at 14022 Park, directly south of Village Hall, and at 830 Engle Place, located southeast of Dolton Park.

The Public Works building is located north of the Union Pacific Intermodal Yard at 401 E. 144th St., Dolton, IL. This department manages the water and sewer system for the Village of Dolton, as well managing road construction and repairs.

The Fire Station is located in Downtown Dolton between the Village Hall and Police Station.

7-4

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 7 | Community Facilities

Parks and Open Space The Village of Dolton provides residents with a diverse set of parks and recreational facilities, which are managed by the Village’s Parks and Recreation Department. The Village contains eleven (10) parks, providing residents with approximately 79.1 acres of recreational open space. Currently, the park district offers a variety of amenities throughout the park system as shown in Figure 2.10. In May 2012, the Dolton Park District completed a Park and Recreation Plan that created an outline for the future growth of the parks system and related programming that will work to enhance and expand these existing amenities.

use park), and one (1) Tot Lot park. Figure 2.11 displays the park locations within Dolton as well as the park boundaries for the Village of Dolton and the Dolton Park District.

Playground and tennis courts at Triangle Park.

The ten parks are dispersed throughout Dolton and include one (1) community parks, eight (8) neighborhood parks (one is also a special

FIGURE 2.10:

7-5

x

x x

Bathrooms

Driving Range

Batting Cagees

Soccer

Basketball

x

Parking

x

Volleyball

x

Concession

x

x

Swings

1.0

x

x x

x x x

Trails

Willowgreen

x x x

x x x x x x

Fountain

x x

Pavilion

x

Field House

Baseball

23.7 6.5 8.9 5.1 11.9 8.0 1.7 7.1 5.2

Tennis

Football

Dolton Blackstone Kandy Kane Meadowlane Riverfront Riverdale Sunshine Town and Country Triangle

Playground

Park Name

Area (Acres)

Parks Facilities

x

x

x x x x x x x x

x

x x x x x

x x

x

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 7 | Community Facilities FIGURE 2.11:

Existing Parks in Dolton

CHICAGO

87

7 6

Ind

ian

IHB Railroad

Cottage Grove Avenue

co l

n

22

Av

en

d Ro ad

Chicago Road

Lin

oo nw

Union Pacific Railroad

33

11

arb

or

Be

lt R

ail

roa

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5

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98

Indiana Avenue

142nd Street

aH

Woodlawn Avenue

RIVERDALE

ue

CALUMET CITY

4 4

Sibley Boulevard

10 11 9 10

HARVEY

5 6 LEGEND Neighborhood Park 2 Blackstone 4 Meadowlane 5 Riverfront 6 Dolton-Riverdale 7 Sunshine 8 Town and Country 9 Triangle 10 Willowgreen

7-6

Community Park 1 Dolton

Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Special Use Park 7 Dolton-Riverdale

Tot Lot Park 3

Kandy Kane

Park District Boundary Dolton Corporate Boundary

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Chapter 8

Economic Development Strategy

Given Dolton’s excellent regional location within the Chicago metropolitan area, the Village has significant opportunities to maintain and enhance the existing business and employment base. From an industrial perspective, the many rail lines that cross through Dolton are a major asset. In addition, burbs, is the leading project of a national demonstration there are a variety of outstanding regional initiatives argo-Oriented Developments (COD). In a COD, industrial will support and enhance the ability of of freightwhich transportation, complementary businesses, Dolton to achieve success. The four economic ut millions of unneeded truck miles from freight routes, areas that“green” Doltonthe can pursue in the over thedevelopment country, and effectively nation’s foreseeable future are as follows: able land located near intermodal terminals, rail lines,

of manufacturers in LPC are eager to expand operations, »» Intermodal and Cargo Oriented ency locomotives and low-emission freight yard Development

»» Retail Development, primarily on Sibley Boulevard »» Green Manufacturing and its economic development arm, the Chicago ating the LPC project in cooperation with a network »» Transit Oriented Development in Downtown This multifaceted development team is seeking private Dolton (when commuter service is provided nefits of a cutting-edge public-private partnership. along the Metra Southeast service line)

nufacturing, Environment) Zone strategy for the burbs.

8-1 1

Industrial The South Suburban mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA) and the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation (CSEDC) have two active programs in which Dolton plays a key role: the Chicago Southland’s Green Time Zone (see Figure 8.1 on following page) and the Logistics Park Calumet. These documents discuss in detail the regional approach to Intermodal and Cargo Oriented Development, Green Manufacturing, and Transit Oriented Development. The most significant opportunity for Dolton involves the Union Pacific Yard Intermodal expansion potential; sites at 394 and the river in northeast Dolton; east from Cottage Grove along the river near Needles Park; and other Village land to the west along the river (15 acres); and ongoing support of the marina and the existing industrial uses. In addition to the UP site, all of these other sites show potential for green manufacturing and/ or cargo oriented development as outlined in the Green Time Zone document.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Locat Chica Mayor (SSMM agenc assist 42 mu popul and W

The C Devel (CSED develo CSEDC oppor resou for th marke sector

Acknowledgements

Source: South Suburban Mayors & Managers Association (SMMA)

In presenting this introduction to Logistics Park Calumet CSEDC and CNT gratefully acknowledge the institutions and organizations whose contributions have helped to launch this initiative, including: Chicago Metropolitan Agency for CSEDC is currently working on multiple » The location of a local Customs Inspection Planning • Cook County Department of Planning and Development • »Delta Institute • Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley implementation to support regional office the region Foundation • Grand initiatives Victoria Foundation • Illinois Department of Commerce andin Economic Opportunity • Illinois development, including: • Illinois Environmental Protection Agency »» The creation of a Foreign Trade Zone Department of Transportation • Illinois Institute of Technology • Member » » The creation of an Intermodal Connector municipalities of the South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association • Metropolitan Planning Council • Union Pacific »» A Brownfield Assessment and Site IdentifiPlan (roads for trucking) Foundation • United States Environmental Protection Agency

cation Study grant for the region including

»» Federal housing funds to acquire and re-

Contact: Reggie Greenwood • SSMMA Director of Economic Development Dolton hab residential property (708) 922-4671 • reggie.greenwood@ssmma.org

»» A Logistics Park Calumet Study to create a strategic plan for the region »» A potential “First Suburban Shovel Ready Fund” to assist in acquiring and assembling sites »» A Calumet Manufacturing Wind, Auto and Rail Research Center

8-2 2

»» Recovery Zone bonding

In addition to opportunities within the UP Intermodal Yard, many of Dolton’s future industrial opportunities lie in the northern part of the community, along the Calumet River and 142nd Street. The following chapter on the Northern Industrial Corridor highlights many of these opportunities.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013

The Ce Techno profit of nati sustain is supp LPC th assess


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Retail In addition to these primarily industrial activities, there are further opportunities to develop retail, primarily on Sibley and in a small way in the downtown as the Metra station is developed. Highlights of the retail market assessment include:

»» Growth in sales tax due to new retail development along Sibley Boulevard »» A high percentage of $75,000+ households as a percentage of total Dolton households »» Evidence of regional drawing of customers (beyond Dolton residents) with opportunities to grow further »» Acceptable median and mean household incomes »» Excellent traffic counts on Sibley Boulevard »» Very high 10 minute drive time employment counts »» Owner occupancy at 75%+ The positioning to pursue opportunities at multiple levels in Dolton is outstanding. Chapters on the Sibley Boulevard Corridor (Chapter 10) and Downtown (Chapter 11) provide more detail into specific strategies to focus Dolton’s efforts to attract and retain quality restaurants and retail businesses to the community.

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High traffic counts on Sibley Boulevard will help to leverage retail opportunities.

Walgreens located on Sibley Boulevard, draws customers to the area and helps heighten surrounding retail sales.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Comparison Communities As part of the market study for Dolton’s Comprehensive Plan, five comparison communities were identified for assessment. These comparison communities included Blue Island, Country Club Hills, Homewood, Lansing, and South Holland. The following describes the comparison community examination process and results.

Methodology The consultant team and Dolton staff jointly identified the five comparison communities for assessment. Community demographics, existing retail clusters, their history and locations, and business recruitment potential were the basis for determining Dolton’s comparison communities. The primary focus for Dolton’s comparison community analysis was an understanding of those retail market attributes and business categories that could assist Dolton’s efforts to revitalize its commercial, specifically retail, corridors. Once the comparison communities were determined, the geographical center of each community’s downtown was used as a center point. The center points are: • Blue Island (High Street and Western Avenue) • Country Club Hills (Village Hall on 183rd Street) • Homewood (Ridge Road and Dixie Highway) • Lansing (Oakley Avenue and RidgeRoad) • South Holland (162nd Street and Park Avenue) 8-4 4

Using these downtown center points, demographic data for a pedestrian market (.5 miles) and a convenience drive time market (5 minutes) were reviewed and compared with the same markets for downtown Dolton. After considering the demographics of each community, their traditional downtowns and other retail locales were visited to assess retail character, issues, and overall business mix. The relationship of each locale to major highways and nearby retail centers was considered. Observations about each community were recorded. Research was also conducted on available ground floor retail properties for lease in each of the comparison communities and in Dolton. Properties available for lease on LoopNet and Co-Star were reviewed individually. The square footage, asking lease rate, property type, and any specific lease requirements were noted for each property. This research was conducted in July 2011. Finally, the comparison communities and their leasing issues were considered within the context of the south suburban regional market.

Blue Island Dolton

South Holland

Country Club Hills

Homewood

Lansing

Source: Google Maps Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Comparison Community Characteristics The key demographic attributes for Dolton and the five comparison communities are shown below (Figure 7.1 & 7.2). Each of the communities, including Dolton, shares certain characteristics. Country Club Hills, Homewood, and Lansing have the highest incomes and have higher numbers of households with incomes exceeding $75,000. South Holland, like these three communities, also has a higher education level than Dolton and Blue Island.

Homewood, Lansing and South Holland have similarly sized employment bases. Homewood, Lansing, and South Holland are significantly older than the other communities. All of the communities are racially and ethnically diverse, the most diverse being Blue Island with its substantial Hispanic population.

FIGURE 7.1:

Comparison Community Demographics Dolton Population Average Household Size Households Total Population Median Age % Bachelor's Degree or Greater Average Household Income Median Household Income %HHs w/ Incomes $75,000+ Total Employees Total Retail Expenditure Race and Ethnicity White Black Asian Other Hispanic Non-Hispanic

Blue Island

Country Club Hills

Homewood

Lansing

South Holland

23,849

23,428

16,576

18,463

26,862

22,081

2.99

2.85

2.96

2.56

2.46

2.77

7,915

8,210

5,542

7,070

10,898

7,777

35.85

33.59

38.10

41.27

40.08

41.81

20.55%

18.31%

26.98%

42.85%

22.63%

29.27%

$62,571

$52,402

$72,538

$79,418

$64,232

$78,294

$59,369

$45,086

$70,777

$71,482

$59,394

$73,556

37.18%

24.14%

46.75%

47.48%

37.26%

49.04%

4,963

8,796

3,295

10,625

11,720

10,982

$170,577,897

$156,979,752

$132,037,052

$179,809,279

$238,846,265

$195,447,675

23.60%

47.80%

27.20%

66.50%

74.20%

44.70%

66.70%

23.40%

62.90%

22.40%

15.30%

44.50%

2.20%

1.70%

2.50%

3.10%

2.40%

2.50%

7.60%

27.20%

7.40%

8.10%

8.10%

8.30%

7.30%

40.10%

6.00%

7.20%

9.70%

7.80%

92.70%

59.90%

94.00%

92.90%

90.30%

92.20%

Source: Experian/Applied Geographic Solutions, 2009

8-5 5

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions Each of the comparison communities again displays demographic similarities within their typical pedestrian markets, or .5-mile market from their downtown center points, as shown in Figure 7.1 below.

With the exception of Blue Island and Country Club Hills, community incomes are typically less in these pedestrian markets. Blue Island and Country Club Hills also have higher levels of education in their pedestrian markets than in the community at large, primarily reflecting the proximity of higher priced housing near the center point.

FIGURE 7.2:

0.5 Mile Pedestrian Market in Comparison Communities 0.5 Miles Dolton Population Average Household Size Households Total Population Median Age % Bachelor's Degree or Greater Average Household Income Median Household Income %HHs w/ Incomes $75,000+ Total Employees Total Retail Expenditure Race and Ethnicity White Black Asian Other Hispanic Non-Hispanic

8-6 6

0.5 Miles Blue Island

0.5 Miles Country Club Hills

0.5 Miles Homewood

0.5 Miles Lansing

0.5 Miles South Holland

3,657

6,496

3,632

2,979

5,323

4,140

3.08

2.80

2.93

2.30

2.27

2.44

1,186

2,309

1,237

1,296

2,342

1,600

34.52

33.85

36.27

38.85

40.23

43.77

17.19%

19.37%

31.49%

41.00%

21.28%

24.84%

$57,986

$53,204

$77,237

$76,208

$56,233

$63,741

$52,797

$45,726

$70,489

$64,576

$56,675

$59,440

32.04%

25.81%

46.16%

40.97%

32.37%

37.25%

1,122

3,819

1,094

2,609

1,235

1,991

$24,302,025

$44,701,654

$30,872,470

$31,970,587

$47,045,002

$35,068,773

24.90%

52.80%

21.60%

77.80%

77.30%

60.50%

64.90%

16.30%

68.00%

10.70%

12.10%

28.20%

2.20%

1.60%

3.40%

2.70%

2.50%

2.20%

8.10%

29.30%

7.00%

8.90%

8.20%

9.10%

8.50%

43.30%

5.50%

6.70%

10.20%

7.80%

91.50%

56.70%

94.50% 93.30% 89.80% 92.20% Source: Experian/Applied Geographic Solutions, 2009 Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions The 5-minute drive times for the Dolton and the comparison downtowns are shown in Figure 7.3 below. With the exception of Lansing, the 5-minute markets are above the conventionally accepted retail market population size of 25,000. Only three communities have employment numbers exceeding 10,000 within their 5-minute markets.

A larger employment base, or daytime population, enhances the attractiveness of drive-time retail markets. All have spending power well in excess of $150 million. Homewood’s drive-time market, with over $300 million in retail spending power, and a large daytime population appears a particularly attractive market.

FIGURE 7.3:

5-Minute Drive Time Market in Comparison Downtowns 5 Minute Dolton

5 Minute Blue Island

5 Minute Country Club Hills

5 Minute Homewood

5 Minute Lansing

5 Minute South Holland

32,530 27,379 25,251 29,950 18,508 31,539 Population 2.98 2.82 2.88 2.62 2.39 2.75 Average Household Size 10,874 9,706 8,732 11,327 7,728 11,314 Households 33.22 33.82 38.9 40.34 40.16 39.39 Total Population Median Age 17.81% 17.74% 33.30% 41.13% 22.55% 24.23% % Bachelor's Degree or Greater $55,345 $52,080 $77,991 $85,566 $64,248 $65,122 Average Household Income $51,788 $45,632 $73,514 $71,904 $57,969 $59,368 Median Household Income 30.36% 24.86% 48.85% 47.72% 35.57% 38.35% %HHs w/ Incomes $75,000+ 5,855 11,137 7,863 15,767 8,023 15,724 Total Employees Total Retail Expenditure $215,627,154 $184,877,004 $218,883,063 $301,872,512 $169,448,569 $250,387,431 Race and Ethnicity

White Black Asian Other Hispanic Non-Hispanic

30.20%

43.90%

31.60%

59.50%

75.60%

38.20%

57.40%

29.80%

58.10%

29.00%

13.70%

48.10%

3.30%

1.70%

3.00%

3.20%

2.50%

2.20%

9.10%

24.70%

7.40%

8.30%

8.20%

11.60%

8.80%

36.20%

6.30%

7.50%

9.40%

11.90%

91.20%

63.80%

93.80%

92.50%

90.60%

88.10%

Source: Experian/Applied Geographic Solutions, 2009

8-7 7

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions

Comparison Community Observations In evaluating each of Dolton’s five comparison communities, five common attributes were identified. These common attributes are followed by specific observations about each comparison community, its shopping and commercial areas, and overall retail offering. »» Vacancies were evident in each of the comparison communities and their retail locales, but numbers of visible vacancies varied. As expected, vacancies and marginal tenancies were observed in all of the communities. As examples, South Holland has multiple large vacant sites, primarily at former auto dealerships; Homewood’s downtown district has vacancies at several key downtown intersections; and Lansing has a nearly vacant big box center (Lansing Square) on Torrence Avenue. All of the communities also had sites available for either in-fill development or redevelopment. In contrast, certain centers in Homewood and Country Club Hills had few vacancies. Ultimately, each community will need to be pro-active in working with the local real estate community to identify and recruit suitable tenants and developers with financial capacity and knowledge of the regional market. »» Proximity to major highways and arterials affecting access and merchant visibility. Each of the comparison communities and their retail locales has access to a major arterial or either state or federal highway traversing through their community. Consequently, each community has an overall business mix that includes significant auto-oriented retail. These retail locales generally function as a series of destinations, lacking connectivity, pedestrian circulation, and sometimes visibility.

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»» Local demographic changes. All of these communities have experienced some level of population decline within the last decade. These communities have also become more diverse. With the exception of Country Club Hills, each of the communities has significant population density. »» Wide ranges of asking ground floor rents. Detail about each comparison downtown’s real estate data is described below in the real estate section. However, asking rents within each community was generally within a wide range. While the success characteristics of any specific retail locale are obviously a key element in determining asking rents, this disparity was significant, when compared with other Chicago suburbs. As an example, asking rents in Lansing ranged from $2.00 to $30.00 PSF (Per Square Foot). The proposed lease structures are somewhat varied, but most are either on a modified gross basis or a triple net basis. Taxes were generally cited in the $6.00$8.00 PSF range for all of the communities. »» City or Village government management of downtown or gathering place programming and redevelopment efforts. In all of the communities, staff works to address downtown or commercial corridor issues as part of the local economic and/or community development effort. The level of private sector engagement was difficult to determine in individual communities. Programming may be conducted with other groups, such as a Chamber or merchants organization, but municipal government assumes the lead role. Blue Island previously had a Main Street organization addressing downtown issues, but City staff has assumed Main Street’s past role.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions In addition to these similarities, some differences exist. The existence of a traditional downtown varies significantly among the communities. Blue Island, Lansing, and Homewood have a traditional downtown core with a typical mix of restaurants, unique retailers, destination businesses, and service and professional practices. Country Club Hills has developed a community gathering place and multiple public amenities near Village Hall, but this area does not serve the traditional commercial function. South Holland has initiated plans to redevelop its downtown as a transit-oriented development proximate to their proposed train station. Observations: Blue Island

In considering Blue Island’s retail environment, four locales were evaluated—downtown, Olde Western Avenue, 127th Street between Vincennes and Western Avenues. All of the locations had vacancies. Downtown Blue Island benefits from the presence of the nearby MetroSouth Hospital complex, a branch of Moraine Valley College, and long-established destination businesses, such as Iverson’s Bakery. Olde Western Avenue functions primarily as a food and beverage cluster, such as destination a Cajun restaurant Maple Tree Inn. This cluster also includes Jeben Hardware, another local destination, and a catering operation. To the north of downtown, Blue Island’s 127th Street core retail corridor extends from Vincennes Avenue to Western Avenue. One key vacancy in this area is the vacant Jewel site at the Vincennes intersection. The recent development of Marshfield Plaza in Chicago, near the border with Blue Island, has brought multiple ‘big box’ retailers, including Target, to the near south suburban market. To a lesser degree, the Ultra Foods Center in Calumet Park appears to have had some impact on the local market.

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Observations: Country Club Hills

From its founding in 1958 and initial growth period in the late 1960s and early 1970s, auto-oriented retail development has been predominant pattern in Country Club Hills. In recent years, Country Club Hills has likely experienced some of the most significant retail growth in the south suburbs. The Wal-Mart anchored center, Country Club plaza, on 167th Street (from Pulaski to I-57) is nearly fully tenanted with a combination of national and regional retail and restaurant chains, a Loews Theater complex, and multiple independent retail and service businesses. Other significant retail centers include Country Club Hills Plaza (183rd and Cicero), Heritage Plaza, and Cooper’s Grove (183rd and Pulaski). Country Club Hills Plaza and Heritage Square have multiple local tenants, with Heritage Health Food Store serving as the anchor at Heritage Square. Both centers have some small vacancies. Cooper’s Grove is the site of a vacant grocery store space. Observations: Homewood

Homewood’s three primary retail areas include the multiple, large format centers on Halsted Street, the traditional downtown area, and Cherry Creek Plaza. As noted, there are few vacancies in the Halsted Street corridor, the most obvious being a vacant former Arby’s site. Homewood’s downtown has two key restaurant vacancies in prominent locations, in addition to the long-standing vacancy in the small Caribou Coffee center. Downtown’s established successful businesses, such as Nielsen’s Bakery, remain as key downtown anchors. Cherry Creek Plaza, the Walgreen’s anchored center, west of downtown, also has minimal vacancies. This center has an interesting and strong tenant mix, including Lorenz Appliances, Panera Bread, Ace Hardware, Starbucks, and locally owned cycling and apparel stores, and functions as a community shopping center with certain lifestyle center characteristics (according to the International Council of Shopping Center’s Shopping Center Definitions). Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions Observations: Lansing

The various Torrence Avenue centers throughout Lansing have some of the most visible vacancies, particularly south of I-80/94. Lansing Square, the center south of I-80/94 and Flikkema Saab has major vacancies; this center also lacks visibility from Torrence Avenue. The centers north of I-80/94 generally had fewer vacancies and included some new tenants, such as Forman Mills, in the Ultra Foods center. Lansing Commons, with Dixie Kitchen restaurant as the most visible tenant, has few vacancies. Lansing’s downtown has few vacancies and includes some interesting re-uses of traditional downtown buildings, such as Beggar’s Pizza in the former theater. Downtown also includes newer Walgreen’s and Aldi stores at key intersections, supplementing traditional anchors like Towne Interiors and Ace Hardware. Observations: South Holland

South Holland’s key retail corridor, along 159th/162nd Street, has both successful areas and some segments with significant vacancies. Approaching I-94, South Holland has multiple vacant former auto dealerships. Certain strip centers near Pacesetter Plaza also have vacancies. The retail cluster at the western end of the corridor, anchored by Walt’s Grocery and South Suburban College, has minimal vacancies. Within South Holland’s transit-oriented development area, roughly two blocks on Park from 160th to 162nd comprise South Holland’s former traditional commercial area. These blocks include a hardware store with a cluster of services and businesses selling convenience goods.

8-10 10

Comparison Community Real Estate Characteristics The asking rents in Dolton and each of the five comparison downtowns vary considerably within each community. Certain differences emerge when comparing downtown asking rents with those in other commercial and retail centers within each community. Downtown lease space is typically listed as negotiable or at a monthly gross rental rate. All of the communities, Dolton included, had some for lease or for sale property listings for smaller properties, suggesting that current ownership was equally interested in exiting their real estate investment as in leasing individual storefronts. Finally, some lease space is advertised as having no common area maintenance and/or no real estate taxes as add-on costs to the net rent or is offered with 3-4 months rent-free. Recent listings for Dolton in LoopNet were for available lease space on Sibley Boulevard. Asking rents for those available spaces were generally within a similar range--$12 PSF on a triple net basis and $18 PSF on a modified gross basis. Of the five communities, Lansing and South Holland had the greatest numbers of listings, many for the vacancies described above. Lansing’s available lease space had the widest range of asking rents as noted earlier, from $2.00-$30.00 PSF. While the $2.00 location is obviously less desirable that the $30 space, one large lease space along Torrence Avenue was advertised at $2.00 PSF triple net. A negotiable ground lease rate was part of that listing. Lansing Square, with its two major anchor vacancies, has asking rents at $20.00 PSF on a triple net basis. Newer space, located next to LA Fitness north of I-80/94, is offered at $17.00 PSF, triple net. South Holland also has a wide range of asking rents—from $11.00-$31.00 PSF, mostly on a triple net basis. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions The typical asking rents near 159th/162nd and Park are generally in the $22.00-$24.00 PSF, triple net range. Certain smaller spaces in less desirable locations are offered in the $12.00-$15.00 PSF on a modified gross basis.

histories that can potentially succeed in a Dolton location. This will present challenges for Dolton’s downtown, given that only 147th Street/Sibley Boulevard has sufficient traffic and visibility to interest most retailers.

Asking rents for lease space on Homewood’s Halsted Street locale are generally in the upper $20s PSF, triple net. Newly developed pads on the periphery of these centers are asking $15.00 PSF, triple net. Downtown asking rents are generally listed on a gross basis, typically $12.00-$15.000 PSF, depending upon the downtown location and size. (No listings were noted for Cherry Creek Plaza.) Blue Island’s asking rents show a similar difference between downtown properties, with asking rents in the $8.00 PSF triple net, and more auto-oriented centers on 127th Street and on Western Avenue. Asking rents in this locale are $24.00-$27.00 PSF on a modified gross basis. No listings were noted for Olde Western Avenue.

2. Dolton can capitalize on regional efforts to expand the south suburban employment base. Increasing the size of Dolton’s employment base can help increase the overall size of its retail market. Dolton’s population will likely remain relatively constant.

Country Club Hills had the highest asking rents, generally $27.00-$32.00 PSF on a triple net basis, for its major centers in its high traffic corridors. Most of the vacancies listed were in smaller strip centers at less desirable locations. Asking rents were generally in the $7.00-$13.00 PSF, usually triple net in these same locations.

Recommendations for Dolton The attributes and real estate characteristics of these five communities present certain propositions for future recruitment and development in Dolton’s commercial locales. 1. Asking lease rates in Dolton are generally comparable to those in the comparison communities. The key emphasis in retail recruitment for Dolton will be identifying and recruiting businesses with strong operating

8-11 11

3. Comparison communities represent a future recruitment opportunity. As Dolton progresses, independent and multi-location businesses within these communities may consider a new or additional location in Dolton. These businesses understand the regional market and how to operate profitably within the region. 4. Dolton could benefit from increased private sector engagement. This is key for Dolton, as the community has only one corridor with strong characteristics for retail development and redevelopment. Village officials can initiate outreach to Dolton’s property owners and area brokers. The goal of this future implementation work should promote viable tenancies throughout the community. This includes enabling strong co-tenancies and functional anchor businesses at the best retail locations throughout the community. Though the business types will likely vary by location, owner knowledge of and experience in Dolton and similar markets will be most important to improving business success and providing options for local residents and employees.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 8 |2Economic Development Strategy Chapter | Existing Conditions 5. New tenants should be committed in advance of new development or redevelopment. In addition to encouraging property owners to lease to tenants with sustainable business operations, securing tenants in advance for any new development or re-development can mitigate potential vacancies at highly visible locations or centers. Village processes and regulations will also need to support this approach to development. Addressing these implications directly will permit the Village to strategically consider the kinds of businesses and future development that can succeed in Dolton and provide additional amenities and shopping and dining options for Dolton’s diverse population and nearby residents. Ongoing focus on viable tenants will strengthen the Village’s reputation as a good place for businesses to locate. Most important, this kind of focus will improve local and regional perceptions about Dolton’s opportunities over time.

Economic Development Tools Enterprise Zone The Village of Dolton is part of the Calumet Region Enterprise Zone, which also includes the communities of Calumet City and Riverdale. This Enterprise Zone, established on June 30th, 1987, is administered by the Village. The zone covers all major commercial and industrial areas of the Village. While originally set to expire in 2017, recent legislation is awaiting the Governor’s signature that would allow the District to be extended for 25 years. Illinois Enterprise Zones are designed to stimulate economic growth through state and local tax incentives, regulatory relief, and improved governmental services. 8-12 12

Businesses in an Enterprise Zone may be eligible for incentives including: »» An exemption on the retailers’ occupation tax paid on building materials »» An investment tax credit of .5 percent of qualified property »» A zone jobs tax credit for each job created in the zone »» Additional exemptions for certain businesses

Tax Increment Financing The Village of Dolton currently has 3 Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts. These areas allow the Village to partner with private developers to redevelop properties. Through TIF, property tax revenue can be reinvested in an area to eliminate obstacles that might otherwise inhibit growth. TIF eligible expenses may include public infrastructure, assembly of property, and environmental remediation (along with several other eligible expenses as outlined in State Statutes). As noted in the Sibley Boulevard Corridor Study, expansion of or creation of an additional TIF along the corridor might be appropriate to promote additional economic development opportunities. The following table highlights the Village’s existing TIF Districts. FIGURE 7.4:

Existing TIF Districts District

Major Uses

Year Established

2011 TIF Revenue

I-94/Sibley

Menards

1993

$ 724,491

TIF #2

Food-4-Less

2001

$ 301,829

TIF #3

Future Industrial

2006

$ 240,824

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

Chapter 9

Northern Industrial Corridor In the last three-four years significant momentum has been building in the south suburbs relative to the rebirth of an industrialized segment of the economy in two unique areas. This initiative has been led by the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation (CSEDC) which has coordinated the development of a comprehensive strategy to maximize the assets of the south suburbs. The first area of emphasis revolves around the transportation assets which are unique to the south suburbs. These include connecting interstate highway corridors, major freight rail lines, two major intermodal facilities operated by the Canadian National and Union Pacific Railroads, multiple proximate sites for industrial and distribution uses which are dependent upon transportation and a substantial labor force which can support this industry. Secondly, the south suburbs has become a focal point of the emerging “green technology manufacturing” industry which is receiving support from multiple levels of government (including the federal government) at the present time. The timing could not be better. The assets which the south suburbs have identified and the strategy they have developed is coming online at precisely the time that the private sector has decided to make investments in both the transportation/distribution industry as well as green technology manufacturing. CSEDC has developed a comprehensive strategy called “Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone…..Green Transit, Intermodal, Manufacturing, Environment 9-1

Zone…..A Core Element of the Southland Vision 2020 for Sustainable Development.” A booklet describing this strategy is available and the strategy has attracted local, state and federal interest as well as funding. The private sector is also very engaged in working with CSEDC relative to the strategy and their investments in implementing the strategy.

Dolton can take advantage of existing industrial facilities, such as the UP Intermodal Facility, to expand and create additional economic opportunities.

Dolton is uniquely positioned to take advantage of this strategy. It is well located and it has sites available for development. Also, it has a labor force and a supportive government to pursue these types of industries. There are only two major intermodal facilities in the south suburbs: the Canadian National facility in Harvey and the Union Pacific facility in Dolton. Canadian Nation is investing millions of dollars at the present time in expanding the Harvey facility. The Union Pacific has indicated a similar interest in investing in their Dolton facility.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

Vision The Village of Dolton will maximize its’ strategic position in the south suburbs by participating in emerging industries related to intermodal distribution and green technology manufacturing. The Village will develop the identified site opportunities with uses related to these two industries with particular emphasis on partnering with the Union Pacific intermodal facility which has the potential for the largest economic benefit to the Village. The result of this site development within these industries will be enhanced revenue for the Village and increased employment opportunities for the residents of Dolton.

Issues 1. While there are excellent sites for development in the industrial corridor the Village will need to either gain control of the sites or develop working partnerships with the site owner in order to develop the sites to their highest potential. 2. Site development will require significant staff resources over an extended period of time. 3. While Dolton can implement multiple activities in order to develop the sites the overall issues involved in addressing these two industries will require Dolton to be fully engaged in the regional “Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone” initiative being conducted by the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation.

9-2

4. It is probable that site development will require significant infrastructure investments in order to prepare the sites for development. 5. Site development will most likely require multiple levels of public financing assistance within Dolton, at the regional level and at the state and federal level. 6. The Village will be dependent on the region effectively meeting other regional requirements particularly in the area of transportation development (rail and road). 7. While Dolton is extremely well positioned particularly with the Union Pacific intermodal facility, site development within the region will be competitive and Dolton will need to be aggressive in order to get its’ share of development opportunities.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

Opportunities 1. There are four primary sites in Dolton which represent the best opportunity for site development in either the intermodal/distribution area or the green technology manufacturing area as shown in Figure 9.1. 2. The most significant opportunity is the expansion of the truck/rail Union Pacific intermodal facility. 3. The Village of Dolton has a long history of supporting these types of industries and there is a labor force within the population which would embrace job opportunities within these industries. 4. The private sector has recognized the assets within the south suburbs for these two industries and trends within the last two years suggest that there will be significant development opportunities going forward. 5. The Village intends to support the ongoing development of both the marina and the expansion of the industry around the marina.

6. In Mi-Jack, the south suburbs host the most significant intermodal development and intermodal management company in the world. Mi-Jack has been very involved in the regional initiative and this asset represents a major asset which few regions can duplicate. 7. The regional effort called “Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone� which is coordinated by the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation has been recognized as an outstanding initiative which has received wide support from both the public sector and the private sector. Dolton has been identified as a potential major partner in this initiative. This represents a unique regional opportunity for the Village. 8. Given the regional, state and national interest in job creation particularly at the blue and grey collar level and the number of potential jobs involved in these initiatives it is probable that significant public funding will be available to support these initiatives.

There is potential for expansion of industrial services on land around the Marina.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

Market Analysis

Policies and Initiatives

Over the last four years, the potential opportunities for intermodal/distribution development and green technology manufacturing have been studied more than any topic on a regional basis. These market evaluations include the following:

1. Support redevelopment, including financial partnerships, and reinvestment. Property owners are reluctant to redevelop due to high investment and uncertainty of tenanting. Village partnerships that aid property assembly, identify tenants, and insure compatible neighboring uses can reduce that risk and thereby assist in redevelopment. Redevelopment will offer significant additional economic development potential.

• The South Suburban Freight Study conducted by Cambridge Systematics for CSEDC on December, 2007. • The Cargo Oriented Development Opportunity Sites in the South Suburbs Study conducted by CNT in May, 2008 • The Selector Analysis and Promoting Cargo Oriented Development in the South Suburban Communities Study conducted by CNT in June, 2008. • The Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone Study and Master Plan conducted by CNT in December, 2010. • Mi-Jack has also conducted extensive private sector research relative to opportunities to expand their business through intermodal site development. In addition, due to the job creation possibilities in the region, state entities such as IDOT and DCEO have studied the opportunities and have visited with area policy leaders to express support. Finally, the federal Department of Transportation has also expressed support and the Secretary has visited the area to meet with regional leaders. These market reviews, public and private, have unanimously indicated that the assets in the region match perfectly with the quickly emerging market opportunities for growth in the intermodal/distribution and green technology manufacturing industries. Dolton is specifically highlighted in all reports as being well positioned for success within the region.

9-4

2. The Village will aggressively pursue the development of the three intermodal/green technology manufacturing site opportunities, the marina area opportunity and the Union Pacific intermodal site. The Village will want to control some of the sites or have a strong partnership with the owner who controls the site in order to successfully pursue development. 3. The Village will evaluate the infrastructure requirements in order for site development to continue and prepare the Capital Improvement Plan which creates the necessary infrastructure. 4. The Village will be prepared to create the financial toolbox which will be necessary to support the public/private partnerships which will be necessary to successfully pursue development. 5. The Village will be fully engaged in the CSEDC Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone initiative in order to capitalize on the strength of this regional plan. 6. The Village will reach out to other state and federal officials to communicate their potential opportunities and their plans to pursue these opportunities. 7. The Village will keep its’ Trustees and stakeholders well informed of this initiative and at the appropriate time will allocate the necessary staff resources necessary to achieve results. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

Concept Plans The concept plans shown in Figure 9.1 identify Dolton’s prime redevelopment areas along the Northern Industrial Cooridor. These properties are currently vacant or underutilized and should be developed in order to take advantage of the Village’s strategic position as part of the CSEDC’s “Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone” initiative. The redevelopment opportunities for these site are further explained in Figure 9.2. The Green TIME Zone initiative capitalizes on emerging economic trends, such as intermodal distribution and green technology manufacturing, by providing a strategy for communities in southern Cook County to utilize their existing rail infrastructure and manufacturing capacity as a way to create desireable neighborhoods, good jobs, and environmental improvements. The TIME Zone strategy uses mechanisms such as Transit-oriented development (TOD), Cargo-oriented development (COD), and Green Manufacturing to create vibrant, healthy economies.

The Green TIME Zone intitative has led to the development of projects such as the Calument River Corridor project, a planning project that stimulates economic development and investment in the seven communities linked by the Calumet River system, including Dolton. As part of this project, the CSEDC created the Green River Pattern Book, a document that provides a guide to sustainable practices and techniques applicable to sites and conditions within the Calumet River Corridor. The Village of Dolton should use this document as a guide as they review, revise, and proposals (re)development along the Village’s Northern Industrial Corridor. Redevelopment of the sites shown in Figure 9.1 will require public/private partnerships to ensure that the highest and best use for each of these properties is attained. Through collaboration with the CSEDC, neighborhing communities and private owners, Dolton can develop this area, building upon existing infrasturcture and creating additional economic opportunities for the Village.

Dolton has a number of vacant and underutilized industrial properties that could be developed in order to capitalize on the Village’s strategic position as part of the CSEDC’s “Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone” initiative.

9-5

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 9.1:

Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan Beaubein Forest Preserve

CALUMET RIVE R

Beaubein Forest Preserve

CALUMET RIVE R

LEGEND Development Sites

138TH STREET

Proposed Cal-Sag Trail Municipal Boundary

Lincoln School

LAKE COTTAGE GROVE

2

MAIN STREET - 142nd STREET

4

IHB RAILROAD

4

1

2

MAIN STREET - 142nd STREET Post Office

3

LEGEND

3

INTERSTATE 94

1

Marina

Landfill Area

INTERSTATE 94

IHB RAILROAD

COTTAGE GROVE AVENUE

Marina

Landfill Area

LI Development Sites N CO L

N

ProposedAVCal-Sag Trail E

Municipal Boundary N O R T H

hern Industrial Corridor Village of Dolton - Northern Industrial Corridor

age of Dolton, Illinois Dolton Comprehensive Plan | Village of Dolton, Illinois

9-6

0

500

1,000

1,500

Last modified December, 2011 Prepared by Teska Associates, Inc.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 9.2:

Redevelopment Site Summary Site

Address

Existing Uses

Area

Existing Zoning

Redevelopment Approach

1

14200, 14059 Cottage Grove Avenue

Large paved industrial lot with two small buildings

20 Acres

M-2: General Manufacturing District

Market the site for major industrial employer.

2

14121 Cottage Grove Avenue

Park and vacant land

65 Acres

M-1: Limited Manufacturing District

Market the site for major industrial use.

3

Properties between Dante Avenue and Interstate 94, 142nd Street and Dolton Avenue

Seven (7) existing industrial buildings

10 Acres

M-1: Limited Manufacturing District

Work with existing property owners to enhance appearance of existing uses or consolidate parcels and redevelop for undustrial use.

4

Area between the Marina and Interstate 94 south of the Calumet River

40 Acres

M-2: General Manufacturing District

Where Interstate 94 and the rail corridor meet and at the river there are 40 acres which would be suitable for intermodal/ distribution development. The plan is for barge/rail intermodal site for containers.

Vacant land

Prior Plans and Studies As indicated, multiple studies have been conducted by the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation. They fall into three categories: »» Cargo Oriented Development (COD) Studies »» A South Suburban Freight Study »» The Chicago Southland Green TIME Zone Study and Plan 2008 CNT COD Report --- Executive Summary and Full Report Working under the leadership of the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation (CSEDC) and The South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA), in 2008 the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) 9-7

developed a detailed report which summarized the opportunity for further intermodal (rail, truck, and in some cases barge) cargo centers in the south suburbs. It has been wisely established that the south suburbs is extremely well positioned to take advantage of the strategic position of Illinois (as a central USA state) and more specifically the Chicago metropolitan area in being a primary cargo moving center in the USA. Intermodal sites are intended to facilitate the speed of cargo movement and through coordinated development reducing the cost of cargo movement to users. The assets frequently cited in the south suburbs include but are not limited to the following: the amount and connectivity of freight rail corridors; the amount and connectivity of inter and intra state highway corridors; the access to river (barge) corridors; the existence of current successful intermodal models in the region; the favorable acceptance of this industry presence in the region; Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

the availability of land to support intermodal development; the quality of the labor force in the region; and, the recent investment of federal funds (i.e. the CREATE Program) in improving freight rail capability in the region. The COD Report highlighted the geographic areas which were best positioned to take advantage of these assets. CNT developed a full report and an Executive Summary. The key relevance of the COD Report to the Chicago Southland Transit-Oriented Development Corridor Planning Study is the potential development of significant new employment centers in a reasonable distance from existing or potentially new Metra TOD stations. From a simply rail transportation point of view, new employment centers enhance both commute and reverse commute opportunities. From a TOD development point of view, the market analysis clearly indicates that the number of employees within a reasonable drive time of a TOD clearly enhances the TOD development potential with particular emphasis on food and beverage opportunities. It can also be presumed that a significant employment center would provide transportation between the employment center and the TOD either through arrangements with PACE or through private means.

9-8

Accordingly, the COD Report points out the following locations as having the highest potential for new or expanded intermodal development: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Harvey Chicago Heights Alsip Markham Crete Burnham Homewood Dolton University Park Glenwood Thornton South Holland Mokena Lynwood Calumet Park Richton Park

Note that all of these sites are located proximate to an existing or proposed new TOD (i.e. the Southeast Line) locations except for Alsip and Lynwood. However, if significant COD development were to occur in either Alsip or Lynwood it is logical to assume that extra efforts would be made to connect the proposed employment centers to the train. In summary, considering the significant opportunities for the development of further intermodal employment centers in the south suburbs and the relative proximity of these centers to existing and potentially new TOD locations represents an unusual opportunity for both train usage, ongoing TOD development and transportation linkage planning between employment centers and TOD’s.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 9 | Northern Industrial Cooridor Plan

The Cambridge Systematics South Suburban Freight Study

The Chicago Southland’s Green TIME Zone Study and Plan

The Cambridge study acknowledged the major asset which exists in the south suburbs in freight rail. The study then outlined a number of potential initiatives which should be pursued in order to enhance this asset: • At the federal and state level improve the funding for rail infrastructure • Continue to address rail congestion through implementation of the federal CREATE program • Create more public/private partnerships supporting specific project opportunities • Improve non-rail infrastructure such as roads which can accommodate trucking • Conduct land use planning for terminals • Create design options for potential new intermodal terminals • Conduct regional planning • Improve the overall business climate in the state • Implement workforce training programs

This study and plan was conducted by CNT in cooperation with the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation. The purpose was to take data and information from various studies and link it into one vision for the region. The three areas which are summarized to become the south suburban vision are: • Transit • Intermodal • Manufacturing (green technology) Thus the name Green TIME (Transit, Intermodal, Manufacturing) Zone for the vision which has now been adopted. The intermodal opportunities have already been well documented in this plan. The transit opportunities have been well documented in Downtown Plan with emphasis on Transit Oriented Development (TOD) throughout the regions multiple commuter rail stations and the possibility of a TOD opportunity in Dolton with the proposed Southeast Line by Metra. The green manufacturing initiatives developing in the south suburbs are summarized and include the assembly of low emissions locomotives in Dixmoor by The National Railroad Equipment Company and various sites which manufacture and assemble the equipment utilized in wind farms. The study and plan links these three opportunities into one comprehensive vision which suggests major opportunities for the south suburbs to produce new revenue and to develop a significant amount of new jobs.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Chapter 10

Sibley Boulevard Corridor The primary retail/commercial corridor in the Village of Dolton is Sibley Boulevard which runs from the Bishop Ford Freeway/I-94 to Indiana Avenue in Dolton with the primary focus from Lincoln to the east side of the railroad overpass. This corridor has outstanding traffic counts (over 35,000 ADT) and as a result significant development on both sides of the corridor has occurred in recent years. While a major emphasis of new development has been regional and national chains which are looking for these traffic counts, there are also entrepreneurial business that have been on the corridor for many years. In addition to high traffic counts, the demographics in the region are more than sufficient to support development on the corridor with uses that are tailored to the diversity and shopping needs of the regional area.

site basis and accordingly the corridor has no particular design character leading to an unsightly appearance in many areas. In its’ present state the corridor is somewhat intimidating to any pedestrian movement. Also, better coordination between ingress and egress to the sites from Sibley needs to be considered. Finally, there are excellent development sites which remain on the corridor. Sibley Boulevard will remain as the top retail/sales tax revenue source for Dolton with an opportunity to further enhance revenue generation. Businesses along Sibley Boulevard Corridor

While the development has been impressive and significant, it has been incremental on a site-by

Vision The existing commercial/retail viability of the Sibley corridor will be retained as an economic engine for the Village of Dolton. Over time, streetscape and complete streets initiatives will be implemented to improve the attractiveness of the corridor while making it more welcoming to customers. In addition, the Village will be aggressive in capitalizing on the success of the corridor to capture significant new business. Finally, the Village will establish some design guidelines which will help guide the development of new sites and the overall corridor.

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Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Issues 1. While very successful, the corridor has developed in somewhat of a disjointed manner in recent years which has created the need for better planning relative to ingress and egress to the sites; traffic planning and traffic calming; signage; design guidelines including landscaping; and, underdeveloped sites which are not being viewed in a strategic manner. 2. There are three kinds of potentially new sites along the corridor: existing cleared sites; existing sites with underutilized buildings on the site; and smaller sites that can become significant sites if assembled. 3. The corridor is not very comfortable for any type of pedestrian movement. 4. The streetscape on the corridor is old and tired and in need of replacement. 5. Constant monitoring of the ability of the corridor to move traffic in an efficient manner will be required in order to assure the necessary traffic

movement to support the retail/commercial cluster. While the vehicular traffic generally appears to flow well in the corridor, significant back-ups and congestion do occur on the westbound I-94 off-ramp due to backups at the Lincoln/Sibley intersection. 6. The Village will need to develop a plan for the future development of the corridor which addresses all the relevant issues: traffic, design, appearance. 7. To maximize corridor potential, the Village will want to get more directly involved in potential sites and site assembly in order to match site opportunities to potential new developers and their tenants. 8. In a partnering manner, given regional competition, the Village may need to continue a thoughtful process of providing those tenants that have the potential to provide the greatest impact to the Village with economic incentives.

The gateway entrance to Sibley Boulevard from I-94 could benefit from increased landscaping standards, better pedestrian crossings, and and improved signage.

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Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Opportunities

Market Analysis

1. Aggressive outreach to existing businesses which the Village wishes to retain to gauge ongoing success and areas which the Village can be helpful in order to support business retention.

The demographic numbers for Dolton and the surrounding communities are more than adequate to support existing and new regional and national businesses on the corridor. The traffic counts on this section of the corridor approaches 37,000 ADT’s which is extremely significant. The combination of the existing development on the corridor, the traffic counts, the demographics and the regional connectivity of Sibley in the south suburbs make the potential of future development very positive.

2. Development and implementation of a streetscape plan to improve the appearance and function of the corridor. Streetscape elements could greatly improve the function and appearance of Sibley Blvd.

There are five key areas which will be critical to the future success of the corridor:

3. Close interaction with IDOT relative to the functioning of the corridor. 4. Development of development principles and design guidelines which can guide future development. 5. Aggressive outreach to the property owners of key vacant sites or sites with underutilized buildings to determine development and site assembly potential. 6. Aggressive outreach to key potential tenants who will find the “economic engine” nature of the corridor attractive and who can significantly add to Village revenue. In short, the Village may have the opportunity to be selective with a thoughtful short, intermediate and long term plan. 7. Potential to expand the existing TIF (Menards’) to the west to spur additional economic development. 10-3

1. Developing the corridor “physical envelope” which will allow for ongoing development in areas such as streetscape improvements, street maintenance, traffic flow and traffic calming, coordination with regional transportation entities (i.e. PACE) and design standards to guide future development. 2. Aggressive outreach to retain existing desired businesses. Development of Village public-private 3. partnership underwriting guidelines to determine those tools which the Village will use to incent economic development and the manner in which these tools will be utilized. 4. Aggressive outreach to property owners of vacant and underutilized sites to determine development potential, site acquisition possibilities and proximate site assembly opportunities. 5. Aggressive outreach to significant tenants to match sites with new economic development. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Successful corridor planning will raise the potential of the Sibley corridor to continue and improve as a major economic engine for Dolton. The following policies and initiatives should be applied to the short, intermediate and long term development of the Sibley corridor. More specific strategies are summarized in the concept plans for the corridor.

Policies and Initiatives 1. Support redevelopment, including financial partnerships, and reinvestment. Property owners are reluctant to redevelop due to high investment and uncertainty of tenanting. Village partnerships that aid property assembly, identify tenants, and insure compatible neighboring uses can reduce that risk and thereby assist in redevelopment. Redevelopment will offer significant additional economic development potential.

2. Reach out to property owners of vacant and underutilized sites to explore future opportunities, assembly opportunities and potential matches to the significant potential tenants. 3. Create a consistent design scheme for the corridor, through the adoption of Design Guidelines, which require quality development as individual sites and commercial centers redevelop. Design Guidelines should address building material, architectural details, building siting, parking lot layout, signage, screening, pedestrian connections, landscaping, and lighting. 4. Work closely with IDOT to assure that the traffic moving quality of the corridor is retained. 5. Through various means, reach out to potential significant tenants who can add to the corridor mix and match them to potential sites that meet their needs.

Food4Less (and associated gas station) is one of the major retailers along Sibley Boulevard. This site has potential development opportunities available on either side of the existing building.

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Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Sibley Corridor Footprint and Site Potential Summary Business Districts, Inc. (BDI) reviewed the existing “footprint” of businesses along the corridor from Lincoln to Indiana. The purpose of the summary was to chronicle and demonstrate the existing economic development power of the corridor while also documenting new site development opportunities. The following list of businesses along the corridor emphasizes the strong interest in the corridor by regional and national tenants. Unlike the downtown where smaller entrepreneurial businesses are appropriate, the Village should focus on these tenants for this corridor in order to achieve the highest economic development potential for the Village. Also, unlike the downtown where adaptive reuse of buildings will be typical and rents will be lower, this corridor can focus on new construction which can be supported by the type of tenants anticipated and therefore higher rents / higher economic value for the Village. Major national retailers include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 10-5

The area also contains a variety of smaller independent shops, restaurants, and many services (salons, offices, nails, banks, etc.).

Concept Plans The concept plans shown in Figure 10.1 offer proposed character treatments around the Sibley Boulevard area and identify potential areas for enhancement opportunities. Potential sites for future development and redevelopment are also identified. These potential development sites are further defined in the chart in Figure 10.2. These figures represent the long-term strategy and ideal future development of the properties along Sibley Boulevard. While these plans will take many years to occur though both private and public actions, they are intended to encourage private owners to explore new investment opportunities, and to guide the Village in the evaluation of proposals. Furthermore, the plans acknowledge the need for public investment as a necessity to facilitate expanded economic growth, offer visual appeal, and provide improvements to the quality of the business districts.

Food For Less (including FFL Gas) Family Dollar Dollar General Burger King Dunkin Donut Wendy’s White Castle Auto Zone Advanced Auto CVS Walgreens Menard’s Domino’s Pizza KFC Payless Shoes Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan FIGURE 10.2:

Redevelopment Site Summary Site

Address

Existing Uses

Land Sq. Footage

Existing Zoning

Existing Building Sq. Footage

Redevelopment Approach This property is owned by the Village of Dolton, and is a prime development opportunity. It is recommended that the existing structure be demolished and the site cleared. Once completed, the Village can market the site for redevelopment for a new restaurant or other commercial use through a RFQ/RFP process. These existing vacant buildings could be demolished and consolidated into one larger redevelopment site. Through combination, this site would be large enough for a modern restaurant or many other free-standing retail uses.

1

1323 Sibley Boulevard

Vacant commercial building

B-2: Limited 74,800 SF Retail Business District

8,500 SF

2

1021, 1023 Sibley Boulevard

Three (3) vacant commercial buildings

B-2: Limited 42,500 SF Retail Business District

12,300 SF

3

14901 S. Dobson Avenue

Vacant commercial building in commercial strip

14,900 SF

B-1: Planned Business Center

14,878 SF

104,300 SF

B-1: Planned Business Center

None

Create new junior box retail use to capitalize on adjacent Food-4-Less

None

Improve circulation on west side of Food-4Less to enhance safety. Development here could either be an extension of the Food-4-Less structure, or a free-standing pad site fronting onto Greenwood with Sibley visibility.

Re-Tenant existing space with appropriate faรงade enhancements.

4

1020 Sibley Vacant lot (east Boulevard of Food 4 Less)

5

14947 Vacant lot Greenwood (west of Food 4 48,900 SF Road Less)

6

848 Sibley Boulevard

Car Wash

7

601 E. Sibley Boulevard

Vacnat lot

8

144, 132 Sibley Boulevard

Three (3) vacant commercial buildings

B-2: Limited 30,700 SF Retail Business District

12,000 SF

Vacant lot

B-2: Limited 13,800 SF Retail Business District

None

Work with property owner to develop additional neighborhood oriented businesses such as dining and convenience stores.

Vacant lot

B-2: Limited 16,600 SF Retail Business District

None

Work with property owner(s) to expand existing strip shopping center.

9

10

10-6

14937, 14941 Lasalle Street 14936, 14940 Lasalle Street

B-1: Planned Business Center

MF-1: Multiple Family 25,250 SF Dwelling 2,600 SF District B-3: General 11,300 SF Business None District

Consider acquisition for gateway/greenway development along Greenwood and under the power lines. Market key corner for additional restaurant or retail use to take advantage of key intersection location. Redevelop this corner for convenience retail uses and/or a gas station.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Urban Design The following presents recommendations for enhancing the accessibility, urban design, and vitality of Sibley Boulevard corridor and its surrounding neighborhoods using a variety of approaches. Figures 10.3-10.5 provide examples for various corridor character treatments for the residential, automobile-oriented, and industrial corridors along Sibley Boulevard that were identified in the concept plans in Figure 10.1. Proposed enhancements for specific areas along Sibley Boulevard as well as intersection and signage enhancements are in Figures 10.6-10.9. These enhancements and character treatments are recommendations for future improvements and are intended to enhance to the visual quality of Sibley Boulevard as the primary commercial corridor serving Dolton residents and businesses. The Village of Dolton is also encouraged to incorporate complete street principles into future improvements for this area. Complete streets are designed to enable safe access for all users

inlcuding pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders. A complete street may include: sidewalks, bike lanes (or wide paved shoulders), special bus lanes, comfortable and accessible public transportation stops, frequent and safe crossing opportunities, median islands, accessible pedestrian signals, curb extensions, narrower travel lanes, roundabouts, and more. Complete streets in each community are unique but are are designed to balance safety and convenience for everyone using the road. The Village is encouraged to explore the following recommendations as it considers its capital improvement plans over the next several years, integrating these designs as resources and funding become available. Illinois Transportation Enhancement Program (ITEP) or other grant programs (identified in the Implmentation chapter) may also be available to provide funding for these improvements. Further studies may be necessary to implment these designs.

FIGURE 10.3:

Residential Corridor Character Treatment 1 Landscaping Improvements »» Provide infill trees where available »» Parkway plantings

2 Right-of-way Improvements

»» Fix damaged sidewalks to ensure handicap accessibility »» Minimize driveway access onto Sibley Boulevard

3 Bus Stop Enhancements

»» Provide bus shelter at existing bus stop »» Ensure all bus stops are handicap accessible

1 2

1

2 SIBLEY BL

VD.

10-7

3

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Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 10.4:

Automobile-Oriented Commercial Corridor Character Treatment

1

Enhancements within the public right-of-way

2

»» Handicap accessible bus shelter at existing bus stop »» Expanded sidewalk area »» Parkway plantings »» Parkway maintenance

Enhancements within private properties abutting the public right-of-way »» »» »» »» »»

Parking lot landscaping Awnings Signage Gooseneck lighting Parkway maintenance

2 2 1 SIB

LE

1 YB

LV

D. Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Current Conditions

10-8

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 10.5:

Industrial Corridor Character Treatment

2

Enhancements within the public right-ofway

»» Understory trees added to provide a buffer between pedestrian/ automobile traffic and industrial properties while not interfering with existing power lines

1

Village of

»» Banners added to the existing light poles »» Pedestrian-oriented lighting added to the existing light poles »» Existing guardrail replaced by decorative wall with masonry features and decorative railing

Enhancements within private properties abutting the public right-of-way

DOLTON

1

Village of

DOLTON

Village of

DOLTON

Village of

DOLTON

1

2 2

1

Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Current Conditions

10-9

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Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 10.6:

Bridge Enhancements

1

Enhancements to existing light poles

»» Banners added to the existing light poles provide wayfinding and add character to the area »» Pedestrian-oriented lighting added to the existing light poles to create a pedestrianfriendly environment

2

Guardrail enhancements

»» Existing guardrail replaced by decorative wall with masonry features to add visual interest and pedestrian seating »» Wall railing provides separation between pedestrian area and industrial property

Village of Village of

DOLTON

Village of

DOLTON

1

DOLTON

Village of

DOLTON

Village of

Village of

DOLTON

Village of

DOLTON

1

DOLTON

1

2 2

Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

Current Conditions

10-10

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Village 10 of Dolton Chapter | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan Comprehensive Plan Corridor Visioning - Bird’s Eye View Prepared by Teska Associates, Inc. FIGURE 10.7: March 2012

Sibley/Greenwood Intersection Enhancements VACANT CAR WASH SITE

G

RE

EN

2

W

O

FOOD 4 LESS PARKING AREA

O

D

RO

4

5

AD

3

1

1

WATERMAN DRIVE

3

SIBLEY BOU

LEVARD

3 3

1

STRIP COMMERCIAL

4 COMED

2 Source: Teska Associates, Inc.

1

ACCENT CORNER TREATMENTS

2

PARKWAY TREATMENTS

3

10-11

»» »» »» »» »»

Decorative paving Salt tolerant ornamental plantings Enhanced pedestrian crosswalks Gateway & wayfinding signage Removal of billboard signage

»» Decorative roadway lighting »» Shade tree plantings »» Lawn parkway areas

ENHANCE PEDESTRIAN CROSSWALKS »» Consider colored pavements, reflectors, and enhanced signs to enhance pedestrian safety

4 GREENWOOD SCULPTURE TRAIL

»» Replace vacant Car Wash with trail & sculpture amenities »» Connects Sibley Boulevard with the Melanie Fitness Center and Downtown »» Asphalt bike trail »» Decorative lighting »» Sculpture elements »» Wayfinding signage

5 PRIVATE PROPERTY ENHANCEMENTS

»» Work with private property owners to enhance landscaping at sites abutting the Sibley Blvd. corridor

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 10.8:

Intersection Enhancements PRIMARY INTERSECTION The concept plan for Sibley Boulevard identifies two primary intersections located along Sibley Boulevard at Lincoln Avenue and Indiana Avenue. These intersections also serve as main gateways into Dolton from the south and from I-94. These areas should include elements similar to those in the secondary intersections as well as primary gateway signage. The Village should consider using a the existing northern gateway plaza, located near Village Hall, as a model for designing additional signature gateways for Dolton. Existing primary intersection along Lincoln Avenue and Sibley Boulevard

This existing gateway plaza, located near Village Hall, should be used as a model for improved gateway design along Sibley Boulevard.

SECONDARY INTERSECTION Secondary intersections should provide pedestrian safety and enhance streetscape character using the following:

>> Lighting >> Secondary Gateway Signage >> Public Art >> Decorative Pavers >> Fabric Banners >> Directional Signage >> Painted Pedestrian Crossings

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

FIGURE 10.9:

Public Signage

Village of

DOLTON

15’-0”

10’-0”

Downtown Public Parking Melanie Fitness Center

Village of Dolton Greenwood Sculpture Trail

5’-0”

0

FABRIC BANNER »» Fabric banner mounted to existing light poles

DIRECTIONAL SIGN »» Pole mounted sign panel directs visitors to key Village destinations »» Sign panel to be aluminum with integrated color »» Sign panel may be mounted to existing light poles or mounted to a freestanding pole structure »» Post finials may be internally lit to match Village logo color

GATEWAY SIGN »» Pole mounted monument sign announces key entry points into the Village and along the proposed Greenwood Trail »» Sign may be aluminum panel or internally lit aluminum cabinet »» Post finials may be internally lit to match Village logo color

ILLUMINATION »» Internally lit sign features reference neon signs in Downtown Dolton and provide night time interest throughout the Village

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Design Guidelines When new development or redevelopment occurs along Sibley Boulevard, it is essential that the visual elements that make up the corridor are carefully considered. The future vision of the Sibley Boulevard Corridor should be based on the application of design guidelines for private development that will result in a higher quality image, such as building orientation, building articulation and massing, treatment of the public right-of-way, building materials, signage and lighting consistency, and landscaping. Carefully creating a vision of the corridor based on high quality design guidelines will ensure that future development will reflect the desired vision of the Village.

Interesting features, such as distinct cornices

The following provides a set of potential design guidelines for the Sibley Boulevard Corridor: Building Design: »» Encourage variety in design yet an overall consistency among buildings. »» Utilize traditional color combinations and high-quality building materials such as brick, stone or other masonry. »» Ensure buildings have interesting roof lines, corner treatments, and highlighted building entrances. »» Use of unique architecture and interesting design elements that break up the facade are encouraged. »» Avoid blank front and side wall elevations on street frontages, and instead provide articulated facades and other design elements such as windows, variation in building materials, interesting roof-lines, etc.

This existing strip mall on Sibley Boulevard demonstrates many high-quality design elements.

Brick and other high quality building materials along primary facades Ground signs preferred using quality material and design Landscape adds visual interest and screens parking lot

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Landscaping, Lighing, and Signage: »» Include pedestrian-scaled lighting and signage. »» Use landscaping to soften building facades. »» Ensure rights-of-way provide an attractive atmosphere with plentiful trees, wide parkways with decorative paving. »» Ensure signage is highly compatible with the building and site design relative to color, material and placement. »» Encourage ground signage that is of quality material including brick and cast concrete. »» Discourage use of pole signs.

Signage should match the character of the building using high-quality materials.

Orientation: »» Regulate access management so as to avoid an excessive amount of curb cuts and promote shared drives and crossaccess between parcels. »» Large parking lots are discouraged in favor of smaller, connected parking lots that employ landscape screening, transitions, and buffers. »» Ensure pedestrian safety by creating “safe zones” for pedestrians through the use of fences, ballards, sidewalks or other means.

Developments should provide cross-access between parcels and incorporate landscaping and sidewalks.

Use of pole signs should be discouraged in favor of ground signage that does not dominate the skyline.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 10 | Sibley Boulevard Cooridor Plan

Public-Private Partnership As noted in Chapter 7, Economic Development Strategy, the Village of Dolton currently has two Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts covering a portion of Sibley Boulevard (see map). Both Districts are located on the north side of Sibley Boulevard, with the I-94/Sibley TIF focused on the east end of the corridor in and around Menards and the Dolton TIF #2 located just east of Greenwood, generally near Food-4-Less. Based on field observations, several additional parcels along the corridor could benefit from potential TIF funded incentives, particularly sites 1 and 2 on the south side of Sibley Boulevard. It may also be beneficial to explore connecting the two existing TIF’s to allow funds to be shared between the District’s. TIF expansion, or creation of a new TIF District, will require the Village to conduct an eligibility study, perform some financial projections, and prepare a redevelopment plan. A public hearing and review by effected taxing bodies through a Joint Review Board would also be required under current State Statutes.

10-16

Dolton TIF Districts

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Chapter 11

Downtown Dolton Downtown Dolton has served as the center of community activity. It represents the history of the community and is anchored by the Village municipal building and the library. The downtown is bounded by Main, Lincoln and Park Avenue. As the Sibley Avenue Corridor developed into a prime retail destination and other proximate regional retail centers developed the downtown lost its’ commercial drawing power and it is in need of revitalization. The key assets upon which a revitalization program can be built include: »» Municipal building and library anchors »» Attractive architecture inherent is some of the downtown buildings »» Pedestrian orientation of the downtown which creates a different environment than the auto-oriented corridors and regional centers »» Potential of a Southeast Metra Line Train Station which would allow for a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) plan for the downtown

»» Multiple available sites for infill development in the downtown »» Strong interest of Village officials to revitalize the downtown. »» Potential growth of the Union Pacific intermodal yard southwest of the downtown which will produce proximate daytime workers Downtown Dolton’s pedestiran-oriented development pattern can be used as an asset when attracting new businesses.

Vision The Dolton downtown will be revitalized as the “sense of place” center of the community capitalizing on its’ history, the current community anchors of the Village municipal building and the library and the addition of restaurants at various price points as well as selected entrepreneurial retail and service businesses. Mixed use housing which is not otherwise available in the community will be emphasized in order to take advantage of the downtown environment and the potential addition of a commuter train station which will create a convenient work/live environment. Finally, open space and streetscape improvements will help create a pedestrian oriented environment which residents will find attractive to live, enjoy and conduct their daily business. 11-1

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Issues 1. Downtown has suffered over many years as primary retailing has moved from downtown environments to high traffic retail corridors and regional retail corridors.

6. Other than the Village Hall and the library, the downtown does not have many reasons for residents to visit and even fewer reasons to make multiple visits.

2. Downtown is some distance from major corridors and therefore its’ success will be connected to it becoming a destination for its’ residents.

7. Over time, the Village will need to determine if the nightclub environment which operates in the downtown particularly over the weekend can properly co-exist with the more traditional environment of a family-oriented downtown.

3. Many of the buildings in the downtown will need revitalization in order to become functional and probably even further revitalization to accommodate current retailing and food and beverage standards. 4. The downtown suffers from the “form vs. function” dilemma. Its form, its’ layout and its’ size reflects its’ former function years ago as opposed to the new functions going forward. 5. Accordingly, it is somewhat disjointed and too spread out.

8. Streetscape improvements are necessary to create an attractive environment in which businesses can grow and pedestrians will find appealing. 9. The train crossing to the north of the downtown creates somewhat of a psychological barrier to visiting the downtown from the north. 10. Building windows and signage create a cluttered image which needs to be improved.

The downtown area faces several challenges including a lack of streetscape elements, disjointed and cluttered storefront signage, and lack of retail diversity. Dolton will need to address these issues in order to attract customers and residents to the area.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Opportunities 1. The Village municipal building and the library will continue to represent key reasons why residents will need to visit the downtown on a regular basis. The Public Library, along with the Village Hall, will continue to draw residents to the downtown area.

5. Rents in the downtown are low enough that they do not represent a barrier to recruitment of businesses to the downtown. 6. Many of the downtown buildings have architectural character and represent opportunities for adaptive re-use. 7. Many surrounding downtowns (Blue Island, Homewood, Lansing, South Holland) have clusters of retail and food businesses which may (when recruited) find the demographics near downtown attractive when considering to open a second or third location. It is this type of business that the downtown needs to attract. Clusters of co-tenancies should be emphasized.

2. Proximate to the downtown to the southwest, the Union Pacific Railroad has indicated an intention to grow its’ intermodal facility over time. This will represent a growth in revenue to the Village, an increase in jobs and an increase in the number of employee/consumers working proximate to the downtown on a daily basis. 3. Traditional half mile and five minute drive time market evaluation index factors for downtown Dolton are more than adequate to support downtown growth (population, number of households, median age, average household income, percentage of households with income over $75,000 and number of proximate employees on a daily basis). 4. Service businesses tend to prefer downtown locations where rents are lower and their customers can enjoy a convenient and attractive environment.

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8. There are many vacant/open land sites in the downtown. In the long term, they represent development sites. In the short term, they represent an opportunity for the Village to “land bank” these sites for the future with moderate municipal investment to create attractive “park like” appearances on each site.

There are a number of vacant sites located in the downtown area that the Village could “land bank” in anticipation of future development.

9. The Village has an opportunity to create zoning, development standards, design guidelines and signage guidelines which can guide future development. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

10. The proposed development of the Metra Southeast Service Line and the train station in the downtown represents a particular opportunity for Dolton. Proximate housing for commuters who wish to live in a downtown environment near the train is a key option. Market rate rental units will most likely be the key opportunity in the next 3-5 years. Also, the train commuters who use the train on a daily basis will become aware of and remember the growth of the downtown and return on other occasions to use its commercial/retail/food and beverage outlets. For commuter oriented items (i.e. coffee, convenience items, etc) they will become daily customers. 11. An improved streetscape in the downtown would considerably upgrade its’ appearance and begin to create the pedestrian orientation which is consistent with improving downtowns.

Market Analysis The information shown in Figure 11.1 illustrates the capability of the half-mile pedestrian market and the five minute drive time market proximate to the downtown to support the revitalization of the downtown. The market analysis indicates the strong potential for downtown revitalization: population density; number of households; a median age which is in the household building stage of their life; acceptable median household incomes; number of households with incomes higher than $75,000; and, the clusters of employees on a daily basis proximate to the downtown. The infrastructure in the downtown with improvement can support growth. Attractive buildings can undergo adaptive re-use. 11-4

FIGURE 11.1:

Downtown Pedestrian and Driver Markets 0.5 Mile Pedestian Radius

5 Minute Drive Time Radius

Total Population

3,657

32,530

Median Age

34.52

33.22

Average Household Size

3.08

2.98

Households

1,186

10,874

Population Density

4,656.71

5,208.01

Stability (% In Current Residence 5+ Years)

37.33%

31.34%

Average Household Income

$57,986

$55,345

Median Household Income

$52,797

$51,788

Income $ 75,000 to $99,999

205

1,708

Income $100,000 to $124,999

113

892

Income $125,000 to $149,999

19

355

Income $150,000 to $199,999

20

187

Income $200,000 to $249,999

5

40

18

119

380

3,301

1,122

5,855

118

644

Total Retail Expenditure

$24,302,025

$215,627,154

Retail Potential

$10,339,900

$91,752,986

Population

Households

Income

Income $250,000+ #HHs w/ Incomes $75,000+ Business Total Employees Total Establishments

Drinking Places

$101,334

$898,089

Full Service Restaurants

$1,123,073

$9,962,915

Grocery Stores

$6,572,720

$58,352,310

Limited Service Restaurants

$1,113,490

$9,879,685

Pharmacy and Drug Stores

$1,429,283

$12,659,987

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

A streetscape plan can enhance the appearance and pedestrian orientation of the existing downtown. Open spaces offer the opportunity for site development in the long term and the ability to create attractive “park like” settings in the short term. The Village Hall and the library will remain the key anchors.

The train station offers a particular opportunity for the market rate rental development for commuters who wish to live close to the train.

Recruitment of small business in the food and beverage area, small retail and service businesses represents the best opportunity for the downtown. A strong emphasis should be put on recruiting successful business from downtowns in area communities who can benefit from the demographics while opening a second or third location. Given the distance of the downtown from major corridors, newly recruited business must have stability, an existing customer base and some name recognition in the community. In the long term, as the downtown becomes more populated, start-up businesses may have a better chance for success. The Village should put into place the appropriate zoning, development standards, design guidelines and sign guidelines to support revitalization.

Prior Plans and Studies

The addition of downtown market rate rental units should be strongly considered. On the one hand, quality market rate rental units are needed in the community. This trend is currently typical in every community where rental is now preferred as the equity housing market is challenged and is not affordable for many seeking quality housing. In particular, these residents will prefer the quiet walking environment in the downtown. However, concurrent with residential development the Village will want to recruit businesses that these residents can use and enjoy with an emphasis on food and beverage at various price points. Finally, the potential development of a downtown Dolton train station represents a very positive potential addition. Many of these commuters will return at other times if there are reasons to return to the downtown (more businesses).

Metra TOD Phase I Study

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Over the short, intermediate and long term there are market opportunities to revitalize downtown Dolton.

Multiple regional studies have been conducted by the South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association and the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation. Four studies were reviewed that had relevance to downtown Dolton. These four studies are: »» 2008 CNT COD Report --- Executive Summary and Full Report »» BDI 2009 Regional Retail Report »» 2004 and 2007 Southeast Rail Feasibility Studies »» Metra TOD Phase One Study

In 2010 and 2011 Land Vision and BDI conducted a market evaluation of 44 train stations including the potential stations on the proposed Southeast Line under the oversight of the RTA. Dolton was analyzed as part of the proposed Southeast Line development relative to the potential downtown station. The study produced similar adequate demographic numbers to support the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) around the station. Both Station and Developer typologies were developed for each station area. Dolton was defined as a Community Transit Area with walkable neighborhoods with moderate density/mixed uses including housing and locally oriented commercial uses. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

The recommended developer typology assigned to Dolton was focused on infill developers who specialize either in market rate residential rental or small food and beverage, retail and service businesses. Prototype design guidelines were developed for each station typology.

Policies and Initiatives The following policies and initiatives should be applied to the short, intermediate and long term development of the downtown. More specific strategies are summarized in the concept plans for the downtown. 1. Support redevelopment, including financial partnerships, and reinvestment. Although aging buildings like many of those in the downtown are currently unattractive, they have architectural attractiveness and their rental rates that match their low investment, making them acceptable elements of a real estate redevelopment portfolio. Property owners are reluctant to redevelop due to high investment and uncertainty of tenanting. Village partnerships that aid property assembly, identify tenants, and insure compatible neighboring uses can reduce that risk and thereby assist in redevelopment. Redevelopment will offer significant additional economic development potential. Tax Increment Financing (TIF) would be one tool the Village could employ to support redevelopment downtown. Through TIF, the Village could fund a façade improvement program, provide streetscape enhancements, create and improve public parking lots, and partner in many other ways with the private sector to promote redevelopment. The Village has successfully utilized this partnership tool along Sibley Boulevard to attract larger users like Menard’s and Food-4-Less. 11-6

Within the downtown, the goal will be to attract mixed use development consistent with the policies outlined in this chapter. 2. Create a consistent design scheme for the downtown, through the adoption of Design Guidelines, which require quality development as individual sites and commercial centers redevelop. Design Guidelines should address building material, architectural details, building siting, parking lot layout, signage, screening, pedestrian connections, landscaping, and lighting. 3. Make a public investment in the right-of-way to improve visual appearance of the downtown. Public investment is necessary to create a desirable image that will also attract higher quality tenants through the implementation of a consistent streetscape pattern. Such streetscape pattern should including planting of street trees/ ornamental shrubs in the parkway, decorative pavers at intersections, decorative street lighting, installation of pedestrian amenities including benches, use of decorative signage and banners, and installation of community gateways welcoming visitors to the downtown. Example streetscape concepts are illustrated later in this chapter under urban design. 4. In the short and intermediate term, make the vacant lots attractive “park like” spaces which can be converted to development sites at the appropriate time in the future. These vacant lots can also be utilized for parking if needed to support downtown businesses. Another opportunity highlighted on the Concept Plan is for creation of temporary event space for a Farmers Market or as a location for Food Trucks. An ideal location for this would be along Greenwood Avenue between 142nd Street and Chicago Road where the former railroad line was removed. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Food Trucks are a major trend in quick dining, and have become very popular in many areas of the country. These small, entrepreneurial businesses prepare unique and fast meals to customers without the expense of a permanent store. While traditionally designed to attract lunch-time crowds outside of larger downtown office buildings, a more recent trend has been to cluster food trucks to create dining events. Dolton could work with food truck vendors to host such events in downtown.

6. Encourage and support the development of the Union Pacific intermodal yard as it represents enhanced revenue for the Village and an important daily employee cluster proximate to the downtown. 7. At the appropriate time, visit market rate rental projects in like communities to assess potential while becoming familiar with potential developers.

Concept Plans

Example of a typical food truck

Example of a food truck cluster

5. Aggressively become engaged in the ongoing dialogue with Metra relative to the development of the Southeast Line in order that the planning for the line is consistent with the downtown plan. 11-7

The concept plans shown in Figure 11.3 illustrate potential streetscape and intersection improvements as well as development site opportunities available within downtown Dolton. Figure 11.2 on the following page further defines the development site opportunities and potential redevelopment options. Once implemented, these proposed improvements will help to create a unique, pedestrian-friendly area that makes the downtown a desination for both residents and businesses. There are currently several vacant lots located in the downtown area. There is significant potential for transit-oriented development to occur around this area in order to supplement the future Metra station. In the long-term, these sites provide Dolton with the opportunity to expand the economy by creating additional development. In the shortterm, the Village could enhance these areas in order to be create additional park and open space for the downtown area as they pursue permanent development opportunities for the sites. The proposed streetscape and intersection improvements will improve pedestrian circulation and safety downtown as well as enhance the existing aesthetics of downtown. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

The primary intersection treatment identified in the concept plan is located at the intersection of Chicago Road and Main Street, and is further illustrated in Figure 11.3. Due to the amount of train lines located in the downtown area, it is also important to incorporate railroad crossing treatments into the downtown streetscape.

The recommendations provided in this concept plan represents the long-term strategy and ideal future development of the properties within downtown Dolton. This plan will take many years to implement and will require both public and private investment in order to make downtown a destination area.

FIGURE 11.2:

Redevelopment Site Summary Site

Address

Existing Uses

1

394, 396,400,420, 426 E. 142nd Street

Vacant and occupied warehouse buildings

2

409, 413, 415,419, 425, 429 E 142nd Single-family houses Street; 14206 Pennsylvania Avenue

Area

Existing Zoning

Redevelopment Approach

6.5 acres

M-1: Limited Manufacturing District

Metra Station, parking, mixeduse development with ground floor retail/restaurants and upper story office or residential

1 acre

14150 Washington Street, 14150 Chicago Road, 528 Main Street

Vacant commercial building and parking lot

50,000 sq. ft. (9,600 sq.ft. building)

4

14103 Chicago Road, 525 & 529 Washington Street

Vacant commercial building - former bank - and parking lot

5

14111 Chicago Road

3

6

7

11-8

14056, 14062, 14066 Lincoln Avenue 1443 & 14217 Lincoln Avenue, 14136 Grant Street, 618 & 630 Main Street

R-3: One Family Mixed-use (when Metra station Dwelling District opens)

B-2: Limited Retail Business District

Retail/office/restaurant with possible upper story office or residential

50,000 sq. feet (buildings - 5,384 sq. ft. & 1,578 sq.ft.)

B-2: Limited Retail Business District

a. Retail/office/restaurant with possible upper story office or residential b. Office complex for social service agencies and nonprofits

Nightclub

6,600 sq. feet (5,400 sq. ft. building)

B-2: Limited Retail Business District

Single-story retail or restaurant use

Vacant land

50,500 sq. ft.

B-2: Limited Retail Business District

Multi-family residential (townhomes, apartments, or condominiums)

Vacant land and 2 single-family houses

49,600 sq. ft.

B-2: Limited Retail Business District

Multi-family residential (townhomes, apartments, or condominiums)

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Urban Design The information presented in Figures 11.4 and 11.5 provide recommendations for enhancing the walkability, urban design, and character in downtown Dolton. Figures 11.4 illustrates a variety of improvements the Village of Dolton could incorporate into the existing streetscape in order to make the downtown a more vibrant and inviting area. These improvements include the incorporation of corner bumpouts, parking area screening, a corner gateway plaza, and parkway treatments. The corner bumpout will expand the existing sidewalk area allowing for addition of features such as sidewalk cafes and planter pots. In addition, the corner bump outs will provide an added measure of security for pedestrians since they are intended to slow traffic and reduce pedestrian roadway crossing distances. The parkway treatments, including trees, lighting and signage, will add to the visual appeal of the area and help to create a “sense of place� for the downtown.

The gateway plaza provides additional pedestrian features along the strip mall area. Figure 11.5 provides a street-level view of these proposed improvements. The Village of Dolton is also encouraged to incorporate complete street principles into any future improvements for this area. Complete streets are designed to enable safe access for all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders. A complete street may include: sidewalks, bike lanes (or wide paved shoulders), special bus lanes, comfortable and accessible public transportation stops, frequent and safe crossing opportunities, median islands, accessible pedestrian signals, curb extensions, narrower travel lanes, roundabouts, and more. Complete streets in each community are unique but are designed to balance safety and convenience for everyone using the road.

The downtown area could benefit greatly from the incorporation of urban design elements including lighting and sidewalk enhancements, corner bumpouts, and improved signage. These elements could increase the visual appeal and walkability of downtown and help attract new businesses and residents to the area.

11-9

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan FIGURE 11.4:

Main Street/Chicago Road Intersection Enhancements 4

TREET

142nd S

FURNITURE STORE

VILLAGE CAFE

4

4 4

1

4 CHICAGO ROAD

1 2

2 3

VACANT BUILDING STRIP COMMERCIAL PARKING

11-10

1

CORNER BUMPOUTS

3 CORNER GATEWAY PLAZA

2

PARKING AREA SCREENING

4 PARKWAY TREATMENTS

»» Occur along Chicago Road »» Expanded sidewalk areas support cafes & reduce roadway crossing distance »» Planter pots »» Wayfinding signage »» Decorative paving

»» Landscape plantings »» Ornamental fencing

»» Occurs at strip commercial parking area »» Provides amphitheater and lawn areas »» Includes interpretive plaza features that reference Dolton’s brickyard history

»» Sidewalk repair as needed »» Shade trees in tree grates »» Ornamental lighting and banners Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

FIGURE 11.5:

Downtown Streetscape Enhancements

1

2

Facade Enhancements

»» Awnings »» Signage »» Goosneck Lighting

Corner Bump-out Enhancements

»» Expanded sidewalk area »» Sidewalk cafe seating includes perimeter railing and planters »» Planter pots »» Wayfinding Signage »» Decorative Paving

1

op

er Sh

Barb

1

afe

eC

g Villa

2

2

2

Current Conditions

11-11

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

Design Guidelines When new development or redevelopment occurs along within Downtown Dolton, it is essential that the visual elements that make up the corridor are carefully considered. The future vision of the Downtown Dolton should be based on the application of design guidelines for private development that will result in a higher quality image, such as building orientation, building articulation and massing, treatment of the public right-of-way, building materials, signage and lighting consistency, and landscaping. Carefully creating a vision of the corridor based on high quality design guidelines will ensure that future development will reflect the desired vision of the Village. The following provides a set of potential design guidelines for the Downtown Dolton: Building Orientation and Setback: »» Main pedestrian access should be oriented along the public street. »» Parking and service areas should be oriented at the building rear and accessed from the alley. »» Recommended front yard setback: 0’-0” »» Maximum allowable front yard setback: 10’-0”

Facade Treatments and Materials: »» Buildings should incorporate masonry materials such as limestone and brick throughout the facade and along exterior walls. »» Building entrances should be prominent and accessible from the public street. Entrances are recommended to be recessed into the facade a minimum of 5’0”. »» Ground floor windows should be large display windows and incorporate multiple divisions, such as mullions. »» Awnings and canopies are encouraged along the public walkway. »» Building cornices, friezes, lintels, sills and surrounds should be clearly expressed with limestone, metal, or painted wood materials.

Building Proportion, Size, and Scale: »» Maximum of 3-4 stories »» Match or transition building proportions between existing adjacent building. »» Main pedestrian access should be oriented along the public street. Maintain ground level pedestrian scale with traditional storefront facade components and proportions as shown in the facade diagram in Figure 11.5 »» Minimize monotony of expansive exterior walls with vertical breaks in the building facade. 11-12

Building entrance is oriented towards the street and incorporates signage into the fabric canopy. The building utilizes masonry materials throughout the facade.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan Parking »» Required parking should be provided within each development site. »» Short-term parking should be provided on-street or in municipal parking lots. »» Long-term parking should be provided at the building rear. Landscaping: »» Where developments abut the public street, streetscape treatments, including parkway plantings, lighting, paving and site furnishings should be provided »» Rear yard parking, loading and service areas should be screened with a minimum planting area width of 6’-0”.

Streetscape treatments along the public street include plantings, lighting, decorative paving and site furnishings.

Signage and Lighting: »» Protruding signage shall not extend beyond the building facade more than 3’. »» Pole mounted signage is discouraged. »» Decorative lighting, mounted to the building facade, such as gooseneck lighting is encouraged.

Gooseneck lighting and quality signage are encouraged within the Dowtown area.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 11 | Downtown Dolton Plan

FIGURE 11.6:

Diagram of Dominant Facade Elements and Streetscape

Cornice

Frieze

Cornice Sign Awning

rian

st ede

Sidewalk 5’

Parkway 4’

Parking Lane 10’

Travel Lane 11’

Travel Lane 11’

Parking Lane 10’

Parkway 4’

Sidewalk 5’

Display Window

w

Vie

P

11-14

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 12 | Sustainability

Chapter 12

Sustainability Sustainability is defined as the ability to "meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" (United Nations General Assembly). A sustainable approach to any issue integrates the social, economic and environmental dimensions to ensure no undue impact is created in any of these factors. In short, sustainable development ensures environmental, economic and social well-being for today and tomorrow. The Village of Dolton should strive to incorporate these principles into future development in order to create a sustainable community that can be enjoyed by present and future generations. Municipal sustainability approaches generally focus on four primary areas: land, water, energy, and recycling. The following guidelines focus primarily on land and water strategies for enhanced sustainability. Regarding sustainable energy solutions, Commonwealth Edison offers many excellent tips and suggestions on improving energy efficiency on their web site - https://www.comed.com/ home-savings/Pages/default.aspx. The Village should partner with this electrical utility to promote energy conservation through distribution

12-1

of flyers, posting articles in the Village newsletter, etc. to encourage residents to take advantage of these low cost (or no cost) opportunities to reduce their electrical usage. Regarding recycling, the Village should consider working with their local garbage contractor Homewood Disposal to expand their services in Dolton to include curb-side recycling. Such programs have greatly increased the amount of material recycled in surrounding municipalities by making the effort to recycle convenient and easy for residents and businesses. Homewood Disposal currently offers this service to over 30 of their other client municipalities.

Sustainable Design Developers, policy-makers, and residents are encouraged to incorporate sustainable practices into new development, redevelopment, and dayto-day activities in the Village. There are a variety of sustainable landscaping practices, streetscape designs, and construction techniques that Dolton could implement. The following provide a list of several of these practices that could be used to support sustainability within the Village of Dolton:

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 12 | Sustainability

Bioswales Vegetated swales that are located in parking lot islands, adjacent to parking lots, and near other large expanses of impervious surfaces. The swales are planted with native materials that slow the speed of runoff and allow water to infiltrate back into the ground instead of into storm sewers or detention ponds. Rain gardens

Bioswale

Similar to bioswales, rain gardens are vegetated depressions that slow stormwater runoff and allow water to infiltrate back into the ground. Native materials that can tolerate wet and dry conditions are planted in the bioswales and rain gardens. Rain gardens can be located near buildings, in parkways, and in and around parking areas. Naturalized Detention A naturalized detention area temporarily collects and stores stormwater runoff in a ‘wetland’ type area. It is then released at a slow and controlled rate to allow it to infiltrate into the ground. These areas are planted with native wetland plantings that can tolerate severe wet and dry conditions.

Rain garden

Native Landscaping The use of native grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees should be strongly considered. Native species can withstand a wide range of temperature extremes, use less water, require less maintenance, and use less fertilizers. Efficient Irrigation Efforts should be undertaken to reduce the amount of irrigation that is needed on-site. Native plant materials should be planted that require little irrigation. Other ways to be efficient with irrigation is to utilize rain-triggered shut-off devices, flow reducers, head layout that only sprays in softscape spaces, and the use of drip irrigation systems.

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Naturalized Detention

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 12 | Sustainability

Level Spreaders To assist with bioswales and naturalized detention, level spreaders can be utilized. Level spreaders collect and evenly disperse stormwater runoff into bioswales and other naturalized detention facilities. Recycled Construction Materials Where possible, the use of recycled materials is strongly encouraged. Pre-consumer and post-consumer content can incorporated into building materials, site amenities, paving, and various finishes.

Level Spreader

Green Roof Vegetated roofs can assist with reducing the energy costs of heating and cooling buildings. In addition, green roofs help to reduce urban heat islands, reduce the rate and quantity of stormwater runoff, and provide unique and sometimes pedestrian accessible outdoor spaces. Green roofs require waterproofing, sub-roof drainage, structural soil, and native plantings. Permeable Paving

Green Roof

Various paving products exist that allow stormwater to infiltrate through the pavement and infiltrate the soil below. Various options include permeable concrete, permeable precast pavers, reinforced gravel and grass paving, and permeable asphalt. The benefits of permeable paving is the reduction in on site storm sewer capacity, the recharging of underground water supplies, and the filtering out of pollutants and other debris. High Albedo Paving Light colored pavement can be utilized to reflect sunlight away from paved areas. This will help reduce the urban heat island effect, allows vegetation to thrive, and cuts down on the amount of irrigation required in high pavement areas.

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Pervious Pavement

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 12 | Sustainability

Dark Sky Lighting To reduce light pollution, dark sky lighting techniques should be utilized. Dark sky lighting fixtures are designed to be energy efficient, and to direct the lighting down and out, rather than up into the sky. Alternative Energy Various options exist to incorporate alternative energies into the development. These include geothermal, reflective roofing, solar energy, and wind turbines.

Alternative Energy

Smart Energy Design Assistance Program A great program the Village of Dolton, the Dolton Park District, and local School Districts should explore is the Smart Energy Design Assistance Program. This federally funded program offers design review to identify areas where building systems can be modified to promote energy efficiency. The service is free to qualifying public agencies. Their recommendations can be targeted to local needs and are building specific, identifying both inexpensive solutions and some they may be more capital intensive initially but can have significant cost savings over time. Dolton Village Hall would seem to be a perfect candidate for this type of analysis given the age and historic character of the structure. More details of their services are noted below.

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Services LEVEL 1: QUICK ADVICE - NO APPLICATION REQUIRED - Immediate advice over the phone or by email. Get in touch to ask us about the Smart Energy Design Assistance Program, energy efficiency technical questions, or to assess the need for program services. No eligibility requirements. LEVEL 2: ENERGY ASSESSMENT - APPLICATION REQUIRED - Recommendations specific to your building. Some criteria apply, including potential for energy savings and the availability if needed building information. Priority is given to applicants who are ready to implement energy recommendations.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 12 | Sustainability

Call or apply to determine eligibility for these services. • Our assessment will include a list of recommended energy cost reduction measures (ECRMs) for your building. • The assessment may cover your whole building or may address a specific need you have. Savings potential may or may not be quantified. Energy assessments for an existing facility may include a site visit, which will be arranged after bills and plans are received and analyzed. LEVEL 3: DESIGN ASSISTANCE - IN ADDITION TO LEVEL 2 ANALYSIS - Project leader does deeper analysis to assess complex buildings more fully, typically including a life cycle cost analysis to identify energy cost reduction measures (ECRMS) and potential savings. • Assessment will include results and analyses using an energy simulation model. • A cost-benefit analysis for upgrades will be performed in order to prioritize the ECRMs identified.

Application Instructions How to apply: »» Fill out an application online at sedac.org »» SEDAC can provide in-depth energy assessment services (Level 2 and 3) for most Illinois businesses and public entities with buildings greater than 20,000 square feet. »» Some buildings smaller than 20,000 square feet will qualify depending on energy usage. The applicant will provide to SEDAC: Fully completed application form, including name and account numbers of energy utility companies, size of building. »» 12-24 months of electricity and gas bills (for existing buildings) »» Building plans upon request For more information see www.sedac.org, call toll free at 800-214-7954, or e-mail at info@sedac.org

LEVEL 4: IMPLEMENTATION ASSISTANCE Follow up advice to program participants to assist with implementation of recommended energy cost reduction measures. Support may include advice on specific technical questions, help finding alternative financing assistance, and bid process support.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

Chapter 13

Implementation Monitoring & Updates

Development Regulations

The Comprehensive Plan is a statement of policy, expressing the objectives and aspirations for the Village, which will assist in developing a wellplanned community and maintain a high quality of life. The Comprehensive Plan is based on currently available information regarding community conditions, vision, growth and development trends, and community issues. Many of these conditions will continue to change over time and necessitate the continual review and update of the Comprehensive Plan. It is recommended that the Plan should be reviewed annually by the Village and updated as needed. The Plan Commission should also do a more thorough review of the Comprehensive Plan and propose necessary amendments every 5 years, or as appropriate.

The Village of Dolton has a number of tools available in order to control the development and use of land including the Zoning Ordinance and Subdivision Ordinance. The Zoning Ordinance regulates the use of land within the Village and addresses the density, setback, and other physical characteristics of development on private property. The Subdivision Ordinance defines standards for dividing property into individual lots and specifies needed public improvements (streets, sidewalks, water and sewer lines, etc.)

Dolton’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) aligns the recommendations in the Comprehensive Plan with the financial realities of the Village. A CIP is generally defined as a prioritized list of public improvement that will be made over a certain time period on facilities such as streets, Village Hall, and other civic infrastructure. Prioritization of these improvements is based on the Village’s fiscal ability and resource capacity to support the proposed improvements. The CIP provides residents, businesses and public agencies with the knowledge of the projects that will be constructed and financed in the upcoming years. The Comprehensive Plan should be used as a key tool in determining future CIP projects and should therefore always remain updated to reflect current issues and recommendations. 13-1

Subdivision Ordinance The Subdivision Ordinance should be reviewed every four to five years to ensure that it is consistent with modern engineering and surveying practices. The Zoning Ordinance The Plan Commission should review the existing Zoning Ordinance to ensure that the regulations set out in the ordinance are aligned with the goals and objectives of the Comprehensive Plan. Some recommended changes for the current Zoning Ordinance are provided in the Appendix. These changes will ensure it remains a relevant and current tool for regulating the use of land according to the Comprehensive Plan.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

Annexation Dolton has limited options for annexation. The only unincorporated land surrounding Dolton is located along the southwestern border of the Village. Currently, the western half of this area is developed in unincorporated Cook County with single-family homes, churches, and schools and has been identified in the Future Land Use Map to remain a Low Density Residential area. The eastern half of the unincorporated area is part of the Shabonna Woods Forest Preserve and therefore is not an area that would be able to be developed.

The residents would then have to weigh these added benefits against the additional municipal property taxes they would have to pay. If residents are interested in annexation, it is suggested that the Village perform a Fiscal Impact Analysis to evaluate the financial implications of annexing this land. This analysis would weigh the cost of providing services versus the anticipated additional property tax revenue. Critical components of this analysis would include evaluation of the existing infrastructure (roads, sewers, waterlines, etc.) to determine needed capital improvements to bring the area up to Village of Dolton standards. From a revenue side, the Village would receive additional property tax revenue and some additional per capita revenues allocated by the State of Illinois (motor fuel tax revenue is an example of per capita revenue allocated to municipalities by the State).

Since the unincorporated area is already developed, and at the fringe of the existing community, it will be up to the property owners in the area to petition the Village for annexation. Reasons for annexation (from a resident’s perspective) would be improved services such as Chicago verdale better street maintenance and enhanced police and fire protection.

Burnham

FIGURE 13.1:

Unincorporated Land

Calumet City

INDIANA

Dolton

Phoenix

LEGEND Unincorporated Area

rvey

South Holland

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Forest Preseve

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

Housing Programs The Village of Dolton will engage in a number of programs designed to promote housing that is affordable for low, moderate, and middle income households. Using federal and local funds, the Village will be able to provide financial assistance for acquisition, new construction and rehabilitation of rental and owner-occupied housing.

The Program provides help to those who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly rehoused and stabilized under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“Recovery Act”). Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG)

The Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is managing this $1.93 billion program to help stabilize neighborhoods that have been hardest hit by the effects of foreclosed and abandoned properties. The Village of Dolton received funding to accomplish the following:

Each year the Village receives funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) through the Cook County Department of Economic Development. The funds can only be utilized to: 1) Provide decent housing 2) Provide a suitable living environment 3) Expand economic opportunities

• Acquire and rehabilitate housing units of foreclosed or abandoned housing for sale or rental by households at or below 120% of the area median income - property types may include single-family homes, townhomes, small flats, multi-family buildings and condominiums, based on availability • Provide a housing counseling for homebuyers

Homelessness Prevention Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)

As of summer 2012, the Village has already acquired and rehabilitated 8 homes through this program.

Cook County Bureau of Economic Development (www.cookcountygov.com)

The County has completed a Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing (HPRP) Substantial Amendment to its 2008 Annual Action Plan on May 18, 2009. The Substantial Amendment concerns the use of HPRP Grant funds in the amount of approximately 4 million dollars to be received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Homelessness Prevention and Rapid ReHousing Program provides financial assistance and services to prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless.

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Emergency Shelter Grants Program (ESG) The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, as amended, and the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 authorize the Emergency Shelter Grant Program under the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). However, effective January 5, 2012 The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) regulations revised the regulations for the Emergency Shelter Grant and renamed it the Emergency Solutions Grant. Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

These revisions, coupled with the name change, reflect the HEARTH regulations’ greater focus on creating permanent residential solutions for people who are at risk of homelessness and for people who have experienced homelessness. Cook County receives formula ESG funds from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Through a competitive application process, funds may be awarded to successful non-profit applicants to carry out the purposes of the Emergency Solutions Grant Program. Designed to create greater coordination with the Continuum of Care, the ESG Program provides funds for outreach to unsheltered persons, emergency shelters, homeless prevention for those at risk of becoming homeless, rapid rehousing for those going from being homeless to having a permanent housing solution. HOME Program Cook County currently utilizes HOME funds to support the following eligible activities: »» Housing Development Loans • Single or Multi-family • Ownership or Rental • Acquisition, Rehabilitation and/or New Construction »» Certified Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) Grants/Loans • Operating Grants • Pre-Development Loans • Set-Aside Project Loans A CHDO is a private, nonprofit organization that meets a series of qualifications prescribed in the HOME regulations. Cook County must use a minimum of 15 percent of its annual allocation for housing owned, developed or sponsored by CHDO's.

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Cook County evaluates organizations' qualifications and certifies them as CHDOs. Recertification is required. In accordance with program requirements, all HOME activities must benefit low-income households whose income does not exceed 80% of the area median income (AMI). Annual income restrictions apply to rental housing projects with 5 or more HOME-assisted units. A minimum of 25 percent in eligible non-Federal matching resources is required per project. Contingent upon project type and amount of HOME assistance, long-term affordability periods and monitor requirements may apply. Dolton’s challenge will be to promote establishment of a CHDO and find an experienced director for the non-profit. Such an organization has much more flexibility to work quickly and efficiently in promoting rehabilitation of the local housing stock.

Community & Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) (www.cedaorg.net) CEDA works collectively with lenders to work out payment plans for those seeking mortgage delinquency assistance. CEDA’s Housing Program works with landlords throughout suburban Cook County to place extremely low income families in temporary and affordable housing. Each year CEDA provides counseling services to families and individuals. All families and individuals are eligible for personalized counseling services. A housing counselor will be assigned to each household to help assess client situation and determine housing services need. Short-term rental assistance may be provided, pending funding availability and client eligibility.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

CEDA Homeowners Services Illinois Hardest Hit Homeowner Loan Program For Under-Employed And Unemployed (HHF) The HHF Program is designed to assist unemployed or substantially underemployed homeowners who satisfy certain criteria with interim mortgage payments assistance on the borrower's personal residence, subject to borrower contribution based on income, for up to eighteen (18) months. The goal is to allow the borrower to sustain income and homeownership through new employment or job training efforts without the immediate threat of default or foreclosure on the residence. Illinois Foreclosure Prevention and Cook County Mediation Programs The IFP and Mediation Programs are designed to assist families and individuals that are delinquent in or in default of losing their homes. The goal is to help the homeowner reach a dignified exit. A CEDA housing counselor will work closely with the legal department and/or lender and servicer for a payment plan to remain in the house or help them obtain other housing opportunities. Renters/Homeless Prevention Homeless Prevention And Rapid Re-Housing Rent Subsidy Assistance For Homeless And Renting Individuals And Families CEDA rental assistance program is designed to help low income individuals and families remain in or obtain permanent housing. This program provides rent payment assistance to clients living in suburban Cook County. The goal is to prevent families from becoming homeless and to help those who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized.

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Rental Housing Support Program for ExtremelyLow And Low-Income Individuals and Families CEDA rental housing program is a unit-based program targeting landlords to provide program units for households who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income. The program is designed to make housing affordable to extremely low income and severely low income households. Transitional Housing for Honorably Discharged Veterans CEDA Transitional Housing Program is designed to develop supportive housing and services to honorably discharged, homeless veterans. This program is designed to improve the lives of men or women who have served our country, but are in need of direct housing and services that can assist them in transitioning back into self-sufficiency. The assistance of the supportive services is to help them to achieve residential stability, increase their skill and/or incomes, and obtain greater self-determination (i.e., more influences over decisions that affect their lives).

Housing Authority of Cook County (HACC) (www.thehacc.org) Homeownership Program If you are a currently a participant in the HACC Housing Choice Voucher Program, you can continue to use your voucher to subsidize your rent payments or you can use your voucher to make owning a home affordable. The homeownership mortgage subsidy program works like the rental subsidy program with one key difference. The mortgage subsidy program provides an opportunity for you to achieve the American Dream of Homeownership.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation

Transportation, Beautification,and Infrastructure There are a variety of funding sources available to help supplement the cost of repairs, updates, and improvements recommended within the transportation chapter as well as the specific corridor and downtown chapters. Funding sources for enhancement and beautification are summarized in Figure 13.2.

Funding Property taxes and sales tax will likely always remain the primary funding sources for both operation and capital improvements within a municipality. However, particularly for capital items, grants are available from a variety of sources to help pay all or a portion of the cost of needed improvements. The following summarizes some of these potential funding sources. Intergovernmental Agreements Emergency management agencies such as police and fire departments have long established agreements, often referred to as ‘mutual-aid’ that provide mechanisms for neighboring communities to work together to fight fires or crime. General Obligation Bond These are voter-approved bonds with the assessment placed on real property for a specified period of time (usually 15-20 years). The money can only be used for capital improvements, not maintenance. Major disadvantages of this funding option are the high approval requirement and the high interest costs.

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Revenue Bonds These bonds are sold and paid from the revenue produced from the operation of a facility. Joint Public/Private Partnership The concept of public/private partnerships has become increasingly popular for municipalities. The basic approach is for a public agency to enter into a working agreement with a private corporation to help fund, build, and/or operate a facility. Generally, the three primary incentives that a public agency can offer are a free site, tax advantages, and access to a facility. This approach is sometimes used for public recreational facilities such as the construction or operation of a recreation center or a golf course. Tax Increment Financing (TIF) is another approach to promoting a public/ private partnership that has been effectively used by the Village of Dolton to promote private development. Public Land Trusts Private land trusts such as the Trust for Public Land, Inc. and the Nature Conservancy will acquire and hold land for eventual acquisition by a public agency. This might be a possible approach to consider for acquisition of either Lake Cottage Grove or Lake Victory for enhanced public access. Other Government Grant Programs »» Urban Forestry Grants. There are several grant programs that provide money for urban forestry projects. One is funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration and provides grants to purchase and plant trees. This program sometimes funds urban street tree planting programs.

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Chapter 13 | Implementation  US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFW): USFW may provide technical assistance and administer funding for projects that enhance water quality, including debris removal, flood mitigation, and enhancements to water crossings. Private Grants and Foundations Private grants and foundations provide money for a wide range of projects. They are sometimes difficult to find and equally difficult to secure because of the open competition. They usually fund unique projects or projects of extreme need. The MacArthur Foundation is an example of a Chicago-based organization that funds many community development and arts related programs.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Appendix

Appendix Review of Dolton Zoning Ordinance – completed 8/7/2012 As a part of the Comprehensive Planning process, the Village’s existing zoning ordinance was reviewed to identify areas for further review. In many cases, comments noted below are designed to update the existing code to reflect modern development and regulatory approaches. In other cases, suggested modifications are designed to improve consistency between the Comprehensive Plan (overall guide) and the Zoning Ordinance (regulatory tool). This review only examines the zoning categories (including the map), parking, and sign components of the zoning ordinance.

General 1. A purpose statement should be added at the beginning of each of the zoning classifications. This would help clarify the intent of the district, and could reference specific land use categories from the Comprehensive Plan. Currently, each district’s regulations has a short section titled “District Regulations” which could be deleted and replaced with a clear purpose statement for each zoning category. 2. Illustrations would be helpful, particularly to clarify bulk regulations like setback, measurement of lot width, measurement of height, floor area ratios, etc. 3. Several issues related to the zoning map (dated 2010) should be addressed, including: a. The zoning map shows a category for “public schools, parks, buildings and other” – yet no such zoning category exists. Either the Village should create a separate institutional zoning district for these uses, or the zoning map should be changed to indicate the underlying zoning while perhaps adding a label for the respective school, park, etc. The issue here is if an institutional use like a church or a school was ever vacated, what uses would be allowed to occupy the space? b. The color coding is a good way to distinguish zoning categories, but the coloring system would be changed to a more traditional zoning/land use color scheme – preferably one following the industry standard Land Based Classification Standards (LDCS) found on the American Planning Association Web Site at http://www.planning.org/lbcs/standards/index.htm. In general, color coding should be: iii. Residential – yellow for lower density, shifting to brown for multi-family iv. Business – red v. Industrial – purple vi. Institutional (schools, churches, etc.) – blue vii. Parks – green A-1

Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Appendix

c. A large condo/apartment project at the northwest corner of Greenwood and California is colored as “public schools, parks, buildings and other” d. The Menards development and adjacent lots have no color – what is the zoning (maybe Planned Business Center?) e. Check the map around Dante and Dolton Avenue. The map appears to show the area zoned as Limited Manufacturing on the north side of Dolton Ave. where New Life Celebration Church and Trinity University are located – yet these uses are not permitted in the M-1 District (unless they were approved as a part of a Planned Development or grandfathered – in existence before the area was zoned). f. The legend should indicate the zoning abbreviation (R1, R2, etc.) – currently it just shows the category name, with 3 colors used for one family dwelling district. g. Blackstone Park, Meadow Lane Park, and Berger Vandenberg Elementary School appear to show appropriate underlying zoning – as opposed to most such facilities that are illustrated as “public schools, parks, etc.” – the map should show all such uses consistently. h. The property at the northeast corner of Sibley and Avalon Avenue is shown as a public building, but in actuality is a private medical use. i. The parcels along the north side of Sibley at the far west end of town (McDonald’s, etc.) are shown as M-1, but would seem more appropriate as one of the business zoning categories. j. The map should be reviewed to verify current municipal limits in the southeast portion of the Village. Conversations with the Village Administrator indicate some possible inaccuracies based on an agreement with the Village of South Holland along Greenwood Avenue.

Residential Districts 1. Some communities have added an impervious (buildings and paved surfaces that do not absorb runoff) coverage ratio requirement. Such a requirement has several benefits, including helping to promote green space on individual properties and reducing storm water run-off. Such a requirement may be appropriate going forward in Dolton. 2. The R5 district appears designed to accommodate 3-flats (vertical layout) but not townhomes (horizontal side-by-side layout). Some adjustments to this district could allow for a greater variety of housing permitted by-right (as opposed to seeking approval via a Planned Development). 3. The R6 Multi-Family District restricts apartment buildings to 6 units. To achieve the scale of development needed to support desirable amenities such as work-out rooms, swimming pools, etc. – most modern apartment complexes have at least 150 units – not necessarily in one building, but certainly in fewer than the 25 buildings that would be required by this standard. Again, a developer could propose a larger apartment complex with larger buildings as a Planned Development currently, but it is recommended that this standard be reviewed and perhaps increased to better respond to modern development practices.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Appendix

Business/Manufacturing Districts 1. The use list should be reviewed, and ideally placed in a table for ease of use. The ordinance appears silent on several sometimes controversial uses such as adult uses or tattoo parlors. It is recommended that provisions for these uses be incorporated into the code – otherwise it will be very difficult to stop such a business from locating anywhere in the Village. 2. Considering expanding the locations where auto dealerships and car washes can locate. Currently, it appears they are only permitted in the M-1 and M-2 Districts. 3. The provisions for restricted delivery times near residential, lighting, and screening of trash receptacles are good. However, it may be helpful to modify these standards a bit to provide more detail (recommended lighting levels and type, alternatives to wood fencing for enclosures, etc.). 4. The ordinance does provide for mixed use development with residential over ground floor retail uses in many of the business categories. 5. Parking standards should be reviewed to adjust to modern zoning practices, including consideration of the addition of parking maximums to avoid large areas of little used asphalt that could be put to use by some more productive use. Some parking requirements to examine include: a. Restaurants – currently regulated based on a percent of the building capacity. This number is often not known at the time of plan review. Most codes base the requirement on overall building sq. ft., such as 10 cars per 1,000 sq. ft. Consideration for the type of restaurant should also be considered – generally with a higher demand for more white table cloth establishments were diners will stay longer, and a lower standard for higher turn-over uses. b. One-family dwellings – current requirement is for only 1 space per dwelling, yet homes in an apartment or duplex are required to provide at least 2 spaces per unit. Consider increasing the single-family requirement to provide at least space for 2 cars, and some provision that would allow a reduction in parking requirements if and when Dolton has a transit station on the proposed Southwest Metra service. 6. Dolton’s sign regulations are very minimal. Most communities are more specific as to what types of sign are permissible, and address the various types of signs (freestanding, wall mounted, etc.). Signs have a significant impact on the character of a commercial corridor, and additional regulations or at least guidelines, would help to provide more consistency of appearance and perhaps some identity for the Village.

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Dolton Comprehensive Plan June 2013


Dolton Comprehensive Plan