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T 19

ISSUE Nº8

92

TERRONI MAGAZINE

Featured Region:

LOMBARDIA land of Franciacorta, risotto, fashion, design, panettone, aperitivo, to name just a few contributions from this region

EXPO MIL AN 2015 FEEDIN G THE PL ANET, ENERGY F OR LIFE why innovation means a return to tradition Plus WE TRAVEL TO THE COUNTRYSIDE OUTSIDE OF MILAN WITH ANTOINIETTA TAMAGNI FROM AGRITURISMO ROVERBELLA WHO SHARES HER TRADITIONAL RECIPES FROM THE REGION AND MORE ON ITALIAN DESIGN, MILAN’S FASHION AND WINES OUR FAVOURITE TERRONI INSTAGRAMS, COURTESY OF YOU

Feature interview with CARLO PETRINI - founder of Slow Food – on Terra Madre Giovani and EXPO 2015. How biodiversity and local farming will save the planet.


CONTRIBUTORS Max Stefanelli is the director of operations for Terroni in Los Angeles and the primary wine director at all Terroni outposts. He began working for Terroni in Toronto in 1999, after he left Bologna, Italy. When he isn’t tasting the bottled fruits of Italy, Max can be found playing ball hockey and zipping around on his shiny Vespa, or hanging out cooking at home with his beautiful wife, Francesca and their three gorgeous bambini.

Alice di Pietro is a journalist living in Milan, originally from the town of Gorgonzola. She is a content intelligence specialist in communication and editorial systems. She likes saffron chocolate and mascara on her lashes. She thinks that the best things in life are not things. Whenever she can, she travels around the globe to experience different cultures and meet new people. To check out her very own magazine visit beautips.it

Daniele Poli, Photographer class 1972, raised in Milan, originally from Livorno. An honorary “Terrone”. His career in photography began in the early ‘90s. He has worked with international photographers and participated in the planning and production of fashion shows, stage and theater shows and movie productions. He is driven by an animal instinct to turn on a flash lamp and shoot an image. Today he photographs artistic creations, mainly Italian ones. To explore his latest work visit danielepoli.com

Francesca Sarti was born and raised in Bologna, Italy, where after completing her University she started working in advertising and design. When she moved to Toronto in 2000 she started to work for Terroni : here is where she found her true passion in food, wine and hospitality. She is currently working as a sommelier at the Terroni Los Angeles locations, where she moved in 2007 with her husband Max. Her 3 bambini are her favorite thing in the world, but only when they aren't taking over the wine tastings and tasting talks.

Federico Guida was born and raised in Milan, Italy. His lifelong passion for photography inspired his training and after exploring several photographic genres, ranging  from studio photography to public events, he developed a natural inclination  for street photography. He currently works as a freelancer, collaborating with studios and agencies in Italy. To explore his latest work visit federicoguida.it

Writer and journalist Elisabetta di Maria lives in Milan. She has contributed to several newspapers and magazines covering design, literature, local customs and traditions. Today, she prefers to dedicate more time to writing short stories and producing jewellery that she designs. Deep inside though, she is still a farmer from Brindisi, who writes about cuisine, agriculture, countryside, lasagna, orecchiette, tortellini and grilled octopus in her spare time.

Stephanie Palmer is the general manager of the Adelaide location in Toronto. She has been with the company since 1998. A graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (BFA’00), her passion for pasta is only eclipsed by her love of photography. To explore her latest work visit stephaniepalmerphotography.com

Jessica Allen started working at Terroni as a dishwasher about 17 years ago. A remarkably quick study, she soon moved on to serving and eventually helped manage the Queen Street location. After she left to take a job at a magazine, she helped launch Terroni magazine with publisher Elena di Maria. Now she works on a TV show, but Terroni will always need her.

Publisher Elena di Maria

Copy Editor Amy Cormier

Editor-in-Chief Francesca Vittoria Gironi

Design Small

Director of Photography Stephanie Palmer

Many thanks to Carlo Petrini Slow Food Rinaldo Rava Antonietta Tamagni Gianna Sami Karina Watsone

Photographers Federico Guida Daniele Poli

T Magazine Headquarters 720 Queen St. W. Toronto, M6J 1E8 For inquiries and comments please email: francescav@terroni.ca Cover photo by Federico Guida

Follow us on @terroniTO @terroniLA @Sud Forno @barcentraleTO Terroni Toronto & Los Angeles

Printed in Canada


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TERRONI INDEX

by Jessica Allen

LOMBARDIA, ALLA MODA ALWAYS, NOW AND FOREVER Year that Leonardo da Vinci completed the fresco of The Last Supper: 1498

Number of countries participating in this year’s Expo Milano – Feeding the Planet: 140+

Number of Franciacorta producers in the Lombardia region: 109

Maximum number of minutes people can view the fresco at the Pinacoteca di Brera – Milan: 15

Number of weeks you can live without food: 5

Number of bottles sold in 2013: 14 million Number of bottles sold abroad in 2014: 5.3 million

Number of days you can live without water: 5

Sondrio

Lago Maggiore

Number of spires on the Duomo of Milan: 135

Lago di Como

Number of years it took to complete the Duomo: about 600

Lecco

Varese Como Lago di Varese

Tons of marble transported through the Naviglio Grande from Lago Maggiore to build the Duomo: 325,000

Bergamo

Monza

Lago d'Iseo

Brescia

MILANO Lago di Gardia

Lodi Pavia

Mantova

Cremona Fiume Po

Number of UNESCO World Heritage sites located in Lombardia: 10 In Italy: 51 In Canada: 17 Number of WWF protected areas in Lombardia: 16 Amount of European patents that in Italy are initiated in Lombardia: 1/3

Percentage of foreign companies that in Italy decide to invest in Lombardia: 50% Amount of Italian GDP coming from Lombardia: 1/5 Number of companies operating in the fashion industry based in Lombardia: 18.904

Number of canals (navigli) in Lombardia built between 1179 and the 16th century for irrigation and to ferry people and merchandise: 5 Number of kilometers they cover: 162 Year that the most of the canals were covered in Milan: 1929


© 2015 Nestlé Waters North America Inc.

Live in Italian™

FINE DINING DOESN’T HAVE TO MEAN FINE CHINA. FROM TABLECLOTH TO SANDWICH SHOP, S.PELLEGRINO MAKES ANY MEAL AN OCCASION WITH ITS FINE BUBBLES AND UNIQUE TASTE.

SHOW US WHAT MAKES YOU A FOODIE AT THE INFINITE TABLE. SANPELLEGRINO.COM


DESIGN ITALIANO

V ES PA P IAG G IO , 194 6 . PONTE DE R A , ITALY.

Intro Although people don’t necessarily think of Milan as one of the world’s most beautiful cities, there is no question that it stands as one of the world’s most significant contributors to beauty, art and style. Milan is renowned for hosting Milan Fashion week and the Salone Internazionale del Mobile (Milan Furniture Fair) and this year it was host to the Universal Exposition: Expo 2015 for the second time in the fair’s history. Origin The term ‘design’ is associated with the age of the Industrial Revolution (early 1800s) when objects were no longer created by a sole artisan but, thanks to more reliable methods of mass production, were able to be faithfully reproduced in infinite quantities. In Italy, the Industrial Revolution didn’t take hold until after the unification of the country in 1861, initially in Milan through the design of mechanical tools. Art Nouveau In the early 20th Century, the Avant-Garde movement was born and to this day, represents the most significant leap of a ‘new modernity’ through experimenting with new visual mediums while rejecting all references to the past. Art Nouveau was defined as a “total” art style that suggested that art should be a way of life.

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by Francesca Sarti

P RI NT C AMPAI GN O LI V E T T I S TU DI O 42, 19 3 9 .

The chair we sat on, the fork we ate from, the necklace around our neck and the textiles we wore — it was all considered art. Constructivism, Suprematism, Futurism and De Stijl were the main styles used by the members to shape a new social model. Italy’s contribution during this time was most noted in car and aviation design from that time. Fiat, Lancia and Alfa Romeo were all launched during this era. The Thirties The dawn of the 1930s ushered in drastic change in the approach to design and visual language. The pioneers of Organic Design believed in creating harmony between people and nature and it can be best seen in the use of natural material and smooth rounded forms that represent this era of design. One of the best examples of this is the Campari Soda bottle by Fortunato Depero which remains the design used today. The caffettiera (moka express) designed by Luigi De Ponti and later acquired by Alfonso Bialetti making it into a lasting style icon. Olivetti Studio 42 designed by Ottavio Luzzati with architects Figini, Pollini and artist Xanti Schawinsky.


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DESIGN ITALIANO

DI AGRAM F O R T HE O RI GI NAL C AMPARI SO DA BO T T LE , 19 3 2. S. A . AN GE LO BO RDO NI E FI GLI O , MI L ANO .

IL BEL DESIGN ITALIANO M OKA E XP R E SS , 19 33 . LUIG I DE P O N T I F O R A LF O N SO B IAL E T T I .


DESIGN ITALIANO

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F I AT 5 0 0 / CIN Q U EC ENTO, 19 57 -  1975 DA NT E GIAC O SA F OR FIAT.

8OTH AN IVE R SARY BOTTL E , C AM PAR I S O DA . M ATTE O R AG N I.

BAY, 19 83. ETTO R E S O TTSA S S TA B L E L A MP I N G L A S S , A LUMI N UM A N D P L EX I G L A S S .

" C O N C O R S O ” S ER I ES , L A PAVO N I , 19 5 6 . B RUN O MUNA R I A N D EN Z O MA R I .

Bel Design Italiano (1945-1965) After the Second World War, Italian design becomes the focus of international attention and acclaim. In 1946 Corradino D’Ascanio designs the Vespa V98 farobasso for Piaggio. 1955-1956, Dante Giacosa designs the FIAT 600 and the Nuova 500. The 50s are marked by the growth of electrical appliances in Italian households: washing machines, fridges, televisions, vacuum cleaners and lamps. The Triennale of Milan was an exposition that showcased to the world the impressive developments in Italian interior décor and furniture design, separate from industrial design. In 1961, the first ever Salone Internazionale del Mobile (Milan Furniture Fair) was held. Castiglioni brothers, Gio Ponti, Bruno Munari and Enzo Mari for La Pavoni coffee machine, Gae Aulenti,

Cesare Cassina, are among the most influential designers of that time. 70s-80s Following the “Bel Design Italiano” era, Italy reached new heights in the field of interior décor and furniture design, developing some of the most renowned brands and groups: Kartell, Alessi, Arflex, Studio Alchymia , Memphis Group. Oggi (today) When one mentions Italian design, Milan immediately comes to mind. This is the capital city of fashion. Since the ‘80s, many of the most influential powerhouses in fashion have set up their headquarters in Milan: Giorgio Armani, Ottavio Missoni, Gianfranco Ferré, Gianni Versace, Dolce e Gabbana, Miuccia Prada and Nicola Trussardi, to name but a few.


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APE RI TIVO

L' APERITIVO


L' APERITIVO

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by Alice Di Pietro

Milan's famous Bar Basso, where the Negroni Sbagliato was born. Created by bartender Mirko Stocchetto, it's a must try for any negroni fan.

Aperitivo

Historical hints: Aperitivo, like most Italian things, has an ancient story. It seems that in ancient Rome there were drinks called “Mulsum,” which were made of wine and honey and were consumed before meals. The modern aperitivo goes back to 1786 when Antonio Carpano invented the vermouth in Turin. It really took It’s a pre-meal drink meant to stimulate appetite. After a long day off at the end of the 19th century in popular of work or on weekends, aperitivo is an experience to share with cafes in Milano, Roma, Firenze and Venezia, friends and co-workers to socialize, while having a drink paired where beverages used to be served before with a variety of complimentary appetizers. dinner to stimulate the appetite. comes from the Latin word aperire, literally “to open,” and in Italian you still describe the effect of something appetizing as something that “opens your stomach.” That’s the idea behind the traditional Italian aperitivo; a little something to encourage you to feel hungry, to get the juices flowing, if you will, so you can fully enjoy your upcoming meal.

Most popular aperitivo drinks: Hugo: on trend Spritz: traditional Negroni: most popular


photos by Stephanie Palmer

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L' APERITIVO

Nowadays In Italy, the tradition of aperitivo time started in cafes, bar and restaurants. More recently, it’s expanded to bakeries, butcher shops and even hair salon and boutiques. Networking Aperitivo is not only about recreation and fun. It’s become a common custom like breakfast, lunch and dinner. It’s not unusual to set up a business meeting while having an aperitivo: sipping on a glass of wine, a Spritz or an Hugo. When in Milan…. The most popular areas to have an aperitivo in downtown Milan are: Brera, Corso Garibaldi, Navigli, Arco della Pace and Porta Venezia. In these areas you can see hundreds of people at aperitivo time gathering in a piazza (square) and along strade (streets.) Besides the most popular areas in Milan, there are a few hidden gems that offer unique aperitivo: Deus Cafè (via Thaon di Revel, 3), hidden in a typical Milanese courtyard, is a paradise for bike lovers and sophisticated drinkers. The latest addition to the aperitivo scene of 2015 is the Terrazza Triennale (Viale Alemagna, 6) that showcases one of the most beautiful views in Milan, and has amazing bartenders and even better chefs. Some of the best cocktails in Milan are at Mag Cafe (Ripa di Porta Ticinese, 43) and at Martini Bar (Corso Venezia, 15) the outdoor garden is open all year round and delicious drinks are paired alongside amazing appetizers prepared on the spot.

Did you know the difference between Aperitivo and Happy Hour? Since its introduction during the Prohibition era, Happy Hour was an all-you-can-drink deal, serving discounted alcoholic beverages before dinner, which is different from the socio-cultural aspect of the aperitivo.


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E X P O M I L A N O 2015

MILANO 2015

FEEDING THE PLANET, ENERGY FOR LIFE

The first Great Exposition (World’s Fair) was held in London in 1851, at the height of the industrial revolution. It was imagined as a platform to show the world that England was a global leader of industry. The fair was wildly anticipated and boasted over six million visitors with a daily average attendance of over 42,000 people. Since then, there have been 34 World’s Fairs, allowing each host country to introduce to the world their greatest innovations under a global spotlight. At the 1855 World’s Fair in Paris, the classification of Bordeaux wines was born; Ketchup, the icon of junk food, was introduced to 13 million people in Philadelphia in 1876, and again in Paris the world was presented with the Statue of Liberty’s head and Edison’s phonograph for the first time in 1878. In 1889, Paris hosted the most famous Expo ever, where they introduced 32 million visitors to the Eiffel Tower. The 324 meter high structure was supposed to be taken down after the fair but it still stands proudly and remains arguably the most recognizable symbol of France. In subsequent Expos, countless inventions were introduced: the electric stove and dishwasher, Kodak film, nylon, air conditioning and the television. In 1906, Italy introduced the Sempione tunnel that connects Milan to Paris by train. At the 1967 Expo in Montreal, the first space capsule that launched Gagarin into outer space was showcased. Their fair drew 50 million visitors in a country with a population of 20 million. In 1970, Osaka introduced the world to the first nuclear reactor, a prototype for the first cellular phone and a

train that could reach 500 km an hour. In spite of all the glory and fanfare, the fairs have had their share of challenges and opposition – many countries have objected to the cost and environmental burden that staging this sort of expo brings while questioning its tangible value. This sentiment was top of mind when Milan gave its Expo the slogan “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”. They chose to program the entire fair around exploring innovations that will protect the earth’s resources and create a more sustainable way to live. The Expo set about examining the contradictions that we face globally: we live on a planet with a staggering 870 million undernourished people and, at the same time, 1.3 billion tons of food are wasted each year and there are an average of 2.8 million annual deaths associated to obesity. Preceding the opening of the fair, there was a staged debate attended by scientific leaders, corporations, environmentalists and the general public which led to the creation of the Carta di Milano (The Milan Charter). The government sanctioned document serves as a call to action to all citizens, associations and institutions to guarantee the fundamental right to nutrition and good food for future generations. There was a strong focus on studying agricultural practices that yield high quality food and support biodiversity with minimal environmental impact. Encouraging people to think of food as more than a source of nourishment but also a reflection of social-cultural identity was the unwritten mantra.


E X P O M I L A N O 2015

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by Elisabetta di Maria

These themes are the building blocks of Slow Food – a non-profit international association that works tirelessly to restore the value of food- specifically regional foods as they tell the story of the people and land that produced and consumed them. They believe that food is the foundation of traditions. Slow Food campaign to bring good and fairly produced food for everyone and crusade to see more diverse agriculture practices in place globally. Rather than limiting our food supply to a few varieties of wheat, rice and corn, or only the four types of apples that make up the majority of the world supply, Slow Food fights for the survival of the Bomberga potato with the same passion that the WWF fights to protect pandas. To preserve our planet, Slow Food believes we need to understand that monoculture isn’t natural and leaves us vulnerable. When we focus on biodiversity, farmers can better manage their crops and support themselves while ensuring a sustainable food chain. Slow Food was initially unsure how much it wanted to be involved with Expo as they feared organizations were more concerned with establishing brand recognition than coming together to protect and preserve our planet. In the end, they felt that it was better to be involved to help drive awareness and engage in conversations they believe we should all be having.

In a video message broadcast from Holland, Joris Lohman, a representative from Slow Food Youth Network said: “Radical changes and innovations are needed and they can’t only come from institutions and corporations. True innovations happen on fisherman boats, in the kitchens and out in the fields. It will not be the governments or food industries that feed the planet but people, farmers, fishermen and cooks. For this reason we are asking that all young people meet us in Milan to let our voices be heard, and to discuss a food system for the future. Because it will be us, all together, that feed the planet.” Carlo Fiorani, agriculturalist with the Youth Network of Lombardia and graduate from the University of Gastronomic Sciences sums up the challenges and effort we are faced with to protect these practices: “I’m up at 5am to work on the farm, make bread and salami. I produce the food that I bring directly to families tables. On the other hand, agricultural industry is more concerned with producing merchandise, which is precisely why we have a crisis in Lombardia. Terra Madre believes in the importance of personal relationships with producers, farmers and chefs to bring them all together to help the chain thrive and survive.” One of the most chilling exhibits at the Slow Food pavilion at Expo is an oversized hourglass that marks

Also, Slow Food organized an event in October called Terra Madre Giovani (We Feed the Planet) in Milan. Thousands of farmers, fishermen, and shepherds under the age of 40 were sponsored to come and share their experiences and to promote their traditions respecting nature, all with a goal to protect small local farming. Participants came together to compare their stories and practices to unite in a goal to bring change.

the brief time remaining before thousands of species are extinct. Biodiversity means fighting against waste, producing responsibly by respecting seasons and protecting traditions. It’s about protecting public health and our water supply by coming together and finding the courage to preserve our traditions. And mostly, it’s about loving the earth and the people who inhabit it now and for our future generations. It’s about working together to find the courage to tell a new story.


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Slow Food pavilion; the architect designed three shacks that remind of the Lombardian farmhouse called Cascina. After the Expo they will be reassembled as garden sheds in schools.

The Tree of Life, 37 meters of height, is the symbol of the Italy pavilion, which stands behind. The designer Marco Balich was inspired by Michelangelo's drawings from the late 1530s.

SLOW F OOD


TERRA MADRE GIOVANI

SOME OF THE FACES BEHIND TERRA MADRE GIOVANI

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photo by Federico Guida

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IN C ONVERSATION WITH C ARLO PETRINI

Mr. Petrini, what compelled you to create Terra Madre Giovani (We Feed the Planet)? The idea of Terra Madre Giovani stemmed from the realization that, despite all of the focus around Expo, the people who actually produce the food that feeds the planet, which are the family run farms, were not being represented. (According to FOA, 500 million families run farms produce more than 70% of global food). We also wanted to focus on the future, the people under 35 who will steer the future of our food production. We didn’t want to work against Expo, but wanted to ensure that when exploring the theme “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”, the voices of all of the young and smaller producers were heard. There are many organizations that are also doing their part, both locally and globally, to help in this crusade - do you see the value in joining forces? Absolutely. I firmly believe that the only way to make change is to build aggregate networks within the communities and organizations that share the same ideals. Environmental groups, consumers, farmer associations…they all play an important role in the change we are working to create.

INTERVIEW WITH MR. CARLO PETRINI, FOUNDER OF SLOW FOOD

Slow Food promotes biodiversity, sustainability and local foods. Where do you stand in promoting “PDO” (protected designation origin) products abroad, as long as they are “good, clean and fair” per the Slow Food motto?

Carlo Petrini – aka Carlin – founded the Slow Food movement in 1986 because he was growing increasingly frustrated by the industrialization of the food supply and the erosion of quality in the food he saw around him.

It is critical to promote and protect products by clearly labeling their origin and where they are manufactured to help inform the consumer so he/she can make the most informed decision. This information helps protect and value the work of farmers and producers globally.

Carlo Petrini is a visionary who works to improve the world’s agriculture and food supply, one bite at a time. His charisma, passion and dedication are reflected in the popularity of the movement and in the Slow Food philosophy, which seeks a rediscovery of authentic culinary traditions and the pleasures of the table, in addition to the conservation of the world's quality food and wine heritage.

With all of your dedication, do you feel that positive change is starting to take hold? I’m optimistic by nature and was inspired and hopeful when I looked around and saw 2,500 youth from 120 countries come together in Milan to talk about the future of food and agriculture. If our past generations ‘cut the cord’ that tied humans to the earth, I believe this next generation will be the one to sew it back together.

Carlo is the recipient of many awards and honors and was named by the Guardian as one of the 50 people destined to save the planet. Slow Food is now operating in 50 countries with over 80,000 members and supporters.

What is your legacy that you hope to leave to the world? I think that Slow Food is the legacy, not me personally. Slow Food still has a long and interesting path to pave and it needs to stay focused and dedicated to create the necessary shift in behaviour in food production and consumption.

BECOME A SLOW FOOD MEMBER AND BE PART OF THE CHANGE: SLOWFOOD.COM


NOW YOU C AN BUY POPUL AR TERRONI PRODUCTS ONLINE AND HAVE THEM DELIVERED DIRECTLY TO YOUR DOOR labottegaditerroni.com


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L A CUCINA LOMBARDA

ALL'AGRITURISMO TENUTA ROVERBELLA CON ANTONIETTA


L A CUCINA LOMBARDA

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photos by Daniele Poli


by Antonietta Tamagni

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These recipes, which are simple to prepare, represent the flavours of my home and the land that I belong to: the countryside of Lombardia. I was born and raised in a cascina (farmstead), where cows, pigs, horses, fields, the hen house, and the vegetable garden would occupy most of the landowner and farmers’ day. Nothing was missing on the dining table: including veal, beef, pork, salami, sausages and cotechino, seasonal vegetables and eggs, which were traded for cheese and milk that was delivered to the milk factory in steel barrels. Since there are entire libraries dedicated to the history of Italian food and wine, I will tell you about the life of a little country girl. There were three siblings and two cousins. We were never alone. Often during warm summer afternoons we were able to join the farmers’ children to play outdoor games, chasing each other around the fields or fighting a war with weeds and sticks. My brother Sergio and I would go mushroompicking; what a surprise when thick bunches of honey mushrooms hiding under leaves would magically appear at the bottom of trees. Mom would clean them, boil them in salted water, thinly slice them and cook them in butter, garlic and a pinch of salt: delicious! Whenever puddles formed in the dried-out ditches, we’d go fishing. It was easy to fill up buckets with little fish mixed with mud and leaves. We would drag our buckets home, the handle bending under the weight. The fish were cleaned, floured and fried. We ate them whole since they were so little and sweet.

L A CUCINA LOMBARDA

An important job was assigned to us kids: bring cold water from the well to the farmers down to the far away fields where they were mowing and raking the fresh grass. We’d jump on our little bikes and off we went! Often times we would bring along a sock and after chasing the mowing machine we would jump into the freshly cut grass to catch frogs that were hopping everywhere. With our sock full, we would speed home and throw the frogs into a tub covered by a cloth sack. I knew exactly how to clean frogs: a frog in one hand, scissors in the other, I cut the head and the four little feet off, sliced open the belly, and gut it, while it still convulsed. The floured frogs would end up in boiling oil and we would eat them whole and crunchy. What a delicacy! One of our favourite games was to jump into piles of corn and wheat. Only the stinging rice would remain untouched. After being husked these white grains would turn into fabulous soups, risotti, or even sweet fritters. Needless to say my mamma Orsolina was able to turn all sorts of good things provided by the fields into delicious meals. She would love to cook risotti, tortelli, polenta (corn meal), cassoeula (pork and savoy cabbage dish), soups, braised meets, cotoletta (breaded veal chop), chickens and stuffed capons, flavourful sides and not to mention desserts. From her, and her love for hosting, comes my culinary passion and knowledge, to which I like to add a pinch of my own personality. This allows me to honour my heritage and Lombardia’s traditions, while turning out unique dishes that satisfy the palates of the people who enjoy them — and reflect who I am. For a taste of Lombardia come visit us at tenutaroverbella.it


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RECIPES ① Cotoletta alla Milanese per person

②M  inestrone con Verza serves 6 (Minestrone with Savoy Cabbage)

Ingredients:

Ingredients:

1 veal T-bone steak 30 gr. of butter 2 eggs 1 cup bread crumbs salt and pepper

Method: Pound both sides of the meat being careful not to break the meat off the bone. If there is connective tissue on the outside of the steak, remove it. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper, dip both sides of the steak in the egg mixture, then in the bread crumbs. In a pan over medium heat melt the butter. Turn the heat up to medium high and fry the veal steak on both sides until golden. Dab the steak on paper towel to remove excessive butter and serve with a fresh salad and roasted potatoes with rosemary.

③P  olenta e Brasato serves 4 (Polenta with Braised Beef) Ingredients: 1 kg of chuck roast or shank cuts 3 carrots, finely minced 2 onions, finely minced 3 celery stalks, finely minced ½ tbsp cloves ½ cinnamon stick 1 tbsp chopped parsley

Method: In a tall and narrow pot, over low heat sauté the minced onion, celery, carrots. Divide the chuck into two pieces, remove connective tissue, and dredge with flour. In a large frying pan, melt butter and brown the meat on all sides, place meat in pot with sautéed vegetables turning it so all sides are exposed to sauté. In the pan where the meat was browned, bring the wine to a gentle boil. Add cloves, cinnamon stick, parsley, salt and pepper, 1 tbsp butter. Add wine to pot containing meat and vegetables. Cover with a lid and simmer for 3 hours

2 bottles of Barolo or Polenta: Bring 2 liters of waBarbera or other full ter to a boil, add 2 tbsp of bodied red wine coarse salt. Slowly add polenta flour while whisking to avoid ½ cup extra clumps. Cook for about an virgin olive oil hour, over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon. 30 gr. butter Great for Christmas dinner! salt and pepper ½ kg of stone ground corn flour for polenta

4 carrots, cubed 6 small potatoes, cubed 4 celery stalks, cubed

vegetable or meat stock 100 gr. Grana Padano 1 slice of “lardo” or pancetta, pounded

2 onions, minced 4 zucchini, cubed 2 heads of savoy cabbage, chopped to pieces about 2 inches thick 2 cans of navy beans, washed and drained ½ cup of extra virgin olive oil

Method: In a tall pot heat olive oil with minced “lardo” or pancetta. Sautee the onions, carrots, celery, zucchini and potatoes. Add the cabbage leaves, cover in stock and add salt. Cook for 45 minutes. Add beans and cook for 10 more minutes. Serve the minestrone with freshly ground pepper and roughly grated Padano.

④R  isotto con Salsiccia e Zafferano serves 6 (Risotto with saffron and sausage) Ingredients:

Method: In a pan over medium high 480 gr. carnaroli rice temperature fry the sausage in 30 gr. butter then set aside. In 1 white onion, minced a tall and narrow pot heat the olive oil and sauté the onion. 3 tbsp of extra Add the rice and let it cook virgin olive oil until it becomes translucent on the ends, stirring it con4 oz dry white wine stantly and allowing the rice to get very hot. Add white wine, 1 pinch saffron, stirring until it is absorbed by alternatively 1 the rice and rice becomes hot envelope of again. Add a ladle of hot broth, ground saffron saffron and 3 leaves of sage, allow rice to absorb again. 1 kg sausage Cover with more hot broth, stir and cook for 15 minutes withgrated Grana out stirring. Add the sausage, Padano to taste grated Grana Padano (at least ½ cup), 30 gr. of butter, salt and 60 gr. butter pepper to taste. salt and pepper to taste beef or veal stock 3 sage leaves


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RECIPES


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VINI LOMBARDI

VINI LOMBARDI


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VINI LOMBARDI

Mamete Prevostini

Lombardia

is the industrial and commercial capital of Italy and the gateway to Europe. Despite the fact that most of its agricultural areas focus on food production rather than wine, Lombardia is still a respectable wine producing area. The zones of Valtellina, Franciacorta and Oltrepò Pavese are the most relevant ones. Let me tell you why: Wine regions of Lombardia

Valtellina

Franciacorta

Oltrepò Pavese

1- Valtellina: Framed by the Alps that mark the border with Switzerland, this valley is pocketed by vineyards that cling to hillsides, and they look almost the same as they did hundreds of years ago. Every wine zone in Italy has its own peculiarities; one that characterizes Valtellina is the orientation of its vines: All the vines face south to catch maximum exposure to the sun. Valtellina is Nebbiolo country (here called Chiavennasca). You may be familiar with Nebbiolo from Piemonte, where this grape is the source of the worldfamous Barolo and Barbaresco wines. Full-bodied and tannic with distinct herbal character, these are powerhouse wines that demand aging. Here, however, Nebbiolo wines display a more seductive character that downplays the muscle of Nebbiolo highlighting the earthy and more rustic nature of the grape. There are two DOCGs (denomination of controlled and guaranteed origin). The first is Sforzato di Valtellina DOCG or Sfursat ("forced" in local dialect). It’s a “Passito Dry Red,” aged for a minimum of 18 months and made entirely from Nebbiolo. The grapes are laid to dry on a straw rack in a small humidity controlled room (called a fruttaio) for three to four months. During this process, known as appassimento, the berries shrivel and their flavour intensifies. This is the same process used to make Amarone della Valpolicella Classico DOCG, (the famous red wine from the Veneto region). The second is Valtellina Superiore, which is broken down into five different cru vineyards, all of which are aged at least 24 months. There is Sassella, named for the rocks in the soil, Grumello, where some of the most powerful wines come from, Valgella and Inferno, named


by Max Stefanelli

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VINI LOMBARDI

for the summertime heat in this vineyard which can get as hot as you-know-where, Maroggia, where the most delicate wines come from—and are very hard to find outside of Italy—and Valtellina Superiore, which generally has aromas of cherry, currant, dried brown herbs. Occasionally exotic notes of rosemary, thyme or even iodine can be found. Medium-to-full-bodied, these wines have an earthiness to them. Combined with their graceful acidity and polished aged tannins, they are very intriguing wines to pair with food. Of course, Valtellina is no different than any other area in Italy when it comes to matching their wines with local foods. Valtellina Superiore “Riserva” is aged for at least 36 months. 2 -The province of Brescia, includes Franciacorta DOCG (best known for sparkling wines), which is made from grapes grown on the slopes around Lake Iseo. Chardonnay, Pinot Nero and Pinot Bianco are permitted in the wine and the best examples have much in common with Champagne. Only wines from the best vineyards are eligible for the DOCG status, which is for sparkling wines only. 3- The Oltrepò Pavese, which means beyond the Po River, has a long tradition of excellent winemaking. The Mamete Prevostini most interesting is the Oltrepo’ Pavese Metodo Classico DOCG, a sparkling Pinot Nero-based wine, produced according to what is known as metodo classico classese. Now, let’s get to the good stuff: our Cavivona wines from Lombardia: Mamete Prevostini: Mamete Prevostini is one of the lead producers of Nebbiolo in Lombardia. The vineyards are situated at the base of the Swiss Alps, set in among terraced slopes that all need to be handpicked due to the steep angle of the hillsides. Mamete’s Nebbiolo has an elegance and femininity to it, typical of the Nebbiolo from the region. They also produce a delicious Sforzato. Contadi Castaldi: This producer is well known for its Franciacorta, Italy’s version of Champagne. In fact it’s made using the same Traditional Method as Champagne. Castello di Luzzano: Castello di Luzzano is a really interesting winery because it straddles two different regions, Lombardia and Emilia-Romagna. This allows them to make wines from both the Oltrepò Pavese denomination (Lombardia) as well as the Colli Piacentini zone (Emilia-Romagna). Castello di Cigognola: This winery is located in the heart of the Oltrepo’ Pavese. Due to its particular terroir, the producers were able to create interesting wines, in particular their white wine Pavia Bianca that is actually made with the red wine grape Barbera.

Castello Di Luzzano

At any given time we carry a variety of wines from these four producers. So what are you waiting for? Come to visit us at any of our Terroni locations or visit cavinona.com


L A MODA MIL ANESE

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Via Monte Napoleone

Via Della Spiga

Unicredit Tower: at 231 meters it's the tallest building in Italy

Burberry's courtyard, Via Monte Napoleone

photos by Daniele Poli


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L A MODA MIL ANESE

IL QUADRILATERO DELLA MODA WE SENT OUR PHOTOGRAPHER OUT AT THE BREAK OF DAY TO EXPLORE MILAN'S FASHION DISTRICT


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INS TAGRAM

terronito La Bettola has launched the 'Fai da Te' gin & tonic menu! #doityourself

sudforno #Sundays call for #good #bread. We've got you covered! @jenlaceda

sudforno This photo should be illegal, but it isn't so... @modelfoodie killed it with this photo!

terronito Sneak peak at Terroni Adelaide's new event space! By @stephaniempalmer

terronito #Truffles make everything better! By @truffletravels

terronito Giving a meal has never been easier! #mealshare #buyonegiveone

sudforno Our neighbours @StelvioToronto joined us for the #Cavinonatasting2015 event

sudforno Our homemade artisanal gelato is #allnatural #noartificial

terronito #Spaghetti al Limone and Tagliatelle alla #Bolognese. By @dapan

sudforno The #perfect side kick to any meal. Fresh made baguettes! By @jaxxsuds

sudforno Lunch preparations are in full effect! #paninosalame

sudforno We're busy gearing up for #panettone season here at #sudforno.


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INS TAGRAM

sudforno Taste-testing our Pesto alla Genovese paired with our #homemade Trofie

sudforno  Have you tried our #delicious #focaccia #sandwiches yet? by @wxnniel

sudforno Coffee and treats for two, coming right up! By @theluckymonday

terronito Friends that eat #pizza together... stay #friends. @top_toronto_restaurants_

terronito Honoured to receive Hot Spot of the Year #pentoladoro2015

sudforno This time our team literally went the extra mile for our next issue of Terroni Mag.

sudforno We've got fresh #pasta waiting for you to take home!

terronito As good as being seaside, Spaghetti in Canna a Mare... @chriselledsouza

terronito Making #brunch plans? Did you know that Bar Centrale does a great brunch?

terronito #Simple and #perfect, #burrata never disappoints! By @fabulousfoodlover

terronito skip the line and pre-order online! #take-out #lunch #picnic

terronito fresh orecchiette photo by our very own @stephaniempalmer


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TE PIAS EL PANETUN? Do you like panettone? – Milanese dialect


by Stephanie Palmer

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When that luxurious, fluffy, sweetbread loaf appears on bakery shelves and on dinner tables, Italians everywhere know the Christmas season is officially upon them. Shared with friends and family, the light, fragrant and moist cake fills one with the warm and festive essence of the season. Tall and well dressed in fancy ribbons and bows, panettone, referred to in Milanese dialect as pane’tun, is a divine yet modest combination of butter, eggs, candied citrus peel and golden raisins. One of the legends of the origins of panettone tells of a friar named Antonio who had a passion for the sweet cake and a cook that devotedly baked a special one for him in the same tall shape as his ecclesiastic hat and presented it as “Pan di Toni”! While the origins of the cake are ancient, dating back to the Roman Empire, Milano, the vibrant capital city of Lombar-

PANETTONE

dia, is widely recognized as the true birthplace of the modern day panettone. In the early1900’s Milanese baker Angelo Motta revolutionized panettone by mass producing it and giving it its recognizable tall domed shape. His process involved making the dough rise three times over the course of 20 hours before baking. Today, panettone is one of the best loved symbols of Milano and over 116 million are produced every Christmas! Efforts are even under way in Italy to have the cake granted DOC/DOP status. Here in Toronto we are blessed to have panettone made by hands of our talented master baker Fabio Papa. With the finest ingredients, he makes a limited run beginning November. Classico & Cioccolato Panettone are available now at Sud Forno or you can place your order from LaBottegadiTerroni.com before it sells out!


/nellacucinatoronto

@nellacucina

876 Bathurst Street, Toronto Ontario, M5R 3G3


Profile for Terroni

T Magazine No. 8  

Terroni Talks to Slow Food Founder Carlo Petrini // Featured Region: Lombardia // Expo Milano 2015 // Recipes from the Lombardian Countrysid...

T Magazine No. 8  

Terroni Talks to Slow Food Founder Carlo Petrini // Featured Region: Lombardia // Expo Milano 2015 // Recipes from the Lombardian Countrysid...

Profile for terroni
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