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THE WELLBEING ISSUE THEWELLBEINGISSUE

FIND YOUR PERFECT BALANCE

COMPETITIVE SPIRIT UNLEASH YOUR

WINTER TENNIS AVOID THE BIG CHILL

INNER BEAST

9 N I M A E R #D N O A F RA

E N I N D U O L C

PREPARE LIKE A PRO

BY JELENA DOKIC

NEW TENNIS INJURIES

WHAT’S HURTING YOU?

PLUS

ROLAND GARROS 2014 REVIEW NAIL THE VOLLEY FOODS FOR GOOD HEALTH

WINNING THE MENTAL GAME JULY 2014 A$7.50 / NZ$8.40 / US$7.50

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JULY 2014 VOL 39 No. 7

contents 24 The MenTaL GaMe

Negative thoughts and self-doubt can sometimes prove to be tougher opponents than the person standing on the other side of the net. But like ground strokes, the mental side of your game can also be trained.

FeaTUReS

12 FeeL Good, pLaY GReaT

53 FaiR-weaTheR pLaYeRS

14 SMeLLS Like coMpeTiTive SpiRiT

62 an edUcaTed baLance

Feeling good physically and mentally, and paying attention to fitness, health and wellbeing has become just as important as all the work you do on the court writes Jelena Dokic.

It’s not enough to be supremely fit and have all the shots, to become a champion you also need a healthy dose of competitive instinct.

For many, the winter months prove to be tennis’ kryptonite, but with a bit of planning and a change of location you can keep playing rain, hail or shine.

Think Australia’s top young players are impressive for their on-court efforts? Wait until you hear about their off-court dedication to their education.

44 pRepaRe To avoid inJURY Injuries are an inevitable part of the game. But like the professionals, there are things you can do to improve your chances of remaining injury free. JULY 2014 AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE

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JULY 2014 VOL 39 No. 7

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UNFORGETTABLE, FOREVER

With the dust now settled in Paris we look back at Rafael Nadal’s record ninth title and a classic women’s final featuring Maria Sharapova and heir apparent to the women’s game Simona Halep.

REGULARS 8 BREAKPOINTS 10 THE HITTING WALL 19 BE THE PRO 43 GEARING UP 58 FROM THE CLUBHOUSE 60 IN FOCUS PROFILE 64 RANKINGS 66 SCOREBOARD 71 LOOKING BACK 72 KIDS’ CLUBHOUSE 74 LAST WORD

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MYSKINA’S MILESTONE

It’s been 10 years since Anastasia Myskina won the French Open, setting off the so-called Russian Revolution in women’s tennis. 4

AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE JULY 2014

EDITOR Vivienne Christie DEPUTY EDITOR Darren Saligari ASSISTANT EDITOR Daniela Toleski FOUNDING EDITOR Alan Trengove GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Andrea Williamson Trevor Bridger

ADVERTISING MANAGER Nicole Hearnden ADMINISTRATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS MANAGER Daniel Heathcote PHOTOGRAPHS Getty Images, John Anthony, Image(s) licensed by Ingram Publishing COVER PHOTO Getty Images COVER DESIGN & PHOTO EDITING Andrew Hutchison, FourFront

Australian Tennis Magazine is published monthly by TENNIS AUSTRALIA LTD, Private Bag 6060, Richmond, Vic 3121. Ph: (03) 9914 4200 Email: editor@tennismag.com.au Distributed by Network Distribution Company Printed in Australia by Webstar The views expressed in Australian Tennis Magazine are not necessarily those held by Tennis Australia. While the utmost care is taken in compiling the information contained in this publication, Tennis Australia is not responsible for any loss or injury occurring as a result of any omissions in either the editorial or advertising appearing herein.


FIRST SERVE

The perfect combination

T

o win a tournament – be it a Grand Slam or your local club championships – a lot needs to go right. Solid preparation, good training, the right diet, a healthy attitude and a body free from injury are nonnegotiables when it comes to performing at your peak. Just ask the 2014 French Open champions Rafael Nadal and Maria Sharapova – both of whom made comebacks from potential career-threatening injuries to

For all players on the Tour, rehabilitation – be it from injury or a match – is part and parcel of the professional tennis player's life. And while you may not be able to jump in an ice bath, have a daily massage or travel with a physio, there is still a lot to be learned from how the world's best stay on court week in, week out. In this month’s issue, which we have devoted to your wellbeing, Jelena Dokic gives us an insight into how preparation and recovery has changed in the

“It’s not just physical obstacles that players have to overcome, there are also the emotional demons who have a habit of rearing their heads when times are tough.” conquer the Roland Garros clay once more. In Nadal's case it was a recordbreaking ninth win from 10 starts, while Sharapova picked up her second career title in Paris.

world of professional tennis in the past 15 years. When Dokic made her first tentative steps on the WTA Tour as a shy teenager, it was common for players to eat chocolate and

swig soft drink during a match for an energy boost. Times certainly have changed! It's not just physical obstacles that players have to overcome, there are also the emotional demons who have a habit of rearing their heads when times are tough. So it's heartening to learn that it is possible to train your mind to develop a champion's mindset, just like you train to improve your ground strokes. Psychologist Ruth Anderson explores this topic and provides some useful tips on how to strengthen your resolve. Sometimes the difference between winning and losing comes down to who wants the W more, so this month we take a look at what the game's greatest competitors have in common and how you can unleash the competitive beast inside. Whether it be a change in diet, attitude or preparation, there are things we can all do to improve our overall wellbeing. And, after all, if you feel good, chances are you’ll play great. Darren Saligari editor@tennismag.com.au

Nexnt th mo

The training iSSue Our special training issue looks at athleticism in the modern game, and how you can make fitness a weapon too. Advice from top tennis trainers and current players, nutrition information and a “brain training” feature will help you reach tip top condition for your next match. August issue on sale from 28 July.

#dreamin9 Rafa’s Roland Garros crowns.

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AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE JULY 2014

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FITNESS

BALANCE Striking the right balance between training, playing and socialising could be the catalyst to big improvements write NATHAN & GISELLE MARTIN

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AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE JULY 2014


FEATURE

It’s not enough to be able to be supremely fit and hit every shot in the book, to become a champion you also need a healthy dose of competitive instinct. But is it possible to be overly competitive and can it have a negative impact on your game? KAIT O’CALLAHAN investigates

T

he importance of being a “fighter” is discussed a lot in tennis. This is especially the case in Australian tennis thanks to the never-say-die efforts of Lleyton Hewitt. Despite a number of serious injuries, he continues to give his all. Yet what defines competitiveness, and how healthy it is to be a competitive person is rarely discussed. From listening to TV commentary, recreational players may figure that the more competitive you are the better it makes you, but being super competitive doesn’t always serve you so well in social tennis. Finding the balance between a healthy amount of competitive spirit and taking things too seriously is an important skill for adults and juniors alike to develop. What makes a fighter? Dr Joann Lukins, the Director of Peak Performance Psychology, describes competitive people as highly motivated, focused people who have clear goals and desired outcomes. They have a rivalry towards other competitors that brings out feelings of solidarity and admiration for their own effort. Winning is what drives 14

AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE JULY 2014

competitive people and boosts motivation. Whether you are the type of person to throw the Monopoly board across the room or not depends on a number of factors. Family is most likely the first influence, and how hard your parents push you to succeed can lead to how competitive you are. In tennis, Lukins suggests that coaches, training environment and peers can lead a player towards becoming more determined to win and improve. Money, prizes, status and accolades can also create a fighter out of an individual. It's been suggested that part of the reason Eastern European players are starting to dominate both tours is due to the war-torn countries’ lack of finances; the players know that family at home are counting on them to win. Maria Sharapova moved from Russia to America as a child, and remembers that desperate times motivated her success. “When you start from nothing, when you come from nothing, it makes you hungry. I am proud of where I came from and I know what I want. I want to win.” Not that you have to be from a war-torn

Dominika Cibulkova


GET YOUR PIECE OF WIMBLEDON Thanks to Slazenger, you can now take home your piece of Wimbledon. Renew or subscribe to Australian Tennis Magazine and you will recieve your own pack of Official Wimbledon Balls. Each subscriber will also enter the draw to win a Dunlop Biomimetic racquet bag.

INGG ISSUE LLBBEEIN WEELL THEEW

FIND YOUR PERFECT BALANCE

TENNIS WINTERAVOID THE

TITIVE SPIRIT COMPE UNLEASH YOUR

BIG CHILL

INNER BEAST

9 N I M A E R D # D NINE U O L C N RAFA O

PLUS

ROLAND GARROS 2014 REVIEW NAIL THE VOLLEY FOODS FOR GOOD HEALTH

PREPARE LIKE A PRO

BY JELENA DOKIC

NEW TENNIS INJURIES

WHAT’S HURTING YOU?

WINNING THE MENTAL GAME JULY 2014 A$7.50 / NZ$8.40 / US$7.50

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FEATURE

Myskina’s It’s 10 years since Anastasia Myskina won the French Open, setting off the so-called Russian Revolution in women’s tennis. SUZI PETKOVSKI revisits the deeds and class of 2004.

A

t the Sochi Olympics last February, Russian No.1 Maria Sharapova was the glamorous face of the Games. The local-girlmade-good debuted as a colour commentator for NBC, was feted in news features the world over, and even given the honour of carrying the Russian flag at the opening ceremony – of the Winter Games. Meanwhile, on the opposite side of the globe in summery Hobart, Anastasia Myskina was also flying the Russian flag – in the Fed Cup trenches with her 28

AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE JULY 2014

over-matched teenage charges in a 4-0 loss to Australia. Poles apart, the two leading lights of Russian women’s tennis continue to carve contrasting roles and legacies. The French Open marked a decade since Myskina became the first Russian woman to snare a Grand Slam singles title, winning an historic allRussian final over childhood friend and rival Elena Dementieva 6-1 6-2. While the 59-minute blowout was far from memorable tennis, it signalled the start of the

so-called Russian Revolution in the women’s game. Former No.1 Russian Anna Kournikova was but a beautiful decoy. A year after her premature exit, a battalion of “Soviettes” stormed the Grand Slam barricades. Russia had arrived as a tennis power. Myskina, champion in Paris at age 22, did not need the personal pat on the back from Russian president Vladimir Putin to realise that she was in the vanguard of an imminent Russian takeover. “Now I hope it’s change about the Russian girls.

Everybody say ‘They are coming’, but finally we’re here and we can prove that we can win, as well.” Her words proving all too prophetic, Myskina didn’t have long to bask in her historic status. A month later, Maria Sharapova stunned Serena Williams to win Wimbledon at age 17. On to the US Open and another teenager, Svetlana Kuznetsova, became the third straight Russian to win a major, over the luckless Dementieva. By year’s end the Russian takeover was complete.


PICTORIAL

A legend continues to grow while a classic women’s final showcased the new and the established. Roland Garros 2014 was indeed unforgettable, forever.

DÉJÀ VU: For Rafael Nadal it doesn’t get any better than this – lifting the Coupe des Mousquetaires on the second Sunday of the French Open.

JULY 2014 AUSTRALIAN TENNIS MAGAZINE

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Australian Tennis Magazine - July 2014