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temple

Medicine

A Publication of Temple University School of Medic i ne

FALL 2010

THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF TEMPLE UNIVERSITY/ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL AND HEALTH NETWORK


temple

Medicine

A Publication of Temple University School of Medicine

Contents

FALL 2010

EDITOR / P RINCI PA L W RITER

Giselle Zayon Director, Alumni Affairs

Features

A rt D i r e c t i o n / D e s i g n

Gail Starr, Temple University Creative Services [377-0809]

Cover Story

Temple/St. Luke’s Regional Medical School 2 A Rich History of the Heart: Cardiovascular Medicine at Temple 8

Departments Temple Family Ties: The Criner Family 17 News and Notes of Honor 18 Personal Perspective: Paul Hermany, MD ’82: A Tale of Solomon and Three Pauls 24

Tales of Temple Medicine: John M. Daly, MD: The Pin Cushion and the Stethoscope 30 Philanthropy Notes 32 Class Notes 36

In Memoriam The Faculty and Student 38 View: Paul Lyons, MD, and Mary Lajoy, MD ’10: Whatever Happened To? Bennett Lorber, MD Words to the Wise 40 26

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Kenneth R. Cundy, PhD CONTRIBUTo r s

Christine Corson Paul Courter Renee Cree Kristin Criner, MD ’10 John Daly, MD ’73 JoAnne DeSanto-Bonewicz Gregory Forester Beth Galinsky Kathleen Harmer Rebecca Harmon Paul Hermany, MD ’82 Eryn Jelesiewicz Mary Lajoy, MD ’10 Paul Lyons, MD Robin McDaniel Stefanie Murphy Leslie Pappas Ingrid Spangler Laura Wortman P HOTO G R A P HERS

Ryan Brandenberg Ed Cunicelli Joseph V. Labolito Elizabeth Manning Paige Ozaroski Jim Roese Mark Stehle DE A N

John M. Daly, MD ’73 A SSISTA NT DE A N , institutional a dva n c e m e n t

Eric J. Abel

P RESIDENT, A LUMNI A SSOCI ATION

Anthony Giorgio, MD ’73 CORRES P ONDENCE

Temple University School of Medicine Institutional Advancement 3500 N. Broad St. Philadelphia, PA 19140 215-707-4850 800-331-2839 e-mail

supportmed@temple.edu medalum@temple.edu

Copyright © 2010 by Temple University Temple University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all in every aspect of its operations. The university has pledged not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status or disability. This policy extends to all educational, service and employment programs of the university.

Cert no. SCS-COC-001013


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introducing the new Medical school “ A group of visionary leaders took historic action when they unanimously and enthusiastically approved the establishment of the Medical School of Temple University and St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network.” —David Lobach, chair, Board of Trustees, St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network

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The First in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley

Temple University School of Medicine and St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network (St. Luke’s) are opening a new medical school regional campus in Bethlehem, Pa. “The first students will enter in August of 2011, the first class will graduate in 2015, and the timing couldn’t be better,” says John M. Daly, MD ’73, dean. The nation’s population is growing and aging. Moreover, with up to 40 million additional Americans about to enter the health care system as newly insured under the nation’s new health care policy, and about one-third of the nation’s 954,000 physicians expected to retire during the next decade, the nation is facing a significant deficit of physicians. Estimates vary, but experts predict that we will be 90,000 to 150,000 physicians short by the year 2020. The shortage of primary care physicians is most acute.

The nation’s physician-training machinery, therefore, is shifting into high gear. Some schools are increasing class size. Moreover, more than a dozen new medical schools have opened around the country during the past five years. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, 16,488 trainees entered medical school in 2002. By 2009, that number was up to 18,390. Now, with the new Medical School of Temple University/St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network, two strong academic medical centers have partnered to reinforce that trend by creating a regional medical school campus. The plans call for the campus to open in the fall of 2011 with a class of 30 students. The capacity may increase in the future, when St. Luke’s opens its new Riverside Campus, 10 miles east in Bethlehem Township. For now, the school will be housed at the Bethlehem Campus.

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which students learn basic clinical skills, professionalism and medical ethics. Students then relocate to the Bethlehem Campus for years II, III and IV. “The curriculum at the Bethlehem site has goals, objectives and competencies identical to those at the Philadelphia site,” says Dean Daly.

Left: John Daly, dean and Harry C. Donahoo Professor of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine Right: Joel Rosenfeld, MD, St. Luke’s chief academic officer and senior associate dean, Temple/St. Luke’s.

Creative, Cost-Effective Starting a new medical school from scratch comes with a very steep price tag. “But the new school’s model is a great example of how to get more physicians in the pipeline in a cost-effective way,” says Joel Rosenfeld, MD, St. Luke’s chief academic officer and senior associate dean, “because the arrangement capitalizes on the existing resources of both institutions.”

Our Relationship Evolves

“We are providing the highest quality medical education at a fraction of the cost by using faculty and facilities at both St. Luke’s in Bethlehem and Temple in Philadelphia,” Dr. Rosenfeld says, noting that the startup cost is less than $10 million.

According to Stephen Permut, MD ’72, JD, TUSM’s associate dean for academic affiliations, the new school is a natural evolution of the longstanding relationship between Temple and St. Luke’s, ties that are more than 30 years old. TUSM students first began doing clinical rotations at St. Luke’s in the 1970s. Thanks to the excellent faculty and quality of the program, more and more students wanted to do rotations there.

Students will complete Year I of the program at the Philadelphia campus—a big key to cost containment. “By doing this we preclude the considerable expenditure connected with constructing a stateof-the-art anatomy lab and recruiting anatomists and physiologists,” Dr. Rosenfeld says. Year I consists of basic science courses in normal body structure and function, and Doctoring I, in

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Year II focuses on clinically related organ systembased courses, integrating pathology, pathophysiology, microbiology and pharmacology. Doctoring II teaches more advanced clinical skills, preparing students for clinical rotations. Years III and IV, composed primarily of traditional clinical clerkships, emphasize the clinical components while continuing to relate basic science knowledge to clinical problem-solving. Training in professionalism, multiculturalism, socioeconomics and ethics continues in the Doctoring course, which runs throughout all four years of the curriculum.

The Medical School of Temple University/St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network will open in August 2011. By Year IV, 120 students will be enrolled.

In March 2006, St. Luke’s became a clinical campus of TUSM. The clinical campus designation means that third- and fourth-year Temple medical students perform all of their required clinical


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“ Temple already contributes more doctors to Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley than any other institution. with the new school, we will further increase the number and also ensure that the quality of care will be first rate, because of the outstanding clinical training they will receive.” —Richard A. Anderson, president and CEO, St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network

rotations there. TUSM’s two other clinical campuses are West Penn-Allegheny Health System in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa.

Keeping it Local

With the clinical campus arrangement continuing at St. Luke’s at the same time the new school is up and running, eventually we will have as many as 122 students attending medical school in the Lehigh Valley—again, a number that may increase when the Riverside Campus is up and running and the school relocates. “The notion of taking the clinical campus concept further and creating a regional medical school at St. Luke’s was something we started discussing in 2006,” says Dr. Permut, one of the earliest advocates of the idea.

Between 1998 and 2008, the number of physicians increased 33 percent nationwide, while Pennsylvania’s increase lagged at 20 percent. Moreover, Pennsylvania is the second-oldest state in the nation—and older people consume more health care. The state’s physician population is aging, too. About 30 percent are 65 or older.

There was a need for the school. The major resources were already in place and the partnership between players is strong. The idea caught on. Feasibility and financial studies were conducted, and the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting authority for medical degree programs in the U.S. and Canada, was alerted to the partners’ intentions. In September 2009 the governing boards of both St. Luke’s and Temple University approved the affiliation agreement. In February 2010, the LCME reviewed the detailed plans and gave approval to move ahead. Two floors in the Estes building on the Bethlehem Campus are being transformed into dedicated facilities for the school—and applications are being accepted for student admission. “It’s really exciting to see this venture take shape,” says Tamara Lynch, a member of the TUSM Class of 2011 who’s been based at St. Luke’s for a year, having selected it as her clinical campus. A Boston native, Ms. Lynch loves the Lehigh Valley. “It reminds me of New England. I feel completely at home here,” she says.

Several factors make the national physician shortage a bit more immediate for Pennsylvania.

“We need to attract and retain more physicians in the region,” says Dr. Rosenfeld. “The Lehigh Valley is already the second-most populous region of the state and the fastest growing. We are already experiencing physician shortages in general surgery, cardiology, otorhinolaryngology, family medicine and gastroenterology,” he says. Dean Daly explains that contributing more physicians to help meet Pennsylvania’s needs is therefore an important goal of the new school. “Fortunately, both Temple and St. Luke’s already have excellent rates of retaining graduates in Pennsylvania,” he says, noting that approximately half the medical students who train at Temple have stayed in the Commonwealth to practice—and 43 percent of St. Luke’s graduating residents and fellows practiced medicine in the Commonwealth in 2008. “Early assurance” programs are likely to help with these localization goals. In such programs, undergraduate juniors are given conditional acceptance to medical school immediately following college, provided they maintain certain grades and other criteria. “Such arrangements are already in place for the Medical School of Temple/St. Luke’s with Lehigh University, Moravian College and Muhlenberg College,” says Audrey Uknis, MD ’87, associate dean for admissions.

“One of the great things about Temple and St. Luke’s is how much they value student input. It really feels like our school, real ownership.” says medical student Tamara Lynch.

Medical students Natasha Fonseka, Cari Brown and Najeem Habibullah review patient records at St. Luke’s. Ms. Fonseka and Ms. Brown grew up in the area. Mr. Habibullah hails from Harrisburg, Pa. All three would have applied directly to the new medical school had it existed when they were applying for admission.

“Some students want that urban, big-city medical school experience. Others prefer smaller towns. Now Temple offers both,” says medical student Dustin O’Keefe, who resides in Moscow, Pa.

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enterology and otorhinolaryngology in recent years. Its cancer center received an outstanding achievement award from the American College of Surgeons, its open heart surgery quality rating is the highest conferred by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and its Level I trauma facility earns top decile outcomes nationally. Many of its other clinical programs have earned critical acclaim as well. Plus, its qualifications and expertise in medical education are very highly valued. “Everything that a medical student could possibly want is all right here,” says Ms. Lynch, who intends to pursue neurosurgery. “St. Luke’s has built an amazing repertoire of programs, systems and experts. Best of all, there are great minds here, and they know how to teach.”

Students who reside in an area throughout undergraduate school and medical school have already put down roots. They are more likely to want to stay in the area for postgraduate training as well. As noted below, St. Luke’s has 20 highly respected residency and fellowship programs to help entice them.

Great Resources, Multiple Benefits With more than 1,200 physicians practicing in 76 specialties, and with four campuses and 150 practice locations and ancillary sites throughout its tertiary care network, the clinical resources of St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network are robust. In addition to being named twice among the nation’s best hospitals according to the 100 Top Hospitals Benchmarks for Success study, U.S. News & World Report ranked St. Luke’s one of America’s Best Hospitals for cardiology, gastro-

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Medical education at St. Luke’s embraces the full continuum, from undergraduate through graduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education. St. Luke’s twice has been named one of the best 25 teaching hospitals in the U.S. by Solucient, a division of Thomson Reuters, a nationally known health care rating agency. Its internal medicine residency program is the only program in Pennsylvania to achieve a 100 percent pass rate for 10 consecutive years on post-program certification exams. St. Luke’s has more than 50 years of experience in graduate medical education and 20 programs with 147 interns, residents and fellows on two campuses. The programs include residencies in emergency medicine, family medicine, internal medicine, general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, podiatry and dentistry. Fellowships include hospice and palliative care, geriatrics, sports medicine, podiatric dermatology, trauma/surgical critical care and urogynecology— with plans underway to establish fellowships in orthopaedic trauma surgery and cardiology.


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major educational affiliates of TUSM: 1. Abington Memorial Hospital 2. Crozer-Chester Medical Center 3. Geisinger Medical Center (clinical campus)

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6. Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center 7. Temple University Hospital, Jeanes Hospital, and TVH Episcopal Division 8. Western Pennsylvania Hospital (clinical campus)

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Looking Ahead The partnership between Temple and St. Luke’s sets a high benchmark. “Strategically, logistically, financially, the new school just makes great sense,” says Dean Daly. “It’s good for students and faculty, for Temple and St. Luke’s, and for patients and the physician population of the state.”

Initially the new medical school of Temple University/St. Luke’s will be housed at St. Luke’s Bethlehem Campus. In time, it will be relocated to the new St. Luke’s Riverside Campus, a 500-acre tract in Bethlehem Township, Pa. Initial phases of development have begun.

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Building on a Rich History of the Heart: Cardiovascular Medicine at Temple “There’s powerhouse potential in the interrelationships among basic science, epidemiologic, pharmacologic and clinical approaches to cardiovascular disease at Temple.” —John M. Daly, MD, Dean With cutting-edge clinical capabilities, a robust research program, and a talented faculty of clinicians and scientists, Temple is on track toward re-establishing a national leadership position in cardiovascular medicine.

mangi tsai

Shortly after the Temple Heart Center’s founding in 1947, we became one of the first hospitals in Pennsylvania to create a designated coronary care unit. During the heyday of big breakthroughs in cardiovascular medicine in the ’60s through the ’80s, Temple was riding the crest of the wave. Thanks to Sol Sherry, we played a pioneering role in lytic therapy, which revolutionized medicine’s approach to the treatment of myocardial

Abeel Mangi, MD, and Emily Tsai, MD, are two of Temple’s newest physician-scientists. Dr. Mangi is associate professor of surgery, surgical director of lung transplantation, associate surgical director of heart transplantation, and director of the cardiothoracic transplant research laboratory. His research interests include stem-cell-based therapies for cardiac repair and regeneration, donor-specific variables influencing heart and lung transplantation, LVADs and platelet dysfunction, and right-ventricular dysfunction after cardiac surgery. He came to Temple from the Cleveland Clinic, and has won three Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards from NIH. Emily Tsai, MD, is assistant professor of medicine, cardiovascular research, and physiology. Her clinical interests pertain to advanced heart failure and cardiomyopathy, and her research centers on the molecular mechanisms of heart failure, ventricular hypertrophy/remodeling, and regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in cardiac myocytes. She trained at Harvard, Penn and Hopkins, and is a former NIH Research Scholar.

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Sol Sherry, MD (1916–1993), changed the face of medicine when he introduced the use of epsilon aminocaproic acid for hemorrhagic states secondary to excessive thrombolysis, urokinase for pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis, and thrombolytic therapy for coronary heart disease. He founded the Council on Thrombosis of the American Heart Association and was a founding member of the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. In addition to serving as TUSM’s dean for two years, Dr. Sherry chaired Temple’s Department of Medicine from 1968 to 1984, organized a superb residency program, and in 1970 founded the thrombosis research center that bears his name and continues to advance therapeutic strategies for thrombosis and hemorrhagic disease.

infarction. And then came Jacob Kolff, MD, a trailblazer in human heart transplantation and the development of the artificial heart. For over 60 years, Temple has invented and refined scores of clinical cardiac protocols and surgical techniques. In 1984, we established the region’s first heart transplant center. And in 2003 we deployed the city’s first ventricular-assist device as a destination therapy. “For years, Temple was one of the top three heart transplant centers in the nation,” says Steven Houser, PhD ’77, director of Temple’s Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC). “Many national leaders in cardiovascular medicine today cut their teeth at Temple,” he says, reciting a long list of names of alumni and former faculty who head major clinical and research institutes— see page 13.

Highlights in Cardiothor acic History at Temple

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Chair of physiology and CVRC director, Dr. Houser is a product of a Temple education himself. “My first project as a new graduate student was to assist Jack Kolff with the artificial heart. It doesn’t get much better than that,” he remarks. “The education that Temple offers in cardiovascular medicine is absolutely outstanding, at all levels—medical students through postdoc,” says Jose Missri, MD, Temple’s chief of cardiology. “I’ve come to know many academic medical centers during my 30 years in the field, and I can tell you: Temple’s education is second to none.” Temple trainees like Paul Hermany, MD ’82, chief of cardiology at Grand View Hospital in Sellersville, Pa., remain grateful to the faculty who gave him his excellent training. Some, he points out, like Howard Warner, MD ’53, and Fred Bove, MD ’66, PhD ’70, are still educating future generations of cardiologists—among them Dr. Hermany’s own son, now in residency training at Temple—see page 24. “Just last year, Howard Warner got the Gifted Educator Award of the American College of Cardiology, a rare national distinction,” says Dr. Hermany. “And look at Fred Bove, who just finished his term as president of the American College of Cardiology. You can’t get much higher in the leadership ranks.” Temple is fortunate that many of its core faculty are still teaching and that talented newer faculty

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Hugo Roesler, MD, associate professor of medicine and roentgenology/chief of cardiac service at TUH, authored one of the earliest books on cardiovascular imaging.

W. Emory Burnett, MD, chair, Department of Surgery, an early thoracic and vascular surgeon, performed the first human pneumonectomy in Philadelphia.

Temple created one of the first hospitalbased dedicated coronary care units in Pennsylvania.

George Henny, MD, professor of medical physics, W. Edward Chamberlain, MD, professor of radiology, and other Temple faculty win the silver medal research award from the AMA for their efforts to perfect the electrokymograph, used in the early detection of heart disease.

Thomas Durant, MD, chair of medicine, and M. Stauffer, chair of radiology, published results of their novel studies of the visualization of intracardiac structures with gaseous carbon dioxide.

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have joined the ranks. For instance, Michael Barrett, MD, clinical associate professor (adjunct) of medicine, who made national news in 2006 with a new way to teach auscultation through a podcast heart sound tutorial. “The leadership that Temple maintains in the profession at national and international levels is impressive,” says James McClurken, MD ’76, professor of CT surgery at Temple. Last March, the American College of Cardiology’s 59th Annual Scientific Session drew over 20,000 participants globally. Dr. McClurken served as program chair, with other faculty as program co-chairs, moderators and presenters. Temple’s leadership in cardiology is also evident in its role in augmenting the capabilities of regional institutions. Earlier this year, for instance, Temple and Doylestown Hospital entered into a clinical alliance to further enhance the excellent program at Doylestown’s Heart Institute. Years ago, Temple helped to build Abington Memorial Hospital’s program, especially through the efforts of longtime Temple cardiothoracic surgeon V. Paul Addonizio, MD—who, according to Dr. Houser, “revolutionized valve surgery.” “Temple continues to build on the trailblazing path of its early days by offering the latest clinical advances for the diagnosis and treatment of patients and by conducting innovative research to push the science forward,” says Dean Daly.

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Sol Sherry, MD, introduced streptokinase into clinical practice for the treatment of thrombotic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and acute myocardial infarction.

Gerald Lemole, MD, performed the first coronary bypass in the tri-state area of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey.

Temple establishes the region’s first heart transplant center and performs the first heart transplant.

The Philadelphia Heart is unveiled, a total artificial heart designed by Temple and the University of Utah—a pneumatic device used as a bridge to transplantation.

Temple deploys Philadelphia’s first left ventricularassist device as destination therapy.

Temple establishes its Cardiovascular Research Center.

Temple performs its 1,000th heart transplant— one of the largest totals anywhere.

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Steven Houser, PhD ’77, director of the CVRC, has been educating new generations of researchers in the Temple tradition since 1978. Having accrued more than $17.5 million in NIH funding during the past 25 years, Dr. Houser is now Temple’s first MERIT (Method to Extend Research in Time) award recipient of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute—a prestigious 10-year research support award that fewer than 5 percent of all NIH-funded researchers receive. Dr. Houser recently served as the first chair of the NIH study section on Cardiac Contractility, Hypertrophy and Failure. He also chairs the Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Council of the American Heart Association and is a past president of the association’s southeastern Pa. chapter. In addition, he chairs the Department of Physiology at Temple. From 2002 to 2007 he served as TUSM’s senior associate dean for research.

CVRC investigations are organized into themes: One team, for example, is looking into ischemic heart disease, studying the heart’s regenerative capacity, searching for ways to bolster the myocardium-rebuilding capacity of aging or damaged heart tissue and to prevent or lessen vulnerability to ischemic insult in the first place. “We are analyzing the consequences of ischemic heart disease at both the levels of the intact heart and the individual myocyte,” says Dr. Houser, “using novel approaches in cell and gene therapy to enhance cardiac repair and regeneration after injury.”

CVRC: Innovative Investigation Temple has made a major investment in cardiovascular disease research in recent years, recruiting new talent to the faculty and building state-ofthe-art research facilities—notably, 7,000-square feet of brand-new, open-format research space in the new Medical Education and Research Building dedicated to the CVRC. “The CVRC’s mission is to illuminate causes, consequences and cures for cardiovascular disease, and to train new scientists and clinicians,” explains Dr. Houser. The 23 investigators of the CVRC come from 11 different basic science and clinical departments, including Physiology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Pharmacology, Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Bioengineering, and Endocrinology. Their varied backgrounds add depth and breadth.

Other studies being carried out by teams with different themes are exploring fundamental mechanisms of disease development with an eye toward developing strategies for early diagnosis and prevention. The focus of the myocardial group is on mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy and failure, approaches to prevent remodeling after ischemic injury, and mechanisms of cardiac dysfunction in hypertensive and ischemic heart disease. The vascular biology group studies the role of vascular abnormalities in hypertension, diabetic vasculopathy, metabolic syndrome and vascular restenosis. Given that the mechanisms involved in thrombosis, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis and inflammation are fundamental to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, CVRC researchers frequently

A. Koneti Rao, MD, is Sol Sherry professor of medicine, director of the Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center, and chief of hematology at Temple University School of Medicine. He is also professor of thrombosis research, pharmacology, and pathology, and former associate dean for Temple’s MD-PhD program. Widely respected in the field, Dr. Rao has been a NIHfunded investigator and Temple faculty member since 1979. His research interests pertain to the molecular mechanisms of platelet disorders, anti-thrombotic therapy, and diabetes mellitus. He has been honored by organizations such as International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis and is recipient of a Temple University Faculty Research Award. He has been listed in Best Doctors in America® and Philadelphia Magazine’s Top Docs.

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collaborate with the Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center (SSTRC), which is internationally renowned for its research contributions in the area of thrombosis, the process that leads to acute vascular events. Investigators of CVRC and SSTRC also partner with the Temple Center for Inflammation, Translational and Clinical Lung Research, another of Temple’s newer research centers, given the many territories all share: tissue factor pathways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, molecular events in platelet activation, platelet signaling and antithrombotic therapy, to name a few. This center was established in 2005 to promote research on inflammatory lung diseases and to coordinate the clinical resources of Temple Lung Center with the knowledge and expertise of basic scientists.

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National Leaders in Cardiovascular Medicine Who tr ained and/or taught at Temple Kenneth Baker, MD ’74, Res ’77: vice chair, medicine; director, molecular cardiology; chair, cardiovascular research, Texas A&M Univ. C. William Balke, MD ’81: head, cardiology, Univ. Maryland School of Medicine and Medical Center; president-elect, American Heart Association midAtlantic affiliate; consultant to NIH on heart disease Alfred Bove, MD ’66, PhD ’70: immediate past president, American College of Cardiology; editor-in-chief, CardioSource (ACC’s education website); professor of medicine, former chief of cardiology and associate dean, Temple

Robert W. Colman, MD: professor of medicine, professor of thrombosis, research, physiology, and microbiology/immunology; former director, Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center, TUSM; senior editor, Thrombosis and Haemostasis: Basic Principles and Clinical Practice George Cooper IV, MD: distinguished professor, medicine; director, Gazes Cardiac Research Institute, Medical Univ. South Carolina; former director, basic CV research, Temple Valluvan Jeevanandam, MD: chief, cardiac & thoracic surgery, Univ. Chicago; former director, cardiac transplant, Temple

Washington Univ. School of Medicine; cardiologistin-chief, Barnes Jewish Hospital Andrew L. Smith, MD-Res ’87: clinical chief, cardiology, Emory Univ. James F. Spann, MD: professor of medicine and former chief of cardiology and executive associate dean, Univ. of S. Carolina College of Medicine; former chief of cardiology at Temple; protégé of the eminent Harvard cardiologist Eugene Braunwald Randall Starling, MD ’81, MPH: head, heart failure and cardiac transplant medicine; medical director, Kaufman Center for Heart Failure, Cleveland Clinic

Joining in the collaborations, too, are newer Temple faculty members with expertise in atherosclerosis. “A number of studies are underway to explore fundamental aspects of atherosclerotic diseases with a particular focus on how diabetes can exacerbate the disease process. Much of this work has direct relevance to the studies being done by the vascular biology group within the CVRC,” notes Dr. Houser.

Blase Carabello, MD ’73: vice chair, medicine, Baylor Univ.; chief, medicine, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center

“The overarching goal is to identify the next generation of therapies and interventions for conditions and disease states.” “Next-gen” might mean cellular, pharmacological, surgical or device-based. Some of the studies are at the bench level. Translational projects cross over into patient care. One such project has vascular biologists, immunologists, cell biologists and CT surgeons collaborating on ways to reduce arteriopathy secondary to immune response among transplant patients—an important clinical issue.

Melvin Cheitlin, MD ’54, MACC: Senate Emeritus Professor of Medicine, UCSF-San Francisco General Hospital; former chief, cardiology; vice chair, medicine, U.S. Army Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; former U.S. Army consultant to the Surgeon General for cardiovascular disease; former chief, cardiology, Madigan, Tripler, Letterman and Walter Reed Army Medical Centers

Advanced Clinical Care Informed by Research

3 alumni on facult y who help keep Temple cardiology on the map

Kenneth Chien, MD-PhD ’80: director, Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital; professor, medicine and cell biology; director, Stem Cell Institute, Harvard Univ.

Satya P. Kunapuli, PhD: co-director, Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center; professor of physiology thrombosis research and pharmacology, TUSM; leading expert on the molecular pharmacology and physiology of nucleotide receptors in platelets Steven J. Lavine, MD ’76: director, cardiovascular fellowship program, Univ. Florida Gerald Lemole, MD ’62: protégé of Drs. DeBakey and Cooley; member, team that performed the first successful heart transplant in the U.S. (1968); former chief, cardiothoracic surgery, Temple; former chief of surgery, Deborah Heart & Lung Center, Brown Mills, NJ Douglas Mann, MD ’79: chair, medicine; director, cardiovascular division,

Barry Uretsky, MD ’72: director, interventional cardiology fellowship program; director, interventional cardiology, Univ. Arkansas; former chief, cardiology; director, cardiovascular catheterization, Univ. Texas Medical Branch; former president, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Intervention Karl Weber, MD ’68: Neuton Stern Professor, cardiovascular medicine; director, cardiovascular diseases, Univ. Tennessee Health Science Center William Winters Jr., MD-Res ’58, MACC: John S. Dunn Chair, clinical cardiovascular research and education, Methodist Hospital/DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center

The Temple Heart Center is one of the region’s top programs. It is known for providing advanced solutions for severe cardiac and vascular diseases and for handling cases that are complex or difficult to diagnose.

James McClurken, MD ’76 Howard Warner, MD ’53

Alfred Bove, MD ’66, PhD ’70

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Independence Blue Cross has designated Temple a Blue Distinction Center for cardiac care and heart transplantation. In addition, Medicare’s Hospital Compare program rates Temple’s hospital care for heart failure patients higher than state and national state averages. “We integrate the newest technical and biomedical breakthroughs into current therapy for all patients,” says Jose Missri, MD, chief of cardiology. “Moreover, with our strong emphasis on research, we work to improve existing strategies and to identify new ones.” The Heart Center has a robust clinical research program with national trials of new drugs and devices for cardiac care. More than 20 clinical

trials are underway in the areas of heart failure, heart transplantation, interventional cardiology, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, pacemakers and implanted defibrillators, telemedicine and education. Clinicians and scientists regularly collaborate to bring findings from the research laboratory to clinical practice. For example, Temple is pioneering new alternatives for heart failure patients, offering access to the latest generation of special surgical techniques with devices, biologicals or cell-based therapies, often in tandem. Temple surgeons, clinicians and scientists are partnering to refine protocols to enhance the safety and effectiveness of these approaches. Together they are developing new regenerative

Victor Rizzo, PhD, associate professor, anatomy and cell biology (right), works with PhD candidate Harinder Singh in the Cardiovascular Research Center to expose cultured aortic endothelial cells to inflammatory mediators that contribute to vascular dysfunction and associated diseases such as atherosclerosis.

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techniques involving myocardial stem cells, novel pharmaceutical protocols and related immunocardiotherapies. They are also collaborating to refine the latest generation of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices.

MCS is an important new horizon for the growing number of patients with intractable cardiac disease —patients not eligible for transplant and patients who are eligible but “on hold” due to the continuing donor shortage. Only about 2,000 heart transplants are performed nationally every year, helping just a small fraction—1 or 2 percent—of those who might benefit. Advances in mechanical pump design and related care, however, are dramatically improving the lives of patients with debilitating heart failure. Many are receiving MCS devices as permanent or short-term support. “Temple is particularly well-known for its LVAD (left ventricular-assist device) program,” notes Dr. Missri. “We have been innovating with ventricular-assist devices since they were first introduced in 1992 and we were the first in Philadelphia to implant an LVAD as destination therapy in 2003. Today’s smaller, more reliable axial-flow devices and third-generation centrifugal MCS devices enable us to send many patients back home with minimal support and a greatly improved quality of life,” says Dr. Missri. “Temple’s advanced heart failure and heart transplant programs are respected regionally, nationally and internationally,” says Dr. Missri. “We have the longest history of heart transplantation in the region and see more patients for advanced heart failure than any other hospital in Philadelphia,” says Dr. Missri. This expertise began over three decades ago when Temple became the first in the Delaware Valley to perform heart and heart-lung transplants. Since 1984, Temple has performed more than a thousand heart transplants—one of the largest totals in the world. “We continue to break new ground, exploring novel surgical approaches for severe heart failure, valve problems, coronary blockages, stubborn arrhythmias, inherited heart diseases, rare conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or complex mixed cardiac and respiratory difficulties,” says Dr. Missri.

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A nationally renowned physician-scientist and educator, José Missri, MD, chief of cardiovascular medicine at Temple, is listed as one of America’s Top Doctors by the Consumer Research Council of America. An academic researcher and writer with expertise in cardiac ultrasound and Doppler echocardiography, he has written four textbooks and numerous textbook chapters on those topics, including Transesophageal Echocardiography: Clinical and Intraoperative Applications (Churchill Livingston, New York, 1993). Prior to coming to Temple in 2008, he was professor of clinical medicine at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and chair of cardiovascular medicine and senior vice president-chief medical officer at St. Vincent’s Medical Center, in Bridgeport, Conn. Before that, he spent 22 years at Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford as chair of medicine, senior vice president for medical affairs, and chief medical officer and medical director of the Hoffman Heart Institute of Connecticut.

In electrophysiology, in addition to providing the newest and most sophisticated ablation techniques, Temple is participating in several clinical trials to test new medications and techniques for the treatment of atrial fibrillation that has been drug refractory. In interventional cardiology, Temple has played an important role in testing breakthrough catheterbased therapies such as drug-eluting stents and embolic protection devices for high-risk interventional procedures. “In addition to offering the newest minimally invasive techniques for major coronary, valvular and vascular conditions, we perform specialized percutaneous procedures, such as closure of atrial septal defects and alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy,” says Dr. Missri. “We also treat vessel disease in the legs, kidneys, abdominal arteries, and arteries supplying the brain. A number of clinical trials are underway.” “With state-of-the-art techniques and procedures we can revascularize many more patients—even those with more diffuse or distal disease, and those with significant calcification that has resisted previous interventions,” says Dr. Missri. Temple’s catheterization and electrophysiology laboratory, one of the newest and largest in the region, features five state-of-the-art catheterization suites, nine full-time technicians, the newest equipment for intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound, electroanatomical 3-D mapping, radiofrequency catheter ablations, complex lead extractions, pacemaker insertions and implantable cardioverter defibrillator placements.

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Eric T. Choi, MD, is Temple’s new chief of vascular surgery and associate professor of surgery. An avid researcher, Dr. Choi is the recipient of numerous grants from NIH and the American Heart Association. In 2006, the Foundation for Accelerated Vascular Research recognized him with The Wylie Scholar Award for vascular surgeon-scientists engaged in independent research that could revolutionize how vascular diseases are treated or cured. Dr. Choi comes to Temple from Barnes-Jewish Hospital and the John Cochran VA Medical Center where he served as an attending vascular surgeon, and was associate professor of surgery and radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. Dr. Choi serves as a reviewer for Circulation, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, the Journal of Vascular Surgery and other leading journals. His clinical interests pertain to open and endovascular interventions for thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, carotid artery disease, and critical limb ischemia of the legs.

New imaging methods lead to better treatment, and with nationally recognized experts in the field, Temple has expert capabilities in noninvasive diagnostics such as MUGA, PET, and stress tests with thallium and Tc-99m sestamibi. Our cardiac CT capability allows coronary evaluation without a need for diagnostic catheterization, and functional cardiac MR provides real-time high-resolution cardiac imaging.

Great Progress, Great Potential In the clinical realm, Temple has integrated its cardiac and vascular services within a model that eases access for patients and fosters best-practice collaboration among our medical, diagnostic and surgical subspecialists. In the research arena, we have built an analogous model that integrates our investigative approach. And with continued emphasis on translational strategies, we are building bridges to speed progress between discovery and application. “I feel very strongly about the utility of advanced therapies—be they in the form of devices, cellbased therapies, new medical therapies, or transplantation for end-stage heart and lung disease,” says associate professor of surgery Abeel Mangi, MD, one of Temple’s newest physician-scientists. Dr. Mangi is surgical director of lung transplantation and associate surgical director of heart transplantation. He also directs the cardiothoracic transplant research laboratory. “Moreover, I feel strongly that such therapies should be available to all appropriate candidates,” he says. During the past five years, Temple University Health System and School of Medicine have

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received more than $53 million in grant funding for research, facilities and training programs related to cardiovascular research from NIH and other funders. And during the past five years, Temple University School of Medicine and Health System have invested more than $42 million to expand faculty, build and renovate facilities, acquire technologies, and launch programs related to cardiology research and clinical care. Now, Temple is committed to climbing to an even higher plane. To improve our ability to bring cardiovascular research, clinical care and education to a worldclass level, Temple is developing a comprehensive strategic advancement campaign that will involve recruiting more faculty, like Eric Choi, MD, Temple’s new chief of vascular surgery, a rising star in the field. And building additional state-of-theart research and clinical space outfitted with ultramodern technologies such as an image-guided operatory dedicated to cardiovascular procedures. “Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of mortality in the United States, so these investments are well worth it,” says the dean.

Temple is proud to announce the establishment of the Alfred A. Bove, MD, PhD, Endowed Chair fund in cardiology. To support it, or any aspect of cardiovascular clinical care, education or research at Temple, contact Eric Abel, assistant dean, eric.abel@temple.edu, (215) 707-3023.


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The CRINER FAMILY by Kristin Criner, MD ’10

“take your daughter to work day” was not just an annual event in the Criner household. It was a regular routine that exposed us to the exciting field of medicine at an early age.

patients before he arrived. The patient I spoke with that day had been diagnosed with COPD—and said something that I will never forget—“your dad saved my life.” Those five words made a lasting impact on me. When we were growing up, medicine never limited family life; it complemented life. Whenever my dad had a conference overseas, he would take one of us with him. Whether it was London or Italy, one of us would be in tow for every meeting and social function. Medicine was a means to enriching our lives in more ways than one.

Kristin Criner, MD ’10 (left), with her father, Gerry Criner, MD ’79, and sister Kate Criner, MD ’08.

My father, Gerard Criner, MD ’79, is a professor of medicine and section chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Temple, where he has worked for 22 years. Here I am graduating from the same medical school as my father, 31 years later, and starting my residency in internal medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, where we both attended as undergraduates. In true idiomatic fashion, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree—but why would I want to? There are five children in our family, four who are interested in medicine. Kate (MD ’08) and I have degrees from TUSM, Karla is currently in TUSM’s post-baccalaureate program, and Rachel, a junior at Penn State, wants to pursue medicine. Each of us took different routes to discover our passion for medicine. Kate had “The Thon”— a dance marathon at Penn State—where she helped raise funds and awareness for the fight against pediatric cancer. Through this program, she became really close to a boy who had leukemia and the seed for a life in medicine was planted. One of my “a-ha” moments was during the summer after my freshman year of college. I was shadowing my dad in the outpatient clinic where he would occasionally let me speak with

Temple even played a part in my parents getting married. As a senior medical student, my dad was taking his ritualistic midnight study break for a Coke and Tastykake in the basement of Kresge when he saw a flyer about a short-term collaboration with a hospital in San Francisco. My mom happened to be a nurse there at the time. After almost running her over on a late night jog to San Francisco bay, they fell in love shortly after, and have been married for 30 years. Between my dad and mom (who is a registered nurse), we were raised in an environment that fostered the pursuit of an altruistic profession. As I witnessed their careers develop, I understood the satisfaction of being in a profession that enables you not only to feel good about helping others, but also to stay sharp because things are constantly changing. “When I was 13 years old, my father took me to grand rounds at Temple University Hospital,” says my sister, Kate Criner, MD ’08, a third-year resident in orthopaedic surgery at Temple. “I distinctly remember being fascinated by the bright white coats and the enthusiasm with which the physicians presented their research.” All three of us selected Temple as our destination for medical school for many of the same reasons: superior clinical instruction, diverse patient population, variation in the disease types and specialty cases, as well as Temple’s emphasis on continuous education and research. My decision of where to apply was simple because Temple came so highly recommended from the most credible source I know of—family.

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News and Notes of Honor 2010 REUNION AWARDS three alumni and one faculty member were honored during Temple University School of Medicine’s 2010 class reunion celebration in Philadelphia in November.

Berman Named Alumnus of the Year For two decades running, U.S. News & World Report has ranked Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio, one of the best children’s hospitals in the country. Rainbow is a world leader in a variety of areas—including sickle cell disease—“and we applaud Brian Berman, MD ’75, for helping to put it there,” says TUSM’s Alumni Association President Anthony Giorgio, MD ’73. Chief of the Division of General Academic Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Dr. Berman directs Rainbow’s Sickle Cell Anemia Center and Pediatric Consultation and Referral Service. He is vice chair for community physician affairs, medical director of the university hospital system’s patient access program, and recently served as interim co-chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve. Respected by patients, families, students and colleagues, he has accrued 14 teaching awards from Case Western and Rainbow, five America’s Best Doctors citations from Castle Connelly, two dozen regional Top Doc listings, and a host of other honors for service and clinical excellence from consumer publications like Ladies Home Journal and professional organizations such as the American Sickle Cell Anemia Association. In addition to serving on the grant review panel for the National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute, he has served as principal investigator on NIH grants of his own as well as on programmatic and research grants from United Way and private foundations. He is an editorial board member of Clinical Pediatrics 18

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and serves as a reviewer for numerous journals, including the Journal of Pediatrics, and his own publication credits feature eight textbook chapters and numerous articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, and other leading publications. Dr. Berman has devoted years of service as a chief officer or board member of the faculty practice plan of Case Western’s hospital network and the Children’s Research Foundation of Cleveland. He has organized dozens of regional and national conferences for the American Federation for Clinical Research, the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and the American Sickle Cell Anemia Association, and has served as an invited lecturer at home and abroad. With dozens of administrative leadership roles in areas ranging from community-based clinical research to media relations to minority cancer care, Dr. Berman has earned the respect and admiration of his trainees, colleagues and patients.

Brian Berman, MD ’75

“Brian Berman is a fabulous clinician, a community advocate, an educator, administrator, researcher, spokesperson and author who does it all with grace, humor, humility and compassion,” says Anthony Giorgio, MD ’73. “In many ways he is the physician, the person, that Temple encouraged so many of us to be.”

Honored Professor Award for Ryan “I met Dr. Ryan in my junior year of college just to get a feel for what medical school might be like,” said Kate Love, MD ’06, a San Diego-based internist with the U.S. Marine Corps. “I was so taken with his explanation that Temple became the only school to which I applied.” Dozens of alumni have said things like this about James Ryan, PhD, professor of physiology. Current students are still saying them. A member of the faculty since 1975 and former associate chair of the Department of Physiology as well as

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medical physiology course director, Dr. Ryan has developed a reputation for helping students develop a vision of the doctors they wish to become. Since 1999, he has been the numberone ranked member of the physiology teaching faculty and has won a host of fans and teaching honors. He’s been awarded five Golden Apple Awards, the George Sowell Award for excellence in basic science teaching, and the Lindback Award for distinguished teaching. “I have never encountered a teacher who performed his job so selflessly that it seemed to be a way of life, not simply a profession,” said a former student. “With the 2010 Honored Professor Award, we recognize Dr. Ryan’s commitment to the civic and administrative lives of the school and the university,” says Dr. Giorgio, alumni association president. Dr. Ryan is a past president of the medical faculty senate, and has served on committees of every concern ranking from curriculum to finance to research. He has provided leadership to professional organizations as well, such as the American Motility Society, plus has more than 200 publications to his credit and serves as a reviewer for 11 journals. Perhaps Steven Busselen, MD ’05, a family practitioner in Providence, R.I., said it all when he said this: “Jim Ryan is a true mentor, a genuinely nice guy— and a really crappy softball player.”

Simeone Gets Alumni Service Award In 2007, Temple University honored neurosurgeon Frederick Simeone, BA ’56, MD ’60, with a certificate of honor to applaud his impressive career achievements. Well-known for his integrative, expansive approach to research and clinical practice, he is author of The Spine, now in its fifth edition. He has served on the faculties and clinical staffs of many prestigious institutions, including the Mayo Clinic, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard University as chief, chair or residency/fellowship program director. Expert in specialized neurosurgical procedures such as stereotaxis, interventional radiology and complex spine surgery, today he is clinical director of the Simeone Center for Neurosurgery, based at the Pennsylvania Hospital. “Now, with the 2010 alumni service award, we recognize Dr. Simeone for his dedication and generosity to the School of Medicine, as he has given of his time and talent for decades,” says Alumni Association President Anthony Giorgio, MD ’73. Dr. Simeone is a member of the Board of Visitors of Temple University School of Medicine, served as the keynote speaker at the school’s Babcock Surgical Society centennial celebration, has hosted numerous events for alumni

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and friends for both the medical school and university at large, and has been an important benefactor, supporting the campaign for TUSM’s new Medical Education and Research Building and the school’s annual fund, among others. Other organizations have honored Dr. Simeone for his service and generosity as well. In 2006 he was the United Cerebral Palsy Association’s Honoree of the Year. Dr. Simeone is founder of the Simeone Foundation Museum. Located in Philadelphia, Pa., the museum is home to one of the greatest collections of automobiles in existence.

Alumni Achievement Award for Cortese “Our country should have the highestvalue health care in the world. It should not strive simply to have cheaper health care,” says Denis Cortese, MD ’70. A top physician executive, Dr. Cortese directs Arizona State University’s health care delivery and policy program. Prior to joining ASU in 2009, Dr. Cortese was president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. He also chaired its board of governors. He first joined Mayo in 1976, directed its pulmonary disease training program from 1979 to 1987, and continued to climb the organizational ladder. From 1999 to 2002, he served as CEO of Mayo in Jacksonville, Fla., then returned to Rochester to become Mayo’s CEO and board chair. With hospitals in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona, Mayo Clinic treats more than 500,000 patients each year. Under Dr. Cortese’s leadership it implemented cutting-edge programs in health care information technology, used genomics to customize patient-specific treatment, and launched a health policy center.

Frederick Simeone, BA ’56, MD ’60

Denis Cortese, MD ’70

Dr. Cortese has won many awards, including the 2009 National Healthcare Leadership Award of the National Center for Healthcare. He is an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, chairs the Institute of

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chief operating officer and chief nursing officer for the former Temple University Children’s Medical Center. She served as TUH’s interim CEO prior to being named to the post.

Medicine’s Roundtable on EvidenceBased Medicine, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served as a board member, board chair or president of numerous societies, including the Academic Medical Center Consortium. He has also served on editorial boards of leading journals, and his own publication credits include five books and 21 book chapters.

Notebaert Steps Down In June, Edmond Notebaert announced his decision to step down, in December of 2010, as president and CEO of the Temple University Health System and senior executive vice president of health sciences at Temple University.

As his career progressed, Dr. Cortese became increasingly immersed in the national dialogue on health care. In his public interviews, he reminds us that this country really does not have a system of health care. Commenting on his 2009 televised interview with Charlie Rose, one blogger wrote: “This should be obligatory viewing for all members of Congress.” A subsequent blogger wrote: “The doc makes too much sense. Washington will never listen to him.”

“When I accepted this position in September 2008, I came with clear objectives and priorities to stabilize the Health System and position it for success moving forward. We have made tremendous progress, and the time is right to look towards long-term executive leadership,” he said. Patrick O’Connor, Esq., chair of the Temple University Board of Trustees, added, “We look forward to continued progress as we strive to ensure that Temple is a leader in medical education and health care in this region and across the country.”

Gomberg Named TUH President and CEO In June, Sandra Gomberg, RN, MSN, was named president and CEO of Temple University Hospital, the flagship hospital of Temple University Health System and the primary teaching site for TUSM. As president and CEO, Ms. Gomberg is responsible for the strategic direction, operational effectiveness, and financial health of TUH, which includes the Episcopal Campus, the Northeastern Ambulatory Care Center, the TUH Bone Marrow Transplant Program, and the Temple Transport Team. Her priorities as president and CEO include implementing, in partnership with the School of Medicine, a comprehensive, multiyear clinical investment plan to increase access to clinical services while further growing targeted specialty-care programs and improving quality and service delivery through physiciandriven leadership. Ms. Gomberg has been a member of Temple’s leadership for 13 years, having served in positions such as associate hospital director of professional services for TUH, and

Temple Lung Center Ranked among Nation’s Best Temple University Hospital has been ranked once again by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top hospitals for pulmonology. The ranking appeared in the publication’s most recent Best Hospitals issue.

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With a volume of more than 9,000 patients annually, The Temple Lung Center is one of the nation’s largest referral centers for lung disease and is nationally renowned for its superior outcomes, particularly in the areas of mechanical-ventilation, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, emphysema and respiratory failure. With more than 25 clinical trials underway to investigate new therapies for COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the center has one of the most active pulmonary research programs in the nation. It has participated in more than a hundred clinical trials in the past decade in COPD, IPF, pulmonary hypertension, sarcoidosis, respiratory failure and emphysema. Temple is also a leading clinical site in multiple NIH-sponsored trials, such as the Long Term Oxygen Treatment Trial, COPD Genetic and Epidemiology Study, and the COPD Clinical Research Network. Gerard Criner, MD ’79, professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine, is director of the Temple Lung Center.

Choi Is New Chief of Vascular Medicine Eric Choi, MD, has joioned Temple as chief of vascular surgery and associate professor of surgery. An avid researcher with many presentations and publications to his credit, Dr. Choi is the recipient of numerous NIH and the American Heart Association grants. In 2006, the Foundation for Accelerated Vascular Research recognized him with The Wylie Scholar Award for vascular

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surgeon-scientists engaged in independent research that could revolutionize how vascular diseases are treated or cured. Dr. Choi comes to Temple from Barnes-Jewish Hospital and the John Cochran VA Medical Center where he was an attending vascular surgeon and associate professor of surgery and radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. Dr. Choi serves as a reviewer for Circulation; Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, the Journal of Vascular Surgery and other leading journals. His clinical interests pertain to open and endovascular interventions for thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, carotid artery disease, and critical limb ischemia of the legs.

Cacciamani Heads Philadelphia County Medical Society John Cacciamani Jr., MD, MBA, assistant professor of medicine and chief of clinical operations and informatics at Temple, has been named president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society. He will focus his presidency on medical malpractice reform, building community among physicians, using technology to improve care, and promoting partnerships. The Philadelphia County Medical Society works in conjunction with the AMA and other societies to uphold standards of medical education and ethics, and to raise awareness about public health.

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Lorber Leads College of Physicians of Philadelphia Bennett Lorber, MD, the Thomas Durant Professor of Medicine and professor of microbiology and immunology at TUSM, has been named president of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Dr. Lorber, who served as chief of infectious diseases from 1983 to 2006, has been a fellow of the college of since 1979 and a member of its Board of Trustees since 1997. The college is the nation’s oldest medical society, founded in 1787 by a group of physicians including Dr. Benjamin Rush, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Moyer Named Governor of SE Pennsylvania ACP Darilyn V. Moyer, MD ’85, professor of medicine and vice chair of the Department of Medicine and internal medicine program director at Temple, has been elected governor of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American College of Physicians. A fellow of the college, Dr. Moyer is also assistant dean for graduate medical education at Temple. Founded in 1915, the American College of Physicians is the nation’s largest medical specialty organization, with more than 129,000 internal medicine physicians and medical student members.

Arthur Lazarus, MD ’80, SBM ’96, senior director of global clinical development, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, Del., has been awarded the Administrative Psychiatry Award of the American Psychiatric Association. This top honor is given to a psychiatrist who has demonstrated extraordinary competence in psychiatric administration and who has achieved a national reputation in this area. Dr. Lazarus is adjunct professor of psychiatry at TUSM, executivein-residence at Temple University’s Fox School of Business and Management, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Temple University Alumni Association.

Permut Elected to AMA Board of Trustees Stephen Permut, MD ’72, chair of family and community medicine at Temple, has been elected to trusteeship of the American Medical Association. Dr. Permut, who is also senior associate dean for academic affiliations, has served as a member of the association’s House of Delegates for 18 years. Founded in 1847, the AMA is the nation’s largest association of physicians and medical students, with over 240,000 members.

Brennan Wins CDC Lifetime Achievement Award PJ Brennan, MD ’82, senior vice president and chief medical officer for the University of Pennsylvania Health System, has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the CDC for his “selfless contributions toward the elimination of health-care-associated infections and guiding national health policy.” He has received numerous honors, including TUSM’s Alumni

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Achievement Award in 2007 and the Commitment of Excellence Award from Penn for “providing extraordinary, unprecedented public health service to the community.”

Baxter Named PAFP President D. Michael Baxter, MD ’80, chair of family and community medicine and director of the family medicine residency program at Reading Hospital, in West Reading, Pa., has been named president of the Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians. He will provide leadership to more than 4,800 physicians, residents and medical students in the state. Dr. Baxter recently served as president of the Berks (Pa.) County Medical Society.

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Stern Inducted into Temple’s Gallery Lillian Stern, MD ’67, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., has been inducted into Temple University’s Gallery of Success for the 2010-2011 academic year. Cosponsored by the university’s Office of Career Services and alumni offices, the gallery is located in a highly visible area of Mitten Hall on Main Campus, where photos and bio sketches of prominent alumni like Dr. Stern inspire thousands each year, illustrating what alumni have done with a Temple education. A respected clinician, teacher and professional leader, Dr. Stern is clinical assistant professor of radiology at Thomas Jefferson University and director of the Women’s Diagnostic Center at Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia, where she also serves as chief of the diagnostic division of the Department of Radiology. Widely recognized for her pioneering work in mammography, Dr. Stern is an authority on medical imaging technologies for breast cancer detection, including breast MRI, breast ultrasound, and BSGI (breast-specific

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gamma imaging), a molecular imaging technology. A fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging, Dr. Stern has lectured and taught extensively throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. She has also taught in Japan and South America, plus led missions to bring mammography to India in the 1980s and 1990s. A past president of the Mam­mography Society of Philadelphia, she has served numerous hospital and professional organizations in leadership capacities.

Axelrod Wins Lindback Award Peter Axelrod, MD-Res ’80, professor of medicine in the section of infectious diseases at TUSM, has been awarded the 2010 Christian & Mary F. Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, one of the highest teaching honors conferred. Students praise Dr. Axelrod as a “wonderful teacher” who gladly puts in extra time for students who are struggling and “a great role model” with a marvelous ability to convey complex information. A clinical epidemiologist and biostatistician, Dr. Axelrod received his medical degree from Yale University and came to Temple for his residency in 1980. After completing an infectious diseases fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in 1987, he joined the Temple faculty and has been teaching microbiology, epidemiology, internal medicine and infectious diseases ever since.

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Wang Named Assistant Dean Hong Wang, MD, PhD, professor of pharmacology at Temple, has been named assistant dean for research at TUSM. In this capacity she will assist Dr. Richard Coico, senior associate dean for research, in supporting the research enterprise of the school, with a particular focus on identifying potential new funding sources. Dr. Wang’s own research program focuses on causes of vascular disease, with current studies aimed at identifying mechanisms through which high levels of homocysteine, a potential cellular toxin, cause cardiovascular disease and other serious pathological conditions.

Distinguished Service Award for Krouse John Krouse, MD, PhD, professor and chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at TUSM, was presented with the 2010 American Academy of Otolaryn­ gology-Head and Neck Surgery Distin­ guished Service Award. This prestigious award is given to members in recognition of their extensive volunteer contributions to the academy and its foundation.


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Also Noted • Ron Spark, MD ’67, Tucson, Ariz., received the 2010 Sattenspeil Award of the

Arizona Medical Association for his longstanding commitment to organized medicine. Dr. Spark is clinical associate professor of pathology at the University of Arizona School of Medicine and medical director of its clinical laboratories.

• Christina Katarina Biller, MD ’04, MPH, Res ’09, was awarded the Philadelphia

County Medical Society’s 2010 Humaneness in Medicine Award, which lauds her service to both the clinical and human needs of patients and families, including her recent year-long volunteer post at Sihanouk Hospital Center of HOPE in Phnom Penh Cambodia, which provides free care to the poor. Dr. Biller is a pediatric surgery fellow at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital at Columbia University.

Christina Katarina Biller, MD ’04

• Jean Belasco, MD ’73, pediatric oncologist, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, was presented with CHOP’s 2010 Pitcher of Hope Award, an honor connected with the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, for her extraordinary commitment to children with cancer.

• David Jimenez, MD ’85, San Antonio, Texas, chair of neurosurgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, was recently elected president of the Texas Association of Neurological Surgeons.

• Stacey Brann, MD, assistant professor of clinical surgery at TUSM, has been

appointed to the Minority Affairs Committee of the national Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing.

• Domenico Praticó, MD, associate professor of pharmacology and microbiology/ immunology at TUSM, and MD/PhD student Yash Joshi have been selected as a trainee-mentor pair for the Medical Students’ Sustained Training and Research Experience in Aging and Mental Health program, a national training program supported by the National Institute of Mental Health that aims to increase the number of geriatric mental health investigators.

Jean Belasco, MD ’73

Clinical Currents • Doylestown Hospital in Bucks County, Pa., and Temple have formed a clinical alli-

ance for cardiothoracic surgical services. Under the agreement, James McClurken, MD ’76, professor of cardiothoracic surgery and cardiothoracic surgeon at Temple, will divide his time between Temple and Doylestown Hospital to provide supplemental surgical support to help meet a growing need in Central Bucks County. Dr. McClurken is a leading cardiothoracic surgeon with experience with a variety of artificial heart and ventricular-assist devices.

Stacey Brann, MD

• Temple is serving as the regional hub for ProTECT III, a nationwide study to

determine whether or not progesterone helps stave off permanent brain damage in patients with traumatic brain injury.

• For the second year in a row, Temple’s Episcopal campus has earned the most prestigious patient satisfaction award, the Press Ganey Summit Award. Episcopal has ranked in the 99th percentile for patient satisfaction for four years running.

• Temple has established a laser angioplasty program led by Riyaz Bashir, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of vascular and endovascular medicine, that offers a more precise alternative for the removal of calcified plaque blockages in the legs for patients with peripheral artery disease.

• Temple Pediatrics is participating in the Pennsylvania Chronic Care Management, Reimbursement and Cost Reduction Commission’s collaborative effort to create a statewide plan to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic conditions while reducing preventable illnesses and costs related thereto.

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Personal Perspective A Tale of Solomon and Three Pauls by Paul Hermany, MD ’82

On his graduation day: Paul L. Hermany, MD ’10, and Paul L. Hermany, MD ’82.

Paul L. Hermany, MD ’82, as a toddler with his father, Paul L. Hermany, MD, and grandfather, Solomon Hermany, MD.

Temple has a great tradition of inviting physician parents to join in the medical school graduation ceremony. On May 14, 2010, when I stood in full graduation regalia in front of 1000+ people and handed that medical school diploma to my son Paul, suddenly it was that incredible day in 1982 when my physician father handed that diploma to me.

Sacred Heart Hospital in 1971. He directed it for 20 years. More than 200 physicians completed the program under his leadership. My dad received numerous awards for teaching and clinical excellence. Today Sacred Heart Hospital awards yearly the Paul L. Hermany Excellence in Teaching Award to an outstanding family practice resident in my father’s honor.

Unfortunately, my dad did not live to see his grandson graduate from medical school. But I felt him in the light that shone on all of us that day—and I believe that his father, my late granddad, also a physician, was there with us too.

In my father’s generation, physicians started forming groups. Among other things, groups provided for on-call coverage, enabling a doctor to have a life separate from medicine, to get away from time to time. My dad’s generation was also the first to be paid by a third party—which was a good thing at the time.

With my son’s graduation, we now have four generations of Hermany physicians. My grandfather, Solomon Hermany (1892–1968), founded the Carbon County (Pa.) Medical Society. He was a 1919 graduate of Jefferson Medical College, interned at St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, and practiced in Bowmanstown, just north of Allentown, for 40 years—delivering babies, pulling teeth, making his own medicines. This was his life. He did not take time off and rarely left town. My dad, Paul L. Hermany (1924–2008), graduated from Jefferson Medical College in 1952. He completed his residency training at Sacred Heart Hospital in Allentown, had a private solo general practice in Allentown from 1954 to 1971, and founded the region’s first family practice residency program at 24

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Medicine was something I was born into, part of the air I breathed. So choosing medicine as my own career was a natural path for me. I broke the Jefferson tradition, however, and opted to learn medicine at Temple. When I interviewed at Temple, it became immediately apparent that I would be valued as a person, not just a collection of grades and scores. When Drs. Joe Baum and Prince Brigham interviewed me, they were interested in why I wanted to be a physician, what personal qualities might make me a productive doctor. I felt that I was being hand-picked in a way. This, of course, was how Temple treated all its interviewees—and it set a tone that has followed me through all of my training years and beyond.


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Temple’s supportive learning environment brought out the best in me and my classmates. Our pre-med competitiveness soon gave way to a feeling of being in it together. Like all classes, the Class of 1982 was a composite of people of various ages and backgrounds who began to coalesce, learning together in a congenial atmosphere. Our professors, some of the best medical educators in the city, taught with great enthusiasm, creativity and effectiveness. The fact that they worked so hard inspired us to work hard ourselves. Now my son Paul is part of the Hermany physician story. And Temple, incidentally, was the only school to which he applied. Paul’s proclivity for medicine was apparent in his earliest years. Occasionally I’d bring home a thank-you note from a patient. I could see it in Paul’s eyes. He got it. He wanted this for himself. Even as a child, he enjoyed hanging out with me and my friends—who are physicians (all Temple-trained, in fact). He was part of the conversation, the shop talk. As I watched him grow up, I could see that he had the characteristics we look for in medical school candidates: the intelligence, the ability to connect, the passion for science, the drive to make a difference. I got to re-live my own medical school experience as I watched Paul navigate his. Although 25 years separate our days in medical school, we both had the opportunity to learn from some of the same amazing educators—including Ken Cundy, Bennett Lorber and Carson Schneck. What a thing to share. It was fascinating for me to see where Paul’s experience mirrored mine and where it diverged. The curriculum is more clinically oriented now. Computer technology has revolutionized the educational process. And the emphasis today is on a team-based approach to patient care. The culture of medical practice has changed immensely from my grandfather’s days of solo practice and house calls. More physicians are employed by hospitals and health systems. So onerous is the business of medicine today that few physicians want the responsibilities of private practice. Newer doctors are less autonomous. Many clinical matters are no longer the physician’s sole call. It is interesting to see how Temple has adapted to these cultural shifts, how it trains students to be “gamers”— able to adapt, to think on their feet.

The author, Paul L. Hermany, MD ’82, on his graduation day with his father, Paul L. Hermany, MD.

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When I reflect back over the 30+ years that have passed since I joined the Temple family, I am filled with great pride. I have been a student, a fellow, an Alumni Association Board member and president, a medical student parent, and I am now a member of the school’s Board of Visitors. Through all the changes— new faculty, new leadership, new buildings, new medicine— the school’s unique personality has remained incredibly intact. To this point, as I compare my son’s experience with my own, I see no change in what hums at medicine’s heart: the desire to help our patients, to make a difference in this life. It’s a timeless, universal trait that I saw in my grandfather and father, feel in myself, and see in my son. Certain rites of passage really bring out the sense of kinship and pride we have as physicians. Clearly, graduation was a special day for me and my son. Another was Awards Day, when members of the senior class are recognized for special aptitude. Paul received the Mathilde and Louis Soloff Prize for superior knowledge, skill and interest in cardiology. I am a cardiologist, so you can imagine how I felt about that. Moreover, Paul is now an internal medicine resident at Temple. Perhaps he’ll stay on for a cardiology fellowship, just like his old man. When I look around, I am always amazed at how many Temple Med graduates there are, especially where I reside in northern Bucks County, Pa. Again and again, I’ve seen delight and surprise when physicians learn that other local doctors are also Temple grads. Over the years, I have tried to stir up alumni pride. I want alumni to remember where they came from and reconnect. Now, with the medical school’s new flagship building, I think graduates will be more likely to say “that’s my school,” because Temple finally has a facility on par with the excellence that defined our education. I think that TUSM is on the ascent. Its moons are in alignment with John Daly’s strong leadership, an invigorated and expanded faculty, and stronger alumni interest and support than at any time in its past. The school is growing to new campuses, producing greater numbers of Temple doctors. I think the Temple brand will be a major force in the next era of American medicine. It certainly has been a major force in my life and my son’s. For us, and for thousands before and after us, it will always be our medical home.

And with his son, Paul L. Hermany, MD ’10.

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The Faculty and Student View Words to the wise

Advice for the graduating and incoming classes By PAUL LYONS, MD, and mary lajoy, md ’10

During the capstone course last spring, a final requirement before graduation from TUSM, Paul Lyons, MD, professor of family and community medicine, delivered this “letter” of advice to the graduating class. The members of the graduating class wrote letters of advice as well—to the incoming class who arrived this fall. See page 28 for more.

A Letter to the Graduating Class May 2010 Dear Class of 2010: Congratulations.You have made it.You’ve fulfilled a promise you made many years ago:You’re a physician. On your first day of medical school, I offered a few thoughts about my own medical school experience, predicting they would hold true for you too: 1. If there was a mistake to make, I made it; 2. If there is a special providence that protects children and fools, it was working overtime for me; and 3. My life has turned out better than I ever expected it to. Paul Lyons, MD, professor of family and community medicine

Now that you’re about to leave the fold, there’s one more lesson I want to leave you with. The lesson of wonder. This particular time in your life is filled with wonder, excitement, promise. If you are wise (and I know you all to be very wise, indeed), you know that wonder often fades. But it does not have to. In fact, you have within you three promises that inspire and renew wonder: The Promise of Patience—for yourself and others; The Promise of Forgiveness—offered often and accepted freely when given. And most important of all; the Promise of Hope—because when patience and forgiveness have reached their limits, hope is what we have left. In the end, if there is a mistake to be made, we all will make it, and at times we all need a little providence. Despite this, my absolute bedrock belief is that life will be so much better than you believe it could be. You hold the promise of that life already. Sincerely, one of the many faculty proud to have known you,

Paul Lyons, MD

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paul’s Points to Ponder 1. If There’s a Mistake to Make, I’ll Make It

Don’t Honk at Other Drivers. (It may be your mother.) It is hard to treat people poorly face to face, but distance and anonymity breed disregard. Distancing yourself from others will make your life easier but will not make it better. Everyone does dumb things sometimes. Bad behavior does not create bad people. Cycles of bad behavior, however, leave everyone more distant and lost. One is Less than Two—and Two is Less than Three. You are capable of getting many tasks done by yourself. But not everything, not always, and not always when you think you can. Teams can be confusing, frustrating, but life is a team sport. Teamwork doesn’t work on an as-needed basis. It requires a standing dose for a homeostatic level. Sit Down, Shut Up. Build your career, family and friendships on a foundation of practiced silence and careful listening. You will hear yourself better as well in a quiet seated position.You have remarkable things to say. Don’t miss them amid the noise and motion. There’s Always a Door to be Held. Small gestures make large impacts. Be more thoughtful and courteous than anyone expects you to be—not because you have to but because it is the right thing to do. Others may not reciprocate; that’s not the point. No matter how low the bar of societal politeness might be set, plenty of folks will manage to crawl under it. Not you.

2. Providence Works Overtime for Fools and Children

3. Life Is Much Better than You Expect it to Be

There’s Never a Bad Time to Laugh. Stoic occasions are more infrequent than we think. Laughter lessens pain and anxiety, builds friendship, opens minds. Don’t assume that now is not the right time to laugh. Make laughter the norm. Be sensitive to those around you, but by all means laugh. Drink the Cure, not the Poison. Nelson Mandela said, “Resentment is like drinking poison and waiting for it to kill your enemy.” Need I say more?

There is no 25. You may wish it were otherwise, but 24 hours are all we get per day. Performing triage is no great trick, but living with the results is. Every day will end with things undone. Forego perfection. Recognize each day as part of something bigger. What doesn’t happen today can tomorrow. There is no 25th hour.

Finders, Keepers. The world as you find it is non-negotiable, but how you choose to keep it is your decision.You will change the world simply by being in it. For better or worse, it will never be the same as before you arrived. Big or small, make it better. Define Yourself by Solutions, not Problems. Each barrier represents a failure or an opportunity.You will not be judged by whether you are flawless, but by how you respond when you bump up against flaws (yours and others’). All Days are Good Days. Each day holds the possibilities of good and bad. Bad events can happen but do not have to make for bad days. Remember, the only alternative to the possibility of a bad day is no day. Every day is a good day because it comes with the possibility of good. Life is Demanding Enough. Years ago I found a lapel pin inscribed with this saying. At first, I took it as a prescription. If you don’t demand enough, no one is going to give it to you. Then one of my mentors pointed out that I’d get a bit further if I read it as a description: Life is demanding enough. Don’t add to the problem. Be the solution.

Worry is not Your Friend. We are thinkers in medicine. We calculate, strategize, plot. Planning is good, worrying is not. Planning implies action to improve outcomes. Worry implies inaction. Save your energy and creativity for things you can do.

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Classy Counsel for New Medical Students Paul Lyons, MD, professor of family and community medicine, and Dr. Keith Gumery, director of assessment and planning at Temple’s College of Liberal Arts, cosponsor a creative writing elective for medical students. Their aim is to help us stay in touch with humanity through the humanities. They encourage medical students to read medical literature, both fiction and nonfiction, and to write about our interactions with colleagues and patients.

Mary Lajoy, MD ’10, is a first-year psychiatry resident at Brown University.

I’m all for it. Pursuits in the medical humanities help us develop positive doctorpatient relationships, which help both doctors and patients achieve good health. Reflection through writing is an important part of that process and I don’t just mean quick clinical notes on a patient’s chart.

On that note, here are some of my thoughts and recommendations about medical school for the Class of 2014, followed by my favorite snippets of advice from my classmates:

“In medical school, you spend a lot of time with books, so strive to preserve your sense of humanity. Don’t lose the patient somewhere in all the medical terminology. ”

■ Competitiveness helped you to get into medical school. You had to be the brightest students in the classroom, the most involved community leaders, the top performers on standardized exams. I have good news; you don’t have to be cut-throat anymore. You are in now. And medical school is about teamwork and being supportive of your peers. ■ Make sure you sleep, eat well and exercise. No amount of studying is worth sacrificing your health. Also, try not to think too far into the future—it will only stress you out. ■ In medical school, you spend a lot of time with books, so strive to preserve your sense of humanity. Don’t lose the patient somewhere in all the medical terminology. Use clear, simple language with patients. Also, reflect on your experiences with patients by talking about them with others or recording your thoughts. This will help you become a better physician. ■ Temple offers a lot of opportunities for your personal and professional development, experiences in the social sciences, humanities and community service initiatives. Take advantage of all the school has to offer. ■ You are going to do well. Rely on loved ones outside of medical school to create a necessary balance in your life. And time will speed by. Before you know it, you’ll be in my shoes—reflecting and writing a letter to a brand-new student.

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Top 20 Things I Wish I Had Known By Graduates of the Class of 2010

1. If you don’t understand something, get help right away from professors or classmates. Ask lots of questions. 2. Do not stress yourself out by comparing yourself to others. 3. Early on, try to gain clinical exposure to find out what you can see yourself doing in the future. Then make connections that will help you pursue those ends. 4. Your medical school experience will be different from everyone else’s. When you get advice from peers or predecessors, use your own filter to decide how it might apply.

8. Medicine is an opening into the lives of people you would otherwise never meet.You learn so much about the world you live in. Patients are surprising and complex—your life will be more interesting than you could ever imagine. 9. You will worry a lot about many different aspects of your life: your grades, finances, social life. In the end, it will work out and you will succeed. 10. Make time for family, new friends, old friends and non-medical school friends. Alone time, too. This is healthy and keeps you sane. 11. Be sure to make it a habit to study every day.

12. The most important thing I learned in medical school is that people 5. Medical education is a process, not are shaped by their relationships a moment that ends. with others. Look around—there are 6. Cadavers are a great learning new and interesting resource, but, remember, they are people all around not like live patients, nor is dissection you.You all share a real surgery. common interest in medicine, but have 7. A lot of the first two years are about different points of keeping your butt in a chair and your view. eyes on the page. You’ll be a master 13. It’s okay to have some worry and memorizer before stress. Medicine is inherently you are through, able stressful. Besides, we all work better to learn faster than with some stress, some urgency, anyone you know. some purpose.

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14. Take a moment after the first month to look at all the new things you know. Let the volume of it surprise you, give you a sense of accomplishment! 15. Find an active hobby and make it a priority. Physical activity will help you with your stress and will be a good habit to keep up throughout your career. 16. Take the time to study and understand the material, don’t just memorize it! 17. If you spend your mornings sleeping and your afternoons watching online videos of classes held live earlier in the day, you are missing out! 18. Take in all you can at every rotation. There will be times when you will feel pretty useless or invisible. That’s okay, as long as you remember to learn something. 19. You don’t have to memorize all the information, but you do need to know where to find it. (Hint: Become close friends with the librarians.) 20. Debt happens. Don’t eat peanut butter and jelly all the time. Treat yourself well.

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Tales of Temple Medicine

Dean Daly with Kristin Sterrett of the Class of 2011

The Stethoscope and the Pin Cushion: A Story about Courage and Family By John M. Daly, MD, Dean Last April 24, I was extremely fortunate to become the recipient of the 2010 Diamond Award of the Temple University Hospital auxiliary. The award is given to individuals with “dedication to excellence, professional and personal integrity, and a deep sense of compassion for others.” Past recipients include a former Temple University Board chair, an Emmy Award-winning journalist, and a coach who exemplifies the “can do” spirit. What an honor to be included in such company. When I thanked the auxiliary for the award, I spoke about family, teamwork and courage—concepts that apply to our professional as well as our personal lives. 30

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Individuals don’t deliver medical care. Teams of professionals do. We rely on our colleagues. We suffer setbacks together and we celebrate wins. We teach and learn together, too.

The Pin Cushion

Six years ago, I was admitted to Temple University Hospital with a small pulmonary embolus. That evening, I developed a fever, which is quite common. An intern and a medical student came to see me, and the intern told me they needed to obtain a chest X-ray and take blood from me from three separate sites, the standard workup for a fever in the hospital. I asked the


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intern to compromise, to take two blood cultures from one site. When he agreed, I thought I had won. Then he suggested that the student draw the blood. Fast forward six years to 2010. My wife became an inpatient in another hospital. I asked a medical resident who was part of her team for information about her. After we talked for a few minutes, he asked if I recognized him. I did not. But, yes, he was the one who drew my blood six years ago. It took courage for me to tolerate all that poking—perhaps even more courage for him to use the dean for a pin cushion. In the end, I don’t know that taking blood from the dean per se made him a better doctor, but I can tell you that he provided excellent care to my wife. Courage means mettle, resolution, tenacity. Our students, residents and attending physicians are truly courageous in their daily battle to return patients to health and to provide solace to those who cannot be healed physically. Our patients demonstrate unbelievable courage. They put their trust in us even when they don’t understand what is happening to them. We must never forget this. Without our patients and our trainees, we are but empty shells. So, too, without our friends and families. Often I have believed that the word courage was created to describe my wife. I’ve known her for 44 years, and we have been married for 39 of those years. She nearly single-handedly raised our six children as I worked long hours, and moved our family back and forth between Philadelphia, Houston and New York during my career. Mary, who has been fighting cancer for 13 years, exemplifies the saying: “Courage does not always roar. Sometimes it is the quiet voice at the end of the day, saying, ‘I will try again tomorrow.’” I cannot tell you how proud I am to have Mary Frances Bonner Daly as my wife, partner and friend. Mary has had considerable health challenges. A liver transplant recipient myself, I, too, have had many. The physicians who have cared for us are our friends and colleagues, our medical family.

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Today Kristin is the recipient of the William Barry scholarship. Now a fourth-year student with a soft voice and a sharp intellect, Kristin is the first person in her family to go to medical school, or even attend college. She recalls feeling a bit like a fish out of water during her early medical school days. “During orientation, we got a list of supplies to buy,” she said. “One item was a stethoscope. It seemed like all the other students already had one that a physician family member or friend had passed along.” Kristin asked her parents to buy her one. They wanted to help, but she’d be better off getting one on her own, they said. “My family is wonderful,” says Kristin, “But I also needed the affirmation of people who have been in my shoes. I went a year without a stethoscope. I didn’t want to buy one for myself because of the symbol I had attached to the gesture of its giving: that someone who had experienced what I was going through was proud of me and supporting me. ” Then along came the Barry scholarship and a chance for Kristin to meet the Barry family. Maybe it was the warmth of Bill and his lovely wife, Lillian. Or the encouragement of the Barry children—all Temple alums, including William Barry Jr., MD ’88, and Mary Barry, MD ’81. “After meeting the Barry’s, I went out and bought myself that stethoscope,” says Kristin, “In the Temple community, I was a member of a great medical family.” As physicians we are mentors to the trainees who follow in our footsteps. Sometimes we need to be someone’s pin cushion. Or affirm someone’s “right” to wear a stethoscope (or give our own stethoscopes away). Medicine, like family, often tests our inner strengths and rewards us in so many strange and wonderful ways.

The Stethoscope

Last spring, during TUSM’s annual scholarship donor recognition dinner, a wonderful tale was told about the meaning of medical family. The story starts with a professor I have known since my student days: William Barry, MD, who joined the Temple faculty in 1961. Bill held many roles during his 36-year tenure at Temple: professor of medicine, co-head of the section of hematology, clinical cancer training program director, and associate dean. A couple of years after he retired, Bill’s family established a scholarship for Temple medical students in his honor. The year was 1999. At that time, a young lady named Kristin Sterrett was attending junior high school in Souderton, Pa., were she lived with her loving family. She was 14 years old.

Kristin Sterrett with Dr. and Mrs. Barry.

TALES OF TEMPLE MEDICINE—Do you have a story about medicine taught or practiced the Temple way? Contact Phil Zeidner, MD ’74, at philzeidner@yahoo.com or Giselle Zayon at giselle.zayon@temple.edu.

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In this section, we highlight recent and longstanding benefactors.

* FORMER CHAIRS HONORED BY NAMED AWARDS “I wanted my two late husbands to be remembered for the impact they had on Temple,” says Joan Stauffer Willson, CHP ’39. “It is important for today’s students to reflect, even if it is just briefly, on those who came and paved the way before them.” Mrs. Willson generously contributes to three endowed funds at TUSM: the Stauffer Award for Distinguished Faculty Service, and two awards with cash prizes for graduating medical students—one in memory of her first husband, Herbert M. Stauffer, MD ’39, and the other in memory of her second, J. Robert Willson, MD. Both held chair appointments at TUSM—Stauffer in radiology (1957–70) and Willson in obstetrics/gynecology (1947–63). “An endowed award is a perfect way for me to honor Temple’s past faculty legends in perpetuity,” states Mrs. Willson, “and, at the same time, encourage current medical students embarking upon their futures in medicine.” This year Marc Dobson Tolley, MD ’10, received the Herbert M. Stauffer Award, which is given to a student who demonstrates special aptitude and interest in radiology during the fourth year. Dr. Tolley is a resident in diagnostic radiology at the National Capital Consortium, Bethesda, Md. The 2010 J. Robert Willson Research Award was given to Amanda L. Horton, MD ’10, now a first-year resident at Temple University Hospital in ob/gyn. The recipient of this award exemplifies outstanding critical and analytic thinking, strong interest in research, and great promise for pursuing a career in the reproductive sciences—qualities that reflect the character of Dr. Willson.

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“I’m delighted to know how talented and civic-minded the students are,” says Mrs. Willson, “and I hope Herb and Bob would have appreciated being remembered in this way.” A Michigan native, Dr. Willson received his medical education and most of his training at the University of Michigan before heading east to Temple University to serve as chair of ob/gyn. “Dr. Willson’s qualities as a teacher were apparent in his belief that the importance of imparting knowledge to students was second only to the welfare of the patient—an attitude that permeated the obstetrics/gynecology department under his leadership,” wrote the yearbook staff in 1951 when the Skull was dedicated to him. After 16 years at Temple, he was recruited back to University of Michigan as chair. Upon retirement he and Joan settled in New Mexico. Sadly, Dr. Wilson passed away in 1993. At 91, Mrs. Willson reflects back on her years at Temple with a smile. She enrolled in the laboratory technician program at Temple in the 1930s—one of the few places in the country that offered training in this field at the time. Temple was where she met her first husband, Herb Stauffer. They married in 1941. “Throughout his life, Herb always said how much he liked being at a teaching institution,” remembers Mrs. Willson, “He enjoyed the scholarly, theoretical, problem-solving research side of radiology.” Herb Stauffer’s ties to Temple began before he was born, as his father, Dr. Milton L. Stauffer, was a close associate of Dr. Russell H. Conwell and began his association with Temple in 1899 as an instructor in the School of Commerce, now the Fox School of Business and Management. Though not a graduate of the university, Milton Stauffer received an honorary degree in 1952, in recognition of his 45 years of service. His many


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Herb Stauffer, MD

Robert J. Willson, MD

assignments within the School of Commerce culminated in his appointment as dean, then later as secretary of the university and special assistant to the president. Created for faculty universitywide, the Stauffer Award for Distinguished Faculty Service was created in 1973 by Mrs. Willson in honor of Herb and Milton Stauffer. The annual award recognizes outstanding faculty contributions to Temple and seeks out faculty whose service goes beyond the classroom. In addition, Mrs. Willson has established funds that will endow the Stauffer Chair in Diagnostic Imaging and the Willson Chair in obsetrics/gynecology. Why does she give back to the school so faithfully? “I met both my husbands at Temple, so it became an important part of my life,” Mrs. Willson explains. “Herb and Bob were so wonderful that supporting Temple is a way to keep their memories alive.”

*THE SANDRA AND FRANK BALDINO JR., PHD ’80, GRADUATE EDUCATION FUND “Collecting the evidence to prove or disprove a hypothesis may take a lifetime,” says Temple University Trustee Frank Baldino Jr., PhD ’80 (pharmacology), “but the mere fact that there is always more out there waiting to be discovered is what keeps a researcher motivated.” Dr. Baldino served as chair of Temple School of Medicine’s Board of Visitors from 2003 until 2008 when he became a university trustee. He is also a leading benefactor at Temple. One of his most recent gifts is a fund to provide travel and research grants for full-time students in TUSM’s doctoral or MD programs.

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Joan Stauffer Willson

In the form of a dozen $1,000 grants yearly, the Sandra and Frank Baldino Graduate Education Fund helps defray the cost of travel to a scientific meeting for students. In some cases, students give scientific presentations at the conferences. “Young researchers in academia represent the future of medicine, and Temple has some of the best and brightest students out there,” state Dr. and Mrs. Baldino. “Funding the graduate education fund is our way of contributing to the advancement of bench-side medicine.” Dr. Baldino is the founder, chair and CEO of Cephalon. A global biopharmaceutical company based in Frazer, Pa., Cephalon prides itself as a company with first-in-class therapeutics and a rich research pipeline. Dr. Baldino has led the company from a privately held start-up to one of the top 10 biotechnology companies in the world. Today, just two decades after its founding, Cephalon has eight products in the market in the United States in the areas of central nervous system disorders, cancer and pain; and more than 30 products in 50 countries worldwide. “I understand the importance of encouraging an up-andcoming researcher because I was once in those shoes,” says Dr. Baldino, who started his career as a research biologist in the medical products department at E.I. duPont de Nemours & Company, where he was responsible for developing research strategies for identifying novel neuropharmaceutical agents. Joyce Belcher, a 2013 PhD candidate in anatomy, is a Baldino Award recipient. “Along with the honor of presenting my work to a diverse population of colleagues from all over the world, I was also able to gain valuable knowledge, guidance and insight that will be of immeasurable assistance in my career,” she said. Ms. Belcher traveled to an experimental biology meeting in Anaheim, Calif.

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(Left to right) Baldino Travel Award recipients Bryan Teets (PhD candidate in biochemistry), Michael Richie (PhD candidate in biochemistry), Karina Jackson (MD candidate, Class of 2012), Maneet Singh (PhD candidate in cell biology), Alice Williams (MD candidate, Class of 2012), Joyce Belcher (PhD candidate in cell biology), and Tiffany Newman (PhD candidate in microbiology and immunology). Frank Baldino, PhD ’80

Another recipient, Alice Williams of the MD Class of 2012, presented at the Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology earlier this year. “I received valuable feedback on my study, which I plan to amend before publication,” she said. “Experiences like this encourage me to continue working hard on my research projects, so I can continue to be a contributing member of this important and thriving community.” “Dr. Baldino is an exemplary leader and innovator in the biosciences community and his investment in Temple University School of Medicine’s research enterprise means a great deal to us,” says John Daly, MD ’73, dean.

* THE YEAR TO BEAT: 1963 The Class of 1963 sets the standard for class-giving philanthropy at TUSM. With accumulated gifts and pledges surpassing $3,126,000, the class boasts a lifetime giving participation rate of 85 percent, compared to a national average of 12.5 percent. Of those who give, 70 percent have made a gift within the past decade, and 40 percent do so at or above the university’s Conwell level of $1,000 annually. “These numbers ought to be a source of terrific pride,” says Dean Daly. “They show class camaraderie, loyalty, and dedication to the advancement of medical education at Temple.” Within the class, several individuals stand out as key supporters: Drs. E. Ronald Salvitti, Daniel Nesi, Richard Albertson, H. King Hartman, Richard Hess, Hugo Schwandt and Heng Feng Lim. “Temple helped me strive for excellence, stay committed and adopt a good work ethic, all of which have remained top priori-

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ties in my career and throughout my life,” says E. Ronald Salvitti, MD, founder and medical director of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Eye Center, Washington, Pa. In addition to a scholarship fund he endowed for medical students, Dr. Salvitti is helping to underwrite the creation of The Unseen World, a large-scale art installation for the new medical school building’s Stone Commons. He also named the grand stairwell in the Simmy and Harry Ginsburg Health Sciences Library. Classmate and fellow ophthalmologist Hugo Schwandt, MD, recalls carpooling to clerkships at Albert Einstein Medical Center with Dr. Salvitti, “a tall man who drove the tiniest car—a Renault.” “I still hold a deep respect for the faculty who taught us— legends like Daddy Huber and Bones Hamilton. Temple’s teaching was top-notch,” says Dr. Schwandt, who practiced in Wilmington, Del., and now resides in Florida, retired. To show his gratitude, he and his wife named a multimedia conference room in TUSM’s new building. “The Class of 1963 was a tight-knit group,” says H. King Hartman, MD, another Class of 1963 ophthalmologist. “I have great memories of rooming in the Phi Beta Pi fraternity with Ron Salvitti, and shooting hoops with him and Dick Albertson.” Dr. Hartman and his son, alumnus H. King Hartman Jr., MD ’91, practice ophthalmology in Greensburg, Pa., and together made a generous gift to name a classroom in the new medical school building. Retired anesthesiologist Richard P. Albertson, MD, is also a loyal, generous class member. “Temple was instrumental in affording me to be in the position I am in today, giving back seems only natural,” he says.


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Richard Albertson, MD ’63 Richard Hess, MD ’63

Heng Feng Lim, MD ’63

Dr. Albertson has been giving to Temple consistently for more than 30 years. In addition to supporting the fund for the Alumni Bridge, the pedestrian walkway that connects the new medical school to the Kresge Building, he has supported scholarship funds and service grants for medical students. In 2003, he and classmate Robert Decker, MD, a retired neurosurgeon, established the Medical Class of 1963 Endowed Scholarship Fund, which 47 class members have now joined in to support. “Without the support of the Class of 1963, achieving my goal of becoming the first doctor in my family would be much more difficult,” says scholarship recipient Edward Yung of the Class of 2012. Another 1963 standout is an otolaryngologist and former Doylestown (Pa.) Hospital chief of staff, Daniel Nesi, MD, who received TUSM’s Alumni Service Award in 2008 for his exemplary record of generosity. Dr. Nesi has a pragmatic view of philanthropy. “You do things because they are important and need to be done—it’s that simple,” he says. Dr. Nesi has made many significant gifts to TUSM, including the dining room he named in the new medical school in memory of his late son. Heng Feng Lim, MD, a cardiologist and internist in Hummelstown, Pa., says, “I will always remain grateful to TUSM for the education that launched my career. After all the hours I spent studying, I chose to name a study room in the new medical school building as a visible and permanent way to show my appreciation.” Another key supporter who recently created a charitable gift annuity to benefit the school is Richard Hess, MD, a rheumatologist and occupational health specialist who practiced for 35 years in Oklahoma City.

Daniel Nesi, MD ’63

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Hugo Schwandt, MD ’63

“I felt right at home at Temple. The professors were approachable, understanding,” says Dr. Hess, who was married with twins as a medical student and recalls missing part of a biochemistry exam because he’d been up half the night with crying babies. “Most professors would give an automatic zero, but Dr. Hamilton let me take the exam again.” In addition to setting the mark for class giving, two of the school’s most important volunteer leaders hail from the Class of 1963: Dr. Salvitti, chair of TUSM’s Board of Visitors, and Dr. Albertson, who served as president of the school’s Alumni Association. Other class members give in other ways—for instance, just outside the classroom endowed by Dr. Hartman is a display case featuring historical medical artifacts donated by class member Robert Strauss, MD. “The friendliness of my classmates and faculty made Temple medical school an extraordinary experience for me,” reflects Dr. Albertson. “I haven’t missed a reunion yet and I’m looking forward to seeing everyone at our 50th in 2013.” Be a Benefactor The School of Medicine welcomes your support and is committed to developing a philanthropic plan to suit your needs. Investments can be made payable over a period of five years or included as a provision in your estate plans. For more information, contact Eric Abel, Assistant Dean, Institutional Advancement, at (215) 707-3023 or abel@temple.edu.

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Michael Mellon, MD ’72, San Diego, Calif., a pediatric allergist immunologist at the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, is also associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the UCSD School of Medicine and chairs the Pediatric Asthma Task Force for the San Diego Kaiser Region. Peter King, MD ’74, Hong Kong, China, is the CEO of Global HealthCare, a medical and dental center operated by international staff from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong and Japan. He also holds positions as chief of cardiology, clinical director of the heart center, and associate chief of staff at Hong Kong’s Adventist Hospital. Richard Cohen, MD ’77, Philadelphia, Pa., a psychiatrist in private practice in Philadelphia and an accomplished tennis player, claimed gold at both the USTA’s National

Senior Father/Daughter Championship and Father/Son Championship with his children, Julia and Josh. Dr. Cohen became the first ever to win gold at both consecutive tournaments. He was once ranked number one in the USTA Middle States competition for men’s 30s singles and men’s 40s singles. Andrew Fishmann, MD ’77, San Marino, Calif., a critical care specialist at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, was recently named a senior fellow in hospital medicine by the Society of Hospital Medicine. Designees represent hospital medicine’s most experienced leaders. Douglas Mann, MD ’79, Saint Louis, Mo., is the Tobias and Hortense Lewin professor and chair of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine, as well as the director of the cardiovascular division. He is also cardiologist-in-chief at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and director of the new Heart and Vascular Institute at Barnes-

Centers of Excellence. HCA has more than 35,000 affiliated physicians. Prior to being named to this post, Dr. Garthwaite served as executive vice president and chief medical officer for Catholic Health East, and from 2002 until 2006, he was director and chief medical officer of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, where he had broad responsibilities for the health of more than 10 million residents and visitors. From 1999 to 2002, he was undersecretary for health at the Veterans Health Administration in Thomas Garthwaite, MD ’73, Nashville, Tenn., is chief medical officer Washington, D.C. Dr. Garthwaite and chief operations officer of the clini- received the Secretary’s Exceptional Service Award of the Department of cal services group of Nashville-based Veterans Affairs in both 2000 and 2002. Hospital Corporation of America. In this capacity he leads HCA’s quality-of- In 2001, he received the Surgeon care, patient safety, and clinical perfor- General’s Medallion, the highest award for public health service given by the mance improvement initiatives, plus United States Public Health Service. provides medical direction for HCA’s

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Jewish Hospital and Washington University. Dr. Mann specializes in the field of congestive heart failure and has made numerous contributions to the understanding of cardiac remodeling and cardiac dysfunction.

’80s

Alan Bess, MD ’80, Wayne, N.J., an expert in drug safety, pharmacovigilance and risk management, serves as the chief executive officer and president of American Health Systems Corporation, based in New York City. He is responsible for the company’s strategic direction and operational execution. Richard Channick, MD ’84, Boston, Mass., has been appointed chair of pulmonary vascular disease at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. He has also been named editor-in-chief of Advances in Pulmonary Hypertension. Lisa Jablon, MD ’85, Glenside, Pa., is director of the breast health program at Philadelphia’s Albert Einstein Medical Center (AEMC). Under her leadership, the program received national recognition as an Accredited Breast Center by the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Jablon also serves as the director of AEMC’s genetics risk program. David Jimenez, MD ’85, San Antonio, Texas, is a professor and chair of the department of neurosurgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and was recently elected president of the Texas Association of Neurological Surgeons.

’90s

Donald Liss, MD, Res ’90, Wyncote, Pa., has been named senior medical director of clinical programs and policy for Independence Blue Cross. A recognized authority on the patient-centered medical home model, Dr. Liss represents IBC on the southeast Pennsylvania Chronic Care Commission, a pilot program launched to promote improvements in the delivery of primary care. Barbara Bix, MD, Res ’87, specializes in internal medicine at Fox Chase Medical Associates in Philadelphia, Pa. David Hurwitz, MD ’91, Indialantic, Fla., is an internist who has practiced in Florida for the last 10 years, and since 2007 has been medical director of clinical informatics at Health First, which has won awards for its electronic medical record system. Dr. Hurwitz served as the physician leader in the development and implementation of the project. In addition, he was recently named a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Patricia Kauffman, MD ’93, Conshohocken, Pa., a forensic pathologist, traveled to Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake with the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services) to lead the effort to identify and repatriate the bodies of American citizens who perished during the earthquake and its aftermath.  Menna Berhane, MD ’98, Columbus, Ohio, is an urgent care physician at Genesis HealthCare System, a nonprofit organization that operates two hospital sites in southeastern Ohio. She completed residencies in pediatrics and family medicine.


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HELPING IN HAITI Dozens of Temple alumni, medical students and faculty continue to volunteer in Haiti, including Ned Bedrossian, MD ’78, an ophthalmologist in Drexel Hill, Pa., forensic pathologist Patricia Kauffman, MD ’93 (see note below); Robert Loeffler Jr., MD ’75, an orthopedic surgeon in Silver Spring, Md.; Traci Williams-Riles, MD ’10, a family practice resident at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital; and Ewere Osian, MD ’10, a resident in psychiatry at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

In Haiti, Peter Sananman, MD ’00 a Philadelphia-based emergency physician (far left) and Malvin Weinberger, MD’ 62 (far right), a pediatric surgeon who lives in Florida, with other volunteers.

’00s

Samir Mehta, MD ’00, Collingswood, N.J., practices with the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. His clinical expertise includes trauma surgery, total joint arthroplasty and spine surgery. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ Implant Committee and Emerging Leaders Program. Kelli Pokorny, MD ’00, Dresher, Pa., is a diagnostic radiologist at Abington Memorial Hospital in Abington, Pa., where she specializes in breast imaging. Karen Chagin, MD ’02, Philadelphia, Pa., is a pediatric hematology-oncologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She completed her residency in pediatrics at the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University. SHARE YOUR NEWS! Contact the Editor: giselle.zayon@temple.edu 215-707-4485 Toll-free outside Pa.: 800-331-2839

To assist with the efforts, Temple medical students coordinated the response of the Temple Emergency Action Corps (TEAC), the Temple Center for Urban Bioethics and Humanities, and Temple University Health System, raising $20,000 for the relief efforts, and $75,000 worth of medical supplies for Partners in Health, a health services charity that operates in Haiti. TEAC is planning a service trip to Haiti for the spring of 2011 for students, residents and faculty.

BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE That’s TUSM alum David Best, MD ’79, on that ticket for the Eagles’ season opener vs. the Green Bay Packers. The story of how it got there started April 10, 2010, when the Philadelphia Eagles marketing team sent an e-mail to its season ticket holders: “Be part of Eagles gameday like never before: Tell us why you’re the biggest Eagles fan and you could be on this year’s season tickets.” Fans had two weeks to reply with a 200-word story. Dr. Best figured he’d give it a whirl. He does, after all, have a wonderful story. Fifty years ago when David was eight, David’s dad took him to the Eagle’s championship game with the very team they played at this year’s opener: the Green Bay Packers. What a waste to take a kid to such a game, protested Mr. Best’s buddies, but David’s dad wanted to give him a memory that would last a lifetime. Indeed it did.

Fifty years have passed and David’s dad’s buddies are still jealous. The Eagles selected this true story as a winning entry. In addition to getting his photo and story on the ticket, the Eagles invited Dr. Best to lead the pep band prior to kickoff on September 12. Sadly, Dr. Best’s father passed away in 1999. Dr. Best regrets that he’ll never know just how meaningful that memory has become. “But my biggest regret is that Dean Daly had a hard time seeing how artfully I handled that conductor’s baton,” jests Dr. Best. ”He’s a season ticket holder, but his seats are way down near the end zone.” In addition to being an Eagles fan with season tickets on the 50-yard line, Dr. Best is president of The Doctors Channel, an internet television company, and MDea, a creative medical education company. He’s devoted his career to medical advertising, marketing and continuing medical education.

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In Memoriam Former faculty member V. Paul Addonizio, MD, died May 5, 2010, at the age of 62 from acute myeloid leukemia. From 1989 to 1998, he was chief of the division of cardiac and thoracic surgery at Temple, and served as professor of surgery from 1989 to 2005. In 2006 he became surgical director of the Porter Institute for Valvular Heart Disease at TUSM’s educational affiliate, Abington Memorial Hospital, where he also served as chief of the division of cardiac surgery. Dr. Addonizio “is known for his fast pace—an average of 300 operations a year— and willingness to take on high-risk patients, many 80 to 90 years old,” reported The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2005. In 2000, for example, he performed an autologous heart transplant in order to remove a patient’s cardiac tumor, repairing the heart with bovine heart tissue prior to returning it to the chest—a procedure rare at the time. V. Paul Addonizio, MD

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Dr. Addonizio earned his medical degree at Cornell University Medical College in 1974, and served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1984 to 1989 prior to coming to Temple. While at Penn he was one of four physicians in the nation to be named a Hartford Foundation Scholar, and he received a number of other honors during his career, including the A.N. Richards Award for Biological Research. Dr. Addonizio is survived by his mother, sister, wife, son and daughter. Bernard Eisenstein, BA ’41, MD ’44, died Dec. 16, 2009. He was 89. Dr. Eisenstein practiced cardiology in the Englewood, N.J., area for 52 years and was associated with the faculties of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey, in Newark. He was a great Temple fan and benefactor who maintained close ties to Temple over the years and supported many Temple funds. “I feel very strongly that without Temple I would be nothing, have nothing,” Dr. Eisenstein once said. Together with his friend and classmate, Bernard Eisenberg, BA ’41, MD ’44, he named a room in Temple’s new Medical Education and Research Building and founded the Class of 1944 endowed scholarship fund for medical students.

Bernard Eisenstein, BA ’41, MD ’44

“When we created this fund many years ago, what we were really doing was creating a legacy of access to superior medical education for superior students who could not otherwise afford it,” Dr. Eisenstein said. Predeceased by his wife, Dr. Eisenstein is survived by three children. Roscoe Dean Jr., MD ’43, died Oct. 27, 2009, at the age of 92 in his home state of South Dakota. Dr. Dean’s grandparents were among the earliest homesteaders in South Dakota’s Jerauld County, and he devoted his life and career to the betterment of the region and the state. He was well known as a physician, a rancher who raised Polled Herefords and quarter horses, an advocate for community and state, a historian, and a patron of the arts. Dr. Dean established his medical practice in Wessington Springs in 1946, and practiced there for 40 years. He led the effort to establish the region’s first hospital, Memorial Hospital.

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Influential in improving health care access for rural communities throughout the state, in 1967 Dr. Dean was adopted by the Crow Creek Sioux as a non-Indian member of the tribe. Dr. Dean served as coordinator for rural health care in South Dakota, chairing the State Comprehensive Health Planning Committee from 1969 to 1971. He earned the South Dakota Department of Health’s C.B. Alford Award in 1974 for outstanding service in public health. Dr. Dean served as a statewide coordinator for key parts of South Dakota’s Centennial in 1989, was inducted into the


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In Memoriam continued South Dakota Hall of Fame in 1993, and served multiple terms on the National Advisory Council of the Center for Western Studies. He also served on numerous regional boards, including the Wessington Springs College Board of Trustees. He was also a founding member of the National Academy of Family Practice. He is survived by his wife, two sons, two daughters, five grandsons, a granddaughter, a great-granddaughter and a brother. Michael T. McDonough, MD, former professor of medicine in the section of cardiology at Temple, died March 27, 2010, due to complications from a stroke. He was 82. A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Dr. McDonough graduated from the Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1954. After completing his internship and residency, he served as an Army physician in Washington state, then accepted a position at Temple in 1960. He practiced and taught clinical cardiology to medical residents and cardiology fellows for nearly 40 years before retiring in 1998. In addition, he directed Temple’s cardiac catheterization program for 15 years, and was instrumental in founding its protocols for postsurgical intensive cardiac care. “His common sense and wisdom molded our careers,” says his former student, Blase Carabello, MD ’73, vice chair of medicine at Baylor University and chief of medicine at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Beloved by his trainees, he accrued a long list of admirers over the years. Dr. McDonough’s family says that he had intended to become a pediatrician until his daughter, Mary Genevieve, died in 1957 when she was 11 days old due to a viral heart infection. It was then that he decided to become a cardiologist. Dr. McDonough is survived by his wife of 54 years, four daughters, four sons, a brother, a sister and 17 grandchildren. He was predeceased by a sister.

’30s Franklin B. Wilkins, MD ’37 6/27/10 Walter A. D’Alonzo Sr., MD ’39 3/9/10

’40s

Herman M. Zeidman, MD ’40 Henry Gloetzner, MD ’41 G. Eugene Hetrick, MD ’41 Meyer Perchonock, MD ’41 Arthur G. Hill, MD ’42 Roy E. Pfaltzgraff, MD ’42 Ray H. Barton Jr., MD ’43 Samuel J. Bucher, MD ’43 Leon Dierolf, MD ’43 Maurice Goleburn, MD ’43 Harold Piltingsrud, MD ’43 William P. Rumsey, MD ’43 Joe E. Conrad, MD ’44 Bernard Eisenstein, MD ’44 Harry G. Neese Jr., MD ’44 Franklin B. Watters, MD ’44 Rita C. Marotti, MD ’45 Robert M. Rees, MD ’45 John S. Gaul Jr., MD ’46 Robert W. Gilmore, MD ’46 William C. Hemmerly, MD ’46 Robert A. Niles, MD ’46 Emanuel D. Brodsky, MD ’47 Col. Mary S. Carlson, MD ’47 Louis C. Lippert, MD ’47 Edwin Mehne, MD ’47 Peter A. Curreri Jr., MD ’48 Joe D. Bentz, MD ’49 Sidney Bolter, MD ’49 Olive M. Jack, MD ’49 Charles F. Wright, MD ’49

’50s

10/1/09 6/1/10 9/30/09 9/3/09 11/20/09 3/1/10 9/7/09 5/21/10 8/8/10 12/10/09 6/2/10 7/9/10 2/23/10 12/16/09 1/8/10 5/29/10 4/11/10 9/1/09 12/10/09 5/30/10 2/3/10 4/28/10 1/12/10 4/17/09 2/28/10 7/1/10 9/30/09 8/17/10 10/30/09 12/17/08 3/3/10

Keran M. Chobanian, MD ’50 8/14/10 William D. Crigger, MD ’50 9/13/10 John L. Grosh, MD ’50 5/18/10 Matthew M. Mischinski, MD ’50 5/9/09 James S. Pinneo, MD ’50 11/13/09 Murray H. Ringold, MD ’50 12/24/09 Col. Frederick J. Sheffield, MD ’50 12/8/10 William E. Hill Jr., MD ’52 6/4/10 Michael Kutsenkow, MD ’52 6/12/10 Paul H. Pettit, MD-Res ’52 3/4/01 Barney M. D’Lin, MD ’54 12/17/08 James D. Hileman, MD ’54 2/3/08 George M. Brown, MD ’55 6/6/08 Larry S. McClung, MD ’55 5/24/08 F. Malcolm Wright, MD ’55 12/29/10

Harry D. Bikle, MD ’56 10/5/09 Herbert H. Eveloff, MD ’56 10/9/04 Richard S. Heinig, MD ’57 12/11/09 John R. Davy, MD ’58 3/28/10 James W. Nelson, MD ’58 6/16/10 Cyril F. Conway, MD ’59 12/13/05 Joseph Gionfriddo, MD-Res ’59 9/2/09 William A. Harada, MD ’59 3/26/10 Mark Martinson, MD ’59 7/24/10 Anthony S. Mastrian, MD ’59 2/17/10

’60s

Anthony J. Cristoforo, MD ’60 4/4/10 Hugh F. Walker, MD ’60 6/5/10 Louis J. Casale, MD ’62 11/12/09 Joseph F. Clarke, MD ’62 5/19/10 John Zavacki, MD ’62 3/16/10 David F. Gillum, MD ’63 2/26/10 Gary A. Lulejian, MD ’63 6/10/10 Randall F. Hipple, MD ’64 8/22/10 Elvin G. Kreider, MD ’64 8/27/09 Henry D. Soltys, MD-Res ’64 10/2/04 E. William Stump, MD ’64 11/11/09 E. James Kohl, MD ’66 3/25/10 Thomas C. Michaelson, MD ’66 6/24/10 Alex W. Jerome, MD ’67 7/26/10 Sandra J. Kaplan, MD ’67 7/23/10 Ray L. Landis, MD ’67 1/13/10 John W. Walther Jr., MD ’67 11/8/09 Miroslaw A. Belej, MD ’68 7/14/10 Phyllis Brandchaft, MD ’68 3/16/10

’70s

Richard E. Johns Jr., MD ’72 5/14/10 Martin A. Cohen, MD-Res ’74 4/5/10 Michael Dietz, MD ’74 1/17/09 Paul H. Roger, DO-Res ’75 12/28/06 Lenore Teter, MD ’78 9/1/10 Mark Martinson, MD ’79 7/24/10

’80s, ’90s, ’00s

Richard C. Laucks, MD ’83 1/5/10 R. Edward Newsome, MD-Res ’98 10/31/09 Kathleen A. Kolsun, MD ’00 3/5/10

FACULTY

Victor P. Addonizio, MD Richard D. Berkowitz, MD Claude R. Johnson, MD Michael T. McDonough, MD Oliver E. Owen, MD Edward A. Volkman, MD

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Whatever Happened To?

And still paints. Several of his pieces hang in TUSM’s new building.

Yes, Dr. Lorber still plays guitar.

Bennett Lorber, MD: 6,500 medical students, 750 residents, 50 infectious disease fellows and counting “When you walk into a classroom and the professor is strumming a guitar, you want a seat in front,” says Brandon Manley, MD ’10, a recent student of Dr. Bennett Lorber. “He creates a classroom atmosphere that’s comfortable, relaxed.” A trifecta of talents, Dr. Lorber is an accomplished musician, painter and physician. He holds appointments as the Thomas M. Durant Professor of Medicine in the section of infectious diseases and professor of microbiology and immunology at TUSM. On a larger scale, he is an internationally recognized infectious diseases expert, especially on listeriosis, and well known for seminal articles he’s authored and leadership roles he’s held. In fact, Dr. Lorber was named president of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia in June. “Some physicians excel in scholarship, education or in the clinic—or in two of the three,” says Richard Kozera, MD, executive associate dean at TUSM. “Bennett excels in all three. He’s also a master of the American College of Physicians— a distinction only three other Temple faculty members have received: Thomas Durant, MD, Martin Goldberg, MD ’55, and Sol Sherry, MD.” Celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic ability, Dr. Lorber sees what other clinicians often overlook. He’s prolific—practicing, consulting, teaching and writing. The only role subtracted rather than added in recent years is that of infectious diseases section chief, a title now held by his colleague Thomas Fekete, MD. Dr. Lorber and his wife, Carol, still reside in Elkins Park, Pa. Their

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children, Joshua (40) and Sam (42), have made names for themselves professionally in music and the arts. “There is great value in being at an institution for a long time,” claims Dr. Lorber. “Early on, I was fortunate to find a home at Temple, surrounded by colleagues I like and respect. Over time, I have built a reputation—something that does not develop as readily or with the same impact if you move around.” Former TUSM Alumni Association president Paul Hermany, MD ’82, believes the word mensch was invented on Bennett Lorber’s behalf. “Think of the tremendous influence he’s had on the people he’s trained—a living legend, like Carson Schneck,” says Dr. Hermany. Dr. Lorber has accrued an extensive list of accolades, including two TUSM yearbook dedications, Temple’s Great Teacher Award, the School of Medicine’s Honored Professor Award, an Honorary Doctor of Science from Swarthmore College, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s Alexander Fleming Award for Lifetime Achievement. But it’s the Golden Apple Teaching Awards that really move him. He’s received twelve of them—his first in 1975, just two years after he started teaching, and the most recent in 2007. “It is gratifying to know that over the course of 30 years, I’ve been able to offer knowledge to students in a way they find valuable,” he says. “To explain a difficult medical concept and see students ‘get it’ is what’s truly exhilarating and satisfying at the end of the day.”


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Temple Medicine, Fall 2010  

A publication of Temple University School of Medicine Office of Institutional Advancement