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OFFICIAL TELLURIDE SKI & SNOWBOARD SCHOOL MAGAZINE

TIPS AND TRICKS TO

TELLURIDE’S HIKE-TO TERRAIN

FROM THE LIFTS TO THE APRÈS

STEEP AND DEEP

AVALANCHE MITIGATION AT THE RESORT

SATISFY YOUR APPETITE

Ski Camps, Bud Keene, Rising Stars, The Perfect Day and more! tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school S K I I N G

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CONTENTS

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TIPS AND TRICKS HIKE-TO TERRAIN

What you should keep in mind if you’re looking to venture into Telluride’s hike-to terrain.

PRIVATE LESSON AT THE TOP OF MILK RUN

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STEEP AND DEEP

Everything you need to know about avalanche mitigation in Telluride.


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FROM THE LIFTS TO THE APRÈS

Delicious options to satisfy your hunger on-mountain or steps from the lifts.

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3 Biomechanics & Specialty Camps At the Telluride Ski & Snowboard School you’re not just taking a lesson.

6 Rising Stars Get to know the next generation of the Telluride Ski & Snowboard School.

FEATURED PROFILE

10 Bud Keene Q&A with snowboarding pioneer Bud Keene, the details on his holiday BKPRO Telluride Sessions, plus his one bit of advice to never-evers.

18 A Guide to Your Perfect Day at Telluride What trails are best if you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced or expert? Get the scoop so you don’t waste precious skiing time wondering where you should go.

32 Adventures in All Shapes and Sizes Telluride’s endless list of off-mountain activities has something for everyone to discover.

36 What’s Left? A checklist of items you’ll wish you had while on the slopes.

38 Ride Like the Wind Summers are a whole lot more fun in the Telluride Bike Park.

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IN PURSUIT OF KNOWLEDGE It is with great pleasure that I present to you the fourth edition of Telluride’s Ski & Snowboard School Magazine, Skiing with the Masters. From the onset, our goal with each issue has been to share the stories of our professional instructors and define what makes time in Telluride with a Telluride instructor such an exceptional experience. If I had to pick one overarching theme that resonates in each of our magazines, it would be the never-ending pursuit of knowledge. From our world-class Ski Biomechanics program to our high success rate in instructor certifications, Telluride Ski & Snowboard School instructors never stop learning and growing. What does this mean for you, the reader? Telluride instructors are constantly honing their craft to ensure a lesson experience like no other. So if you have not had the pleasure of spending time at Telluride Ski Resort with one of our sought-after professional instructors, this is the winter to do so. Not only will you improve your skills to master the mountain and its 2,000 acres of legendary terrain, you will feel more connected to and exhilarated by this magical valley. And, you may just make a new best friend in the process.

Think snow,

[Noah Sheedy]

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UNDERSTANDING BIOMECHANICS M E E T isTan Hunfamiliar E M A Sterm TER Biomechanics to S most skiers. The term is defined as the study of the mechanical laws relating to the movement or structure of living organisms. So how does biomechanics relate to skiing? Any ski instructor will tell you that good skiing begins with the feet (and more insistently, good ski boots). As you ski, the bones of your feet move up and down, backward and forward, and sideways— always working together. Biomechanics, to put it (over)simply, is the awareness of how your foot sits in the boot and how it moves. Of course, skiing is more than just your feet, so biomechanics looks at how the rest of your anatomy works in concert while shredding the slopes. “Any athlete naturally incorporates biomechanics into their routine as they are much more in tune with their body and the way it works,” said Dr. Kim Hewson, Biomechanics Camp founder. Hewson, a retired sports medicine

about body awareness—helps instructors doctor and orthopedic surgeon, was beginning his second career as a ski school understand how the body works in the application of skiing, and as a result, instructor when he began to research instructors start speaking the same the ideal skeletal alignment for optimal skiing. He incorporated his findings into his language. Returning instructors must complete 22 hours of training, and most teaching, and found that when students participate in an additional 25 hours or grasped tough concepts earlier, there were fewer complaints of soreness, and the rate of injuries dropped. Thus, the birth of “Any athlete naturally incorporates biomechanics at Telluride. biomechanics into their routine as This groundbreaking approach led to the they are much more in tune with development and overhaul their body and the way it works.” of a curriculum that has set the standard for instruction at Telluride Ski & Snowboard more of elective training. School ever since. “We focus on the entire body,” Hewson Hewson’s curriculum is the foundation said. “Athletic ski stance, alignment and of instructor training. His series of balance are required, and we look at biomechanical lectures—there are each individual body part management. classroom sections that use videos and Equipment uses are analyzed, as well.” specific exercises to teach the teachers

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UNDERSTANDING BIOMECHANICS

cont.

Telluride Ski & Snowboard School is the first ski school to create a biomechanics camp that’s available to the public and open to intermediate and advanced skiers. Participants ski in small ability-matched groups with a maximum of four students per instructor. The three-day camp utilizes Dr. Hewson’s innovative approach to the skiing curriculum and includes video analysis, in-classroom learning and on-snow application that’s all focused on efficient skiing using natural functional alignment. “Body awareness makes skiing easier,” Hewson said. “The important thing—and this goes for tennis or football or any sport—is to know the ‘why’ before you can understand the ‘how.’ Our students are very receptive to the ‘why,’ leading them to learn the ‘how’ much faster.”

Ski Biomechanics Camp

The three-day camp uses Dr. Kim Hewson’s innovative approach, which includes video analysis, in-classroom learning and on-snow application that’s all focused on efficient skiing using our natural functional alignment. Telluride was the first ski school to create a biomechanics camp that’s available to the public. The camp is based out of the The Peaks Resort & Spa in Mountain Village. tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/biomechanics

HOW STUDENTS BENEFIT ° 12-year ski instructor training program available to the public. ° Innovative biomechanical approach to alpine skiing. ° Easier skiing through less effort enjoyed in a unique learning experience. ° Experiencing the value of continuity of instruction over three days on-snow. ° Learning how the body works using natural functional alignment. ° Discovering how to stack your bones so that your muscles do less work. ° Pre- and post-camp personal video analysis. ° Coming away with special technical knowledge, improved skills and training exercises to check performance after leaving us.

ON-SNOW TRAINING TOPICS ° Basic parallel turns, initial personal video analysis. ° Foot and ankle skills: refine ski edge control and improve turning skills. ° Independent leg actions: outside leg rotation, inside leg steering, long leg/short leg. ° Upper/lower body separation, zone of separation: inclination, angulation and counter. ° Compare skill demands in varied snow conditions and terrain. ° Put it all together: dynamic parallel turns, final personal video analysis.

CLASSROOM TRAINING TOPICS ° Skeletal analysis: skeletal anatomy, stance, balance and stacking. ° Foot and ankle mechanics: “It all starts in the feet.” ° Boot structure and alignment: effect on foot/ankle mechanics and stance. ° Hip and knee mechanics. ° Upper/lower body separation. ° Skill blending in varied snow conditions/terrain: steering, tipping and pressure control. 4

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S P E C I A LT Y C A M P S Women’s Week

Telluride Ski Resort and The Peaks Resort & Spa partnered to develop the ultimate ski and yoga retreat. You’ll enjoy a week full of yoga, meditation, wellness speakers and après fun with expert ski instruction, no matter your level of expertise. The Three-Day Women’s Ski & Ride Camp will take place in January and March, while the Five-Day Women’s Ski & Ride Camp is in February. Camps include lift tickets, expert instruction by Ski & Snowboard School’s leading women instructors, assessment of alignment and equipment, and video analysis of technique, along with additional fun perks and activities. This event is entering its 37th year. tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/womens-week

Making Friends with Moguls Camp

This two-day camp is aimed at the mature intermediate skier who is very proficient on all the groomed runs a ski resort may have to offer, but who avoids mogul runs. The goal of this camp is to make friends with moguls and develop confidence in blue-level mogul fields. tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/making-friends-with-moguls-camp

Development Squad

A seven-session youth ski and snowboard program designed to promote team-building and model safe mountain tactics in a noncompetitive environment. During each session, guests ski or ride with their coach from 10am to 3:30pm, and in the second half of the program get to train in areas like the terrain park and big mountain. This is guaranteed to fuel a lifelong passion for their sport, the mountains and Telluride. tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/development-squad

Silver Skiers Camp

This is one of the newest Ski School & Snowboard programs that continues to grow in popularity. Offered to skiers 50 years or older, the two-session program allows you to broaden your social circle with those who share the same love and passion for the sport, while exploring the mountain with just the right amount of coaching. tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/silver-skier-program

Heli-Ski Camp

On all three days of this intense camp, you’ll ski with one of Telluride’s most experienced instructors. You’ll spend two days exploring Telluride Ski Resort’s terrain to hone the necessary skills, then on the third day, you’ll jump on the helicopter with your coach and a guide from Helitrax, and head out into the San Juan backcountry. A one-of-a-kind experience that’s for advanced skiers with the physical endurance to ski hard for all three days.

tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps/heli-ski-camp

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RISING STARS MEET THE NE X T GENER ATION OF TELLURIDE’S SKI AND SNOWBOARD INSTRUCTORS CARRYING ON A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE.

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RISING STARS

QUA LIFICATIONS Four seasons at Telluride PSIA Alpine Level 2, Children’s Specialist 1 Wilderness First Responder AMGA SPI (American Mountain Guides Association, Single Pitch Instructor)

LAURA SOWALSKIE

Why I’m an instructor

Favorite non-skiing activities

and why in Telluride?

Getting in a few afternoon pitches of

I grew up and attended

climbing by Bridal Veil Falls in the

college in central New York

summer and hot yoga at Mangala.

and had never been west of the Eastern time zone. After college I took

Non-skiing talents

off on a yearlong road trip to hike and rock climb my way around the

I love to sing, so I taught myself to play

US—specifically the western states. I had a goal of settling down in a

the ukulele.

ski town for at least one winter to see what skiing out west was like.

Greatest personal achievement

While climbing around Moab, UT, I met people from Telluride who

I hiked the 46 Adirondack high peaks in

convinced me that Telluride was the one to choose if I was going to

New York State.

live in a ski town. Some of them were ski and snowboard instructors

Where’s your go-to lunch spot?

here and spoke highly of the ski school. I’ve skied my entire life, and I

Tacos del Gnar! It’s a short walk from the

enjoyed instructing people in the outdoors, so ski instruction seemed

Oak Street gondola station and seriously

like a natural option for me. During my first winter in Telluride, the

delicious. Or if I’m taking a quick lunch

fantastic in-house training led me to feel confident in my skills and

break up in Mountain Village, I enjoy a

fueled my desire to improve as both a skier and a teacher. This is the

burrito bowl from The Pick.

most fulfilling job I’ve ever been paid to do. I absolutely love inspiring the next generation to love skiing, especially empowering women and girls to be strong and confident through this sport. S K I I N G

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RISING STARS

TRAVIS WOLF

Why I’m an instructor and

Favorite non-snowboarding activities

why in Telluride? After college

My favorite activities outside

I spent the summer as a raft guide.

of snowboarding are rafting

Once that was over, I needed a job that

and whitewater kayaking.

was fun and exciting in the wintertime. Since Telluride was the resort

Uninteresting talent

where I learned how to snowboard, I figured it’d be a perfect spot for

I can only snap my fingers with

me to teach snowboarding.

my left hand. Greatest personal achievement

In your opinion, what is the secret of Telluride Ski &

My greatest achievement I’ve had on and

Snowboard School? I would say the secret to the Telluride Ski &

off the slopes is being able to show nature

Snowboard School is the number of certified instructors we have on

to people in a way they may not have seen

staff. Strength in numbers, if you will.

before they met me. Where’s your go-to lunch spot? My favorite lunch spot is Tomboy Tavern. The Pork Schnitzel Stack is out-of-this-world good.

QUA LIFICATIONS Level 2 American Association of Snowboard Instructor Certification First Aid, CPR, AED, and Swiftwater Rescue.

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RISING STARS

QUA LIFICATIONS Alpine Level 2 Freestyle Specialist 1 Children’s Specialist 2

LOGAN LANIER

Why I’m an instructor and why

Greatest personal achievement

in Telluride? I have worked at a boys

In August 2018, I completed a year-long

summer camp in Alabama for seven

production of a narrative short film titled

summers­—most recently as the program

director. Youth development, whether hands-on or administrative, has been a part of my life for years. I consider instructing at Telluride

“Jetty.” It has played in a few festivals in the US and abroad, and I have a few more applications to hear from in 2019. The film is 13 minutes long, and shares

Ski & Snowboard School an extension of my “youth development

the story of a young girl with a hearing

professional identity” and I believe our program at Telluride offers

disability who uses her imagination to

children the tools to build self-esteem, confidence, and inspire

create happiness for herself.

appreciation of ideals in others. The Ski School instructors are an

Where’s your go-to lunch spot?

incredible piece in this puzzle. Telluride Ski School boasts a wonderful

I am a regular at The Pick in

lineup of instructors each morning, all of whom share a similar

Mountain Village.

passion for improving our students, not just in skiing, but in how our students create relationships and discover confidence in themselves. I take pride in the work we do at Telluride.

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FE ATURED PROFILE

BUD

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Bud Keene, widely regarded as the most successful Olympic action sports coach of all time, will join forces with local legends, Olympians and US National Team members to bring a series of holiday progression sessions to the slopes of Telluride. We had a chance to chat with the legend himself and discover his love for the outdoors, positivity, music and everything in between.

A snowboarding pioneer, Bud Keene was a pro snowboarder from 1985 to 1989 before switching to coaching. Over the course of the past five Winter Olympic Games, Bud has worked with multiple Gold, Silver and Bronze medal-winning snowboard and freeski athletes, most famously as Shaun White’s personal coach for three Olympics and countless X Games. In 2006 Bud was named the US Olympic Committee’s National Coach of the Year. He has worked with numerous champions, including locals Gus Kenworthy (Telluride freeskier, Olympic Silver Medal in slopestyle at Sochi 2014) and Lucas Foster (US Snowboarding Rookie Team), as well as backcountry rock star Jake Blauvelt, widely considered one of the best snowboarders in the world.

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BUD KEENE

Tell us about you. What are you passionate about? I am passionate about every single thing that I do: being a good husband, cooking dinner daily with my wife, staying physically fit, climbing rock and ice, being a good father to my two sons, helping people to believe in themselves in order to realize their dreams, and spreading a positive message of inclusion, respect for others and selfesteem wherever I go and to whomever I encounter. What’s your greatest personal achievement (on/off the slopes)? Cut down 110 trees, peeled them by hand, and then designed and built a twostory three-bedroom log home in northern Vermont using a chainsaw and my own hands. Climbed the highest mountain in the Andes (Aconcagua 22,841') in 1988 and then snowboarded down, setting a world

Why Telluride Ski & Snowboard School?

altitude snowboarding record. Rode my bicycle

I have always loved the San Juans and Telluride in

across the USA in 1985, established dozens of new

particular. I have traveled here to climb many times

rock climbs in Yosemite during the late 80s and early

over the years, so when my wife Alex got a great job

90s, made dozens of first-snowboard-descents in the

opportunity here, we decided to take it. I look up at the

Sierras from 1987 to 1992, etc. I don’t know which.

mountain from our home in Mountain Village every day, and it didn’t take long for me to get the idea to

Favorite non-ski/snowboard activity?

collaborate with Telluride Ski & Snowboard School.

Rock climbing, ice climbing, golf, cooking, writing and playing the electric guitar.

What is the one tip you would give to a never-ever? Take it slow so you don’t hurt

Do you have any uninteresting talents?

yourself along the way. If you get hurt and set

Are any real talents uninteresting?

yourself back, you will be sidelined, and that’s no fun. Stay within your limits and increasing levels

What led you to ski instruction? I was one of

of difficulty will gradually open themselves up to

the first snowboard instructors in the US at Boreal

you. Never get caught up in the hype or any kind

Mountain on Donner Summit in 1985. When my pro

of negativity. Every single one of us, no matter

career was nearing its end in 1989, someone got the

how good we are at our sport of choice, has the

idea that maybe coaching could help snowboarders

absolute right to be out there doing it at our level and

get better more quickly. Since I was the oldest guy

deserves the same amount of respect. Whether you

around who had a pro career (at 29 years old), they

are performing at a level two, or at a level 11, you are

asked me if I wanted to coach. I said, “Yes.”

just as awesome as everyone else. And more than anything…have fun!

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F E AT U R E D

medal accomplishments are great and all, but I am teaming

Professional Certifications

up with a staff of athletes whose amazing careers lie both

USASA and USSA Level 300

inside and outside of the Olympic realm, yet are just as—if not more—meaningful. The best part is they’ve all cut their teeth here in Telluride, making them homegrown heroes!

PROFILE

This program is going to be sick! My coaching and Olympic

CERTIFICATIONS / QUA LIFICATIONS

Tell us about your BKPRO program at Telluride.

Awards and Distinctions Five-time Winter Olympic Coach 2006 US Olympic Committee National Coach of the

We will ski and ride the entire mountain. We will learn new tricks in the park as a part of our day, but will also explore the natural environment and all that it has to offer. Participants will be mentored and guided by some of the most inspired freeski and snowboard athletes in the world,

Year, USSA National Coach of the Year and US Olympic Committee Order of Ikkos Coaching Medal Recipient Multiple Gold, Silver and Bronze Olympic Medals Coach Countless X Games, Dew Tour, US Grand Prix, and USASA Nationals Podiums

whose collective skills have been chiseled sharp by a life 2005 and 2006 USSA International Snowboard

spent in Telluride.

Coach of the Year

Young skiers and riders will utilize the entire mountain including the terrain park during these two-day sessions, which will focus on fun, confidence-building and personal technical progression. Safety, respect for the mountain environment, personal responsibility and good decisionmaking will also be highlighted.

2007 MMSC Olympians Hall of Fame Inductee Other Published author and photographer Internationally-recognized industry consultant and motivational speaker

B K P R O T E L L U R I D E “A L L - S TA R S ” S E S S I O N S 2 019 These sessions Participants in this special program will be mentored and guided by some of the most inspired freeski and snowboard athletes in the world, whose skills have been chiseled sharp by a life spent in Telluride. are for freeskiers and snowboarders Young skiers and riders will utilize the entire mountain including the terrain park during these two-day sessions, which will focus on fun, confidence-building and personal technical progression. Safety, respect (boys and girls) for the mountain environment, personal responsibility and good decision-making will also be highlighted. ages 13 and up. BK P R O T EL LUR IDE “A L L- S TA RS” SE S SIONS INCLUDE Participants must ° Two days of all-mountain instruction and mentoring from Bud Keene and all-stars be at a skill level ° Discounted snowboard and freeski demos to confidently ° BKPRO Telluride “All-Stars” t-shirt ° Lunch on-mountain each day negotiate blue square runs. W I N T E R 2 0 1 9 - 2 0 S E S S I O N D A T E S ° Session 1 December 23–24, 2019 ° Session 2 December 26–27, 2019 ° Session 3 December 29–30, 2019 ° Session 4 January 9–10, 2020 ° Session 5 February 17–18, 2020 ° Session 6 March 9–10, 2020 ° Session 7 March 16–17, 2020 S K I I N G

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TIPS AND TRICKS

HIKE-TO TERRAIN Telluride Ski Resort offers some amazing ski terrain that chairlifts do not access. Only available by taking off your skis/snowboard and hiking uphill within the resort boundary, hike-to skiing can be a challenging adventure and a great way to find powder stashes. When your skills and nerves are ready, follow these tips from our seasoned Mountain Guides that will help you conquer hike-to terrain like a seasoned local.

TWO SKIERS ASCEND THE RIDGE TOWARD PALMYRA PEAK

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PREPA R ATION ° You will need the right gear to make your hike up successful. Take the time to find a pack that is specifically made for carrying skis or boards. Make sure your gear is cinched snugly to your backpack. Travel light, but bring the basics. Sunscreen, water and a snack. ° Layer appropriately and be ready to shed layers on the way up. ° Always hedge your risks by knowing your route and the phone number for ski patrol.

THE UPHILL ° Modern ski boot design often includes features that make hiking uphill more comfortable, more efficient, and—most importantly—safer. Look for boots with tech soles—they have softer, grippy tread on the bottom to improve traction when hiking uphill. Boots that have a walk mode will allow your ankle a more natural range of motion to improve dexterity as you hike. ° For unwavering balance, always maintain three points of contact when hiking up in ski boots (both poles and one foot should always be firmly planted). ° Each step should be deliberate, with a solid downward toe strike to create a platform from which to step. ° Take small steps to conserve energy and establish a breathing pattern.

SKIING THE TERRAIN ° Having a plan is key to being successful in this type of terrain. Pick a drop-in spot that gives you the confidence to make that first turn and hit the line you have planned. Your first turn is the most important; this will establish your line, rhythm ° and flow for the entire run. ° In terrain like this, momentum down the hill is key—look down the hill and keep the turns coming! Master the kick turn: When skiing the extremes with unmarked obstacles, ° you may find yourself facing the wrong direction. A well-executed kick turn can get you out of trouble and facing the right direction again. With your skis across the hill and your poles anchored behind you, shift your weight to your uphill ski. Once your downhill ski is unweighted, swing it toward the tail of your uphill ski. Now quickly shift your weight to the downhill ski and swing your uphill ski around to face in the new direction.

DROPPING INTO GENEVIEVE

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STEEP AND DEEP EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT AVALANCHE MITIGATION IN TELLURIDE

W H A T C A U S E S A N A V A L A N C H E ? There are many factors that contribute to an avalanche, and people study snow science for years to learn its ins and outs. In general, an avalanche needs four things to occur: a weak layer of snow, a cohesive layer of snow, a trigger and a steep slope. First, when a cohesive layer of snow forms over a weak layer of snow, instability is present. Then, when a trigger is introduced—rapidly warming temperatures, a ski turn, etc.—the weak layer collapses and allows the cohesive slab above to slide. On a steep enough slope, usually between 21°–50°, this will result in an avalanche. Thus, the primary task of avalanche patrollers is to prevent these weak and cohesive layers from forming.

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From the first snowfall to the last, Telluride Ski Resort ski patrollers work tirelessly to mitigate avalanche hazards at the resort. Each day of the ski season—and even weeks before—they study and ski the entire resort to keep a close eye on snow conditions on the 300-plus avalanche hazards. It is thanks to their efforts that guests of every ability can enjoy Telluride’s legendary terrain. It’s a job that requires persistence, consistency and quality. It also necessitates a diverse skill set as the techniques they employ go far beyond simply studying and skiing the terrain. In fact, Telluride employs a most diverse assortment of avalanche control tools. From helicopters to access steep terrain at the resort’s upper elevation, to “avalaunchers” and World War II howitzers that launch shells at high-elevation slopes, the patrollers cover every piece of steep snow at the resort. Two of the tools used—the Bosse Roller (a three-wheeled, remote controlled tractor) and a bomb tram—are custom-made by Telluride’s very own lift mechanic, Mark Bosse. Ski patrollers lower the Roller down steep slopes with a snowcat winch, which chops up the snow and prevents weak layers from forming. This allows them to prevent a dangerous snowpack from developing, while staying out of the danger area themselves. In addition to this, the bomb tram can be used to lower explosives onto sleep slopes, thus triggering any potential avalanches without exposing the patrollers to the slope. There’s a lot to manage, but fortunately the ski patrollers have great backup: the Telluride Avalanche Dogs. While they provide essential rescue support with their ability to locate buried skiers, they’re also educators. They’re able to captivate an audience, so they’re the perfect tool to teach kids about avalanche awareness and staying safe out in the mountains. Last year was a heavy snow year, which meant the patrollers were busy monitoring slopes for the entire season. Once the season ended, they were already preparing for the next season by stockpiling supplies, materials and very importantly—more howitzer shells. “We’re very happy with the systems we have in place,” said Jon Tukman, the Snow Safety Director in Telluride, “but every year we’re looking to improve and explore what’s next so that our systems remain among the best in the industry.” “We truly have incredible terrain, and we work very hard to keep it open for everyone,” he added. “It’s challenging work, but we appreciate everyone at the resort making it possible by respecting trail closures so that we’re able to do our work safely and effectively.”

OPPOSITE

// SLIDES IN PALMYRA BASIN ABOVE // PATROL FIRES ONE OF THE RESORT’S HOWITZERS // AVALANCHE DOGS ARE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE AVALANCHE MITIGATION TEAM

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RE V EL ATION BOWL

LEGEND

It is against Colorado law to cross any rope on Telluride Resort; VIOLATORS WILL BE PROSECUTED. Closed terrain is indicated by the following signage   . Enter backcountry through gates only. Skiing or snowboarding irresponsibly could lead to the loss of all skiing and snowboarding privileges.

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PALMYR A PEAK & BL ACK IRON BOWL

A GUIDE TO THE P E R F E C T D AY AT T E L L U R I D E For Every Skill Level E X

It’s easy to do when skiing a mountain for the first time: You spend half your day navigating trail maps to figure out where the best skiing is for you. Then you get home from your vacation and someone asks, “Did you ski this run?” or “I hope you ate lunch at...” and you realize you’ve missed some great spots. Maximizing your time on the mountain is key, which is exactly what instructors do for a guest: They take the guesswork out of getting to know Telluride. Noah Sheedy, Telluride Ski & Snowboard School Director, shares his inside knowledge on how to have a perfect day on the mountain.

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GREEN MEANS GO

1. Morning Warm-Up Start your morning off from Mountain Village with a warm-up run down Meadows, then hop on the Sunshine Express (10). On the 10-minute ride up, you’ll immediately feel as though you’ve entered an entirely different resort. Along the chairlift ride, take in the magnificent mountain homes that dot the gentle and undulating terrain.

ABOVE // RIDING THE UTE PARK (11) LIFT OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT // TERRAIN THAT MAKES EVERY SKIER HAPPY // FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY // HIGH CAMP AT THE TOP OF PROSPECT EXPRESS (12) // BRIDGE CROSSING ON DOUBLE CABIN

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2. Like a Kid Once at the top, follow the Double Cabins ski run to Bridges, and relive your childhood where everything was a playground—that’s the feeling you get skiing under and over bridges and through tunnels as you make your way to the bottom of the aptly-named ski run. 3. Ride the Ute Ride back up Sunshine Express (10), then disembark and head into Ute Park. Here you’ll hop on the Ute Park (11) lift. As you ride up the lift, the uniqueness of Telluride and its green runs becomes apparent. On this lift, you are transported along the top of the mountain where you can take in the same great Prospect Basin views that expert skiers have.

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4. Fill Your Fun Tank Although Prospect Basin will beckon you to explore it, hold off for a bit and make one lap through the Ute Park area (which may turn into 10 when you realize how fun it is). There are lots of natural and manmade features that are extremely fun but not intimidating, even for a novice skier.

5. Explore the Basin Once you’ve filled up your “fun tank,” dip into Prospect Basin from the top of the Ute Park (11) lift, following Little Maude and Madison through gentle meadows with seemingly endless tree islands that make your first Prospect Basin experience unforgettable.


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6. Time to Hydrate At this point, you’ve probably built up a bit of an appetite, so ride the Prospect Express (12) to the top, then swing into High Camp for hot chocolate, warm soup and some much-needed water. Rather than eat inside, head outside and post up in front in one of the Adirondack chairs on the snow. You can watch advanced skiers hike up the Prospect Ridge toward Palmyra Peak and see all the expert terrain the upper Prospect Basin has to offer. From here, you’ll see Mt. Wilson to the southwest, while Gold Hill Ridge with more expertlevel skiing terrain is to the east. This is when you truly realize that Telluride offers even novice skiers who stick to green runs unbeatable views and a top-of-the-world feeling. After all, you’re standing at 11,815 feet above sea level here, so have your camera ready!

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7. Duck, Duck, Goose Once you’ve refueled and rehydrated, hop on the 3.6-mile-long Galloping Goose trail that meanders through high alpine forests, spectacular vistas, and past beautiful mountain homes as you work your way back to the bottom of Sunshine Express (10) and the Meadows ski run. 8. The Road to Mountain Village From here, ride the Chondola (1) back up to Mountain Village and load Village Express (4) to finish the day skiing with your family and friends who are exploring all the great intermediate trails this lift has to offer, all while staying on the Village Bypass trail, a beginner-level run. At this point, all roads lead back to Mountain Village and a well-deserved après drink and appetizer at Tomboy Tavern.

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FEELING THE BLUES

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1. Rise and Shine Hop on Village Express (4) out of Mountain Village promptly at 9am—all the freshly groomed corduroy early in the morning is well worth making it to first chair. One of the best-kept secrets on this chair is the Peek-A-Boo trail on a freshly groomed morning. Head right off the top of Village Express (4) and find your zen first thing in the morning by enjoying this trail, likely all by yourself. 2. A Gold Mine of Trails Head back up Village Express (4), this time following the upper section of Boomerang to Cake Walk and the Polar Queen Express (5). The trail network encompassed by the Polar Queen Express (5) is perfectly tailored to the intermediate skier. Take the time to explore every run accessed by this chair, as none will disappoint and each is unique. Ophir Loop and Stormin’ Norman—named after Norman Schwarzkopf—are the most mellow and are great warm-up runs. Then up the intensity a bit with Polar Queen and Alta. As you gain confidence and with your legs feeling great, make your way to Gold Rush to explore the perfectly-spaced trees hidden between Henry’s and Silver Tip. Make one last run to test your mettle on one of Telluride’s steepest blue trails, Henry’s.

3. Beat the Lunch Rush By now, you’ll have worked up an appetite. If it’s a sunny day, you’re in the perfect spot to beat the crowds and take an early lunch at Bon Vivant, which offers authentic French cuisine in an amazing outdoor dining setting. The French onion soup is to die for, as are many of the dishes on Bon Vivant’s menu, but pace yourself—you have plenty of spots in Telluride Ski Resort left to explore.

4. Look Closer As you contemplate which is better, the soup or the outstanding views of Prospect Basin, look closer at this terrain because—believe it or not—this is where you’re headed next. Tucked within the seemingly sheer cliff walls of Gold Hill and the extreme terrain of Upper Prospect Ridge lies some outstanding intermediate skiing. As you exit Bon Vivant, don’t pass up the opportunity to stop into arguably the nicest on-mountain public bathrooms before clicking back into your skis.

5. Pure Magic Head out on Lower Woozley’s Way as it winds through the Prospect Bowl basin, and follow the signs for the Prospect Express (12). Once on the chair, it’s easy to get inspired—and maybe slightly overwhelmed—at the immensity of skiable terrain that stretches in all directions. Don’t worry, you’re going to really enjoy the blue trails that Prospect Express (12) offers. Sandia and Magnolia are perfect intermediate trails, both offering a combination of short, steep pitches to get your heart racing, and playful lowerangle terrain that bobs and weaves through forested alcoves that make you feel as though you are the only person to ski the pathway you just did. It’s pure magic! 6. Enjoy the Ride Regardless of the trail that you took through this magical area that is Prospect Basin, veer toward Sandia and follow the signs to the Gold Hill Express (14). This will be an intense chairlift ride where you’ll get to watch some of the best skiers on the mountain play on expertonly terrain. Just like during your ride up the Prospect Express (12), you may feel a bit overwhelmed at the terrain that is in front of you. Not to worry though, you’re about experience Telluride’s signature blue trail: See Forever.

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8. Experiencing Forever See Forever is one long ridge, with never-ending views. It’s a wide-open groomer the entire way back to Mountain Village. You’ll go by Alpino Vino, North America’s highest-elevation fine-dining restaurant, as well as Tempter House, a private vacation home perched above a permanently-closed chute for which it’s named.

9. An Après to Remember As you ski the final pitch of See Forever, your legs will surely be ready for a well-deserved break. Rather than following the ski traffic into Mountain Village, follow the signs to the San Sophia Gondola Station, take your skis off, and walk through the station to Allred’s for an après experience like no other. Trust me when I say that the view from the bar in Allred’s is one of the most special in all of Telluride. No words can describe it, but it will surely make you forget about how tired your legs are after the perfect day of exploring Telluride’s blue ski trails.

7. Savor the Views At the top of the Gold Hill Express (14), move out of the way and off to the side so that you can get your camera out—you’re going to want it here! The views into Bear Creek and toward the town of Telluride are better here than anywhere else within the resort. Be prepared to spend a solid 5–10 minutes simply taking in the unbelievable views. I promise you that if it wasn’t winter and you weren’t itching to ski, you’d probably want to stay here all day—but eventually your toes will start to get cold and your excitement to ski See Forever will take over.

OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP // POWDER TURNS ON ALTA // YOUR TABLE FOR LUNCH AWAITS AT BON VIVANT // GATEWAY TO ENDLESS EXPLORATION IN PROSPECT BASIN

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DIAMONDS FOREVER

1. Take the Plunge Every now and

2 Maximize the Morning Sun

4. Midday Après At this point you’ll be

again I am lucky enough to ski with a particular guest who regularly utilizes the Telluride Ski School. I won’t name him, but I always know that it’s going to be a special morning when I go out with him because he is adamant about one thing: skiing Telluride’s most iconic black ski trails—Plunge and Bushwacker— on Plunge Lift (9).

After your legs are thoroughly warmed up from several thousand vertical feet of 40° slopes, make your way to Revelation Bowl via the Gold Hill Express (14). Revelation Bowl offers above-tree-line bowl skiing and is Telluride’s most east-facing terrain, so you’ll maximize the morning sun while enjoying unparalleled views of Bear Creek. Silvercloud is another of Telluride’s iconic steep, groomed, expert-level ski trails.

famished from all the skiing (and hiking!) you’ve done. I highly recommend treating yourself by riding the Gold Hill Express (14) to Alpino Vino. Soaking up the sun on the Alpino Vino deck with a charcuterie plate is a lunch experience above any other. Resist the temptation to overeat because you’ve got an afternoon of high-intensity skiing ahead of you.

Each night, the professional groomers of the Telluride Ski Resort alternate laying down the most perfect corduroy on one or the other of these two perfect pitches. Oh, and did I mention the vertical drop off these runs? A whopping 2,100 feet of pure bliss. I urge you to do the same as this guest—grab a grooming report and get over to Plunge Lift (9) ASAP in the morning for some of the most exhilarating turns you’ll make all day. And the best part is, if you get there early enough you’ll practically have these runs to yourself. Trust me—you’ll want to make lap after lap on these runs.

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3. Dip Your Toe Before the temptation of Alpino Vino draws you in for an early lunch, ski past it and make your way to Woozley’s Way and back into Prospect Bowl. It’s time to dip your toe into the amazing hike-to experience that the Telluride Ski Resort offers advanced-level skiers and snowboarders. Confidence, the first run along Prospect Ridge, is the perfect hike-to introduction for skiers and snowboarders. Don’t bother with the lower entrance into Confidence, take your skis off at the top of Prospect Express (12) and hike the 30 yards up to where you’ll drop in to the top entrance.

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5. Southern Exposure After lunch head toward Apex—a steep, off-piste run that softens up nicely in the afternoon because of its southern exposure. This will work out the lactic acid in your legs from lunch and will get you in the groove again. There are lots of playful lines in and out of the trees in Apex that will keep you exploring for several runs on Apex Lift (6). In spring, there’s nothing better than Apex and “town” laps in the afternoon. So once you’ve had your fill of the Apex terrain, follow See Forever to Milk Run—the epitome of spring corn skiing when the warm spring sun softens the snow to a perfect, milky texture. If it’s still midwinter, opt for a run down Coonskin to finish your afternoon skiing directly into the town of Telluride.


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T O G R E AT EXTREMES

4. Rite of Passage Head back up the Gold Hill Express (14) and follow See Forever to Plunge Lift (9). It’s time for a rite of passage for any expert skier in Telluride— Kant-Mak-M, which is a solid 40-45° slope consisting of about 800 vertical feet of big, awesome moguls. The snow is almost always perfect here and, although the bumps are big, your smile will be bigger when you successfully make it down this pitch.

1. Your Own Playground As an

2. The Perfect First Experience

expert skier in Telluride, the mountain is truly your playground. And as such, there is no better way to start your day than a hike to the top of the mountain. So, work your way up to the top of Revelation Lift (15), where opportunities abound for the expert-level skier. It’s time to experience Gold Hill, a mile-long ridge of steep, off-piste runs. You’ve gotten a good warm-up skiing to Revelation Bowl, so it’s the perfect time to take your skis off, throw them over your shoulder, and hike out to the iconic Gold Hill Chutes. Be forewarned—this is expert-level terrain. But for those with the experience and skill, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a more backcountry experience in the controlled environment of in-bounds resort skiing.

Venture all the way out to the end of the ridge and hike up the Gold Hill Staircase to access Gold Hill 9 Chute (GH9). GH9 is the perfect first experience for expert-level skiers new to skiing chutes. It’s relatively wide and opens up to a beautiful apron of playful skiing underneath the runout of Palmyra Peak. Make your way to the Sweet Martha zone where you’ll play amongst fun, natural features and wellspaced trees as you make your way back to the base of Gold Hill Express (14).

5. Not Done Yet Craving more? At the

3. Like a Million Bucks After

6. Finishing Touches Once you’ve

experiencing the glory of Gold Hill Chutes and Palmyra Basin, it’s time to ski another iconic route in Telluride’s advanced/ expert repertoire—Dynamo, then skiing left to Claude’s Couloir and finishing the run on Lower Millions. If this doesn’t simultaneously get you hooting and hollering, your heart pounding, and your legs burning, you’ll want to check your pulse.

finished Lower Plunge and have given your legs a break, finish off your town-side lap by skiing Jaws (more steep bumps!) to Cats Paw finishing at the base of the gondola in town. From here you have two options… if it’s the spring and the sun is still up, ride the gondola back up to ski Milk Run in the phenomenal corn snow that develops in the afternoon. If it’s still midwinter and the sun is already hidden behind the ski area, take your skis off and walk in to OAK Fat Alley BBQ at the base of the gondola for a well-deserved après drink in a fun, relaxed environment that this mountain BBQ joint offers. Cheers!

OPPOSITE PAGE LEFT TO RIGHT // REVELATION BOWL // MILK RUN ABOVE LEFT TO RIGHT

// GOLD HILL CHUTES 6–10, PALMYRA BASIN AND BLACK IRON BOWL // GOLD HILL CHUTES

bottom of Kant-Mak-M, follow the lift line traverse track and it will spit you out onto an equally-as-challenging mogul run called Spiral Stairs. As Spiral Stairs starts to flatten out, stay left and cut across to Lower Plunge to complete the bump run trifecta on the Plunge Lift (9) terrain. If you can ski these three runs, consisting of over 2,100 vertical feet of steep bumps nonstop, please come talk to me in the Ski School offices—I may very well have a job for you!

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LUNCH ON THE DECK AT ALPINO VINO

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FROM THE LIFTS TO THE APRĂˆS

One must never argue with a hungry stomach, and at Telluride, delicious options to satisfy your appetite are mere steps from the lifts. We’ve put together a foodie guide to the slopes so you can let your stomach guide your runs for the day.

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FROM THE LIFTS TO THE APRÈS

ON MOUNTAIN Allred’s San Sophia Station (gondola) Telluride’s flagship restaurant at the top of the gondola offers an incredibly unique mountaintop dining experience at nearly 11,000 feet. Enjoy drinks and a light supper in Allred’s cozy bar. Signature dish: Elk strip loin marinated in juniper-bourbon, with sunchoke purée, black cherry compote, sauce muscovite and rainbow chard.

Alpino Vino Gold Hill Express (14) At nearly 12,000 feet, this quaint European hütte is the highest elevation fine-dining restaurant in North America. Alpino Vino boasts leisurely European-style ski-in skiout lunches, an outdoor wine bar offering a stunning setting for a midday escape, and a nighttime dining experience above any other. Ski in or travel via an enclosed Snow Coach to peruse world-class wine lists and enjoy Chef Nicola Peccedis’ delectable fivecourse Italian alpine comfort food menu.

Bon Vivant

Giuseppe’s

Big Billie’s

Plunge Lift (9)

Sunshine Express (10)

Located on-mountain at the top of the Plunge Lift (9), Giuseppe’s is a local favorite offering New Orleans-inspired comfort food, sandwiches, soup, snacks, beer and wine. On clear days, you can see all the way to the La Sal Mountains in Utah.

Located at the base of the Chondola (1) and Sunshine Express (10), Big Billie’s features Southwestern and American-style family food in a casual atmosphere. Kids will love this easy-to-get-to restaurant at the bottom of the green runs. Those who don’t ski or snowboard, can meet friends and family for lunch by taking the Chondola down to Big Billie’s from Mountain Village.

Gorrono Ranch Village Express (4) Situated mid-mountain on the Misty Maiden run, this historic Basque sheepherding ranch serves up mouthwatering burgers, Chuck’s Famous Chili, soups, a variety of fresh salads and other casual fare. Check out the noodle bar or stop in to the Smokehouse for unbeatable rotisserie chicken right off the spit and housemade smoky pulled pork sandwiches. Or relax with a cocktail on Gorrono’s famous beach and listen to live music daily while enjoying the view of majestic Mt. Wilson.

Siam’s Talay Grille The Inn at Lost Creek Village Express (4) Founder Jeff Badger brings his unique talents to this popular restaurant located within the Inn at Lost Creek. Using only the freshest ingredients with Asian spices and herbs, the uniquely crafted dishes will invigorate your taste buds with the exotic tastes and textures of Thai cuisine.

Tomboy Tavern Village Express (4)

SKI IN /SKI OUT

Polar Queen Express (5)

Altezza Restaurant

With breathtaking views of Palmyra and the Wilson Range, Bon Vivant stands out as Telluride’s premier on-mountain dining venue. The menu, created by “Telluride Top Chef” Jared Campbell, combines classical French country cuisine and his modern creations. The all-French wine list is worldclass, and the friendly and knowledgeable staff work to enrich your experience. Enjoy luxury and authenticity that creates an ambiance which is second to none.

Altezza offers casual mountain dining with regionally-sourced ingredients and panoramic views of Mt. Wilson from both the restaurant and outdoor deck. Enjoy breakfast, midday and dinner menus in relaxed comfort with genuine hospitality.

The Peaks Resort & Spa Chondola (1)

Tomboy Tavern features a wraparound bar, expanded indoor seating and big screen TVs to go along with the best beer garden and patio in Telluride. Enjoy craft beers, cocktails and a menu to suit the whole group for lunch or dinner. With a huge slopeside patio and bar underneath an oversized European umbrella and a fully remodeled interior, Tomboy is also the perfect venue to host a summer or winter event for up to 120 guests.

OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM THE TOP // LUNCH WITH A SIDE OF TAN LINES ON TOP OF THE WORLD AT GIUSEPPE’S // EXQUISITE FOOD AND WINES AT ALLRED’S // SKI IN/SKI OUT AT THE PEAKS FOR LUNCH AT ALTEZZA

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TRUFFLE FRIES AND A BURGER AT TOMBOY TAVERN

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FROM THE LIFTS TO THE APRÈS

MOUNTAIN VILL AGE Black Iron Bar + Kitchen The Madeline Hotel & Residences Village Express (4) Signature fire tables accent the outdoor plaza in Mountain Village, creating a lively and energetic but modern and casual dining environment. The ambiance also hints at Executive Chef Will Nolan’s rugged culinary style and authentic, rustic mountain cuisine, where his love of open-fire cooking and bold flavors is showcased in dry-aged steaks, smoked beef short ribs, barbecued shrimp and more.

The Pick Village Express (4) Whether breakfast or lunch, enjoy createyour-own hand-rolled burritos and hearty burrito bowls that highlight seasonal ingredients. Be sure to take full advantage of The Pick’s key feature: unique homemade salsas and sauces like Local Honey Sambal Oelek, Orange Soy Crema, Kimchi Salsa, Local Sweet Corn and Peach Chutney, and Tequila-braised Black Olive Sauce.

Tracks Cafe & Bar

Cosmopolitan Bar & Lobby

Village Express (4)

Oak Street Lift (8)

Owned by locals Jeff and Erica Jurecki for 11 years, Tracks Cafe & Bar has flourished in the heart of Mountain Village. Just steps away from the Gondola and Village Express (4), the eatery is the perfect place for a quick breakfast before hitting the slopes. Enjoy après on the large patio during their Happy Hour.

The newly-renovated Cosmopolitan Bar & Lobby offers a more relaxed and contemporary environment perfect for enjoying one of the many craft cocktails. The Cosmo Bar features a revolving selection of wines on tap, making great wines from around the world available by the glass. Walk-in guests are welcome in the Bar & Lobby areas on a first-come, firstserved basis, year-round. During warmer times of year, outdoor seating is available.

TOWN OF TELLURIDE 221 South Oak

Oak Fat Alley BBQ

Oak Street Lift (8) 221 is set in a tastefully refurbished historic home nestled in the trees on South Oak Street, just steps from the Gondola. For years, 221 has been renowned for its intimate atmosphere, incredible food, extensive wine list, friendly service and uncompromising quality. And with Top Chef’s Eliza Gavin at the helm, 221 offers a blending of styles and flavors on their menu that is a result of fresh ingredients and an abundance of hard work.

Oak Street Lift (8) Telluride’s premier BBQ restaurant, at the base of the Oak Street Lift (8) and the Gondola, serves up a variety of food including mouthwatering BBQ, burgers and sweet potato fries. The outdoor patio is great in summer or winter, and OAK is the spot for après ski. Tip: Ask about the secret menu.

ABOVE LEFT TO RIGHT // BLACK IRON KITCHEN + BAR IN THE HEART OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE // ONE OF THE RUSTIC AND COZY CONFINES AT GORRONO RANCH

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ADVENTURES IN ALL SHAPES AND SIZES

There’s no denying the world-class skiing and unmatched terrain in Telluride, but there’s plenty of off-mountain adventure to discover as well.

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FOR THE KIDDOS Kids Winter Camps Located inside the Ski & Snowboard School at the base of the gondola in Mountain Village, the Telluride Adventure Center is open daily and provides day camps for kids ages 5–12. The Center offers programs designed to connect kids with their environment and develop a deeper appreciation for the world around them. With fullday, half-day and afternoon options, kids camps include programs for all interests. Email the Telluride Adventure Center at adventure@tellurideskiresort.com or call 970.728.7433. Kids Snow Camp A cool alternative to ski school for kids ages 5–12, where they will experience a full day of indoor and outdoor winter activities such as Winter Wilderness Survival, Trekking and Tracking, and Geocaching!

Kids Night Out Full of fun, food and games, kids will learn about one another through interactive indoor games, share dinner and do kitchen experiments like making slime. After dinner, there’s an outside option (proper attire required).

Kids Happy Hour Après ski for kids. This program was created for both kids ages 5–12 and parents alike. Kids get some fun after-skiing activities, and parents can take another couple of runs and enjoy après ski. As a complement to an active day of skiing or playing outside, Kids Happy Hour takes place indoors. Kids can learn how to make candles, snowflakes or crafts from recycled materials; they create collages, poems and stories, souvenirs of their trip, and much more. Experienced staff will pick up your child from the Ski & Snowboard School, so there’s no interruption to your day of skiing. N O T E Telluride Adventure Center Instructors are CPR-certified, qualified childcare providers, professional, and over 21.

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ADVENTURES IN ALL SHAPES AND SIZES

GUIDED TOURS Snowshoe Tours Imagine being led through Telluride’s winter wonderland by an expert naturalist. Our legendary guide staff will detail the local environment’s flora and fauna, and provide fascinating insights into the captivating natural world. Tours are designed to accommodate all ability levels and depart from the Telluride Adventure Center (Village Express [4] lift in Heritage Plaza). Advanced reservations for snowshoe tours and rentals are highly encouraged due to limited availability. Telluride Adventure Center

Ice Climbing

Backcountry Skiing

Ice climbing trips are great for individuals and families of all ages, and the perfect outing for adventurous visitors looking to mix up their ski vacation as well as for climbers looking to expand their skill set. Join the highly-trained and accredited staff of Mountain Trip for a day of ice climbing around Telluride or Ouray. You do not need previous climbing experience, as the company has taken children as young as four and adults as old as 75. Mountain Trip is the only Telluride-based guide service permitted to guide in the Ouray Ice Park. Mountain Trip mountaintrip.com

Mountain Trip also offers guided backcountry skiing around Telluride. Whether you want to learn the skills to explore the winter backcountry, or gain the confidence to drop into steeper lines, they can help you realize your big mountain aspirations. Their guides are highly trained in ski guiding, as well as avalanche forecasting, assessment and rescue. There’s no better way to learn the skills necessary to help you expand what you thought possible in the mountains. While you don’t need previous backcountry skiing experience, you should have intermediate to advanced skiing or snowboarding ability. Mountain Trip mountaintrip.com

970.728.7433 adventure@tellurideskiresort.com

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FOR THE THRILL-SEEKERS Heli-skiing For those seeking high-adventure thrills, Telluride’s Helitrax earns the distinction as the ultimate heli-ski experience in the US, with over 200 square miles of high alpine basins, cirques and summits. A family-owned operation for the past 35 years, the guide service utilizes small groups of four guests per guide for a more intimate experience that you can’t find at any ski resort in this country. Plus, flying in a Eurocopter AS350 B3s, a helicopter built specifically for high altitude mountain flying, is an event in itself. Telluride Helitrax helitrax.com

Snowmobiling Explore the region’s pristine backcountry on an exhilarating guided snowmobile tour. Telluride’s local snowmobile outfitters, including Telluride Outside and Telluride Outfitters, specialize in half-day and full-day tours that accommodate all abilities from novice to advanced riders. Snowmobiling is the most popular winter adventure activity off-piste, so reservations are always highly recommended. Telluride Outside tellurideoutside.com Telluride Outfitters tellurideoutfitters.com

Fat Biking Explore the valley floor with fat tire bikes and ride through snow, mud and stream crossings with tires that are nearly 5" wide. If you’re feeling the itch for adventure, bike up the popular Bear Creek trails. Bootdoctors, with locations in town and at the resort, offers fat bike rentals and guide services to show you some great trails around Telluride. Bootdoctors bootdoctors.com S K I I N G

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What’s left? You’ve got gloves, but are they waterproof? You’ve got plenty of layers, but did you make sure they’re wool or synthetic fibers, not cotton? It’s easy to miss certain items when packing for a ski trip. Here’s a guide to items often forgotten, though essential, for a comfortable experience on the slopes. Don’t worry! You can find any of these items in Telluride—from the Telluride Sports locations around Mountain Village and in town, to Patagonia and Bootdoctors in town.

THE ESSENTIALS Baselayers Cotton clothing is never recommended when skiing or snowboarding. Wool or polyester is your best bet, and can even be worn under your jeans while you’re roaming around town. Moisture-wicking materials such as these are crucial for keeping you warm and dry.

Mid-layers Your mid-layer will mostly depend on the kind of ski jacket you’re wearing, as some come with a zip-in layer. With Telluride’s typical winter conditions, we recommend a light down jacket or merino wool sweater.

Ski Jacket and Pants Important aspects to keep in mind regarding your jacket

and pants: 1) Are they waterproof? 2) How much breathability (and are there breathing pockets, which are usually near the underarms and behind kneecaps)? 3) Does your jacket overlap your pants by a couple of inches and do your pants overlap your boots? 4) Does your jacket have a high collar (in case you don’t have a buff/balaclava)?

Sunglasses or Goggles Telluride receives up to 300 days of sunshine annually, so it’s likely you’ll be enjoying plenty of bluebird days during your visit. Combine the sunshine with the snow reflection and it’s easy to see why shades are necessary. While sunglasses can be a chic choice on the slopes, goggles provide extra protection from the powder that you’ll be shredding.

The Right Socks It’s easy to go for the thick wool socks, but you’re not skiing in the East. Besides, thick socks can make your boot fit a lot tighter, and even make your feet colder, so we always recommend going with thinner socks made of a dry-fit material. 36

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A CHECKLIST OF ITEMS YOU’LL WISH YOU HAD WHILE ON THE SLOPES E A S I LY F O R G O T T E N

HELPFUL TIPS

Sunscreen At 10,000 feet of elevation in Colorado sunshine, getting

Stay Hydrated At 10,000 feet, hydration

sunburned is far easier than you’d expect. SPF 15 is all you need, and it can be found all over Telluride, even in your hotel lobby.

is key to staving off fatigue and headaches. Keep a water bottle in your backpack. Be sure to drink more water than alcohol—one glass of wine can equal two at elevation, particularly on the first day of your visit. Pro tip: The front desk at The Peaks Resort & Spa will happily provide complimentary bottles of water throughout your stay.

Chapstick Even if you’re wearing a buff, chapstick is your best bet against the wind as you’re zipping down the slopes. It’s as abundantly available as sunscreen.

Buffs Speaking of, this extra layer of protection for your face will go a long way to keeping you protected against the elements.

Swimsuit Just because it’s winter doesn’t mean you can’t hop into a heated pool or hot tub—most likely at your hotel—to relax after a day of skiing or snowboarding.

Moisturizer Colorado has a dry climate, and with dry winters the skin can get irritated between the warm insulation of your clothes and the cold air surrounding you. Snacks Staying hydrated is important, but so is snacking (responsibly, that is). Dried fruit, nuts and granola bars are perfect, so keep some in your pocket or within reach. Don’t worry, you’ll still have room for those tasty nachos at Tomboy Tavern.

Pain Reliever Skiing uses muscles that you don’t normally use, so even if you’re fit, you could experience some soreness. A variety of pain relievers are likely available in your hotel lobby or visit Sunshine Pharmacy in Mountain Village.

Start Easy Avoid injury and pulled muscles by warming up on a green trail or short intermediate runs before hitting the big stuff. Pro tip: Spend at least 15 minutes doing stretching exercises before suiting up. Pro tip for beginners: Try the Peaks Trail before heading to Meadows.

Food Moderation Bon Vivant and Gorrono Ranch, along with other spectacular onmountain dining spots such as Alpino Vino, Big Billie’s and Giuseppe’s, offer enticing lunch options. But don’t fill up too much! A heavy lunch will only slow you down the rest of the day, and worse, cause cramps during your run. Cold Phone Admit it, you really want that awe-inspiring Instagram shot from the top of a run, but phones don’t do well in freezing temperatures. If you don’t have a sleeve to protect your phone from the cold, try using a spare sock (not a used one, obviously). Change for Après Enjoying a cold beer is arguably the best activity to cap off a day of skiing or snowboarding, but doing so in cold and wet clothing is not comfortable. Take a few minutes and change into some warm and dry clothes, then dive into that well-deserved beer (or two). And don’t forget to hydrate!

OPPOSITE Images courtesy of Stio and Smith Optics.

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RIDE LIKE THE WIND With over $1 million invested into a new and expanded mountain bike trail network, the new Telluride Bike Park is a unique lift-served experience

Summer got a whole lot better in Telluride!

with a variety of interconnected trails (freeride, technical and cross-country) guaranteed to put a smile on your face. Downhill biking is not all about big air, high speeds and technical lines like you see in videos, so don’t be intimidated! However, whether this is your first trip to the Telluride Bike Park or your first time riding a bike park, it’s important to get started right so you’re rolling down the trails safely.

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WHAT IS THE TELLURIDE BIKE PARK? The Telluride Bike Park is located within the ski resort and is a designated network of interlinked mountain bike trails. The Telluride Bike Park is “gravity fed” and accessible by the Village Express (4) lift and the Gondola. Gravity-fed trail means there is little to no pedaling involved. Gravity does all the work for you and the chairlift brings you back to the top. Riders may also use the chairlift or gondola to access the resort’s cross-country trials.

TRAIL DIFFICULTY Trail difficulty within the Bike Park is designated by color and shape markers, similar to ski trails—green is easiest, blue is intermediate, black is most difficult and double black is extremely difficult. There are also two categories of trails within the difficulty designations. Flow trails are wider, machine-built trails that are smooth and feature man-made elements such as jumps, berms and rollers. Technical trails are tighter and take advantage of natural features such as roots and rocks, but also have manmade elements.

GUIDING AND CLINICS You may be thinking: If you know how to ride a bike, why hire a guide or take a clinic? Downhill biking is similar to skiing or snowboarding, in that it is a sport that requires a specific set of fundamental skills best taught to firsttime bike park riders by a professional guide. Single day passes, season passes, guides and clinics, along with bike rentals, are available for advance purchase. Additionally, guests can also activate their passes online.

The green flow trail, Tommyknocker, is a freeride trail ideal for novice riders with basic mountain bike skills. The trail is wide and has a mellow pitch, giving riders a great opportunity to advance their skill set.

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NOTE We highly recommend hiring a guide or participating in a clinic your first time riding the Telluride Bike Park.

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RIDE LIKE THE WIND

TELLURIDE M O U N TA I N BIKE PARK

Safety First

Mountain Biker’s Responsibility Code

Whether this is your first time riding in a bike park or you’re a seasoned veteran, make sure you slow down before you speed up. Riding a trail multiple times allows you to become familiar with the trail and its features, along with the equipment you are using. This will allow you to comfortably increase your skills without exceeding your limits.

Mountain biking involves risk of serious injury or death. Your knowledge, decisions and actions contribute to the safety of yourself and others. As with skiing, know and follow the code. It is your responsibility. ALWAYS. 1. STAY IN CONTROL You’re responsible for avoiding objects and people. 2. KNOW YOUR LIMITS Ride within your ability. Start small and work your way up. 3. PROTECT YOURSELF Use an appropriate bike, helmet and protective equipment. 4. INSPECT AND MAINTAIN YOUR EQUIPMENT Know your components and their operation prior to riding. 5. BE LIFT SMART Know how to load, ride and unload lifts safely. If you need help, ask. 6. INSPECT THE TRAILS AND FEATURES Conditions change constantly; plan and adjust your riding accordingly. 7. OBEY SIGNS AND WARNINGS Stay on marked trails only. Keep off closed trails and features. Ride in the direction indicated. 8. BE VISIBLE Do not stop where you obstruct a trail, feature, landing or are not visible. 9. LOOK AND YIELD TO OTHERS Look both ways and yield when entering or crossing a road or trail. When overtaking, use caution and yield to those ahead. 10. COOPERATE If involved in or witness to an incident, identify yourself to staff.

EQUIPMENT POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS ° Helmets are required when riding in Telluride Bike Park. (A full-face helmet is highly recommended when riding technical trails or jump trails.) Eye protection, body armor and gloves are highly recommended. ° The trails at the Telluride Bike Park are specifically designed ° for modern full-suspension mountain bikes. Hardtail and rigid mountain bikes are not forbidden, but not recommended within the Bike Park. Due to the gravity-fed nature of downhill bike parks, disc brakes ° are highly recommended for adequate stopping power. ° Rim brakes, although not forbidden in the Bike Park, will increase fatigue for the rider and have limited stopping power. Bikes with coaster brakes are not allowed in the Bike Park. Uphill riding is not allowed in the Bike Park. °

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Family Adventure B E G I N S

Give your skis a break and delight in a cool winter activity with your kids. Snowshoe in the San Juan Mountains, take a snowbike lesson, or enroll your children in a Kids Snow Camp— the Adventure Center has the perfect option for everyone.

Open daily from 8:30am–5pm adventure@tellurideskiresort.com 970.728.7433


RESERVE YOUR P E R S O N A L I Z E D L E S S O N T O D AY PRIVATE LESSONS 970.239.7062 CHILDREN’S LESSONS 970.239.7060 or email children@tellurideskiresort.com GROUP LESSONS 970.239.7062 or lessons@tellurideskiresort.com TELLURIDE WOMEN’S CAMPS 970.728.7536 or womensweek@tellurideskiresort.com SKI BIOMECHANICS CAMP 970.239.7062 HELI-SKI CAMP 970.239.7061 MAKING FRIENDS WITH MOGULS 970.239.7061

tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school

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Profile for Telluride Ski Resort

Skiing With The Masters 2019-20  

Telluride Ski Resort's Ski School Magazine for the 2019/2020 Ski Season

Skiing With The Masters 2019-20  

Telluride Ski Resort's Ski School Magazine for the 2019/2020 Ski Season