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Tuition to be lowered to S20 per unit By Chris Meyer THE TELESCOPE

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill that will drop community college tuition from $26 per unit to $20 per unit beginning Jan. 1, 2007. This comes after Schwarzenegger released the 2006-2007 state budget. Schwarzenegger and California Secretary of Education Alan Bersin said they hope the fee reduction will have a

long term impact on the overall affordability of higher education. "This fee reduction will be instrumental in helping students achieve higher education, therefore ensuring the economic vitality of California through a better educated work force," Bersin said. Many Palomar students are still unaware of the change. Herman Lee, director of enrollment

services, said he is excited about the drop in tuition. Lee recalled a few years back under a different governor when the state had a deficit of $14 billion that carried on for the next few years. Lee said the community colleges saw a 1 to 2 percent drop in enrollment during that period as tuition went up. "A lot of us here felt the waves of all that," Lee said.

Lee said that because of the sales tax, property tax and luxury tax the enrollment fees do not matter as much to the state as they once did and the state has moved past the time when it depended on tuition fees. The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education determined that projected income in California will significantly diminish by 2025 unless there • SEE TUITION, PACE 11

Prop. M will help disabled students By Keith Gemmell FOR THE TELESCOPE

Dodging students and open doors while barely making it through narrow hallways, is cypical for most physically disabled Palomar College students. Riding his motorized wheelchair, Hendrik, a Palomar student who would only give his first name due to the sensitive nature of his disability, said most students at Palomar don't think twice about how they're going to get from class to class, but for students with physical disabilities, it's just one challenge of many to deal with every day. Palomar's Governing Board voted Aug. 8 to put a new bond measure worth $694 million on the Nov. 7 ballot, which if • SEE

Student debate heats up between parties

Web site asks Palomar for grading data

By Alma Hernandez THE TELESCOPE

Republicans and Democrats squared off on national issues in the Student Center Oct. 23 during a debate, sponsored by Phi Theta Kappa. The acoustics at the event were bad but once the Democrats denounced Bush's ability to run the country, the Republican club president rebutted loud and clear. Students were invited to watch the debate and participate by writing questions on index cards directed toward the debaters. The Democrats talked about the inability of the Bush administra-

tion to run a country that is at war, while the Republicans said that Bush is taking the correct actions in securing the United States. Democrat Eric Marc-Aurele said when it comes to North Korea the U.S. must send a message by bombing North Korea's launching ground and destroying its nuclear weapons. Republican Matt Fleming, president of the Republican Club, said that would not be the answer because North Korea is a threat to • SEE

DEBATE, PACE 13

DISABLED, PACE 3

By Jason Dunn and Robert Grimmick THE TELESCOPE

SCOn EVAIIIS I THE TELESCOPE

(Top): Student Cody Campbell debates with (bottom) Matt Reming at a debate in the Student Center on Oct. 23.

A Web site similar to www.ratemyprofessor.com is asking Palomar officials to release faculty grading histories. Students can visit www.pickaprof.com and view detailed information about the distribution of grades in a given professor's class. The site can also display the percentage of students who have dropped the class during previous semesters. Currently, information for Palomar College is not available on the site. Earlier this year, Pick-a-Prof filed a law• SEE GRADING

TAXING TOBACCO

A DELICATE ART

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Students find gl11ss blowing eh11llenging 11nd teWIItding.

Soeeer e11pt11in f11ees h11rdships but endures.

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DATA, PACE 12


2

THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

Palomar

··· ····'IN BRIEF

Dia de Los Maertos celebration Nov. I Palomar College will be hosting a Dia de Los Muertos celebration from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Nov. 1 in the Student Center. Altars dedicated to the dead will be displayed in the Student Center. A disc jockey will be playing music in English and Spanish. Martha Velasco's Spanish 101 class and the Financial Aid Department are organizing the event. Various campus groups will have tables. Taquitos, rice, beans, and beverages will be available free of charge. For dessert, a Pan de Muerto (Bread for the dead) will be offered.

College celebrates Halloween Oct. I I Ghosts, goblins, and witches aren't the only things on club leaders' minds as they plan for the Oct. 31 Halloween Escape. Palomar clubs are holding a celebration of the spooky holiday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Center. There will be Halloween decorations, game booths, and music to help bring holiday spirit to the event. Kettle corn will be available and the cafeteria will be providing witches' brew punch bowls. There will be a costume contest, open to anyone who comes in a Halloween costume. Judges from academic departments will be choosing winners for three categories, including scariest and funniest costumes. Each category will have

prizes for a winner and two runners-up. _ Campus clubs will be at tables on the patio to promote themselves, including the Pre-Med Club and Phi Theta Kappa. The Pre-Med Club has a cakewalk planned that people can join. Baked cakes will be given to the winners. Phi Theta Kappa is decorating jack-olanterns. ASG will create a graveyard in the grass and be assisting with booths. Other clubs are planning Halloweenthemed events.

Library display to celebrale Dia de Los Maertos The library is hosting a display for the Mexican holiday Dia de Los Muertos. Spanish professor Martha Velasco had her Spanish 101 class put the displays together and make the decorations. The displays are altars to the dead. A Sept. 11, 2001 podium is on display as well as a podium for all the illegal immigrants who have died trying to cross the border. A display is set up for deceased rock stars from the 60s and 70s. There is another display for students to put pictures of deceased loved ones or memorabilia. The altars have traditional sugar offerings and papel picado. Papel picado is paper cut into designs reflecting the dead. There are also pictures of the deceased and unlit candles to commemorate them. Dia de Los Muertos is celebrated Nov. 2. In some places it is celebrated Nov. 1. The holiday originated in the southern and central regions of Mexico. The display will run until Nov. 15 on the second floor of the library.

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• Halloween Escape The Inter-Club Council hosts a Halloween celebration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Center.

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• Dia de Los Muertos celebration Martha Velasco's Spanish 101 class and the Financial Aid Department host a celebration from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Center. Free food will be available.

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• Free Film Series "Shaun of the Dead," a British comedy film about zombies screens at 6:30 p.m. in Room P32. Admission is free.

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• SDSU Presentation Represetatives from San Diego State University will give a presentation from 10 to 11 a.m. in the governing board room. The event is hosted by the Transfer Center.

I j, III • Plant sale

• Transfer information for UC Santa Cruz Representatives from UC Santa Cruz will be available by appointment in the Transfer Center from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Call (760) 744-1150 ext. 2552.

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• Campus Explorations History Professor Chris Johnson hosts a discussion on "Coping with slavery" from 2 to 3 p.m. in Room ES-19. Admission is free.

The Friends of the Palomar

II/Z College Arboretum will sell plants from 9 a.m. to 3:30p.m. at the entrance to the Arboretum.

1

• Free chlamydia screenings Health Services offers free chlamydia screenings from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in lot 11.

• Internship workshop part two Part two of the career center's internship workshop is held at 11 a.m. in the Career Center lab. Students who did not attend part one are not excluded from attending.

• Concert Hour The Palomar Chamber Singers and the Palomar Women's Chorus perform at 12:30 p.m. in 0-10. Admission is free.

• UC application workshop The Transfer Center hosts an application workshop for University of California schools at 1 p.m. in the Transfer Center lab.

• UC personal statement workshop The Transfer Center hosts a workshop on writing personal statement for transfer to a University of California school from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the Transfer Center.

Makint a stand for a healthier campus pus, except for parking lots. She said she knows those against a ban will argue parking lots can be just as dangerous to smoke in. Palomar student and frequent smoker Daniel Gregg, 20 , said he enjoys being By Sarah Jones allowed to smoke on campus, Tit£ TELESCOPE but can understand why it is a Associated Student health risk. Gregg said he Government Vice President wouldn't mind walking to a Michelle Eichelberger is fight- parking lot if it was a rule. ing for a new and healthier Other students feel differsmoking policy at Palomar. ently about making a change. Eichelberger believes it is in Malory Shores, 20, said she the best interest of students to worries that taking away the have a clean and smoke-free freedom to smoke on campus campus. She said according to will lead to other changes that the latest Surgeon General's could affect her personal freewarning that there is no dom. healthy level of exposure to Eichelberger said Palomar cigarette smoke. isn't the first local college At a recent ASG meeting, campus to take this stance on Jayne Conway, director of smoking. San Diego Mesa Health Services, told stories College already has a similar about problems caused by sec- policy. Supporters of ond hand smoke. She talked Eichelberger's cause are waitabout students leaving school ing on the results of campus by ambulance because of asth- surveys that asked students ma attacks from exposure. what they want. Palomar's current policy Eichelberger said she didn't states that smokers must be want to start a crusade with20 feet away from buildings out knowing what students and designates certain areas of would prefer. campus as non-smoking. The She said when people are policy is hard to enforce around certain things all the because buildings are close time, like cigarettes, they together. The policy don't see the effects or possible Eichelberger said she hopes damage they are doing. She for would ban smoking on cam- said she knows that people

• Vite president ol ASG lights lor • smoke-lree ttlmpus polity

FOR NOT SMOKING BEYOND THIS POINT

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TOM DENNY I THE TELESCOPE

smoke to relieve stress, fill in time and because they are addicted. Some students view smoking as a social activity, like drinking alcohol. Friends lend each other cigarettes, share packs and swap lighters . Eichelberger said she promises as ASG vice president and a student representative that she will stand up for a policy students agree on. The ASG has two events

planned for November that Eichelberger said she hopes will influence students to change their views on smoking. The ASG will be working with Phi Theta Kappa, Vista Community Clinic and Health Services to host a campus clean-up Nov. 13. Students are invited to pick up cigarette butts with gloves and baggies in a competition where prizes will be given to students who

collect the most cigarette butts, Eichelberger said. The second event is The Great American Smoke Out on Nov. 16. Vista Community Clinic will be on campus helping raise awareness about the effects of smoking. Eichelberger said she would love a smoking ban. She said what is more important to her is to do what students want to make Palomar a better campus.


THE HLESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

3

Glass blowing class fires up .students few days for larger pieces. This ful," he said. Grupe has made keeps the glass from cracking bowls, figurines and paperweights. . The Glassblowing-Offhand 1 due to thermal stress. "Cohen gives you a lot of Bernadette Reed is the Class at Palomar College teaches the process of forming glass instructional support techni- exposure to the art of glass into shapes while the glass is in cian for the glass blowing class. blowing," Grupe said. "If a stua molten, semi-liquid state. The She has a degree in general dent does not understand the class has about 20 students of arts from Cal State Long protocol of glass blowing, different age groups and art Beach. Reed said she has been Cohen will take you step by working at Palomar for 10 step. He is full of energy." ideas. "Glass blowing is a chalInstructor Garry S. Cohen years. She said she started said he started glass blowing in working in ceramics but decid- lenge, it's always changing his early 30s and has been ed she liked working with glass and it is so immediate and teaching at Palomar for several instead. She helped build the very exciting," Reed said. She 350-pound said working with glass is years. furnaces dangerous and that safety is "I was originally a ceram- ''6lt111 blowing is t1 eht1/lenge, used in the the No. 1 concern. Students wear special glassics teacher, but it's t1fwtlys eht1nging tllfd it is glassblowing studio. es to protect their eyes from I fell in love so immedit1t1 11nd rery Student the intense heat that comes with glass Acee Grupe from the furnaces and the blowing after a exeiting." said he has glory holes. They use fireproof glass blowing - Bernadette Reed b · instructor INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT TECHNICIAN een mter- gloves to protect their hands ested in glass and arms. invited me to Reed told a story from a few since he was try it and I liked it," Cohen said. "Since I 5-years-old when he saw a years ago when a couple of was a technique freak and liked glass paperweight at his grand- students would stop by reguma's house that fascinated him. larly in winter to warm up discipline, I fell right into it." "I would look at the glass near the furnaces and watch Cohen said famous American glass artist Harvey Littleton paperweight and wonder how the students work. One of the observers got sick inspired him, and that it takes color and bubbles got in there," concentration and focus to be Grupe said. "Growing up, I and found out he didn't have an efficient glass blower, as well always thought glass blowing long to live. He asked one of was cool. I enrolled in the the students in the class if he as good muscle coordination. The studio is warm from the glass blowing class with Cohen could make him several small glass hearts with hollow 2,000 degree heat of the ovens. and now I'm hooked for life." He said he has been working spaces inside. The student Glass blowing involves three furnaces. The first, which con- with glass for the past eight agreed to make the glass tains a crucible of molten glass, months and said it',s dangerous hearts for him. The terminal is simply referred to as "the fur- work because of the hot fires student asked another observnace." The second is called the from the furnace and glory er, who was his friend, if he "glory hole," and is used to hole. He said he has been would fill the hearts with his reheat a piece in between steps burnt, but said the thrill and ashes after he died, seal them of working with it. The final dangerous process has kept and give them to his girlfriend, his daughter, some of furnace is called the "lehr" or him intrigued. "Working with glass blowing the glass blowers and to Reed. "annealer," and is used to slowly cool the glass over a period of and the process of the hard set His friend honored his a few hours for small pieces to a and color is something beauti- request. By Colleen raroli

THE TELESCOPE

MEGAN CASSISE I THE TELESCOPE

Students Justin Reagle makes a glass flower with torch fire in Gary Cohen's advanced glassblowing class earlier this semester.

• DISABLED: Prop. M would pay for campus facilities to reach ADA compliance CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

SCOn EVANS I THE TELESCOPE

Student Manuel Gutierrez enters the Disability Resource Center on Oct. 26.

passed, would help students like years especially with large ply benefits to both disabled and Hendpk. Known as Proposition heavy doors to restrooms, like non-disabled persons alike. M, the bond is designed to help the ones in the campus library Calling it "Universal design," the school build facilities and that limit easy access for blind Haines said ADA problem solvapply state-of-the-art programs and physically disabled stu- ing makes school settings better to remain competitive in helping dents, Haines said. for everyone. While Department of State Under Prop. M all renovastudents get a better education Architect codes have helped to tions and new buildings will be and graduate soone,r. All new buildings on campus fix some of the door issues on fully ADA compliant. Every will have to comply with the campus, they will also guide the multi-level building will have at Americans with Disabilities Act, construction of new buildings least two elevators, disabled but older buildings are not nec- and resolve additional prob- workstations in each classroom, specific wheelchair spaces at lems. essarily compliant. For students like Matt Wild, · both top and bottom of lecture "We feel that disabled needs are being met on campus, but simply using the restroom is a halls, multi-leveled counters in we can always add more sup- daily challenge. Wild, a third- science labs, accessible paths port," said Mark Evilsizer, gov- semester Palomar student, said with no higher than two percent erning board vice president and the campus is fairly accessible graded ramps, curve cut curbs former Palomar adjunct profes- to his hydraulic wheelchair, but at the end of walkways, and dissor. could improve by adding more abled parking within a short The Disabled Resource stalls in the restrooms for the distance of each new building. Ellis said he is excited for the Center, provides assistance to disabled. People without any students with disabilities and disability use the larger stalls improvements that will be suggests changes to meet the too often and are either in the brought by Prop. M. He said the requirements of the Americans way or leave the stall dirty and new science building alone will difficult to use, Wild said. bring a 20 percent increase of with Disabilities Act. Mike Ellis, director of facili- ADA standards on campus and Disabilities are not limited to mobility but also include visual ties since 1985, said Prop. M that each new building will proand hearing impairments as will provide funds to renovate vide a similar increase in comwell as functional limitations. and build new structures with pliance of these standards. The center helps meet students' restrooms that will allow more Ellis said it will take about 15 needs with mobility and note- accessibility to ADA approved years to fully implement taking assistance, test accom- stalls and possibly add more upgrades funded by Prop. M, modations and providing alter- than one stall for disabled per- but rapid increase will be seen nate media as well as counsel- sons per restroom. To avoid non- within three to five years. For students like Hendrik, ing. disabled persons using these Ron Haines, director of the stalls, Ellis said that regular who has trouble getting through DRC since 1990, said that being stalls will have wider designs the hallway in the SU building, a one-story campus is fortunate offering more comfort and and for Wild in the restrooms and others with varied disabilibecause it has made access appeal. much easier for disabled stuIn addition to restroom ties, Prop. M can provide larger dents. Hallways and entrances enhancements, ADA and hallways and classrooms, better to older buildings have been a Department of State Architect restrooms, new computers and challenge over the last several codes create standards that sup- equipment they can use.


4

THE TELESCOPE II MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

z

EDITORIAL

0

Prop. M is needed and a. deserved 0

For 60 years Palomar College has been the beginning step for students on the path of higher education. Proposition M, a $694 million dollar bond, is giving • students, faculty members and the community a chance to help the college which has given an education to so many throughout the district. With a new science building soon to be completed, Palomar is due for more than one new building. Looking across campus, the science building towers over outdated buildings and rows of mice-infested portables not suited for a college dear to many alumni, faculty, students and residents. With many of the buildings over 50-years-old, the majority of the money from the bond will be used to modernize the San Marcos Campus with a new library and modern classrooms. If Prop. M passes Nov. 7, property owners will pay $14.72 per $100,000 of assessed value. This amount will be a small sacrifice to give the students of Palomar College a stronger learning environment. Money will also go toward building two new campuses in Fallbrook and Poway, as well as fixing the Escondido Center. The money is needed, and Prop. M is the boost Palomar needs to fulfill dreams of refurbished facilities. The only opposition to the proposition is the Libertarian Party, who object on the grounds that students and their families should pay for the rebuilding if the situation is drastic. Through Prop. M, the money would come from the community, as it should. Palomar College supports many students in the district, more than 30,000. These students come from the community, whether they are fresh out of high school or adults wishing to further th-eir education. Students and their families should be promoting Prop. M as often as they can. When Palomar College hosted a 60th anniversary celebration April 8, many members of the community, alumni, students and faculty attended. · ·These same people should be endorsing Prop. M and educating the rest of the community about how vital the $694 million dollars will be for building a better future for upcoming students. If every student and their family members voted yes on the bond, it would pass. Today's children in the community deserve to have the highest quality facilities when they reach higher education, and Prop. M will fulfill that need. Many students on campus have felt the cramped classrooms, poor air circulation and mice-infested buildings. The Telescope has suffered along with them. The "temporary" portable we use is showing its age of over 20 years with a leaking roof and broken air conditioning. . · The district, which is larger than Delaware, must answer the call for help set by Palomar College by voting yes on Prop. M. ·The bond needs 55 percent approval and this goal can easily be reached by the community. Vote yes on Prop. M.

TeliSctpe

Monday, Oct. 30, 2006

Volume 60, No. 8

FOCUSED ON PAlOMAR The Telescope is published weekly on Mondays, except weeks containing holidays or exams .. Signed opinions are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily represent those of the entire newspaper ·· staff, Palomar faculty and staff or the governing board. HOW TO REACH US ADDRESS THE TELESCOPE, PALOMAR COLLEGE, 1140 WEST MISSION ROAD, SAN MARCOS, CA 92069 NEWSROOM ROOM TCB.-1

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SAMSON MARTINEZ I THI TELESCOPE

Student vote itnored By Alma Hernandez

How many students know about it? Guess what? No one expects young voters to! Many political followers believe the Nov. 7 Yeah, that's right. If students don't care, politielection will determine the fate of the United cians don't care. All it means to them is less States. That it is yet to be seen, but one thing is work. These are things that directly impact everyfor sure, most college students will once again one's life. Voting is the only say Americans have be bystanders to a historical election. In the controversial 2004 election, MTV went in government so why don't most students vote? Since most college students don't vote, they big with their "Rock The Vote" campaign in an effort to encourage the young voting demo- are of little value to politicians. Non-voters are graphic to vote. Diddy promoted his "Vote or seen as an expendable voting bloc. What this voting bloc fails to realize is that Die" slogan, endorsing the value of voting. Ironically, Paris Hilton, who took part in get- their representatives will not represent them if ting the word out on voting did exactly what they don't express their concerns and demand most young voters did - she didn't vote or even political action. bother to register. · Young voters complain about the lack ·of repEven with the importance of the 2004 elec- resentation for issues that affect them, but up tion, only 22 percent of California voters until now they have not done anything about it. between 18 and 29 voted. That's not even half, Perhaps the most valuable tool young voters have is voting, ·yet they so easily give that up. which is pathetic. According to The Center for Information & It's exactly what is expected to happen this year. It's sad to admit that most California col- Research on Civic Learning & Engagement, 21 lege students will disregard the privilege of vot- percent of political party chairs believe. senior citizens are of more importance than young voting. Did you know that this Nov. 7 Proposition 86, ers. This is why the platforms of most politiwhich could increase the price of a box of ciga- cians deal with medical and social security rettes by an additional $2.60, will be on the bat- issues. Elections are popularity contests, and since lot? Or did you know about Proposition 85, which would force pregnant minors to have most students make themselves useless by not parental consent and wait 48 hours after a voting, the contestants aren't fighting for them. physician notifies their parents before having If students voted and had a substantial impact on election results, politicians would become an abortion? What about safety in your neighborhood? If concerned about student issues. Young voters could benefit greatly by the . passed, Proposition 83, an initiative to increase penalties and better monitor sex offenders competition among politicians for their vote. As of now, young voters only feel the effects of · would be a step in the right direction for a safer community. There's a proposition that affects the elections after the fact. This Election Day, Palomar students directly - Proposition M, a keep in mind that everyone should be conbond that would give Palomar $694 million to cerned with the future because eventually we update existing facilities and build new sites. will live there. Ttl£ TELESCOPE

EDITOR IN CHIEF STEPHANIE TOMBRINCK NEWS EDITOR JASON DUNN PHOTO EDITOR JARED LANSFORD OPINION EDITOR JASON DUNN ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR IAN ClARK SPORTS EDITOR JOHN SCAFETTA ONLINE EDITOR SCOTT ERLER AD MANAGER DOREEN SCHULl INSTRUCTIONAL ASST DONNIE BOYLE INSTRUCTIONAL ASST CHARLES STEINMAN" INSTRUCTIONAL ASST TOM CHAMBERS JOURNALISM ADVISER WENDY NELSON JOURNALISM ADVISER ERIN HIRO PHOTOJOURNALISM ADVISER PAUL STACHELEK

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The Telescope welcomes all letters to the editor. Letters must be typewritten (no more than 350 words), and must be signed with the author's first and last names, and· phone number. Phone numbers will not be published. The Telescope reserves the right to editletters for space and not to print letters containing lewd or libelous comments. Letters must be received by Monday at 3 p.m. to be considered for publication the next Monday.

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THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2001

5

Prop. 8 5 would raise cigareHe taxes Proposition is a cover for Proposition will promote health and reduce smoking hospital~s special interests By Kim Gatto

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THE TELESCOPE

Everyone knows that smoking kills, but people still do it. In the United States, more than 440,000 people die annually from tobacco-related illnesses, making it the leading cause of death for Americans. The ironic thing is, unlike accidents, these deaths could have been prevented. Proposition 86 will help to do just that. Prop. 86 would impose an additional 13 cent tax on each cigarette distributed. That adds up to $2.60 per pack: That money would then be used to provide funding for various health programs, children's health coverage and tobaccorelated programs. The bottom line is that Prop. 86 will reduce smoking and save lives. My Grandma on my mom's side was diagnosed with lung and throat cancer due to smoking cigarettes. She had one and a half of her lungs removed. She had a tracheotomy, a hole cut in her throat so she could breathe, and then she died. The doctors also had to remove her voice box and replace her beautiful British accent with a machine that would talk for her. She was in a lot of pain before she died. She was only 67 . My grandfather on my dad's side was diagnosed with throat cancer. He too had to live with a tracheotomy. After years of being handicapped with the disease, he died last year. Cigarettes kill almost 5 million people worldwide per year. That is nearly 5 million families who lose loved ones to tobacco-related diseases. Prop. 86 will help lessen the amount of people who will have to exp.erience the losses that my family did. So of course I believe the cost of cigarettes should increase, simply for the fact that lives will be saved. My uncle John, my dad's little brother, was diagnosed with throat cancer. He has already beat it twice and found out a month ago that the cancer is back. He started smoking in high school and then continued on until he graduated college. Ten years later he was diagnosed. Because of his decision to smoke when he was younger, he will struggle the rest of his life against this disease. According to a study conducted by the California Department of Health, Prop. 86 will keep 700,000 children from becoming smokers and prevent 300,000 smoking related deaths. The tax is supposed to make cigarettes more of a luxury item than a dependen-

Do you support adding a tax of 13 cents per cigarette?

cy. Smoking can already become very expensive. Most of my friends who smoke spend so much of their money on cigarettes they can't afford to do other things. Also, almost all my friends who smoke say that they want to quit, but it is just too hard. Hopefully, Prop. 86 will make cigarettes less obtainable for already financially struggling students and encourage them to quit. Raising the cost of cigarettes will reduce how many packs people can afford to smoke, making it more difficult to be a chain smoker. Prop. 86 is a positive step toward a future without cigarettes and premature tobaccorelated deaths. Prop. 86 not only saves lives, it saves money as well. With smoking related ill-

By Hannah Starr THE TELESCOPE

Proposition 86 is a wolf in sheep's clothing. Major hospital corporations are hiding behind the promise of better health care to gain support for Prop. 86, when their true motive is to raise taxes for personal gain. Prop. 86 is unfair because it isolates and punishes smokers for the financial benefit of small interest groups and the hospital industry. Prop. 86 would add a 13 cent tax for each cigarette sold. Supporters of Prop. 86 want voters to believe the proposition is for the health interest of smokers and prevention of potential smokers alike. In reality, only 10 percent of the estimated $2.1 billion in tax revenue from Prop. 86 will go to anti-smoking efforts, according to the official

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care costs and overloading our health care systems, Prop. 86 will save . nearly $16.5 billion in health care costs. Prop. 86 will also increase state revenue by more than $2.2 billion per year. Prop. 86 also includes tough financial safeguards so the money will go exactly where voters intend. The bottom line- Prop. 86 taxes cigarettes to save lives and money. Vote yes on Prop. 86 for a healthier future.

o n Prop . 86" campaign Web site. The hospital industry drafted the initiative and is funding the campaign efforts. This is no surprise considering the largest amount of the tax revenue, nearly 40 percent, will go directly to hospitals. After giving a measly 10 percent to anti-smoking efforts, the remaining 50 percent will go to a plethora of state programs that directly benefit the hospital industry. The hospitals will then distribute the money to each program as they see

SHAWN TEIIIIIIY SOCIAL WORK

LINDSAY AFFSA PSYCHOLOGY

HARRISON SCHMIDT

"If it went to stop-smoking programs sure, but I very much doubt it's going there."

"I'm kind of on the fence on this one because it's an unfair tax. It's extreme."

"Well, I really don't smoke, so it doesn't make a-difference to me."

HISTORY

fit without voter representation. In short, if Prop. 86 passes, the smoking taxpayer will become a personal piggy bank for special interest groups. Prop. 86 is not the first attempt by hospitals to abuse taxpayers for personal profit. In 2004, Prop. 67 proposed a 3 percent surcharge on all telephone lines. Hospitals claimed the tax revenue would be used to fund 911 operations and increase the number of emergency rooms statewide. In reality only 1 percent of the annual $500 million would have gone to the 911 system and the remaining revenue would have been unaccounted for. Voters rejected Prop. 67 by a substantial margin, but the hospitals are back and ready to tax with Prop. 86. Supporters of Prop. 86 use anti-smoking sentiment to draw an emotional reaction from voters. Over the years, smokers have been targeted and taxed unfairly because of those who strongly oppose smoking for personal reasons. Supporters pretend to be interested in smokers' health to get false credibility. The Association of California Neurologists, The Capital Medical Society and a slew ofhealth care professionals oppose Prop. 86. It is obvious Prop. 86 is not about health when those who dedicate their lives to keeping us healthy oppose it. A number of provisions are written into Prop. . 86 that California voters should be concerned about. Prop. 86 would allow hospitals special exemption from antitrust laws, which promote competition to protect a market from monopolization. If they are granted exemption through Prop. 86, hospitals will be free to distribute and limit medical services and supplies as desired. Hospitals will also be allowed to raise prices without fear of competition. Uninsured visits to the hospital could become a nightmare under Prop. 86. Hospitals will have no limit to what they are allowed to charge uninsured taxpayers for emergency services. Hospitals need to be monitored and shouldn't be allowed to set their own prices and inflict financial hardship on the sick. Hospitals and special interest groups are prepared to strip smokers of cash under the false pretence of helping them kick the habit. It is unfair to single out a group and tax them excessively no matter how noble the pretense for the taxation may seem. Unfortunately, Prop. 86 supporters don't care about the smoker, but only the smoker's wallet. Vote no on Prop. 86 if you support equality and expect integrity from our health care system.

TRill STARK DENTAL ASSISTING

CHARIR KELLY GENERAL EDUCATION

"Yes. I don't like smokers and they're gross and it'll make them have to pay more for cigarettes."

"It might not do that much difference, but at the same time it might, you never know. It might just discourage people from smoking as many packs a day."


6

THE TELESCOPE 111 MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

Forum measures poverty By Kyle Ray THE TELESCOPE

Palomar economics professors Loren Lee and Teresa Laughlin held a seminar Oct. 18 called "Not Making a Living: American and International Poverty" as part of Campus Explorations. The interdisciplinary campus-wide project is focusing this year on issues of work and poverty. Throughout the school year seminars have been, and will continue to be held every We d n e s d a y from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Room ES-19 with seminars by various professors and guest speakers. Lee began his lecture by saying President Lyndon B. Johnson declared unconditional war on poverty in 1964 and that poverty rates were declining until about 1970 when they leveled off. President Ronald Reagan was able to say in 1988 that "poverty won." Lee said the American definition of poverty in use since the Johnson administration is based on the annual cost of food for a single person times three and that people earning less are considered impoverished. Adjustments are also

made based on family size, Lee said. Since the '60s these numbers have been adjusted for inflation. The present poverty line for a single person in the United States is $10,160 per year, and $19,971 for a family of four. By these standards, 12.6 percent, or slightly more than one in eight Americans, are living in poverty. Another method of measuring poverty presented by Lee is the relative poverty measurement, which is 50 percent of the median household income in a country. This method is used in the European Union. The median household income in the U.S. in 2005 was $46,326, making the relative .poverty threshold $23,163. Using this measurement, more than 20 percent of Americans a~e living in relative poverty. By this measurement many European nations have lower poverty rates than the U.S. Lee put these figures into perspective by showing World · Bank estimates that 1.6 billion people, more than a quarter of the population of the world, are living on less than

$2 per day. Lee showed data on the distribution of income in the U.S. for 2003 . The data showed the poorest 20 percent of society made only 3.4 percent of the total U.S. yearly income while the richest 20 percent made 49.8 percent. The richest 5 percent of Americans made 22.4 percent of the income in 2003. During a discussion session after the presenta_tion, Lee and Laughlin spoke about the importance of education and it's relation to poverty, answering questions about welfare reform and suggesting it is to the benefit of society to have higher education as accessible as possible. Student Lizabeth Hodges shared her struggles with government assistance as a single mother and a Palomar student. "You have to fight," she said, adding that government programs encourage getting a minimum wage job and off of welfare, and that higher education is almost not an option. Students stayed after the presentation and continued the conversation into the halls. More information on the Campus Explorations learning community is available at www.palomar .edu / campus explorations.

Palomar professor speaks at Political Economy Days By Shahrazad Encinias TilE TELESCOPE

A lack of seats didn't stop students from attending one of the sessions offered through Political Economy Days. Political Economy Days was a tw9-day event held by the Political Science and Economics Departments. Political Economy Days were started last semester by economics professor Loren Lee .and political science professor Peter Bowman. There were 16 · speakers for this semester's event Oct. 19 A presentation on political violence in the near east was held during the event by adjunct political science professor Brian Kupfer. There were approximately 70 students attending the session. Students were sitting between rows and standing outside of the classroom. The presentation was in Room P-18, but should have been in another classroom, many students said. Bowman said Kupfer is very knowledgeable about political violence. Kupfer spoke about three

main conflicts in the Near East. Israel and Lebanon is conflict No. 1, he said, Iraq as a whole is conflict No. 2 and Israel and Palestine is conflict No. 3. Kupfer said he believes the conflict between Israel and Lebanon is the most hopeful to be resolved. "Proxy-wars" were also a large part of his presentation. Kupfer said "proxywars" are a type of war instigated and funded by another country not involved in the war. "It brou,ght up new ideas, especially funding," Palomar student Nicholas Brown said. Kupfer passed out a list of recommended Web sites that deal with the Middle East at the beginning of the presentation. Kupfer said he passed out the list and participated in Political Economy Days · because he wanted to give students a general understanding of what's going on in the Middle East. Kupfer said students don't understand the causes of the stories they see on the news. "I wanted to give a general sense to follow the stories," Kupfer said.

Financial Aid &ASG are co -sponsoring this event Financial Aid will be providing information. Questions? Contact Foreign Languages Martha Velasco (760) 7 44-1150 ext. 5550 or e-mail: mvelasco@palomar.edu


THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

7

Paid Political Advertisement ,

Palomar College Needs

Proposition M! Palomar College is 60 years old. Major repairs and upgrades are needed. Proposition M will help. In fact, Prop M will authorize the most significant facilities improvements the college has seen in nearly half a century.

Support Palomar College! Vote YES on Proposition M! Sometimes people don't vote because they think their vote won't make a difference. For the 31,236 students attending Palomar College today, and the hundreds of thousands who will attend in the future, YOUR YES VOTE will make the difference.

Please, whatever you do, on Tuesday, November 7

REMEMBER TO VOTE! Vote YES on Proposition M-for Palotnar College. ,

¡Your "YES Vote" for Proposition M is Critical. ELECTION DAY is Tuesday, November 7 Polls are open froiD 7 atn to 8 ptn. Paid for by Citizens for Palomar College-YES on M. Sponsored by Palomar College Foundation and President's Associates 31 oState. Place, Escondido, CA 92029. (760) 740-6937. Nancy Haley, Treasurer. FPPC # 1286415.


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By Ashley Ward TilE TmSCOPE

Halloween is right around the corner and if you still haven't made any plans, here are some ideas to get a frightening night started off right . The Ocean House in Carlsbad (fomerly known as Neimans) is hosting Boogie Nights, a costume party. Musical guests include DJ Craige Smoove and the M 80s. There will be a contest for the best costume with prizes. The party kicks off at 9 p.m. and is 21 and up with a cover charge of $10. For more information call (760) 729-4131.

The Haunted Hotel in the Gaslamp District is one of the most popular places to check out during the month of October. "Hostel," "Saw," "House of Wax" and "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" are just a few of the horror films that come to life at the Haunted Hotel. The Haunted Hotel is in its14th year, so the special effects are bigger and better than ever. It is open from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. and costs $13.99 to get in. For more information call (619) 231-0131. Another attraction that's sure to send a chill down your spine is the Haunted Trail at Balboa Park. It's San Diego's only all-outdoor haunted location, which makes the unknown even more unexpected. Fairy tales with a dark twist is the Haunted Trail's theme for this year. It is open from 7 to 11 p.m . and costs $13.99. For more information call (619) 696-SCARE. The Scream Zone at the Del Mar "Scaregrounds" is a terrifYing Halloween encounter that you will never forget. The Scream Zone features three different adventures, allowing you to chose one, two or all three. The ''Haunted Hayride" includes a haywagon trip toward the back of the racetrack, the "Chamber of Chills" is a bloodcurdling walk through San Diego's longest tunnel of terror, and the ''House of Horrors" features several rooms full of scary surprises. You can see all three attractions for $26.99, "Chamber of Chills" and one other for $17.99. Or just ''House of Horrors" or ''Haunted Hayride" for $13.99. The Scream Zone goes from 7 to 11 p.m. Go to www.thescreamzone.com for more information.

If you're looking for some real ghosts and people who aren't just dressed up in costumes, visit the Whaley House in Old Town. It seems that this unassuming, 19th-century residence is still home to many of its former residents and other "guests." Visitors to the Whaley House have reported everything from throat constriction, chills to swaying meat cleavers in the kitchen and floral scents. On Halloween it is open from 5 p.m. to midnight and costs $15. Also on Halloween, check out the "Rocky Horror Picture Show". It's a play about a newly engaged couple that has a breakdown in an isolated area and must pay a call to the bizarre residence of Dr. FrankN-Furter. Showing at the La Paloma Theatre in Encinitas, costumes are not required but highly encouraged. It's showing at 9 p.m. and also midnight. For those of you who are 21 and older, there are also a lot of fun things to do this Halloween. The Abbey in Hillcrest is throwing a ''Thriller"-themed '80s costume ball. DJs will be playing House music in the ballroom and 80's music in another room. Radio station 91X is hosting a "91X Brand XOrcism" at 4th & B. Musical guests include Dead Man's Party, Spiders from Mars and David Bowie tribute band Ziggy Shuffiedust. The venue will also include DJs and a costume contest. Cane's Bar and Grill in Pacific Beach is also celebrating Halloween with music. Cane's Halloween Zombie Prom includes bands such as ·Accident Experiment, Lodus, 18 Bones and Divided by Zero. It starts at 8 p.m. and costs $8. For more information call (858) 488-1780.

Pick a flick in a By Jared Lansford THE TELESCOPE

There are plenty of classic and contemporary horror flicks that would make for a spooky All Hollow's Eve, but sadly those are sometimes all rented out on that last minute you go to get a Halloween movie. On Oct. 31 at about 5 p.m. none ofthe staples of the horror genre will be in at Blockbuster. Gruesome murders from "Saw" to ''Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and classics like ''The Shining" to ''The Exorcist" are sure to terrifY but maybe Halloween night movie time can offer nostalgia, comedy or thought provocation. Not finding the great slasher films like ''Nightmare on Elm Street" or ''Friday the 13th" in the horror section can expand the search to other

parts of the store. Browse comedy or check out a drama, and some who are brave enough can watch a black-and-white or subtitled movie. Halloween doesn't have to be about the scary movie, a fun movie night can be held with choices from any section. Philosophers and mystery lovers can direct their attention toward the drama section. 2000's "Donnie Darko," starring Drew Barrymore and the famous cowboy Jake Gyllenhaal, uses a Halloween backdrop and allegory to explore how often people wear costumes. The film won't scare but will inspire deep thought that revolves around pivotal scenes occurring during Halloween. Film buffs and people who appreciate aesthetics can watch some of the dubious foreign films or classics. "Psycho" may still

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OPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

9

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24hourstoget By Ki m Gatto THE TELESCOPE

Many students have waited until the very last minute t put together a costume. With Halloween just one day away, it's time to get creative. Being a student usually means that you are struggling financially and don't have the time or the money to throw down $40 on a Halloween costume. It is possible to get a costume that costs less than $24 in 24 hours. Many Palomar students found that the overall inexpensive way to dress for Halloween is to put together your own costume. "I am going to be a girl scout," said Kaylie Kraus. "I am reusing some of the stuff from when I was one." Other students like Anthony Leon are still unsure about what they are going to be or how they are going to make it. "I might be Easy E," Leon said." "I am going to make it, probably get stuff from some thrift store." Thrifty Threads off of Coast Highway 101 in Encinitas is a great place to go if you are looking to rent a Halloween costume. The costumes are available for rent for 24 hours and then it is an additional $20 to extend the rental time from now until Nov. 3. They have a large selection of costumes available for rent, with prices ranging from $15 to $150. The costumes appeared to bein good condition, with a wide range of themes and sizes still available. For more information contact Thrifty Threads at (760) 753-0023. Another option is Party City located in Oceanside, Escondido and Encinitas. Although people began shopping for Halloween costumes at Party City in September, the shelves appeared to still be stocked with great Halloween ideas and accessories. Many of the packaged commercial costumes were put on clearance, some even for the low price of $16.99. Many of the

is a huge that make it their own ~.-v,,.,q,..u,"' too much chase of an eye ~:;~;;;~;:~~~ could easily create "t tume theme of this year; a Pirate. The ever-reliable Target and Wal-Mart stores also offer complete packaged costumes at a low price as well as Halloween costume accessories. Although most of the costumes were picked over, these stores . still have numerous packages of makeup kits that could easily be used to create a scary or one-of-a-kind Halloween character at an inexpensive price. Lastly, students can visit The Super Halloween Sprit shops, located in most of the Westfield shopping malls. They are located in place of the closed down Robinson May stores and are open from 10 a.m to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays. Although, these stores are running low on merchandise, they still offer various supplies to create your own costume at an affordable price. For the really creative students who need ideas for a fast, do-it-yourself costume, the Web can be a great source. This is a good idea for students who don't want to show up in the same costume as 20 other people. Search Google for Halloween costume ideas and countless links will be available to help you. Good luck in your quest to find a Halloween costume that is both inexpensive and fast to put together. Don't stress, you still have 24 hours!

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JARED LANSFORD I THE TELESCOPE

i ferent section

:hecked out at the local video store hut te may consider it too old and too black1-white. "Psycho" changed the landpe of the genre without actually filming famous murder scene. The film is ·ed Aitchcock at his best, innovating miques to capture audiences with capLting terror. fermany's "M" predates "Psycho." 1se brave enough to read the subtitles a film on Halloween will get chills at beautiful cinematography along with a ling performance by Peter Lorre as one he wst-ever murderous psychotics on

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oo much thinking or work seems [ous to some for a Halloween night. oily movies bring out great nostalgia, ~ watching "Deal or No Deal" host ;vie Mendel as a monster from under

the bed in ''Little Monsters." Sarah Jessica Parker had her mind on spells not "Sex and the City'' as witch in 1993's ''Hocus Pocus." Partying may be the event for Halloween evening and there are plenty of movie options for such an occasion. Mel Brooks brought us not only "Dracula: Dead and Loving It" but also "Young Frankenstein. Insomniac Keifer Sutherland spends 24 hours fighting terrorism these days on television but who can forget when he couldn't even see the light of day as the lead bully vampire in "The Lost Boys." The film is light, funny and has the extra 1980s touch since one of the cast members is Alex Winter, also known as Bill S. Preston, Esquire of the "Bill and Ted" movies.

PHOTO BY JOHN PORTER

Thrifty threads is located off Coast Highway 101 in Encinitas and has costume rentals available 24 hours a day.


10

THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

'American Hardcore' opens in Hillcrest By Hannah Starr

played the better. Concertgoers dived from the stage into the The early 1980s hardcore punk crowd and thrashed about often scene is finally given its due in times leaving eachother bloody, the new documentary "American but all in good fun. Punk rock was Hardcore." The film is directed by a revolution led by dirty blackPaul Rachman and based on clad rebels who were instrumenSteven Blush's novel in the same tal in the evolution of modem day name. rock. Rachman and Blush became The film follows the begginings acquainted while circling the east and careers of Black Flag, Minor coast hardcore punk scene in the Threat, D.OA. and Bad Brains as r----------, well as the early 1980s. When they ran into each ! 'American Hardcore' bands they

THE TELESCOPE

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other 20 years later in ;; spawned. New York Blush was ... iO'JTCfFrv<STAFSl G r a i n y just finishing up his ~ STARRING, IAN MCKAYE, GREGG GINN, videos of novel.Rachman had • ~N;xRRNOJyUNS, GREG HETSON, MATH- early conthe idea to combine certs grant DIRECTED BY, PAUL RACHMAN their creative talents an accurate and make a documentary. glimpse of the energy behind the "American Hardcore" docu- movement. This rarely seen ments the anger and dissatisfac- footage makes the documentary tion with the government as felt exceptional. by Reagan-era adolescents. Clips highlight the Bad Brains Hardcore punk rock was a count- with front man HR enthusiastier culture movement in direct cally bounding about the stage defiance of the American lifestyle with dread locks flying and vocals at the time. Teens and youths fed blaring. Minor Threat is featured up with cashmere sweaters, priv- as well with clips of the young ileged preppies and disco music band (all 18 or under at the time lashed out with their own expres- the band was formed) energeticalsion. ly tearing up guitars and screamHoards of dirty, bedraggled ing politically charged lyrics into teens and pre-teens flocked to the microphone. venues such as CBGB's in New "American Hardcore" also feaYork to watch their favorite hard- tures a wealth of candid intercore band bang out three chord views with musicians from the tunes with highly distorted elec- punk scene. The musicians intertric guitars and frenzied drums. viewed spoke about the unheraldThe faster and harder they ed influence that hardcore punk

""'-------......!

has had on modem rock music. Flea, of The Red Hot Chili Peppers reflects on the influence that punk bands like the Bad Brains had on his evolution as a musician. It is interesting to see how far the former grimy punk fan has come since his days circling the hardcore scene. Almost everybody interviewed spoke passionately against modem "punk rock" and angrily talked about how commercialization eventually killed the already failing genre. "American Hard core" showed that violence did not always characterize hardcore punk rock, but it eventually tore it apart. Bands such as Minor Threat and Black Flag eventually stopped touring and disappeared from the scene as concerts became increasingly violent and fights between punks and cops were frequent outside shows. The scene began to take on a more sinister note as musicians and fans alike began abusing drugs, participating in promiscuity and drinking excessively. From this evolution the straight edge movement began propelled by Ian MacKaye of Minor Threat. Straight edge punks don't use drugs, drink alcohol, and are frequently vegan. Straight edge punks were angry at how punk was developing into a genre characterized by debauchery instead of its beginning as an intelligent introspec-

tive rebellion. The Hardcore Punk scene became so divided that almost all the founders eventually retired to form other bands or reflect longingly on a tiny energetic blurb in musical history. "American Hardcore" was at times disorganized and lengthy but fascinating in content. Hardcore Punk rock is a genre that is virtually ignored and

excluded from music history although it formed some of the most popular bands into what they are today. Without punk there would be no Nirvana, Fugazi, Red Hot Chili Peppers, or Beastie Boys. "American Hardcore" is a loving memoriam to a dead genre that is still fiercely appreciated by those that lived it.

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THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN PUNK ROCK 1980 ·1986

COURTESY PHOTO

"American Hardcore" opens up for viewing at the Hillcrest Cinemas on Oct. Zl.

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6

THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

Foru111 111easures poverty By Kyle Ray THE TELESCOPE

Palomar economics professors Loren Lee and Teresa Laughlin held a seminar Oct. 18 called "Not Making a Living: American and International Poverty" as part of Campus Explorations. The interdisciplinary campus-wide project is focusing this year on issues of work and poverty. Throughout the school year seminars have been, and will continue to be held every We d n e s d a y from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Room ES-19 with seminars by various professors and guest speakers. Lee began his lecture by saying President Lyndon B. Johnson declared unconditional war on poverty in 1964 and that poverty rates were declining until about 1970 when they leveled off. President Ronald Reagan was able to say in 1988 that "poverty won." Lee said the American definition of poverty in use since the Johnson administration is based on the annual cost of food for a single person times three and that people earning less are considered impoverished. Adjustments are also

made based on family size, Lee said. Since the '60s these numbers have been adjusted for inflation. The present poverty line for a single person in the United States is $10,160 per year, and $19,971 for a family of four. By t.h ese standards, 12.6 percent, or slightly more than one in eight Americans, are living in poverty. Another method of measuring poverty presented by Lee is the relative poverty measurement, which is 50 percent of the median household income in a country. This method is used in the European Union. The median household income in the U.S. in 2005 was $46,326, making the relative .poverty threshold $23,163. Using this measurement, more than 20 percent of Americans are living in relative poverty. · By this measurement many European nations have lower poverty rates than the U.S. Lee put these figures into perspective by showing World · Bank estimates that 1.6 billion people, more than a quarter of the population of the world, are living on less than

$2 per day. Lee showed data on the distribution of income in the U.S. for 2003. The data showed the poorest 20 percent of society made only 3.4 percent of the total U.S. yearly income while the richest 20 percent made 49.8 percent. The richest 5 percent of Americans made 22.4 percent of the income in 2003. During a discussion session after the presenta.t ion, Lee and Laughlin spoke about the importance of education and it's relation to poverty, answering questions about welfare reform and suggesting it is to the benefit of society to have higher education as accessible as possible. Student Lizabeth Hodges shared her struggles with government assistance as a single mother and a Palomar student. "You have to fight," she said, adding that government programs encourage getting a minimum wage job and off of welfare, and that higher education is almost not an option. Students stayed after the presentation and continued the conversation into the halls. More information on the Campus Explorations learning community is available at www.palomar .edu/campus explorations .

Palomar professor speaks at Political Economy Days By Shahrazad Encinias THE TELESCOPE

A lack of seats didn't stop students from attending one of the sessions offered through Political Economy Days. Political Economy Days was a tw9-day event held by the Political Science and Economics Departments. Political Economy Days were started last semester by economics professor Loren Lee .and political science professor Peter Bowman. There were 16 · speakers for this semester's event Oct. 19 A presentation on political violence in the near east was held during the event by adjunct political science professor Brian Kupfer. There were approximately 70 students attending the session. Students were sitting between rows and standing outside of the classroom. The presentation was in Room P-18, but should have been in another classroom, many students said. Bowman said Kupfer is very knowledgeable about political violence. Kupfer spoke about three

main conflicts in the Near East. Israel and Lebanon is conflict No. 1, he said, Iraq as a whole is conflict No. 2 and Israel and Palestine is conflict No.3. Kupfer said he believes the conflict between Israel and Lebanon is the most hopeful to be resolved. "Proxy-wars" were also a large part of his presentation. Kupfer said "proxywars" are a type of war instigated and funded by another ·country not involved in the war. "It brol.lght up new ideas, especially funding," Palomar student Nicholas Brown said. Kupfer passed out a list of recommended Web sites that deal with the Middle East at the beginning of the presentation. Kupfer said he passed out the list and participated in Political Economy Days · because he wanted to give students a general understanding of what's going on in the Middle East. Kupfer said students don't understand the causes of the stories they see on the news. "I wanted to give a general sense to follow the stories," Kupfer said.

Come and celebrate tlie 1pemury of loved food, ·music. and "pan, d~ muert0''.

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esperam~s

Iio faltesl

Financial Aid & ASG are co -sponsoring this event Financial Aid will be providing information. Questions? Contact Foreign Languages Martha Velasco (760) 7 44-1150 ext. 5550 or e-mail: mvelasco@palomar.edu


12

THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

• GRADING DATA: Pick-a-Prof asks for grades CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 suit against UC Davis after the Gowen said. Unlike other professor rating "I don't think it's a sound basis sites, Pick-a-Prof does not rely school refused to turn over their grading records. Pick-a-Prof for making decisions about which solely on advertising for revenue. argll.ed that it should have access professor or which class to take," In many cases, the student govto those files since grading histo- Gowen said. "But we live in a ernment of a school will make ries are public records. The court market economy. You can't blame annual payments to Pick-a-Prof, agreed, and UC Davis was forced people for taking advantage of the allowing students to access the site for free, said Karen Bragg, to hand over the information. market." Private schools do not have to Palomar Faculty Federation co- director of university relations for comply with Pick-a-Profs president Julie Ivey said Pick-a- Pick-a-Prof. requests as their records are not Prof doesn't present a problem for Students at some schools must public. tenured faculty, but she is con- pay a membership fee, while othFaculty Senate President . cerned about part-time faculty. ers endure advertisements for free Brent Gowen said Vice President She said part-time faculty would access to the site, but most stuof Human Resources John be compelled to inflate grades and dents do not pay directly to use the 'lbrtarolo is dealing with Pick-a- she opposes grade inflation. site, Bragg said. Prof. 'lbrtarolo declined a request "The grades become meaningPalomar student Shelby Golish for an interview. less," Ivey said. said any information is useful Gowen said he believes Ivey said students' grades when choosing classes, but she Palomar has told Pick-a-Profthat would be devaluated at schools wouldn't pay for what Pick-a-Prof the college's computer software where Palomar students transfer offers. isn't equipped to release the infor- and that Palomar students would "Word of mouth is the same and mation Pick-a-Prof wants. Gowen graduate uneducated. I can talk to people," she said. "It's not Palomar College's misStudent Ky Ross said Pick-aalso said he has concerns about Pick-a-Prof. sion to encourage worthless Prof appeals to him because he "It's an uneducated way of grades- we're here to encourage works a lot, so classes with low education," Ivey said. "It goes workloads help him manage his selecting teachers," Gowen said. He said the information offered directly against the mission of time. He said he would be willing by Pick-a-Prof is data without what an educational institution is to pay for Pick-a-Profs services. "If it's reasonable, not astronomcontext and ignores important supposed to do." Ivey said the PFF is not in ically expensive, I wouldn't mind aspects of a class like analytical thinking. He said the data great fear of Pick-a-Prof, but shelling out a few bucks," he said. reduces classes to final grades. would like to see some resolution Student Jacob Zdvorak said he "Educators in general would be at the state level preventing Pick- used Rate-my-Professor once opposed to that kind of reduc- a-Prof from releasing teacher's when he heard bad things about a grading histories. tion," Gowen said. particular teacher. He said he "Right now, there's no way to doubts how relevant Pick-a-Profs It's also possible that Pick-aProfs information may influence suppress it," Ivey said. She said information would be. students to change the classes she doesn't know of any faculty - "It sounds like that would be a they plan to take, giving them an member who approves of Pick-a- big hassle for professors too," he incentive to change majors, Prof. said.

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THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

13

• DEBATE: Democrat and Republican club students debate over national issues CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

America and its allies. Marc-Aurele used the opportunity to point out that Bush was exhausting military resources and leaving the U.S. unguarded. Marc-Aurele also accused .Bush and Republicans of not supporting the troops who were at war and fighting to protect Americans. Fleming responded by saying that it was Democratic U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin who, while on the Senate floor, compared the Guantanamo Bay prison guards to Nazis as he read an FBI report that had been leaked. Fleming added that as a United ~tates Air Force veteran he was

outraged that the Democrats would accuse the Republicans of not supporting U.S. troops. Fleming said countless Democrats voted against the Patriot Act, which gave America the necessary tools to intercept and obstruct terrorist acts. Fleming accused Democrats who voted against it of doing so in an effort to protect the civil liberties of the terrorists and disregard those of Americans. The Democrats rebutted by saying that America is at a higher risk of being attacked now than at any point in history. Immigration was a topic that aroused

emotions among many of those present at the debate. The audience got loud as they discussed immigration issues among themselves. The Democrats lashed out at the Republicans by saying Bush has yet to deliver on the reform promises he has made. An audience member stood up in the middle of the debate wanting to ask a direct question regarding immigration, but was told to write it down by the debate moderators. Republicans said that Bush is doing what he can short of taking drastic measures like gathering the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants living in the U.S. and sending them back to Mexico in order to control the immigration issue. Palomar student Ally Wells said she felt the Republicans did a good job expressing their values, and that the Democrats didn't get their

point across. Palomar student Teresa Korrea said the Democrats didn't seem prepared for the Republican comments. "The Democrats compensated for the lack of a sound argument by over talking issues," Korrea said. "I think that Democratic views represent the values of most young, hardworking people," said Cody Campbell, Palomar College Democratic Club president. "I think we did· very well," Campbell said. "I'm glad the clubs were able to put this together," Marc-Aurele said "It was a great experience." Palomar student Lacy Joseph said she was glad these types of events were available to students, but that the cafeteria was the wrong place for it. "I was eating here with friends first and people who came after me began to hush me," Joseph said.

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Services offered Training Information Career Information o Short-term Career & Databases • Eureka Major Search Classes . • Choices o Career Information www.assist.org www.collegesource.org Databases Student eServices • Eureka Internet • Choices · Career Information o Career Library o Look in our Job o Career Research Binders • Blue binderLinks Off-campus jobs o Career Assessments • Palomar College o Career Counseling Human Resources Appointments website www.palomar.edu/HR · 1. Attend a Monthly Workshop hosted by the Career Center. o Employment Links (See links on Career 2. Schedule an appointment to get your resume critiqued. . Center website) 3. Schedule an appointment to o Online Resume see a Career Counselor. Tutorial STUDENTS AND o Resume Templates COMMUNITY MEMBERS o Resume Books (Look ARE WElCOME! in career library)

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THE TELESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

14

= Women's golf to be added, again ~

By John Scafetta

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THE TELESCOPE

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ball coach, Eldridge will return with a superb coaching history under his

After an unsuccessful attempt at creating a women's golf team last spring, Palomar College is back in discussions with TaylorMade- Adidas with expectations that it will go smoother the second time around. Last February, Palomar Athletic Director John Woods announced the birth of the 20th team to be added to the college's roster, only to have talks stall due to unforeseen reasons. "There were some staffing and logistical issues that went into last year, trying to begin women's golf fall of 2006," Woods said. "Those issues have been worked out and we are back into conversation with TaylorMade." The current plan will have the team prepared for competition fall of 2007, joining the Orange Empire Conference, while becoming the first team added since women's cross country in the mid 1990s. In February, Woods initially said lack of money was the major reason for the delay, in addition to the growing cost of officials and transportation. "You're looking at $20,000 to $25,000 (to create a sport), honestly, the money wasn't falling in our direc-

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_ John Woods ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

tion," Woods said last February. "The institution in the last few years has become more business oriented." Woods said he could not go into extensive details on the setback due to contractual issues, but stressed that staffing was a fraction of the problem, along with other sponsors who support Palomar athletics. "A piece of it was in conflict with TaylorMade and their subsidiary companies," Woods said. "We had to work (through) that and I think that's been cleared up." The sponsorship is now set up to only support the women's team, as opposed to the original agreement, which would have also benefited the Palomar men's golf team. The obligation will continue to provide the team with uniforms, golf balls and discounts on TaylorMade products. "Part of the agreement is that they

will work to identifY a home course for our women," Woods said. "We will (still) have access to their training facilities in Carlsbad. They have sent a preliminary proposal to support women's golf and we're going to proceed under those conditions." Last spring, the Athletic Department originally announced Mark Eldridge as the coach of the women's team, and he remains its selection. "Mark Eldridge will be the coach, through approval of my boss, Joe Madrigal - pending approval of the executive administration," Woods said. Woods said that once conversations between TaylorMade-Adidas and himself are complete, then he will sit down with Eldridge and proceed with approval through the administration. After retiring last year as head soft-

FOOTBALL The Comets took a step in the wrong direction Oct. 21, suffering a heartbreaking 41-38 loss at Fullerton in a Mission Conference American Division game. Tyler Lorenzen piled up 404 total yards, completing 22 of 31 passes for 326 yards and three touchdowns, along with a 30-yard touchdown run. Tobias Shanks had four catches for 144 yards, with two touchdown catches of 41 and 95 yards. Despite the healthy offensive output, the Hornets took advantage of Palomar's mistakes, returning an interception for a touchdown and a fumble for a touchdown. In the fourth quarter, Fullerton blocked a Comet punt attempt, which set up a Carlos Reyes' 20yard game winning field goal to SCOn EVAIIIS I THE TELESCOPE grab the victory with six seconds left. Jessica Parts (No. 7) and Sierra Clart (No.l5 } blocked the ball Ocl18 in a 3-1 win over Cuyamaca. Linebacker Mike Bethea, a freshman who missed most of the season team struck back on Oct. 18 after a On Friday, Oct. 20, the Comets after having his appendix removed, two-game losing streak as they defeated Grossmont College three led the Comets defensively with defeated Cuyamaca three games to games to one (30-23, 30-27, 30-22). eight tackles, including a tackle for one (30-19, 27-30, 30-24, 30-21). Jessica Parks led the Palomar a loss. The Comets (3-2) displayed their charge with 14 kills. intense unified team on Wednesday. MEN'S SOCCER "We played much better today," WOMEN'S WATER POLO head coach Karl Seiler said. The Comets secured a Pacific In the Long Beach Tourname·n t, two consecutive losses, the After Coast Conference victory Oct. 20 Paige Stephens racked up 10 goals Comets were due for a change. with a 3-2 win over San Diego Mesa. "We had a new beginning," sopho- as Palomar split four games overall Valentin Diaz scored two goals as Niccole Denke said. "We've got in the tournament. more the Comets moved to 7-7-2 on the Stephens scored three goals in the a lot of talent but we're young. We season. first game Oct. 20, but it wasn't changed it up a lot and have a new Paco Felix added the other enough as the Comets lost 12-7 to tempo." Palomar goal. Setter Sierra Clark had 10 kills Sierra College. Palomar rebounded later in the WOMEN'S VOLLRBALL and 44 assists. Jessica Reed had 14 kills, Jessica Parks had 13, and day to defeat Southwestern. Meaghen Golden and Mandy The Palomar women's volleyball Tiffany Dunn had 11.

WOrts CALENDAR

Men's Soccer Imperial Valley at Palomar -1 p.m. ~ Women's Soccer . . . . MiraCosta at Palomar -3p.m. 1 • Wrestling Palomar at Santa Ana -?p.m.

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• Women's Volleyball San Diego Mesa at Palomar -6p.m.

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• Men's Soccer Palomar at San Diego City- 1 p.m .. • Women's Soccer Imperial Valley at Palomar- 3 p.m. • Women's Volleyball Imperial Valley at Palomar- 5 p.m

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from the 29 years he has devoted to Palomar athletics, he has tallied more than 1,000 career victories and three state championships as the head coach of the softball team. "I.'ve known Mark 30 years and I've watched him," Woods said last February. "He is very successful with female student athletes and he has demonstrated that with the success he has had in softball." Despite the change in sport, Eldridge has made one thing clear. "I don't anticipate it being much different," Eldridge said. "I know how to coach." Eldgridge stressed that Palomar is receiving a deal from TaylorMade that is similar to what 20 other four-year colleges are receiving. With the discussion of the women's team back in place, Palomar will continue to adhere to the requirements of Title IX. The title provides equal opportunities to women throughout community college athletics. "This gives females an opportunity to participate in collegiate sports," Eldridge said last spring. "There are a lot of four-year opportunities to female golfers, its growing nation wide."

Enriquez each garnered four goals for the Comets. Palomar dropped the opening game Oct. 21 to Mt. SAC, as goalie Kiera Kenney had 17 saves, eight steals, and one goal from the cage. Palomar downed Merced College 10-4 later in the day to move to 1114 on the season.

MEN'S WATER POLO Palomar (17 -4, 3-0) slipped past the defending conference champion Grossmont Griffins, 8-6, while clinching at least a tie of the PCC title. Kraig Lofstedt and Sean Moser each tallied three goals for the Comets.

WRESTLING The Comets defeated Mt. SAC 1714, as Glenn Shaw won by major decision, 13-4, over the Mounties' Danielo Garay. Palomar advanced to 6-3 on the season and 2-0 in the South Coast Conference.

WOMEN'S SOCCER A hat trick from Judy Barragan helped the Comets beat San Diego City 8-1 on Oct. 18. C.J. McKensie added two goals and Nathalie Ortiz had two assists. Palomar tied San Diego Mesa 2-2 Oct. 20, as Felicia Velte knocked in two late goals. Judy Barragan and Ashley Weaver each had an assist against Mesa.

COMET PITCHER COMMITS Palomar pitcher Nick Vmcent has given a verbal commitment to pitch for Long Beach State following the 2007 season. Vmcent was 9-2 last season with a 1.51 ERA.

• Football Palomar at MI. SAC- 1 p.m. •Wrestling Cuesta Tournament -All Day


TliE ffLESCOPE • MONDAY, OCT. 30, 2006

15

Co111et captain overco111es obstacles By Shahrazad Encinias THE TELESCOPE

Dante Brooks is the definition of a leader. He has been the team captain and key defender for the Palomar men's soccer team the past two seasons, while being named captain in his first year. "He's a leader on the field and off the field," said Robert Morales, assistant coach for men's soccer team. Teammate and friend of 16 years, Thomas Ortiz, said Brooks is always willing to help everybody out. With being captain, comes pressure, which Brooks is well aware of. "When things go wrong people come to me," Brooks said. "They look to me." At 20 years old, he not only faces the challenge of team captain, but also the issue of racism on the field. "I've always been the only black guy on the team," said Brooks. He stressed that it doesn't bother him one bit, because when teams are losing it's easy to use racial slurs. "Soccer is about the skill not your skin color," Brooks said. "That (racial slurs) is their way of saying I beat them." He uses the opponent's distraction of his race to perform well on the field, and tries to emulate the way Robson de Souza, his favorite soccer player, handles his business on the field. "The best feeling is winning when all odds are against you," Brooks said. His mom gave him that quote and said he has found it most inspiring in helping him through his hardships. He said his mom is a huge part of his life and inspiration, supporting whatever decisions he makes. Brooks said there was a time in his life where he wanted to give up soccer. When he was 15, he was questioning his soccer future, but his mom made him stay. "I really thank her for that," Brooks said.

SCOn EVIIIS I THE TELESCOPE

Soccer was not his first experiment in athletics. He dabbled with playing football and baseball in high school. "I'm not good with hand eye coordination," said Brooks about his baseball experience. After trying other sports Brooks decided he had the speed and talent to excel in soccer. Brooks has played soccer for 16 years. He was born in Hawaii and later moved to Japan, until his family finally settled in Oceanside. He has lived in Southern California for

more than eight years and has played for multiple teams on the west coast, including the Oceanside Breakers and a club team, the San Diego Surf. He graduated from Oceanside High in 2004, where he excelled in football and soccer. In high school Brooks sprained his ankle twice during the same season. He was forced to make a choice of either having surgery to fix the problem or gamble with the risk of giving his ankle a rest and not playing for six months. He decided to sit out for six months and

fully recover, because he did not want to go through surgery, with the risk ofre-injuring his ankle. Soccer has given Brooks the chance to do many things he otherwise might not have had the opportunity to do. Team captain is one thing, but he was also offered scholarships to go to four year colleges directly after high school. He turned those down and decided to stay in Oceanside and attend Palomar College, but still plans on transferring to either San Diego State or Hawaii Pacific University, with hopes of continuing his soccer career.

Coach: Poor officiating forces missed chances physical." In the 37th minute, the center referee pulled the yellow card on Moises Aquino Intensity was at its max Oct. 18, as the after he allegedly kicked the San Diego Palomar men's soccer team suffered City goalkeeper. Bullying from the through poor officiating, along r---------, Knights followed the kick, 1 with a flurry of yellow cards. Knights which was left unnoticed by The Comets (7-7-2) felt the sting COMm 0 the officials. of a mediocre officiating crew as "There was a novice referthey lost to the San Diego ee in center with little experience making bad City College's Knights 2-0. The Knights (9-1-2) had a calls," Jacob Chappell strong offensive advantage said. early in the game, scoring The first half ended within the first five minon a frustrating note, utes, and jumping out to a leaving the Comets 1-0 lead. down 1-0. Following the goal, the Wlto: Palomar versus Imperial Valley "I did warn them center referee made what What: Pacific Coast Conference that sometimes the refhead coach Carlos game eree was going to be a Wilen: 1p.m., Nov.l factor in the game and Hernandez referred to as a series of inconsistent calls. Where: With only four games left in you never want them to After Chris Zamora was the seasons, the Comets wm continue be a factor because you knocked to the ground, the its push toward the top of the Pacific don't want the referee referee failed to bring this Coast Conference. Palomar faces an to decide your game," to the other players' attenIVC team they defeated 2·0 eariy in the Hernandez said. "[The PCC season, as JufiO Ruiz garnered his team] needs to focus on tion or stop the game until Hernandez and several second shutout of the season. what [they're] doing other players alerted the and the game plan and official. I don't think we did a good job of doing that." Jorge Calderon was injured shortly after he collided with another player, Palomar came out much stronger which was also not called or noticed by the after it struggled through the first half referee. Even as Hemandez asked the refas Hernandez urged the players to eree ifhe could conduct substitutions, the "play smart." referee initially said no, but quickly However, in the 65th minute, Palomar allowed the substitution after Hernandez keeper Julio Ruiz was unable to stop the and the players questioned the call. ball that one of the Knights had kicked "I think the referee played a part in straight in his direction, giving the the first half," Hernandez said. "I think Knights a 2-0 advantage. he was not calling the game even. We "Nothing about the other team was were playing pretty clean and he made tough," forward Beau Lawler s~d. "We some calls where we weren't playing that just did not play to our potential. It took By Nicole Henson

THE TELESCOPE

SCOn EVIIIS I THE TELESCOPE

Paco Felix attempts to escape aSan Diego City defender's slide tackle during a 2-0 loss to the Knights Ocl18. our momentum away with the mystery calls [from the referees]." The Comets could not gain momentum, falling to the Knights 2-0 as the clock struck the 90th minute. "At the end of the game, we got three

yellow cards," Hernandez said. "When [the Knights] had only one at the endsomething is wrong. But, they played a good game. I think they took advantage of our mistakes and we were not able to step it up to the next level and score."


THE TELESCOPE •

16

low11 St11te tr11nsfer Tyler lorenzen extelling 111 the eommunity eo/lege level By Eric Bennett and John Scafetta

THE TELESCOPE

Lorenzen said he decided It all runs in the family for Palomar was the right place Palomar quarterback Tyler for him, and it was easy to discover Palomar's football proLorenzen. His grandfather, Donn, was gram through high school an academic, all-conference teammates who were already football player in 1954. His playing at the college. Comet wide receiver Tyler father, Jerry, was a Division-! Fenton grew up playing footfullback from 1979-1982. His ball with Lorenzen in Iowa, as cousin, Lynne, is the all-time they were teammates in both leading scorer in United Pop Warner and high school. States prep basketball history, "He has been my quarterand his sister, Nicole, is a curback since 7th grade and since rent Big-12 volleyball star. day one he has Astounding always been a as it is, one leader of the common trait team and somebrings all these one that the athletes togethrest of the team er-they all looks up to," played at Iowa 144-for-111 for 1,917 Fenton said. S t a t e yards and I7 touchdowns "He is a very University. motivational Tyler, 20, person and all grew up in Iowa he wants to do knowing what is win." he wanted the opportunity 81 aHempts for 551 yards Fenton said the reason he to stand behind and five touchdowns initially came to center and be Palomar was because of another high he was destined to be. 19! plays for 1,479 yards school friend As a fresh- totalint J54 yards per game (Craig Luckett) who enrolled at man, he redthe college shirted at ISU, Source: Palomar Athletic Department because of famibut soon really. ized that conFenton passed the knowltinuing at the university was edge on to his best friend, and not for him. Not yet given the chance to from there, it didn't take long for Lorenzen to make a deciprove himself at the quarterback position, the Cyclone sion. coaching staff wanted to trans"I wanted to do the recruitform him into a wide receiver. ing process all over again," Lorenzen said. "A friend told Yearning to stay at the posime about the program, that tion he loved, Lorenzen knew a they have good recruiting and change would be his only a lot of people come out here. option. So the 6-foot-5 inch mobile So I arr. going to take a chance quarterback, packed his bags, and see where it will lead me." Lorenzen said that with left Iowa State and his homePalomar having a high percenttown behind, and made the age of players transferring to switch to Palomar. "Iowa State was home to me, four-year universities, it was but it was time to move on, the right choice for him. time to do my thing elsetransferring to After where." Lorenzen said. Palomar in January, Lorenzen It would not be hard to find hit the gridiron quickly and a new school to prove himself earned himself the starting quarterback position as well after putting up superb numas a preseason All-American bers at Eddyville-Blakesburg high school in Iowa, where he selection. was named to the all-state Lorenzen said he noticed team. His standout junior seaonly minor differences in the transition from Iowa State son saw him amass nearly 1,500 total yards and 17 total and was pleased with his decitouchdowns. sion of transferring.

BY THE NUMBERS

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"The game is the same, everything is about the same," he said. "We have a wonderful coaching staff. They are young and energetic. It's been really great playing for Coach (Joe) Early." Lorenzen has sparked the Comets' offense and has been the main threat on the offensive side of the ball, not only completing 144 of 211 passes for 1927 yards, but also rushing for 552 yards and accumulating 22 total touchdowns on the season. Lorenzen has also earned the honor of being named the top Pacific Coast Conference athlete for the week for October 15. "It's all about work ethic," Lorenzen said. "We try to have up-tempo practices, we game plan and execute all week long Everyone comes together, that's all there is to it." Lorenzen is doing his best to put Palomar's recent consecutive losing seasons behind him, and approach the season with a positive mindset. "We are taking the season game by game," he said. "Our ultimate goal is make the playoffs, make a bowl game, and win the whole thing. In order to do that you have to take it game by game and focus on the game at hand."

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PALOMAR QUARTERBACK 011 HIS DECfSION TO TRANSFER

PHOTOS BY HUIH COl I THE TELESCOPE

Quarterback Tyler Lorenzen has led the Comets to the No. one scoring offense in the Mission Conference, averaging 40.6 points per game.

The Telescope 60.08  

The Telescope 60.08 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 60 / Issue 08 / Oct. 30, 2006 / the-telescope.com

The Telescope 60.08  

The Telescope 60.08 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 60 / Issue 08 / Oct. 30, 2006 / the-telescope.com

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