Page 1

Group highlights youth gun violence in California

When you gotta go, you gotta go ... Tour the best and the worst of Palomar's restrooms

NEWS PAGE 3

'

' . . . . . . LESC FEATURES PAGE 8

THE

Friday, March 3, 1995

Palomar Community College

San Marcos, CA

Baseball crushes Orange Coast at home 9-2 SPORTS PAGE 16

Volume 48, Number 14

Palomar student wins 1995 Campus Patrol Miss San Marcos Pageant to carry mace "

Steven Zivanic

Jessica Estrin

Stllff Writer

Staff Writer

he City of San Marcos has a new queen. In ceremonies held at the San Marcos Community Center Feb. 11. Palomar College sophomore Julie Rose was crowned Miss San Marcos 1995. Rose, a graduate of San Marcos High School. is currently studying pyschology and hopes to work with abused children in the future. She works part-time in the fitness industry, attends school and volunteers at retirement homes. Rose's responsibilities as Miss San Marcos include representing the City of San Marcos as one of 35 finalists competing for the dual title of 1995 Fairest of the Fair and Miss San Diego County. The Fairest of the Fair will serve as the official hostess at the 1995 Del Mar Fair, which runs from June 15 to July 4. The Fairest of the Fair will also compete as Miss San Diego County at the Miss California USA Pageant. Other Palomar students honored at pageants were Detra Eckman and Casey Arnold. Eckman, a 20-year-old sophomore, was named second runner-up for the title of Miss San Marcos. Arnold, an 18-year-old freshman, was named second runner-up for the title of Miss Poway. The contestants in the Miss Poway pageant also voted her Miss Congeniality.

T

Student Julie Rose (right) was crowned the new Miss San Marcos Feb. 11. last year's winner, Jasmine Jurling , also a Palomar student, presides over the ceremony.

Student Services Dept. undergoing automation

Prompted by "violent and uncontrollable students," the Palomar Campus Patrol has been authorized to use mace as of Feb. 23, according to Campus Patrol Leader Boyd Mahan. The decision to equip patrol officers with mace was made by Mahan who cited an increase in violent activity in the school, especially in the past two years. The College's Safety and Security Council and the President's Advisory Council both approved the idea of patrol officers being equipped with mace, said Mahan. For now, two patrol officers will be authorized to carry mace while on duty. Various incidents in which students became violent toward faculty members triggered the need for mace, Mahan said. One year ago, the Director oflnstructional Operations and Services, Catherine Ott, was confronted by a student who was yelling 'Til kill you, I'll kill you." A patrol officer intervened and diffused the situation, Mahan said. "The patrol officer had to get between Mrs. Ott and the attacker, and shield her with his body, placing himself at risk. If he would have had mace, a sim ple five-second spray in the face would have subdued the attacker until the Sheriffs

Deputies arrived," said Mahan. Ott, who supports the use of mace by Campus Patrol officers, said, "People are confronted at Palomar, and we need to have an effective way to deal with it. Mace should have been in use a whtle ago." Patrol officers will be using mace as a defensive weapon to protect themselves along with the students and faculty of Palomar, not as an offensive weapon, said Mahan. Police officers at Mira Costa College in Oceanside have been using a combination of mace and pepper spray for over five years, and have been quite successful in controlling extreme situations, said Robert Norcroff, Mira Co~ta Campus Police supervisor. "Instead of having to beat them (the attackers), we would just spray them," said Norcroff. Mahan added, "Mace will definitely help us get extreme situations under control. Ifl' m confronted by, or have to deal with a guy that's 6foot-2, and I'm only 5-foot-9, then without mace, I'm pretty much in trouble." Only two patrol officers, Gerard Perez and Eric Verella, will be permitted to carry mace on patrol. Both officers have completed six months of police academy training and have had form~ mace and pepper spray training. Students who are patrol

See MACE, Page 5

Dog bites man . . .

• Department hopes to be able to provide its services to students over the telephone Brian Wallace Managing Editor

Palomar's Student Services Department wants to let you reach out and touch your grades, financial aid status and other Student Services related information via your home telephone. The capacity of Palomar's phone and register (PAR) system will soon be tripled and Student Services would like to use the extra lines to provide automation of many, if not all, of its services. "We have a commitment to make as much information as possible as easy to access as possible," said Dr. David Chappie, assistant superintendent/vice pr:esident of Student Services. "Any information in our computers

that you would ordinarily have to come down to campus and stand in line for, you should be able to access on your own." Right now Student Services has the hardware to allow students to access their financial aid status over the phone, but the system cannot start operati on until some programming work is done by the Information Systems & Services Department. The opportunity to allow students more access to information via the telephone comes thanks to a new interactive voice response system (IVR), part of a campus-wide effort to update Palomar's outdated infrastructure. "Right now we have a very antiquated old system that deals with 161ines," said David

See SERVICES, Page 5

Nicole Demers I The Telescope

Demonstrating the importance of hand and voice signals for controlling canines, Sgt. Chuck Byrne from the Camp Pendleton Marines K-9 unit provided a 45-minute, on-campus presentation to the Criminal Justice Club Feb. 22. The dogs are also trained to identify odors and detect bombs.


Friday, March 3, 1995

The Telescope

2 CAMPUS BEAT

CAMPUS BEAT 6*_ F.Y.INF0~~~ Free bone marrow screening offered

Photo courtesy of Public Information Office

County Supervisor Bill Horn spoke at the dedication ceremony for the recently completed transit center, which went into full operation Feb. 26. Other speakers, from left, included: Dr George Boggs, superintendent/president of Palomar College; U.S. Representative Randy Cunningham, San Marcos City Council Member Betty Evans and Dr. Robert Dougherty, Jr., a member of the colleges Governing Board.

Women's University protests male enrollment DENTON, Texas-After class recently, Dawn Tawwater-King returned to her new on-carnpushousingatTexas Woman's University. She pulled up a chair to joining a circle of friends in her new living roomthe free speech lawn outside the administration and classroom buildings at TWU. Tawwater-King, a graduate student in sociology, and about 40 other students sleeping in 19 tents have made the lawn their new horne, in protest of the TWU Board of Regents' Dec. 9 decision to allow men to enroll in all of the university's undergraduate programs. Previously, men had been allowed only in graduate programs and the School of Health Care Services. At the informal meeting in the heart of "tent city," Tawwater-King went over strat-

egy and upcoming events with a core group of II other members of the newly formed TWU Preservation Society. She cautioned group members about security and hostile outsiders, and suggested that the group recruit a guest speaker and hold a concert with all-female bands to raise awareness for their cause. The university's new policy was adopted to avoid possible legal action from men seeking admittance to the university's general undergraduate programs, said Regent Sheryl Watley who made the motion to amend the admissions policy. Accusations that the board acted outside of their authority and in violation of the Texas Open Records Act led to the Dec. 29 filing of a class action lawsuit against the regents by 37 TWU faculty, students.

"A lot of women profit from being in an environment that allows them to excel in leadership positions," said Bettye Myers, a TWU professor of kinesiology and chief plaintiff in the suit against the regents . "Legislatively, we have the authority to remain exclusatory." Students are concerned that ifTWU admits more men, the focus of the university will be lost, said Erika Whitzke, editor of TWU's student newspaper, "The Lasso." "A lot of people think that since this is a women's university, we hate men, which is ridiculous," Whitzke said. "A major focus of this university is what women have done and what they can do. This is about not losing that."

p A T R 0 L B L 0 T T E R __c_o_rn_pi_led_{l_ro_rn_C_am_p_u_sR_a_rto_L_re_po_r_ts_ Monday, Feb. 27 1:35 p.m.: Petty theft: A student reported his full-face helmet stolen from his motorcycle parked in Lot #2.

Friday, Feb. 24 9:45a.m.: Ill student- A student was transported to the Student Health Services after having a mild seizure during class. 2:35p.m.: Ill student- A student lost her balance, became dizzy and fell to the ground during class. A Health Services nurse was called to the scene. The student was evaluated with no injuries and remained in class.

Wednesday, Feb. 22 5:45 p.m.: Indecent exposure - A student reported to library officials that another student exposed his buttocks to her on the third floor of the library. The victim left before campus patrol officers could question her. The suspect denied involvement and after answering CPO questions was released.

Tuesday, Feb. 21 2:05p.m.: Petty theft (vehicle)- The hood ornament was removed from the trunk of a students Honda. The piece was valued at $50.

2:35p.m.: Impediment of traffic- A vehicle had roll,ed out of its parking space and was blocking the entrance to Lot #5. Campus patrol officials had to gain entry with a slim-jim and push the vehicle out of the flow of traffic. A note of explanation was left for the owner.

Friday, Feb. 17 1:30 p.m.: Students drinking on campus- Campus patrol officers, acting on an anonymo us tip, apprehended two male suspects for drinking beer in the back of Lot #12. The suspects were asked to dump out the remaining beer and their keys were confiscated until later in the day. 1:30 p .m .: Student drinking alcohol - Campus Patrol officers spotted approximately 12 individuals in the back of Lot #9 drinking alcohol ic beverages. One student became aggress ive during questioning and patrol officers determined he was too intoxicated to drive. His keys were confiscated and the student left with a sober friend.

Wednesday, Feb. 15 8:30a.m.: Petty theft- Two flags were reportedly stolen from the flagpole at Lot #I of the Escondido campus. 1 :55 p.m.: Ill Student- A student with a history of strokes and heart trouble was transported to a local hospital after complaining of chest pains.

The San Diego Blood Bank is offering free screening for bone marrow donors on Saturday March II from I 0 a.m to 2 p.m., the screenings will be offered at the Escondido and San Diego donor centers. In light of Biology Professor Lester Knapp's search for matching bone marrow, Palomar officials are encouraging all interested people to take advantage of the free screening. A person can become a bone marrow donor if they are between the ages of 18 and 55, have no history of asthma, cancer, heart or circulatory disease, are willing to be a marrow donor for anyone who needs a transplant and weigh within 20 percent of the ideal weight for their height and age. The North County Donor Center is located at 1340 West Valley Parkway in Escondido and the Main Donor Center is located at 440 Upas Street in San Diego. For more information please contact the San Diego Blood Bank's Bone Marrow Donor Center at 2966393, Ext. 268.

-Kelley Brewer

SHS plans to help smokers kick habit Want to quit smoking? Kaiser representative Janet Holzwarth will be coming to the Palomar campus to answer your questions on how to quit and what spec ifics options are available. She will be in room E-7 from 12-1 p.m. March 7. For reservations call Student Health Services at Ext. 2380.Total cholesterol screening is also being offered by SHS throughout the month. The fee for students is $15 and for staff $25. It is important that not to eat or drink any thing for 8 to I 0 hours before blood is drawn. However, it's acceptable to drink water. No appointment is needed.

-Jasmine fttrling

EOP&S Club will have first meeting The Extended Opportunity Programs & Services Club will hold its first meeting at 2 p.m. on March I 0 in TCB-3. The club is designed to provide a support system for students with the primary focus on counseling and helping students get through the system. The club will meet two times weekly on Tuesday and Friday afternoons to develop scholarship opportunities, plan social events and organize fund raisers. For more information contact EOP&S Director P.J. DeMaris at Ext. 2236.

-Kelley Brewer

Poets sought for national contest The National Library of Poetry has announced that $24,000 in prizes will be awarded this year to over 250 poets in the North American Open Poetry Contest. The deadline for the contest is March 31 . The contest is open to everyone and entry is free. Any poet, whether previously published or not, can be ¡a winner. Every poem entered has a chance to be published in a deluxe, hardbound anthology. To enter, send one original poem, any subject and any style, to the National Library of Poetry, 11419 Cronridge Drive, P.O. Box 704-1973, Owings Mjlls, Maryland 21117. The poem should be no more than 20 lines, and the poet's name and address should appear on the top of the page. Entries must be postmarked by March 31. A new contest opens April I.

-Barbra Dijak


The Telescope

Friday. March 3. 1995

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NEWS 3

munity could regu1ate handguns according to values and practices in that particular town. Currently;California state law preempts, or overrules, local legislation. In the poll conducted by the Wellness Foundation, 73 percent favored Home Rule. Congresswoman Maxine Waters said that since handgun control affects different communities in different ways, it should be left up to the community to control handguns. "(City Council members) have the responsibility for the infrastructure, for the traffic flow, for the water, on and on and on," she said. "Certainly they should not be prohibited when they want to take guns out of their cities. It's about time for Sacramento to get out of the way and let that happen." In 1993 , Caldera and Senator Tom Hayden introduced a Home Rule bill. The bill was defeated in the Assembly and the Senate Judiciary Committee.

In a poll conducted by the California Well ness Foundation in January, 63 percent of the state's voters said that they are concerned about Penalties for the rising number of violent acts Concealed among California youths. Handguns Robert Dillard, a member of the Real Alternatives Program (RAP), The California Penal Code makes it a misdemeanor crime an anti-violence support group in for a person to carry upon one's Los Angeles, sees the effects of person or within any vehicle any youth violence every day. He said pistol, revolver or firearm capable that the young people he works with of being concealed. think handgun violence is ineviThe carrying of generally less table. "You wake up expecting to fatal weapons, such as certain see the sun rise; you wake expecting types of knives, throwing stars to hear a gunshot," he said. and metal knuckles, is punishDillard was a featured speaker at able as a felony crime. a statewide videoconference titled Daniel Kwan I The Telescope "First Aid for What's Killing Our Kids-A Prescription for Preven- communities to construct their own tion," which was broadcast to 18 handgun laws, and other forms of California cities, including handgun control. Escondido, Feb. 22. The Wellness Foundation supThe goal of the videoconference ports four policies involving handwas to educate concerned citizens gun violence that they believe are of about laws being passed in the na- particular importance to voters: the Concealed Handguns tional and state legislatures con- banning of Saturday Night Specials, Currently, in California it is a cerning handgun control, said Dana Home Rule for handgun regulation, misdemeanor to carry a concealed Stevens, coordinator for the penalties for concealed handguns firearm . Carrying concealed knives, Escondido site. and the regulation of handguns as a throwing stars or brass knuckles is a The videoconference gave sta- consumer product. felony offense. In the poll, 78 pertistics proving that handgun viocent of the participants thought carlence is a legitimate problem. Acrying a concealed firearm should be Saturday Night Specials cording to the California DepartA Saturday Night Special is a a felony. In 1993, three bills in the ment of Justice, in California in handgun with a barrel less than four Assembly and one in the Senate 1992,603 young people were killed inches long, which makes it easily dealt with raising with the penalty by handguns. The medical costs for concealable. These guns are made for carrying a concealed firearm; taxpayers for teenagers injured by from inferior plastics and metals, so none of them were passed. firearms was estimated to be ap- they are not suitable as a weapon of Chief Arturo Venegas, Jr. of the proximately $176.8 million. self defense or for hunting purposes. Sacramento Police Department said Reverend Romie Lilly, director According to American Rifle- if there was a stricter penalty for of Not Even One, an anti-violence man, a publication of the NRA, Sat- carrying a concealed firearm, less group which is part of the Carter urday Night Specials are "miser- people would break the law. "When Center Interfaith Health Program, , ably-made, potentially defective drunk drivers were held accountsaid that violence is a huge problem arms that contribute so much to able when they broke the law, less in Los Angeles . Between Jan. 16 rising violence." people drove drunk," he said. and Feb . 8, 17 young people in Massachusetts, which has a tough In 1968 Congress banned SaturCalifornia were killed by handguns. day Night Specials from being im- penalty f<(.r carrying a concealed Secretary of Health and Human ported into the United States, but firearm, now has a lower rate of Services Donna Shalala said that domestic manufacture of the weap- firearm assaults and robberies. Other gun violence is a public health epi- ons was not halted . states, which have less stringent laws demic. She called for more concerning carrying conregulations on handguns, cealed weapons, such as "You need a license to drive and bottles using the story of a 10Oregon, have higher inyear-old boy who shot say 'Keep out of reach of children.' Where cidences of gun violence. himself with his father's gun in fron of his school was the safety warning on the gun that Regulation of Handguns as a Consumer Product as an example of why snatched the life of that young boy?" Consumer products more regulations are - Donna Shalala needed. Secretary of Health and Human Services such as teddy bears and toasters are regulated by "You need a license to the Consumer Product drive and bottles say 'Keep out of reach of children.' "The irony is inescapable-by Safety Commission (CPSC), but Where was the safety warning on banning the importation of these there is no federal agency that reguthe gun that snatched the life of that handguns, Congress created a cozy lates the manufacture and sale of young boy?" she said. refuge for domestic manufacture of firearms. Eighty-five percent of people Escondido Mayor Pro- Tern these guns," saidDr.Nancy Snydennan, Elmer Cameron said he didn't think "Good Morning America's" Medi- polled wanted regulation of handthat a lot oflocal people would exert cal Correspondent and mediator of guns as a consumer product. The Well ness Foundation suggested that pressure on their legislators, but a the videoconference. few might. In a poll conducted by the the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and "Two or three or four people will Well ness Foundation, 78 percent of Firearms (BATF) regulate firearms. say, 'That's important enough and those polled said they thought that The regulations would include inI'm going to work with some Saturday Night Specials should be specting manufacturers, monitoring people.' And that's sometimes what banned. State Assemblyman Louis the sale of handguns and imposing it takes, just two or three people," Caldera said he was planning to safety regulations. George Rodriguez, a special Cameron said. introduce legislation to allow the Speakers on the videoconference attorney general to determine which agent with theBA TF, said, "There's no reason why we can't save lives urged the participants to start grass- guns should be banned. by regulating handguns as a conroots movements against the Nasumer product." tional Rifle Association, which has Home Rule for Handgun The Foundation is planning to hold Regulation consistently opposed the Home Rule Under Home Rule, each com- more regional meetings June 2. bills, which would allow individual


The Telescope

4 NEWS

Friday, March 3, 1995

Campus clubs protest lack of funding control

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• Current methods for obtaining money involve too much red tape and take too long, clubs say today's current monetary problem, said Desuse. ICC representatives are calling for a reinstatement of the petty cash arrangement. According to Fiscal Services Director Lois Meyer, about I 0 years ago one club misused school funds and in consequence the petty cash fund was eliminated, and the disbursement of money to clubs became more strict. The club purchased beer and then unsuccessfully attempted to get reimbursed for their purchase by the school, said Meyer. "We shouldn't be punished for what some other club did a long time ago. We earn cash money at a club event, hand it to the school, but when we need the need the money again, we're handed a piece of paper which we have to wait almost a month for, " Crawford said. "If I give Palomar cash, I expect cash back, not a purchase agreement," she added. Bowen said perhaps they could have a quicker money disbursement · program, which eliminates the week necessary to even get a club request for money on the ICC agenda. Palomar should simplify the process, he said. ''I'm here to help the students, not hinder them," added Bowen. The clubs have also formed a Financial Stability Committee where the main focus will be trying to work with the school and solve the money disbursement problem, said Jenkins. In past weeks, clubs have mentioned everything from assembling a strike against the school, to each club donating money towards the purchase of an investigative lawyer, in hopes of resolving the problem. Desuse added, "We should take this to the extreme. My club and I are prepared to strike, or do whatever is necessary, even to the point where the school might try to disassemble my club." Jenkins hopes that the newly formed committee will come to some type of an agreement with the school, ending all clubs anticipation of a strike.

Steven Zivanic Swf!Writer

Various school clubs at Palomar protested at the Feb. 7 Inter-Club Council meeting against what they refer to as an unfairly slow response time with regard to the funding of club activities by the school. Current disbursement methods for available club funds can take up to three weeks on average, according to ICC Chairperson Robert Jenkins. If a club doesn't have any money at the time of an event, then they ' ll have to decline participation, Jenkins said. There are currently two methods of paying for items which the clubs must adhere to. Clubs can either seek to obtain a purchase order, in which they must find a business that will first accept a purchase order·, and then complete a nine-step process before receiving any funding directly from the school. Or clubs can use their own money and complete a five-step requisition process, and then be reimbursed by the school, according to an ICC Leader Guide. The ICC allocates each club $125 per semester toward club activities. Clubs who require more than $125 for specific events can request additional funding. But club members argue that they cannot afford to wait three weeks, and sometimes even longer, as the prolonged bureaucratic process will slow down their progress and club enthusiasm, said Julia Crawford, president of the Sisters Informing Sisters Together Exploring Resource Services (SISTERS) club. "We should be able to get the mc11ey right away, just show areceipt of what we used it for," said Cecilio Imhotep Desuse, president of Pan Afrikan Student Movement. In response to the school's monetary distribution system, clubs are considering some countermeasures to remedy their current situation. One proposal is to put club-earned money in an account outside of school, in a local bank. Jim Bowen, director of Student Activities, said, "It is illegal for a club to have an account off campus,

"We should take this to the extreme. My club and I are prepared to strike, or do whatever is necessary, even to the point where the school might try to disassemble the club. " - Cecilio lmhotep Desuse President, Pan Afrikan Student Movement and if the school finds out, which we usually do, then the club is dismissed from Palomar." Jenkins had a favorable response to the bank account plan, saying, "If everybody just stopped putting money in their school account and started putting money in a bank account, then they (Palomar College) can say it's illegal all they want to," he said. "If you have to go through all the ropes to get your money, then why not put it in your own bank account and set up your own system?" The reason Palomar considers any accounts out of school to be illegal is because students are under the "Palomar College Umbrella," said Jenkins. An example could be where school clubs are referred to as the "Palomar Photography Club," and then subject to Palomar regulations. If a school club was called the "North County Scooter Society," then they are not officially recognized by Palomar and do not fall under any school rules whatsoever, said Jenkins. A benefit of being recognized as an official school club is that during fundraisers and other such events, clubs directly associated with the school tend to receive more money and publicity than those that are not, according to Jenkins. Clubs are also seeking to revive a petty-cash fund, which existed previously, according to Jenkins. The fund, which granted students money within a week, was deemed more appropriate in contrast to

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Friday. March 3. 1995

The Telescope

NEWS 5

MACE: Carried by Campus Patrol Continued from Page 1 officers will not be carrying mace. Mahan attributes the increasing rate of violence at Palomar in part due to the expansion and growing population of San Marcos. Nine years ago Palomar had less crimerelated problems, but there were also 50 percent less people living in San Marcos, according to Mahan.

Now, the population has more than doubled, with a lot more people attending Palomar, and when all of those people are enclosed in a single institution, there is a tendency to have problems, Mahan said. "It really is depressing to see the rate of violence at Palomar go up, but we have to deal with it, and mace is definitely a good start," added Mahan.

SERVICES: Available by phone Continued from Page 1 Delacalzada, director of Information Systems & Services. "What that means is that there can only be 16 calls that can be processed at any one given time. We've just gone through and purchased a new IVR platform which will allow us to expand that capabi I ity to 48 I ines, and that's going to be up and running by the next registration." According to Delacalzada, what they hope to do is automate other areas on campus. "As opposed to you getting a person, suppose you wanted to do something at Student Services that required someone to key in on the system. What we can do is port those things over onto the new IVR system so you can do it over the phone as opposed to you having to

get in line," said Delacalzada. But before any services are made available via the new phone system, Delacalzada said that students and the Student Services Dept. will be polled in order to find out what services will work out best with the new phone-in methods. "They're going to starttalking to the students to see which services will be practical for them," he said. "If the students agree, then what we will do is put it in a beta test, which means we'll put it on the system and actually have students and Student Services personnel check out the system, and, hopefully, we' II be able to automate a number of the manual things that they're doing today." It is not certain how many services wi II be automated or how soon; that will be decided on the basis of funding and testing results.

ASG revives their monthly newsletter Jeff Vize Staff Writer

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Bridging what some student government officers call a two year information gap with the students, the Associated Student Government voted March I to rekindle publication of a monthly ASG newsletter. The newsletter, which was last distributed during the spring semester of 1993, had been shelved indefinitely due to lack of participation from the government's members. The legislation approved on Wednesday now requires monthly submissions for the newsletter from each ASG member. "I think it will bridge the information gap between the students at large and the ASG. If we put this newsletter out, the students will have a better understanding of what it is we do," ASG PresidentMerri II Tyler said. Approximately $150 has been allocated in the ASG budget to print an undetermined amount of issues. Distribution will likely occur in classrooms and campus offices, in addition to "traffic spots," according to Tyler, who said that it would be similar to the pattern used previously. Publication is tentatively scheduled to begin in April, with subsequent issues coming each month during the school year. Despite the positive attitude from much of the board, there was some question over the effectiveness and legitimacy of a loose, single-sheet newsletter being distributed campus-wide. "I wanted to see it in The Telescope so that it wouldn't be somethingjust floating around," said the Carla Mays, Vice President of Social Affairs. "I don't think anyone is going to read this if we just put it out."

She also questioned the cost-effectiveness of the newsletter, saying the ASG should work more closely with The Telescope and provide the newspaper with more story leads since the newspaper is more accessible and frequently read than a flyer-type newsletter. Mays added that it may be difficult creating public awareness about the newsletter since most of the student population is not aware of the newsletter's previous existence. Mays, whose Programming and Publicity ~ommittee is in charge of the newsletter's publication, introduced the idea for inclusion in The Telescope, but the proposal was voted down by the ASG because of potential space and conflicting interest factors. In the past, it was apathy on the part of the ASG that stopped the newsletter from being published, according to Vice President of State Affairs Matthew McNamara. "[In Fall 1993] the committee in charge of it told everyone to turn in an article ... and they ended up quitting [when no one turned in any submissions]," said McNamara. With the new bylaw in place that requires a monthly submission from each member, McNamara said he hopes to see the ASG's apathy replaced by student interest. Executive Vice-President Antonio Muiioz, the author of the legislative resolution, said, "Before I was involved in any activities, I used to read those newsletters and I certainly began getting interested in student government by reading them. "I enjoyed them because they told me what was happening on campus through the eyes of the ASG ... and between it and The Telescope, you get a pretty good idea of what's going on," he said.


6 NEWS

The Telescope

Friday. March 3, I995

Program searching out future minority teachers Chad Rebmann Staff Writer

By recruiting minority students to the teaching field, a Palomarbased program is trying to counter projections for a shortage of teachers by the year 2000. The Future Teacher Diversity Corps (FTDC), a student outreach program, was born five years ago when San Diego schools, including Palomar and the then newly opened Cal State San Marcos, met to address the possible shortfall of teachers by the end of the century. One of the ideas to alleviate that shortage was to recruit students at the college level, said counselor Dan Franco, who along with counselor Frank Puchi, coordinates the program at Palomar. "Teachers come from students," saidPuchi. "Whydon'twegetthose students now when they're graduating out of high school?" So far in its first four years, the FTDC has successfully assisted approximately 60 Palomar students in transferring to upper division university programs. Future projections show that, on the average, 24 FTDC students from Palomar will transfer to CSUSM each year in the next five years. Puchi began the corps project in 1990 with no funds from Palomar. However, CSUSM gave the program an incentive. Since they had just opened and didn't have theresources to recruit, they looked to Puchi's corps program. In return, FTDC students would be guaranteed admission into CSUSM when they finish their program at Palomar. "They left it up to me to design a mechanism that could get students to enroll and get into the program," Puchi said.

Since then the Diversity Corps has grown too fast , and without funding, the corps had to look to outside sources to pay for the program and to aid students, according to Puchi. One solution was to develop a community service program that would enable students to give something to the community, in return the community could help the students.

"Gang Prevention Program." The program consists of a sixweek classroom curriculum on gang prevention, bringing-in some of the FTDC students who were former gang members and utilizing them as college student mentors to English as a Second Language students in grades six to eight. The gang prevention program was so successful that Grant Middle School and Palomar were recog-

"We're really proud of [the college mentors program] because it gives students who are going to be future teachers an opportunity to see the system. " - Counselor Frank Puchi FTDC Coordinator at Palomar College Mentors Thus, the Mentors program was born. Students are assigned as "college mentors" to local elementary, middle school or high school students. FTDC members are required to volunteer 20 hours per year to a community organization or school. The Mentors program has been successful, mentoring 6,600 students and giving over $33,000 to the schools since 1992. "We're really proud of this because it gives students who are going to be future teachers an opportunity to see the system, because they're working with the teacher and observing," Puchi said. Gang Prevention A second program was developed when some schools came to the FTDC with special needs and asked to develop a program for them. One such school was Grant Middle School whohadagangproblem, so the FTDC developed a

nized last year as the most promising program in San Diego County. Another service the FTDC offers is an alcohol and drug prevention program and a Youth Diversion Program. All the community services have paid off. The San Marcos Community Foundation has granted the FTDC $5,000 dollars to these programs for San Marcos Junior High and San Marcos High Schools, in addition to providing 20 book scholarships. Geared toward underprivileged students, the Corps' requirements include completing 56 lower division CSU transferable units, with at least 12 of those units with a minimum GPA of2.4; completing your upper division units atCSUSM; and completing a teacher credential year at the office of education at CSUSM. For more information about the Future Teacher Diversity Corps, one should contact Puchi or Franco in at the Counseling Office, Ext. 2179.

ASG traveling to Washington for conference and lobbying Jeff Vize Staff Writer

In an attempt to strengthen the federal lobbying effort of Palomar College, eight members of the Associated Student Government will take part in a legislative conference being held in Washington, D.C. March 3-7. According to ASG President Merrill Tyler, the American Student Association of Community Colleges (ASACC) National Leg-

islative Conference is designed to provide student governments with the opportunity to meet and discuss legislative issues with representatives from over I 00 schools nationwide. In addition, the trip allows the ASG to lobby other interests to federal representatives. "I'll be going to Speaker Gingrich's office and Speaker Dole's office and to talk with their staff and let them know our legislative positions," Tyler said. The trip, which is costing the

student body nearly $15,000 for travel expenses, hotel accomadations and conference registration, makes Palomar one of only four schools from California to attend the conference. Tyler, who believes that most students don't realize the importanceoflobbying at the federal level, said there are many issues that will be addressed in Washington by the ASG. The largest right now being the potential cutbacks scheduled for educational federal aid programs.

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The Telescope

8 FEATURE

FE~

A romp • • Steve Troop Staff Cartoonist

Kate Nelson News Editor

Restrooms are a necessity people think about only in times of urgency. But it's a function that ties everyone together. Whether you're man, woman or child, let's face it, you need a place for the elimination of bodily waste. While restrooms are plentiful on campus, some are tucked behind buildings. Students usually find them by accident because there isn't a school-produced map showing where restrooms are located. The Telescope hopes this article comes in handy the next time nature calls and you don't know where to answer it. In addition to descriptions of 35 student restrooms, this article includes a map showing the location of all student restrooms on campus (or as many as we could find). The faculty restrooms were not reviewed.

are three restrooms here (faculty men, faculty women and student women), there is nota student men's restroom. Men:N/A Women: The B Building doesn't have any graffiti, but since there are only two banks of fluorescent lights, one over the sinks and one near the door, if there was graffiti, you couldn't see it anyway. D Building

Location is a key factor to the importance of these recently-remodeled restrooms. Servicing the A, C and D Buildings, these restrooms keep up with modern conveniences. Men: The D Building's men's room was out of order and unavailable for critique. Women: The entry way to the restroom in the D Building is not very well lit. One of the sinks vibrates the wall when turned on. The floor has a kind of psuedo-Mexican tile, and is scuffed. If the door to the handicapped stall was any bigger it would need an automatic opener.

A Building

The Dome

The restrooms in the A Building are the only restrooms on campus that aren't handicapped accessible. Men: This restroom was brought to you by the letter "A" and the number "two." The A Building has two stalls, two wall-to-floor style urinals, two sinks (one push-button style, one lever style), two soap dispensers, two mirrors and two towel dispensers. Women: The A Building's entrance is crowded: when you go through the door, you run right into a wall. Its only redeeming characteristic is that there are working locks on all three stalls.

Located in the lobby to the Dome, these restrooms have seen many renovations over the years. Some good, some bad. Men: The Dome's restrooms feature the tried-and-true cream and white paint scheme. Exposed pipes overhead highlight a renovated sprinkler system and inconsistent lighting makes for a dark entry way. Highlights include: Two stalls, five urinals (old wall-to-floor style), four sinks, two towel dispensers and one soap dispenser. Of particular note is the first stall. The white toilet has a brown seat: the only brown seat in any men's bathroom on campus. Women: The Dome's women's restroom looked very clean, as though it had been freshly painted. It was also well-lit, with the exception of the entry way, which was lit worse than most caves. There are three regular stalls and one handicapped stall with working locks.

A.A. Building

The last time these restrooms were remodeled, "the Brady Bunch" was a top-1 0 show. These restrooms, located on the second floor of the A.A. building showcase brightly colored Formica and a horrible stench of all their own. Men: The A.A. Building's outstanding features include its blue and yellow color scheme and a smell similar to a septic system backing up. Other features include: a sink with hot and cold running water, one towel dispenser, two high wallmounted urinals and two stalls. If you're a Chargers fan, then this is the restroom for you: Blue stalls, yellow Formica and it stinks. Women: Upon entering the restrooms in the A.A. Building, one is slapped across the face by the bright orange stalls. There is a lock on the inside of the external door of this restroom, but I don't know why anyone would want to spend any more time in there than necessary. On your way out, check out the fake marble countertop around the sink. 8 Building

Although a "neat-o" graphic on the B Building shows both a men's restroom and a women's restroom, this is not the case. Although there

very clearly marked. Men: The E Building features three large mirrors, five sinks, two soap dispensers, one paper towel dispenser, two urinals (one lower for children) and five stalls (with working locks). The P Building boasts two sinks, two wall-mounted urinals (one lower for children), two stalls (one regular, one handicapped) and features both spotlights and fluorescent lighting. The Wellness/Fitness Center takes this new style of Palomar restroom to a whole new plateau. I've seen fancy hotel washrooms less impressive than this. It features hot and cold running water, a shower, a locker room, three sinks (with handles, not time-release push buttons), two stalls with heavyduty locks and two urinals. Women: The large E ~uilding is an appropriate size for the high-traffic area in which it is located. It has eight stalls, all with working locks . One stall is equipped for handicapped use. Above the five sinks is a large mirror. The P Building has two sinks in good working order and three stalls (one handicapped and two regular) with working locks. This bathroom is impressive, because it is very clean and free of scratches and graffiti. The Wellness/Fitness Center bathroom is truly a thing of beauty. Not only does it have four stalls (one handicapped), it also has a doublewidth, full-length mirror. This bathroom also has hot and cold water (unlike most of the other bathrooms.) The locker room and shower portion of the facility is separate from the stalls and sinks.

people know about them, so no one take prisoners. The graffit cares how they look, or if people just over the soap dispenser h a s 7 L choose to ignore them ... been neatly, although Men: Features of the ES!LS obviously painted / Building restrooms are a heavy hard- over. core door, one weak sink, one high wall-mounted urinal, one small, low mirror (scratched) and one stall. Although the restroom appears to be handicap-accessible, the prisonlike door is so heavy, I doubt that a wheelchair-bound student could get it open, let alone navigate through it. Another quirk that distinguishes this restroom from the rest is the fact that the toilet seat cover dispenser (pull up, then down) was obviously ripped loose at one time, and reinstalled about four inches lower on the wall. This is made even more () evident because the usual cream~----.•r-color paint is everywhere except u~~rct;;-,t=..=:=========t__;;:.~ where the dispenser once was attached .. Here, the paint is still brown . Women: In the restroom behind the ES and LS Buildings, the handicapped stall has to be forced shut in order to use it. Then , to escape from the cell, er stall, the user has to pound on the door. Fortunately, the other standard stall doesn't

l

B

Behind the ES and LS Buildings

These restrooms are probably the most obscure restrooms on campus, and this fact is very evident. Wedon'tknow if it's that so few

E Building, P Building and Wellness/Fitness Center

These three bathrooms were part of Palomar's reconstruction that started in Summer '94, and it shows. These are the first campus restrooms designed for the needs of wheelchair-bound students. TheE Building and P Building feature pushbutton locks for easier access. The Wellness/Fitness center doesn't have outside doors. The designers used a gray tile and black sheet metal motif on all three restrooms, breaking away from bathrooms of the past. Note the dramatic lighting. The spotlights reminded us of the transporters from "Star Trek." The only complaint we had was that the men's and women's bathrooms in the Wellness/Fitness Center were not

Scoring: Out of four roll s 1 roll

7'

/

1/2 roll Map graphic courtesy of Palomar Graphic Communications. Restroom graphics by Steve Troop and Greg Skinner


March 3, 1995

FEATURE 9

TURE F Building

These restrooms have seen a lot of renovations over the years, and it shows. They're screaming out for a remodel job. Both restrooms have weird floorplans and areas of the floor that have rotted way over the years. Like in the B Building, these restrooms are painted in the standard Palomar cream color and use sheet metal to the fullest. Men: The F Building's vital statistics include: two sinks, one urinal (old wall-to-floor model,) two stalls and flickering fluorescent lights. Women: The F Building's good point was that it's clean. There are three stalls (no lock on the handicapped stall.) Also, the first sink creates an earthquake effect, shaking the wall when it is turned on. The Howard Brubeck Theatre

These restrooms need to be kept up, because they serve people other than Palomar students (e.g. theater patrons .) All in all, the theater's restrooms are excellent. Men: Aside from the rather antiquated brown/beige color scheme and lack of hot running water, the Howard Brubeck Theatre features three sinks, two towel dispensers, a large mirror, three soap dispensers (two epoxied to the mirrors), three wall-mounted urinals (two standard, one lowered) and three stalls (one handicapped, two standard). Women: The entrance from the lobby of the Howard Brubeck Theatre into the restroom is very dark (You could probably develop film in there), and could be dangerous for people with bad eyesight. One of the sinks recreates the effect from the restroom in the D and F Buildings, shaking the wall and making you think the Big One has finally arrived. The Library

B.aseball Field

MISSlON ROAD

The Library features three restrooms for both sexes (six in all), one to each floor. While the floor plan of each is the same, there are several minor differences. The basic floor plan for the library opens with an airlock (our term for one door, a small hallway and then another door), two mirrors, two sinks, one soap dispenser, one towel dispenser and two hooks in the main lavatory area. Men: First floor quirks: Neither of the stalls' doors lock on the first floor and the first stall has a lot of diverse and stirring graffiti in it. Second floor quirks: Less graffiti overall and this restroom is conveniently located across from Palomar Superintendent/President Dr. George Boggs' office. Third floor quirks: The light flickers in the airlock and the hook

on the door in the handicapped stall has been torn loose and lost. Women: First floor quirks: The handicapped stall has an attractive floor-to-ceiling window which is covered over with black paint. Second floor quirks: The cold water faucet makes a horrendous noise when turned on. Third floor quirks: This restroom is very much the same as the first two floors, except the view out of the window in the airlock is spectacular from the third floor. N0-1

While most people aren't particularly impressed with NO-I restrooms, they deserve praise because they're the only restrooms on the north end of campus. While many of its facilities are in need of servicing, it's amazing that they're in as good a condition as they are, considering the amount of students who use them. The decor of these lavatories deserves special mention. Instead of using the Palomar standard (tile work and blue-grey sheet metal stalls), NOI features wooden shelves and stalls made from some sort of prefab textured material. While this may be aesthetically pleasing, these stalls do not have hooks for hanging coats on while using the facilities. Men: N0-1 features three mirrors (scratched), a shelf, two soap dispensers, one towel dispenser, three sinks (with push button faucets), three wall-hanging urinals and two stalls (one regular, one handicapped). While the regular stall's lock works fine, the handicapped stall's door has sagged with age, causing the lock to become useless. Women: NO-l's women's facilities are decent, aside from the fact that of four stalls, only one of them, the handicapped stall, has a working lock. This bathroom also features a full length mirror and a nifty wooden shelf above the sinks. S Building The S Building is the epitome of "the bathrooms that time forgot." They look like maintenance hasn't set foot in them since the mid-1960s. Men: The S Building features one low mirror, six sinks with the annoying "push-and-hold" style faucets, two towel dispensers, three stalls, four urinals (wall to floor style) and the customary cream walls. While I don't recommend using theS Building's bathrooms on a regular basis, check them out of archaeological curiosity. The first stall has no hook to hang your coat on. The second has no lock. The third stall has no door. 'Nuff said. Women: Just about the only positive thing about the S Building restroom is it is one of the few restrooms on campus that has windows: one above the door and one high above the sinks. The four mirrors lined up in a row have a big key scratch across the center, like someone failed a test or crashed their car and took out their aggression on the mirrors with a key. Student Services Center

These restrooms are in probably the most convenient place on campus: next to the Counseling Center, the long lines of the information windows, across from the PIC Informa-

tion booth and, best of al l, indoors. Men: The Student Services restroom has two sinks (one lower), two mirrors (one slanted at an 80 degree angle), one soap dispenser, two urinals and two stalls (one handicapped). While the slanted mirror and lowered sink were probably altered to make them more accessible for wheelchair-bound students, the single soap dispenser is too high for anyone in a wheelchair to use. This was one of The Telescope staffs favorite restrooms (if there can be such a thing). With all its quirks, its light blue and white color scheme reminds us of a shirt a certain staff cartoonist likes to wear. Women: My entrance to the restroom in the Student Services building was a guarded one, heeding the Plexiglas signs on the doors that say "Open With Caution." This is understandable; if someone opened the door with too much force, she would clock the person using the paper towel dispenser. Other than that, the four stalls, two sinks and two mirrors aren't that bad. The Student Union

While the Student Union's restrooms see more traffic than any other bathrooms on campus, the only reflection of this fact is that they have double doors. Both the men's and the women's restrooms are regarded by many as the hind end of Palomar's restrooms. While dirtier than other campus restrooms, this is understandable due to the large amount of traffic that goes through them on a daily basis. The Student Union's restrooms are in dire need of an overhaul. Like the platypus, they look like they were designed by a committee. Stalls are inconveniently arranged and feature several makeshift renovations that were made over an extended period of time. Men: The Student Union features two sinks as you go in, six urinals, three stalls, four more sinks, two mirrors (scratched) and two more stalls behind a small retaining wall. Also scattered around the lavatory are five towel dispensers and three soap dispensers. The first stall closest to the door (behind the retaining wall) has a broken lock. The same is true for the handicapped stall. Decorated primarily in the svelte cream color so popular in the restrooms we reviewed, students should keep their eyes open for the occasional beige panel signaling a recent repair. If it's good enough for a used car, why not a restroom? Women: The¡ Student Union restroom features an ad hoc design of aqua tile, white tile, and white brick on the walls, and the same confusing layout found in the men's restroom. The main section consists of eight stalls and four sinks . There are another two sinks as you walk in the door, along with a soap dispenser. The best thing that can be said about this restroom is that it is located in the center of campus. While some may think this comprehensive guide to Palomar's bathrooms might be a bit obsessive, we hope it will aid students in choosing restrooms¡on campus. There is a differe nce, believe it or not.


10 OPINION

The Telescope

Friday. March 3. 1995

OPINION Thinking heads or talking heads? â&#x20AC;˘ They uphold the First Amendment

â&#x20AC;˘ Ratings points drive the dialogue Francis T. Crowley

Brian Wallace

Swf!Writer

Managing Eduor

Kelley Brewer We live in a society that values freedom of speech, and in this current age of information we should be grateful that we possess radio talk shows as one way for the common man to get up and speak his mind to audiences that span the entire nation. Talk shows, whether they be local or nationally syndicated, are unique in their ability to broadcast the common person's views to a large audience. Anyone with a telephone can call up a talk show and voice their opinion. There are no restrictions of wealth, social status, gender, ethnicity or other limiting factors. On the radio, you are just a voice and it is only your thoughts and ideas that matter. Other forms of mass media may be able to accommodate this task to an extent, but in a much more limited means. Newspapers and magazines have letters to the editor and television news broadcasts read editorial rebuttals on the air, but neither of these have the potential to serve so many people while reaching so large an audience. Some would say that people who call these radio talk shows and voice their opinions do not represent the average person and that only the highly motivated actually call in and go on the air. While there is some truth to that statement, the argument is off-base. Both sides of any debate are going to have people who feel strongly for their side of the argument, and both sides, in this case, have an equal opportunity to voice their opinions. Plus, it gives the common man a witness stand upon which he can plead his case to a jury that could number in the millions. Of course, radio talk shows are not always out to do some sort of civic duty. There are shows created to titillate, disgust and cause controversy. But, as with anything, the bad must be taken with the good. Thanks to our freedom of speech people will occasionally hear things they disagree with. Well, when you hear them on a radio talk show, you can call up and give your opposing viewpoint. So, even though the views expressed are not a 100 percent accurate scientific survey of what America feels on the issues, it is an important way to cut through all the hype spewed forth by the mass media and the political spin doctors. It is on-air democracy, where anyone can make their point.

THE

TELESCOPE Volume 48, Nu,nlur 14

Friday, March 3, 1995

Serving the Palomar College community

Merrber: Cal~ornia Newspaper Publishers Assoc. and the Journalism Assoc. ot Community Colleges

Tilt Tdt!Scope is published Fridays except during final exams and holidays. Letters to the editor and other correspondence can be brought or mailed to the newspaper office, room TCB-1, on the north side of campus. Phone: (619) 744-1150, Ext. 2450 I FAX: (619) 744-8123(attention: TheTekscope). Signed opinions are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily represent those of the entire newspaper staff, Palomar faculty, staff, the Publications Board or the Palomar College Governing Board. Views expressed in staff editorials reflect the majority vote of Th~ Ttltseopt editorial board.

Campus Bellt Editor

Limbaugh, Stem, Gross, Liddy, Buchanan, Snyder, Brown, Hart, King ... and the local supporting cast of Taylor, Hedgecock, Leitner, et al. Is it good for the country? Is it good for democracy? IS IT GOOD?

Editor-in-Chief............................................... ............ .. .......................... Daniel Kwan Managing Editor ................................... .......... ........... ,............... .. .. ...... Brian Wallace News Editor ........................ .. .................................................................. Kate Nelson Opinion Editor ............................................ ................ .................... .. ... Chris Gleason Entertainment Editor ............................................................. ............ . Peter Sansom Feature Editor ................ ... .......................... ............. ..... ..................... Stephen Rubin Sports Editor ....................................................................................... Jeremy Lynch Campus Beat Editor ......................................... .. ................................. Kelley Brewer Copy Editor ................................................................. ... ...................... Angela Logan Photography Editor ...................... .. ........... ........ .. ... ............................... Dave Mauch Staff Cartoonist... ........................... ....... ... .. .... ............... .. ._.... .......... .. .... Steve Troop Advertising Manager ........... ............................................................. Greg Armstrong Journalism Adviser ............................................................................ Susan Deacon Special Assistant... ............. ......................... .. ....... ................ .. .. ... ...... Roman Koenig Staff .......... Alex Azarmi , John Barger, Liz Bennett, Kimberly Berg, Stepanie Carlson, Carmen Chavira, Francis T. Crowley, Peter Delgado, Nicole Demers, Barbara Dijak, R.J. Ekerberg, John Farr, Debbi Goss, James Hatch, Diana Hooper, Bill Hunter, Jasmine Jurling, Michael LaRocchia, Rick Martinez, Carla Mays, Jim Minkler, Chad Rebmann, Kathi Renaud, Greg Skinner, Nicole Stone, Levi Travis, Carla Van Wagoner, Donny VanZandt, Jeff Vize, Stephanie Ward, John Windish and Steven Zivanic. Special thanks to Graphic Communications.

Talk radio is a fine form of entertainment and should not be mistaken for objective reporting. The forum of speech without correct attribution, such as the t; pc used by Rush Limbaugh, should never be confused with factual information. The present popular talk radio shows have forsaken integrity and honesty for better ratings. In the ~atings battle, the substance of programming content plays second fiddle to outrageous attention grabbing tactics calculated to provoke publicity. Over the past ge neration, thanks to the advent of television, Americans have been trained to expect top ic, plot and c limax all wrapped up in brief 60 to 90 second spots sq ueezed between advertising and promotional messages. The popular politica l talk show hosts on A.M. radio today are following those marketing guidelines by giving their capsulated sp in on current events packaged in "ear pleasing" sound bites. Radio talk shows are just another fad exploited by the entertainment industry. To make the arg ument that radio hosts' reflect what America is thinking, is insinuating that the nation doesn't have the ability to think objectively. The problem lies with the medium itself. A listener can be easily deceived with an aural slight-of-hand. Unless the program is recorded, an ambiguous statement cannot be studied for accuracy because of the verbal nature in which the message is transmitted. As the listener is attempting to decipher one topic, the host has a lready moved onto the next topic, inhibiting the ability of the listener to contemplate the veracity of the spoken statements. Rush Limbaugh is constantly refuting his detractors claims with the statement, "I didn ' t say that. " Which is usually true. In most cases he makes vague statements with underlying implications . His own argument that his words were misunderstood is proof of the inherent flaw with talk radio. The entire medium opens itself up to misinterpretion . In fact, successful hosts use misinterpretation to drive the ratings. Listeners are fascinated with hosts who misconstrue information and get away with it. It's all part of the show.

The Telescope welcomes all letters to the editor. Letters must be typewritten (no more than !50 words) and include the author's name, major and telephone number. The Telescope reserves the right to edit letters for space, and to not print letters which contain lewd or libelous comments. Send letters to The Telescope, I 140 West Mission Road, San Marcos, CA 92069. Letters may also be deli vered to our offices located at the north end of campus in room TCB-1, or Internet e-mailed to: telescope@cnb.com. Letters must be received by Monday at 3 p.m. to be considered for Friday's publication.


Friday. March 3, 1995

OPINION II

The Telescope

Out Of The Inkwell Steve Troop

Movies are like a box of chocolates I'm sure none of us is completely immune from the effects of celluloid pop culture. In the '80s, America said "Phone Home" more often than they said "I love you." The same is true today. Sure, we aren't quoting "E.T." at the drop of a hat anymore, but the fact that it's still remembered is a tribute to a film that is no longer mainstream. Some movies go even further than that. Take "Strange Brew," for example. Although not nearly as popular as "E.T," this little movie transplanted the speech patterns of one country's cui ture into that of another. A speech pattern that can still be heard today . C'mon, you hoser. You know what I'm talkin' 'bout, eh ? Other films have created new catch phrases that lend themselves easily to the culture of any time. "Airplane" is a prime example. You can still say "Surely you can't be serious!" and still get the appropriate countersign: "I am serious. And don ' t call me Shirley." Both the "Star Wars" trilogy and the "Star Trek" phenomenon have given birth to an entire sub-culture. This is even more dramatic considering that "Star Wars" has been around for 18 years and "Star Trek" for almost 30. What other medium could make "the Force" or "dilithium crystals" household words? But a real sign of a truly quotable movie is any film that has legions of fans that can recite every line, word-for-word, with musical cues and sound effects. And I'm not just talking about "The Rocky Horror Picture Show," either. I know several people that can recite "Ghostbusters" and "Back to the Future." But what differentiates these films from any others? While there may be people out there that can recite lines from "Ghost" or "Smokey and the Bandit," why haven't these lines become part of our culture? Other factors may be blockbuster material. "Star Wars" is one of the highest-grossing films of all time, but "Jurassic Park" is the highest-grossing of all time, and how many people go around quoting it regularly? Also, how would that count for movies like "Strange Brew" or "Buckaroo Banzai" that never had what people would call a successful box office run? The answer lies in a variety of areas. But realistically speaking, all the above movies feature something that will force other movies into obscurity: Good writing that says something in an entertaining, new way. So, next time you shell out seven bucks for a film like "Dumb and Dumber" or "The Jerky Boys," ask yourself one question: "Will anybody remember this stupid movie in ten years?!"

What is your impression of the Howard Stern radio program?

Staff Editorial ¡

Universities should be teaching, not re-teaching The Board of Trustees for California State University is considering eliminating remedial English and mathematics classes, in hopes that students who need such instruction will get help at their local community colleges. This would reduce the number of class hours required in university classes spent teaching the bare-bones basics to students who should not be dragged down by those who need help. While it would be an intelligent move for people who need the slower environment of the community college circuit, it does nothing to treat the root of the problem. California is not making sure that all who come through the system know the difference between a noun and a verb. The California Proficiency Tests, passage of which are required for graduation in this state, are obviously not enough.

Meemo Ahmed Computer lnformation Systems "Who?"

Recent CSU studies indicate that over 40 percent of high school grads need remedial math, and a similar number need rem~dial English classes. How is it possible that people can pass a basic skills test, yet not know enough to write a complete sentence? For the benefit of the students, high school graduation requirements must be made tougher. It is unfair to the students for the schools to pass them into the college world if the students are unprepared. Not only are tax dollars wasted re-teaching what should have been learned already, but the students are thrust into a world they have no chance of understanding. California must find a way to ensure that those who graduate from state-funded high schools have the skills necessary to become productive members of society.

Lourdes Garcia International Business "He's too 'out there' for me. I've never been able to relate to him. He's overrated and I just don't like him."

Frankie Contreras Mechanical Engineering "He seems to be a bit vulgar, but very spontaneous and he has a dinstinct personality."

Minimum wage laws cause harm In discussing the minimum wage, Barbara Boxer wants to make a "value" judgment on the quality of a person's life. She would rather see inner-city youth collecting unemployment at $5.25 an hour than working $4.25 an hour. Boxer and her ilk have caused the destruction of families and created a class of government parasites (a Democratic voting block), instead of productive citizens. Abolish the minimum wage and get kids off the street. Jobs, not unemployment checks are going to give our children the experience and opportunities they need. Give them opportunities, not charity. Mary Szterpakiewicz Economics

Limit presidential power ... NOW! I support Senator Bob Dole's efforts to repeal the Emergency Powers Act. My research indicates that the United States has been under martial law since FDR amended the Treading With the Enemy Act. Every president since has invented or extended a "national emergency" in order to maintain their power and that of the executive agencies. It' s long past time to limit Presidents of the United States. Then we can dust off the Constitution and use it-our eontract with the feds-to limit government to the protection of persons and their property.

Patrick Bicamum Paka International Business "What I like about him is that he' II say things that other people won't say."

William T. Holmes Escondido

Dante Mutti International Business "I think he's way gnarly. I fully agree with what he says."


12 ENTERTAINMENT

The Telescope

Friday. March 3, 1995

ENTERTAINMENT 'Six Degrees' brings life lessons to the stage â&#x20AC;˘ Brubeck Theatre presenls award-winning play tJwt exposes Ore ironies of relntion15hips Diana Hooper Swf{Wrirer

For those who haven't seen the play or the movie "Six Degrees of Separation;" written originally as a stage play by John Guare, lets make it clear- it' s NOT about a divorce in the north pole! The play has been shown on Broadway and won the 1993 Oliver Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. It is based on the true story of a confidence man who posed as Sidney Poitier's son in New York and California. Directed by Palomar's Manager of Theater Operations and Performing Arts Patrick Larmer, "Six Degrees" is about Paul, a young man from the streets, who parodies the Liza Dolittle character from "My Fair Lady" by learning the lingo it takes to get him in the door of the upper class New York socialites. "Six Degrees" is comedy and tragedy entwined with intrigue and gossip from the wealthy New York art scene to international business. This initially ignorant yet extremely intelligent youth makes his newly adopted rich friends face their own personal lives and realize their relationships with their children are disjointed and distant- unlike their strong bond with money. For some, he gets too close for comfort, six degrees too close, others go away gaining more than they lose. The title comes from a theory

that we are each related in some way or another to everyone on the planet by every sixth person. Paul poses as the son of Sidney Poitier and Harvard buddy of the New York couple's children . He charms the couple, Ouisa and Flan , into staying the night, and the comedy gets underway. The play is a tragic comedycomedy with a purpose. " You ' ll not only find it funny, but you ' ll leave the theater with something to think about," said Director Pat Larmer, adding that he really dislikes making generalized statements. "The play speaks for itself," said Larmer. The play, put on by Palomar's drama department, has 17 characters in all. They act out a collage of themes that reflect different aspects of our current times. There are college kids who can't relate to their parents and parents who are frustrated with their children ' s disdain for them. Communication problems in relationships, including sexual , racial, and social barriers, are mixed with openness and strong language in offbeat but real situations. Rick, one of Paul's con victims, finds that he has trouble dealing with his own problems. Unfortunately, he doesn ' t come to grips with his personal demons and takes his own life. "Paul is someone who Rick wants to be," said Palomar student Jason

Daniel Kwan I The Telescope

RomanS. Koenig (standing) plays Flan, while Dana De Goes plays Flan's wife Ouisa. Rowland James West, who plays the con arti~t Paul, is sitting on the couch attending to a bleeding stab wound.

Waller who plays the part of Rick. "Rick ' s own father has labeled him as a fool and he can't let him be right. He ends his own life as he feels he's done wrong to his girlfriend and he ' s let everyone down ." Box office manager of the Howard Brubeck Theatre here on campus, Diane Cenko met the con artist when she was box office manager at a La Jolla theater about II years ago. "He wasn't stupid. He was very

flamboyant," said Cenko. He came to the theater where she worked to pick up some tickets. When she told him he didn ' t have any tickets for him he still insisted. '"Do you realize who I am, I'm Sidney Poitier's son, darling,' he said to me and asked to see my supervisor," said Cenko. "I told him I knew he was the imposter because l had seen his picture on the news. ''I'm sure he was the same person who was scamming the people

in New York and L.A.," she added. "Six Degrees" is showing on campus at the Howard Brubeck Theatre. Show times are 8 p.m . on March I 0, I I, 16, 17 & 18, and 2 p.m. March 12 and 19. Bring your student ID and get in for $5. General admission is $9 and $7 for senior citizens and military. Call Palomar's drama dept. for further information at Ext. 2453. Department hours are Monday through Friday I 0 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Extreme goes back to the basics on 'Waiting' â&#x20AC;˘ Boston rockers focus their musical energy into a stripped-down angry album

** *

Brian Wallace Managing Editor

Extreme's latest album "Waiting for the Punchline" is all about changes: changes in sound, attitude, look and lineup. Perhaps the most noticeable thing about Extreme's latest effort is its production , or rather, its lack thereof. The album is raw and possesses a live studio atmosphere not found on any of their previous three albums. The band is stripped-down to a four-piece funk/rock band that sounds like they're jamming in someone's garage. Gone are the orchestras, horn sections, rappers and other special effects that were featured on their last two discs, both of which were concept albums. The sound works, though, and the effect it has is to show the band in a new light. The funk, while still there in Pat Badger's bass playing, is de-emphasized, and the crunch of straight-ahead rock n' roll takes its place. Once you get past the new sound of Extreme and delve into the lyrics of the new songs, you'll be hifwith their new attitude. For some reason (perhaps the disappointing sales of their last album "Three Sides to Every Story") lead singer Gary Cherone and guitarist Nuno Bettencourt were in an extremely bad mood when they wrote the songs

which appear on this album. A quick glance at the song titles says a lot: "There is no God,'' "Cynical," "Tell me Something I Don't Know" and "Leave Me Alone" ... the titles are self-explanatory. The first single, "Hip Today," takes a jab at bands who try to become popular by exploiting the latest popular trends. "No, never contrived/ It's an overnight sensation/A clever disguise/That holds all of your pretension ... Hip today/You'll be gone tomorrow." That song, along with "No Respect" seem to show a band unhappy with their lot in life. While the band is very popular among critics and Bettencourt is recognized by many as one of the world's premier guitarists, the band, in most peoples' eyes, is nothing more than a one-hit-wonder. Their 1991 hit "More Than Words" was both a blessing and a curse - it gained the band immense popularity, but at the same

time it had the effect oflabeling the band as an acoustic love ballad band, which they're not. It seems they're still fighting to be heard for what they really are, and they're not very happy about it. This unpleasant attitude spills over from the music and into the packaging as well. When you open up the CD case you are greeted with a black and white photo of a sadlooking clown holding a gun to his head.

The liner notes, which in the last two albums featured cartoon ish drawings, bright colors and fold-out posters, are now designed in the 1800's era style of sloppy typewriter text, as seen in Pearl Jam's "Vitalogy." The artwork features an old merry-go-round horse and a lonely clown standing on an dismantled circus tent. And for fans of the band, perhaps the most depressing thing about the new album is the departure of drummer Paul Geary. It seems everyone is replacing their drummers lately. With Geary's departure and that of Dave Lombardo (Slayer) and Dave Abbruzzese (Pearl Jam), its no doubt there's a support group out there somewhere for unemployed drummers. Geary is replaced by Mike Mangini, yet still plays on all but three of the songs. Overall though, the album is really solid and at times its anger and force sound great at loud volumes. Cherone's screaming on the bluesy track "Naked" will both hurt your ears and stick in your mind. The band's vocal harmonies on "Cynical" showcase one of the band's greatest assets. One song, "Midnight Express," however, seems to be filler. An uninspired instrumental track, its presence serves little purpose other than to prove that Bettencourt can play classical acoustic guitar for three minutes straight. Its an album of four frustrated musicians venting their anger. That's fine, and to hear the band adopt a new sound is somewhat refreshing, but for those of us who are accustomed to the band's other albums, the old sound and the old attitude are a bit missed.


Friday, March 3. 1995

The Telescope

ENTERTAINMENT 13

Punk and prayer, a redeeming combination â&#x20AC;˘ Magnified Plaid leads the Christian -punk scene with their explosive debut 'Pokinatcha'

Stephen Rubin Feature Editor

Punk rock has always been synonymous with legendary outfits such as The Dead Kennedys, Minor Threat, The Germs, Black Flag and Bad Religion. 1994 witnessed a born again "punk explosion" with MTV and the music press pinning fashionable Green Day and Offspring as socalled leaders of the new punk revolution . The band that is truly on the cutting-edge of 90s' punk isn't even Pennywise or NOFX, but rather Magnified Plaid. Better known as MxPx to their fans, Magnified Plaid is leading the charge of the vibrant hard-core Christian-rock scene that is poised to break out of the Church youthgroup culture. When people think of Christian music, visions of "Sister Act" come to mind . In reality , Christian music is a diverse mosaic ranging from gospel to death-metal, unified in only their message of Jesus Christ. Magnified Plaid candidly covers God, life, redemption and other assorted topics on its 1994 debut record for Tooth & Nail Records titled, "Pokinatcha." On 21 tracks, MxPx lays down fierce bass lines, catchy hooks, melodic vocals and divine lyrics to create the perfect record to listen to before a surf session or to just let off some positive steam.

Preconceptions of a Christian-punk band might have you thinking that they scream "Praise Jesus" along with Bad Religion riffs. However, MxPx's originality is a sweet deliverence from the current crop of Bad Religion-cloned California punk bands. Instead of mimicking the sounds of punk's forefathers, MxPx carves ou its own musical niche . The disc contains 21 tracks that sound nothing like other punk bands except maybe for the trademark universal drum beats. "Pokinatcha" opens with "Anywhere But Here," which deals with God being the only constant to turn to when nothing else is going right. The song redefines the traditional ways towards going about punk riffs with the heavy reliance on constant bass feedback to counter the lean lead riffs. Following the first song, the band pounds out powerful music and words on such fierce fight-song cuts like "Weak," "Realize," "Unopposed," "The Aspect," and "Ears To Hear," intertwined around a few pop-flavored takes. "My flesh nature won't abide it's ripping me apart inside/ Jesus pulls me back together/ My soul will be with Him forever," lead singer Mike trumpets on "Weak." The band changes gears in the middle of "Pokinatcha" to lay out some mellower, harmonious grooves with " Bad Hair Day" and "Too Much Thinking." Emphasizing the vocals on these two songs personalizes the lyrics, making them more the focus rather than the music. Mike's vocals are the prototype punk vocals, in the vein of Jim ofPennywise, loaded with harmony but able to take the tough route as well. To kick off the econd-half of"Pokinatcha" Mike takes the tougher vocal route with the anthemic "Pokinatch Punx." That is where

MxPx excels the best, playing the music hard and putting out the message in frank fashion. This formula works on "H igh Standards" where the answer is spe lled out bluntly, "G ive your life to God, come into His light." MxPx doesn't have all the answers nor do they explain themselves on every song, one must interpret that for themselves. "Twis ted Words" is one Christian's rebuttal to all of those naysayers who distort the words Christians say for their own twisted antiJesus soundbites. Now many a punk fan may respond to this review and spew "blah, blah, blah" about how they don't want some poseurs preaching, telling them what to believe. Well, I have news for all punk rock fans. Bands have been doing it forever, on a secular level, and listeners have been biting. The clones crowd the bulletin boards claiming individuality but they just copy the words of Greg Graffin and Henry Rollins.

Nightmares of Stryper cloud the thought of a significant hard-core Christian scene making a positive influence on today's youth . Stryper was a testament to the fact that "cheeseglam" knew no boundaries. Thankfully the bands that make up Tooth & Nail Records are cheese-free and far above the fraud of that once-platinum embarrassment. Magnified Plaid succeed in glorifying God glowingly with one of the few new original and truly cutting-edge punk records that stands out on its own for Christ.

Native American, Latino and Chicano film festival offers a new perspective Donny VanZandt

Robert Navarro's Regador, sexism and racism against a female construction worker in Lexi Leban's More Than a Paycheck and the Chicano, Latino and Native American difficulties a homeless man living in New work by award-winning students wi ll be York faces when trying to enroll his daughter showcased in the second annual Cine in public school in David Riker's La Ciudad. Estudiantil, a film and video festival that Many of the works are short films, so they will be featured March 7-11 at venues in offer a quick glance at some obscure films San Diego and Tijuana. that would otherwise be Jificult to come The five day festival includes screenacross. This years festival- which coincides ings preceded by discussions with visiting with the 25th anniversary of the Centro Culscholars and filmtural de Ia Razamakers. The films is offering over 30 Festival Dates deal primarily with films. The event ts Hispanic and Native sponsored by the All events are free and begin at 7 p.m. American themes Centro Cultural de March 7: Universidad Autnoma de from the shocking to Ia Raza, a cultural Baja California, Tijuana the sympathetic. art center dediMarch 8: UCSD Peterson Hall #110 "It's always that cated to preserving March 9: Centro Cultural Tijuana way the first time ," Chicano, Mexican March 10: SDSU Little Theater says Hector, trying and Native AmeriMarch 11: Centro Cultural de Ia Raza, to convince his can art and culture. 2004 Park B Ivd friend Jesus to try '¡By establishFor more information call 235-6135, Ext. I? heroin again after an ing an annual event unpleasant first exfocusing on perience in Pete Chicano/Latina/ Resto's Alma Perdida, a film about HisNative American student film and video, the panics and heroin addiction in New York. Centro Cultural de Ia Raza is making a comThe film's black and white imagery and mitment to recognize this voice," says Ethan dreary downtown scenery convey the feelVan Thillo, festival director. mg of absolute helplessness and frustration A selection of films and videos will be felt by the junkies on the screen. available for viewing during gallery hours at The film's stark symbolism certainly the Centro, located at 2004 Park Blvd. in San grab the viewers attention, but it might be Diego. Gallery hours are Wednsdays through too graphic for some. Sundays noon to 5 p.m. Notal! the films are as shocking as Alma For further information, like a quarterly Perdida, but they do cover issues such as newsletter, on Cine Estudantil or the Centro the difficult life of an irrigation worker in in general, call 235-6135 Ext. 17. Swf!Writer


14 SPORTS

The Telescope

Lady netters tune up at Invitational

SCOREBOARD

• Women's tennis looks to start conference title race Alex Azarmi Staff Writer

Palomar's women's tennis team had an impressive showing last weekend at the South Western Community College Invitational Tournament. In both divisions, singles and doubles, the Comets placed high. Suzy Nesbit, who played in the no. I and 2 singles bracket, won a meaningful match in the first round against Orange Coast College's no. I player in straight sets 7-6 (7-4) , 7-5. This match could be significant in the future when state rankings come out. Nesbit eventually lost in the quarterfinal.s to Grossmont's no. I player in straight sets. In the three and four singles bracket Genoveva Gomez , who plays no. 3 singles for the Comets, also had a strong performance. Gomez only losing four games in her two previous rounds fell short in a grueling three hour match to the no. 3 player from Riverside College 4-6, 7-6(7-4), 6-3. On the doubles side of the tournament Jennifer Boyer (no. 2 singles) teamed up with partner Becky Concklin (no. 6 singles). They played in the team 2 division. Boyer and

Money, fame and fortune. All the wonderful things usually reserved for the extremely powerful or the extremely lucky (lotto winners). Recently however, a new group of people have emerged on the scene of the rich and famous . The professional athlete. In today's society, sports figures no matter their level of talent are placed on a pedestal. With fame usually comes fortune, professional sports is no different. The ininimum salary in the National Football League (NFL) is $162,000. The average Major League Baseball salary is around a cool million. Plus, pro athletes don't work for an entire year. Their "year" is how ever long their season lasts. If an athlete happens to work for an organization that doesn't field the greatest team they may only have to work five months outofthe year. With every profession, salaries must usually increase to keep up with the cost of living, inflation, etc. But do we really need the players unions of both MLB, the National Hockey League (NHL), and almost the National Basketball Association (NBA), striking because the owners don't want to pay unproven rookies $1 00-million .contracts? Players complain about having mortgages, child support, this, that, and the other thing to pay for. Maybe they shouldn't have extended themselves so far in the first place. Hell , life can't be that bad with only two cars instead of four and a $!-million home instead of a $3-million home. I agree that in today 's society, money is almost everything. but somewhere there has to be an end. Sports isn't the real world, it's a fantasy land where grown men play little boys' games. The real world is in deep*&#%! Why don't the players and owners of the various sports use some of their outrageous profits to help make the world a better place. Donate some money to third world countries that don't have any food. Donate some money toward the war on drugs. Anything to let the general public know they aren't a bunch of greedy pigs . When asked if they are being greedy the players of the various unions say that they are only striking to look out for those who will come after them. Yeah and the remorse we all feel for all those 'underpaid' athletes is overwhelming. NOT! If the professional athletes took a good look at themselves, they would all know they·have it a lot better off than most of us who work our asses off just to make rent and pay for school. They should be happy with the huge salaries they make and not look a gift horse in the mouth Here's an idea: let's turn all professional sports into amateur sports. In other words, make all the players play for free. Then we will see who's greedy and who isn ' t. Maybe that's why college athletics are so great, most of the players are out there because they love the game, not because of the money. Just a couple of thoughts from beyond the arc.

From

Beyond The Arc

Jeremy Lynch

.

I

BASEBALL

Concklin easily won their first round match 6-2, 6-3. The next day in the semifinals, they lost in a tough match to Orange Coast College's no. 2 team 7-5, 6-2. The team three division consisted of Gomez and her partner Nikki Raab (no. 5 singles). Gomez and Raab had the most successful results in the tournament upsetting the number 3 team from Grossmont College in an exiting three setter 2-6, 6-;3, 6-4. Reaching the finals, they eventually lost7-6(7-4), 7-Stothe College of the Desert's no. 3 team. The women's team came into this tournament with a 6-1 preseason record . This includes wins over Saddleback and Long Beach College, both highly regarded teams in the state. After last years championship season, coach Nan Haugen said, "Our main goal is to repeat as the Pacific Coast Conference champs."Thiscould be a hard task with teams like Grossmont and Mesa College in their conference. Although Grossmont and Mesa have given the Comets a hard time in the past, a solid foundation returning from last year's team should help with the challenge. The Palomar women next face Imperial Valley March 7.

Sure it's not greed ... it's standards, right??

Friday, March 3, 1995

Palomar 9, Orange Coast 2 • At Palomar: Tim Mulligan had four hits, three stolen bases, and two RBI to lead the Comets (4-8). Joel Walker added a two-run homer in the fourth inning for the Comets. Chad Stewert won his second game of the year going eight shutout innings. SUMMARY Orange Coast 000 000 002 - 2 6 1 Palomar 002 231 Olx- 9 14 0

WOMEN 1S SWIMMING South of the Border Relays • At Palomar: The Comets won the meet by 92 points over the nearest competitor San Diego Mesa, 510-418. Tracy Lincoln led the Comets, winning both the I ,000 freestyle and the 200 medley. In winning the 1,000 freestyle, Lincoln broke the meet record, previously held by her sister, Nasution Lincoln, by II seconds. TEAM RESULTS I. Palomar 51 0; 2. San Diego Mesa 418; 3. Grossmont 398.5; 4.Mt.Sac 385; 5.

Saddleback 358.5; 6. Riverside 285; 7. Long Beach 238; 8. Chaffey217; 9. Citrus 196; I 0. Pasadena 38.

GOLF Orange Empire Conference Tornament PALOMAR 371, CUYMACA 390, CYPRESS 390, FULLERTON 437 • At Lake San Marcos: Palomar's Andre Wen shot a 70, the top score of the day. He was followed by Comet teammate JoeMuaau's 71. With the victory, the Comets improved to 4-0 in conference play. PALOMAR RESULTS-Wen 70, Muaau 71, Meeks 75, Tsuchiyama 76, Whang 79, Stanley 79.

MEN•S VOLLEYBALL • At Palomar: Matt Hyden led the Comets to a 15-12,5-15, 15-10, 15-5 victory over San Diego Mesa with 18 kills. Dave Forester added 5 serving aces and Steve McLaughlin contributed 15 kills for PC.

PALOMAR- 15 5 15 15 SD MESA - 12 15 10 5

Rain stops Pima's upset bid Jeremy Lynch Sports Editor

Every once in awhile a te.am needs a wake up call to get them in gear. Palomar's men's tennis team got their wake up call when an average team from Pima, Arizona gave them a t»ima(Ariz.) :J scare before a rain storm stopped the match with the Comets ahead 4-3. From the start Palomar seemed very sl uggish, as if they were just going through the motions. Head coach Jim Miller thought his team shouldn't have been looking past the Aztecs. "They are ranked decently well in their own conference," said Miller. "They beat IVC 8-1. Pima is a very good team." Ray Stark, Palomar's no. I singles player started quickly, but

couldn't finish losing to Pima's Boris Polo 4-6,6-4,6-4. The defeat was Stark's first dual match loss of the year. Palomar dominated the no. 2-4 singles matches, winning all three in straight sets. However, Palomar's depth was depleted a bit with an injury to their no. 3 singles player Roger Glaser. One definite bright spot for the Comets was Matt Macabitas. He won his singles match, defeating the Aztecs Ben Schwartz 6~0. 6-4. Macabitas also teamed up with Sasha Azarmi to earn another point for Palomar with a 6-1 ,6-1 victory in no.2 doubles. "I just tried to play my game in my singles match," said Macabitas. "I made him play the extra ball and I got the ball back. That's how I win." Macabitas went on to talk about his easy victory in doubles saying, "Sasha and I have good chemistry. We've played doubles

together for a while." When Macabitas says a while he means it. He and Azarmi won the CIF doubles championship while they were both at San Dieguito High School. With Palomar up 3-1 in the overall match, they seemed to have a let down, losing the next two singles matches, while Azarmi/Macabitas won in doubles, bringing the score to 4-3 . When the rain hit, Palomar was down 0-6, 6-5 in the no. I doubles match. The no. 3 doubles match had yet to get under way. Uncle Mo (momentum) had swung to Pima's side and the match could have gone either way if the rain hadn't come. "We needed this wake up call before league," said Azarmi. "We can't have let-downs in the middle of league and expect to compete with Grossmont for the title." Palomar begins PCC play on March 7 against Imperial Valley.

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Friday, March 3. 1995

The Telescope

SPORTS 15

Cheer squad heading to nationals Liz Bennett

"This is by far the most talented team that we've had competing at the nationals. "

Staff Writer

Jeremy Lynch Sports Editor

Palomar College's co-ed cheer squad's video placed first in the nation and they have received an all-expense paid trip to the national competition in Florida, April 6-9. The West Coast regionals will be held April2 at Long Beach State University. Then the nationals will be in Florida, April 6-9. The Palomar team has placed within the Cheerleading top five nationally for the past five years. "This is by far the Report most talented team that we've had competing at the nationals," said assistant coach Ray Jasper. "I think we have a very strong and motivated team and we have an excellent chance of winning."

-Ray Jasper Assistant Coach Palomar's number one team consists of highly dedicated students. It is all volunteer, they're not receiving any kind of scholarship for their hard work and effort. "I'm really happy that the ASG has been a major sponsor of our team this year," approved coach Sheldon Price. The squad members have come from all over to participate on the Palomar team. Besides the practice time they spend together, five of the team members live together. "We are a very tight squad, very familylike," commented Wally Farrell. When the squad went to the National

Cheerleading Association (NCA) camp over the summer of 1994 (located in Dallas, Texas) they placed first in every event, including stunting, fight song and cheer. They received the gold trophy for the Circle of Champions, and they also received a special Unity award. "We cheer for sports and support our school throughout the year, now it's our turn to show them what we're all about," Courtesy McElhaney added Jill McElhaney. The Comet Cheer squad happy to be going to nationals. Many people think the cheer squad is connected to the athletic de- and dedication that is required to make the partment. Instead, they are part of the student cheerleading squad, or that would like more activities office. Tryouts will take place in inforrnation regarding tryouts, contact Marilyn April after Nationals. For those students that Lunde at the Student Activities Office, E:<c. think they might have the strength, stamina, 2596 or 2594.

Golf Expo coming to Southern California â&#x20AC;˘ Anaheim Convention Center to host PGA 's sixth annual golfer's paradise Jeremy Lynch Sports Editor

All you golfing enthusiasts, stand up and take notice. For three days this month the golfing world stops in Southern California to show off what's new hot in golf club design,swinganalysis and instructional breakthroughs in the golfing world. The Southern California Professional Golfer's Association's (PGA) sixth annual Golf Expo will be held at the Anaheim Con-

vention Center Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 10, 11 and 12. The expo will be open to the general public and features this year's newest, most innovative advances in golf equipment, instruction and information to help the beginning through advanced player improve his or her game. Some of the top names in golf will also showcase the expo. Tom Addis, President of the PGA of America, will speak on Sunday about the PGA, the PGA Championship com-

ing to the Riviera Country Club (Los Angeles) in August, and the United States' chances in the 1995 Ryder Cup. Also speaking over the weekend will be Dr. Elaine Moore, psychiatrist. She will be concentrating her seminar on the mental aspect of the game, saying that 90 percent of the game is the mental aspect. The golf Expo will feature free individual instruction by PGA professionals. This will give each golfer an opportunity to work on

specific problem areas of their game with a pro. The Golf Expo is open on Friday from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m . and Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults, seniors (55 years and over) and juniors (II to 17) are $4, and children under 10 years of age are free. The Anaheim Convention Center is located at 800 W. Katella, across from Disneyland. For more inforrnation, call (714) PRO-GOLF.

STUDENTS: You Qualify for an AlJto Loar1 Rate as Lo\v s 7.45% an Diego Teachers'

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in dustn] in that they are

non-profit-returning net offering membership to profits back to the memall Palomar College students. Rs a bershill in the form of better rates student. you're entitleti to all the on auto loans and credit cards, and qreat credit union benefits that¡ hil}her interest on saUinqs and membership with SDTCU has to checking accounts. offer, including rates on auto loans Call today to join San Diego as low as ?.45~'! Teachers' Credit Union, and qet the Rt SDTCU you're nntjust a cus- same I]Ieat auto loan rates that tomer, lJOU're a member. Credit thousands of others haue . tor ouer Unions are unique in the financial 65years.

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The Telescope

16 SPORTS

Friday, March 3. 1995

SPORTS Comet spikers start quickly, fizzle late against GW • Quick 15-1 start only a mirage as Comets falter late, lose 3-1 to No.2 Rustlers Michael A. LaRocchia Swf!Writer

Palomar's men's volleyball team controlled the first game of their Wednesday night match with the Golden West Rustlers, winning 151. But the Rustlers showed why they're the states second ranked team, wint•alomar I ning the match 1510, 15-9,1510 in front of an excited crowd at the Dome. Led by Dave "the powerhouse" Forester, the Comets cruised through game one. But the decisive victory seemed to ignite the Rustlers, as they stole the momentum for the remainder of the match. "We saw Golden West play in the Grossmont Tournament and we thought we could dominate them," said Forester. ··we had confidence, but we were over confident."

The Comets battled through each game, continuously stopping the Rustlers attempts to run away with the match. Matt Hyden had 15 kills,while Steve McLaughlin and Dave Forester had 12 kills each to keep the Comets close. But they couldn't regain the intensity they showed in game one. "We had trouble serving and passing after the first game," said Comet head coach Duncan McFarland. "We were surprised at the way we won the first game, and it seemed Golden West became more sure of themselves as the match went on." However, coach McFarland wasn't too upset with the loss, as he has high hopes for this young season."We'reagood team this year. We expect big things and to win a lot of hard fought matches," said McFarland . The Comets, now 1-1 in the Orange Empire Conference, won 1513, 15-1, 15-6 over Pasadena on the 17th. Carla Van Wagoner I The Telescope

Palomar's Seth Schreiner attempts a kill against two Golden West blockers. The Comets lost, 3-1.

1995 Comet Home Softball Schedule Opponent

Time

Day

Date

Thursday

March 9

Imperial \'alley 3 p.m.

Wed.

March 15

San Diego City

3 p.m.

San Digeo Mesa 3 p.m.

Friday

March 24

Monday

March 27

Southwestern

3 p.m.

Wed.

April 5

Grossmont

3 p.m.

Friday

April 7

Southwestern

3 p.m.

Friday

April 21

Imperial \'alley 3 p.m.

Wed.

April26

San Diego City

3 p.m.

Fri. -Sat.

May 12-13

State Playoffs

TBA

Fri. - Sat.

May 19-21

State Finals

TBA

Comets want state title • Palomar so{tballers expecting big things in '95 Jeremy Lynch Sports Editor

If Palomar's softball program could be compared to another dominant sports team, the UCLA men's basketball program of the 1960's might come to mind. That era saw UCLA won an unprecedented eight consecutive NCAA championships. So when they didn ' t at least get to the NCAA finals, it was news. The same situation has begun to occur at Palomar. Head coach Mark Eldridge returns six members of a team that went 37-13, won the Southern California championship and advanced to the state tournament, last year. The Comets also have won nine consecutive conference titles, and have been to the finals of the state tournament six ofthe last nine years. "Overall I'm very optimistic," said Eldridge. "You couldn't ask for more than having both your

pitchers back. Plus, we're strong up the middle and we have a great blend of freshmen and sophomore." The two pitchers that he is referring to are none other than AllAmerican Jennifer Ortiz and Jessica Fender. Ortiz went 31-7 last year with an amazing 0.42 ERA, including 17 shutouts. Fender also returns with a very respectable 1.14 ERA, and a 5-6 record, including five saves. Also returning for the Lady Comets are all-state catcher Candice Fode, first baseman Christina Marquez, infielder Kylene Dyson, and outfielders Mindy Anderson and Katie Carrao. Eldridge thinks that the newcomers will make the difference between just getting to and winning the state finals. The top newcomers include second baseman Augrista Belford, shortstops Julie Soderlund and KeiraJester, first baseman Carin

Bats come alive in 9-2 victory Rick Martinez Staff Writer

Hitting has been rumored to be mental. In Palomar's case against Orange Coast on Feb. 25, hitting was also contagious. Tim Mulligan's third inning double that scored Ernie Silva from second opened the flood gates for a 9-2 Comet romp over the OCC Pirates at Myers Field on Saturday. Mulligan's 4-for-5 effort at the plate, along with three stolen bases and two RBI was the muscle behind

Palomar's overpowering offensive display that saw the Comets torch three different OCC pitchers for 14 hits including two doubles by Mulligan and a 370Palomar 9 foot shot over the leftfield fence by Joel Walker. "I was just really seeing the ball good for once," Mulligan said. "The ball looked like a big watermelon up there, I was just hitting every-

thing. I felt really good at the plate today. I'd been struggling the past few games; I'm just glad I finally put it all together." If the game was ever in doubt, Walker's blast in the fourth inning assured the Pirates that Palomar just wouldn't be denied. "It was right there, right up inside [the] pipe. [It was a] 2-0 swing and I was just looking for anything in the strike zone," said Walker who finished up going 1-for-4 with three RBI. On the mound for Palomar Chad

Stewart seemed to have his way with the Pirates all afternoon. Stewart retired the first nine batters he faced and 16 of his first 17 while pitching eight shut-out innings. Stewart gave up only one hitthru six innings and finished the day with five strikeouts. Sef Soto came on to relieve Stewart in the top of the ninth, giving up two meaningless runs to get the final score, 9-2. With the win Stewert moves to (2-1) on the season and Palomar improves to (4-8).

Jimenez and outfielders Lisa Flores and Jennifer Funkhouser. "We have returnees and All-CIF players who are going to find it hard to get playing time," said Eldridge. 'Tm confident we're going to do very well." With a solid foundation returning from a team that went 14-1 in the Pacific Coast Conference last year, the Comets should be the favorite to win the conference title once again this year. So far the Comets have concentrated on playing in various tournaments around the Western United States. As expected Palomar has faired extremely well, including a championship in the Apple Photography Tournament at Cypress.

Also contributing to this article were Tom Saxe I San Marcos Courier and John Maffei I Blade-Citizen.

CORRECTION Due to an editing error, inaccurate information was included in the story "WFC wants more staff' in the Feb. 17 issue of The Telescope. Jon Cnossen is not the director of the Well ness Fitness Center as was reported. The director of the WFC is Paula Rinehart. Mr. Cnossen is however an assistant tennis coach and a physical education instructor. The Telescope regrets the error.

The Telescope 48.14  

The Telescope 48.14 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 48 / Issue 14 / March 05, 1995 / the-telescope.com

The Telescope 48.14  

The Telescope 48.14 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 48 / Issue 14 / March 05, 1995 / the-telescope.com

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