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~~~ Discover

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Low-down on a 'Dirty Shame'

Comets to play in bowl game

Entertaz·nment I Page 12

Sports I Page 16

THE

. . . . . .LESC Palomar Community College

Friday, December 2, 1994

ASG appoints new senators

San Marcos, CA

Volume 48, Number 11

Seagulls in the forrest?!

• Two vice-president positions to be decided at next meeting Daniel Kwan Co-Editor-in-Chief

Getting closer to their goal of filling all the Associated Student Government positions, the student body appointed four new senators Nov. 30. Students interested in running for the two remaining seats, executive vice-president and vice-president of social affairs, should submit applications to the Student Activities Office • VP of state affairs spends in SU-21 by Tuesday, Dec. 6 $2,000 before given formal in order to qualify for approval. See Page 3 appoitmentattheDec. 7 ASG meeting. The new ASG senators are Greg Armstrong, Antonio Munoz, Ellen Noonkester and Scott Teerlink. Kim Neeley, who was elected executive vice-president in an election earlier this semester, resigned from her postition last Wednesday. Neeley was unavailable for comment, butASG President Merrill said "personal conflicts forced her to drop classes, making her ineligible to be on student government. She hopes to come back next semester if there is an open seat." The position for vice-president of social affairs has been vacated since Kelly Lupro resigned in October.

Courtesy fred Schindler

The digital imaging photo by Fred Schindler, a graphic communication/photography student, is an example of how images can be manipulated. The image, which was scanned using the Adobe Photoshop program, consists of three photos composited into one. The trees are from Oregon and the fence is from the eastern United States while the seagulls are from Mexico.

See SENATORS, Page 3

Rio prof key to Baja trip

ASG lobbies through $1 Student Rep. Fee

Carla Mays Staff Writer

Forthelasttwodecades, thedriving force behind Palomar's field biology courses has been Associate Professor of Life Sciences, Lester Knapp. But Knapp may not be able to celebrate the program's 20th anniversary aboard a boat in the Sea of Cortez with his students this spring. Knapp is suffering from a potentially fatal blood disorder that now requires him to receive blood transfusions every two weeks. A bone marrow transplant may be the only thing that can save his life. The need for additional blood donors exists, and people who are blood type 0 positive are encouraged to contact the Life Science Department. On Saturday, Dec. 3, people who donate blood at the Mira Mesa Mall will be able to have a preliminary bone marrow transplant screening done. Knapp bas not yet been able to locate a matching bone marrow donor. This year's Baja class is currently full; it's popularity a result of glowing reports from past trip alumni, according to other faculty members involved in the program.

Sherry Pipenburg Staff Writer

Courtesy of Life Sciences Dept.

Students from a past trip to the Sea of Cortez take a break from academic studies. Twenty-five students enrolled in biology and zoology classes will attend this year's trip in April.

Imagine if you bad $100,000 to spend. Before you conjure up thoughts of a new car, shopping spree or Hawaiian vacation, know that there are strict limitations on your spending. Palomar students have approximately $85,000 to spend but only to lobby government officials on student issues. The $1 Student Representation Fee fund, which was initiated by student vote four years ago, bas grown steadily. The Student Representation Fee provision was enacted in 1987 and is currently part of the California Education Code. The fee can only be initiated at a college by majority vote of students. A majority vote is also required to stop the fee. According to Admissions and Records Director Herman Lee, $17,000 is paid each semester and

about $8,000 in the summer accounting for the rapid growth in the rep fee fund. Since Palomar' s accumulated surplus is so large, Ralph Black, California State Community College Vice Chancellor and General Counselor Attorney, has suggested that students consider refunding the money or stopping the fee. Many students may be unclear as to how the fee is used, according to Associated Student Government President Merrill Tyler. Tyler said he would like to see increased student awareness regarding the fee. When he was a new Palomar student, he explained, he was unsure bow the money was used and refused to pay the fee for the flrst few semesters he attended Palomar. Tyler now feels that it is important for students to understand the benefits of the fee. See REP. FEE, Page 5


Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

The Telescope

2 CAMPUS BEAT

CAMPUS BEAT fWN

Honor societies to offer prizes in drawing Alpha Gamma Sigma and Phi Theta Kappa are holding an opportunity drawing Thursday Dec. 8 at 2:45p.m. in the Student Union. Some of the prizes include a chance for a lighter Palomar financial burden such as a free three unit class at Palomar and Spring semester parking permits. Other prizes include free gasoline, oil changes, car washes and haircuts. If entrants aren't lucky enough to fix up their cars and try a new hairstyle for free, chances for a Lucky's gift certificate and dinners at Restaurant Row are also opportunities at hand. A $1 donation allows students one entry, and a $5 donation allows six.

-Linda Schaefer

Library fines waived with food donations Brian Wallace/ The Tekscope

If your library books books are late this month A wom•n wu taken to the hospital after an accident Tuesday on Mission Road. S;m Marcos resident Diane M. Berry's there's no need to pull out your wallet, just look in your west-bound sedan c.me to rest on • fence at the comer of Comet Circle and Mission after it struck a new sports cabinet. c.r driven by Kristen Comen, who was comin1 to register for spring semester. Berry was taken to the hospital with The usual Palomar library fmes are being waived head and foot injuries, said Campus Patrol officer Luz Gonzalez. Comen was not injured. this month in exchange for non-perishable food. The list of acceptable items includes canned goods, baby food, dried beans, rice and pasta. Donations with or without overdue materials will be accepted from Nov. 21 through Dec. 23 at the circulation desk, which is temporarily located on the frrst floor "I would think about having my own on a large scale. He then worked out a deal of the library. Last year the program collected more than 24 boxes business sometimes when I was younger, with a local food packer and shipped a of food for the campus food bank. The food bank, which but I never really gave that much serious sample off to the U.S. Food and Drug thought until I went to college," says the Administration for approval. While he gives food to qualified people in need, is operated by the 21-year-old Garcia. who is a student at St. waited, Garcia took every opportunity to college's Extended Opportunity Program and Services program. There are some people who attend col- Mary's University in San Antonio. "I test-market his product. The library is open Monday through Thursday 7:30 lege to major in business, then there are decided to do something so I could start "I had a lot of help from my friends and a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and others who go there and start one. applying the things I was learning and so family in going door-to-door to test the Many of today' s students are combin- that I could have something to look for- product," says Garcia. "We'd take opin- Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m .. From Tuesday through ing their capitalistic spirit with their own ward to when I graduated." ions and adjusted the product all the time." Friday, Dec. 20-23, the hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m .. For additional information call the library at Exts. bright ideas and have started businesses For Garcia, the chance to start a new Once the St. Mary's senior knew the while still in college. One of these new business carne from the realization that product was right, he hit the streets. "I took 2612, 2613 or 2614. -Jasmine furling entrepreneurs tells how he took the leap the homemade salsa he'd been eating all it to a bunch of stores and started really from studying marketing theories and the his life was the best he'd ever tasted. "The pushing it," he says. ''The reaction was principles of supply and demand to apply- recipe is from my grandmother, who good. People couldn't believe someone so ing them. passed it on to my mom," says Garcia. young was responsible for the salsa." "We were sitting around on New Year's As if developing and promoting a new Roland Garcia wants to be the "Salsa Eve one year, and we said that the salsa product is not enough, Garcia continues to King" of Texas, and judging from the way was so good, it should be sold in stores." take 18 hours a semester at St. Mary's and his Autentica Salsa is flying off the she! ves That was all the inspiration Garcia is scheduled to graduate this December of supermarkets, he may be well on his needed. With the help of his mother, he with a double major in international busiAlpha Gamma Sigma and Phi Theta Kappa will way to royalty. created a batch of salsa that could be made ness and marketing sleep," says Garcia have a new member orientation and informational seminar Dec. 8 at 2 p.m. in the Student Union. Dr. Ken Burns will also be hosting the seminar, "Crash Course In Cramming." Students interested in running for office in Phi Theta Kappa or Alpha Gama Sigma need to talk with Ellen Compiled from Campus Patrol reports: Noonkester. Applications are due by Feb. 3. Elections will be held on March 1 for officers for the '95-'96 Frjday Noy 18 Construction Specifications Institute-San Dischool year. 10:40 p.m. Student Injury- Campus Patrol officers reG$JO ~hapter: Due to do11.or Dec. 30. Students enNew members' dues are required March 1. The sponded to reports of a person who had fallen out of his roUed.in llfChitectural~ engfueering. construction maninduction ceremony will be held March 17. wbeelchair, and was lying on the ground bleeding. The student agement and construction eligible for two $500 Graduating student members may purchase gold received a cut above his right eye, a swollen and scratched nose awards. Requirements: Overall GPA, financial need. tassels and stoles from the national head quarters. and scraped hands. The student was treated by the nurse and active C()mmunity participation and intent to pursue For more information contact Marilyn Lynde at then taken to Tri-City Hospital. the above career, plus an application, transcript, essay Ext 2595 · -Carla Mays 2 p.m. Auto Accident- Campus Patrol officers entered Lot and cover letter to donor. The address is listed in the 2 and discovered that a white Honda had backed into a Ford letter, Festiva. The officers waited for the driver of the Honda and .{ames Cason Memorial: Due Dec. 16. Students obtained insurance information .The owner of the Festiva later enroll¢ iri computet science or history, preferably an to Campus Patrol. The Festiva sustained minor damage. came Alpha Gamma Sigma member. are eligible for one $200 award. Requirements: financial need, but not Monday Nov 21 eJ.igible fo~ federaJ. assistru\ce, an application, trimEnglish 270, a new class examining the last 50 5:20p.m. Auto Accident- A student reported that that he sCript, <;lass sChedule autObiography. . years of science fiction will start spring semester. returned to his car to fmd a gray Mazda resting on his front J)~r~om· ~u Col leg& Foun(fation Music ScholarThe course, taught by Associate Professor of Enbumper. The car sustained damage to its front license plate. 16. Student must . a continuing glish Gary Zacharias, will fulfill the humanities refo(rryear college in quirement for the A.A., California State University and Tuesday Nov 29 University of California. Authors to be read in the class 10 a.m. Contraband Seizure- After following up on a tip, are Issac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, Campus Patrol officers questioned a student who said he had Robert A. Heinlein, Ursula K. LeGuin, Kurt Vonnegut drunk two beers. Officers noticed that the student was holding and Roger Zelazny. English 270 is section #8778, and a bong between his legs. The CPO seized a small bag of meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at Noon. For marijuana, four beers and the bong. No charges were filed more information call Zacharias at Ext. 2710 or drop by against the student P-2A. -Levi Travis

Business majors start companies

Orientation for new club members to be held Thurs. Dec. 8

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Friday, Det.:. 2, 1994

The Telescope

NEWS 3

VP allocates ASG money before given approval Jeff Vize Staff\Vriter

Breaking a string of three consecutive canceled meetings , the ASG returned to the board room on Nov. 23 only to be haunted by the problems of missed meetings. Among the problems was the appropriation of $2000 to cover the costs for the Nov. 23 Palomar College Lobby Day Reception. The proposal to spend the money had been on the ASG' s agenda for a month, but had never come to an actual vote due to the lack of quorum at ASG meetings for three consecutive weeks. ASG Vice-PresidentofStateAffairs Matthew MeN amara allocated the funds without the consent of the entire ASG-making the allocation illegal-because, he said. the money for the reception was in danger of not being appropriated due to the cancelled meetings. According to ASG President Merrill Tyler, legislati ve commit-

tee heads are allowed to appropriate up to $200 of ASG funds without coming before the board. The concern with theLegislativeLobby Day Reception was that the amount of money involved wen t over the limit by $1800. "When we try to get something passed and we don · t have that time [to come before the board] , we try to get a consensus of the board," said ASG Treasurer Sharon Hubbard . "I don' t think that allocation should have been done without the consent of the board." Hubbard stressed that the majority of the board did not know about it, therefore, it shouldn'thave been passed. " I didn ' t know about it, Les (Hubbard, ASG senator) , didn't know about it. The consensus wasn' t there," said Hubbard at the Nov. 23 meeting . "I'd like to make a record that this was done illegally and it did not get the consent of the board." McNamara defended the lack of concensus citing the presidential

proclamation that allows for tl1e $200 allocation without going before the board. "It was on tl1e agenda a month ago, but wehaven ' thad a meeting," said McNamara. "No one came forward to talk to me [concerning this legislation]." Discussing the reception, Tyler shared partial blame with McNamara. "At this point. I shquldhave written a proclamation saying ' we're going to spend up to $2000 to p ut this reception together, it's already on our agenda, it' s al ready been discussed .. . therefore, it' s approved."' said Tyler. "B ut! didn ' t.

I just assumed it was here, we'd get in the meeting, it wouldn't be a problem. I also assumed we'd have a meeting before today." The Lobby Day Resolution was officially passed at the Nov . 23 meeting, the same day as the actual reception . President Tyler believes that the Nov. 30 appointment of four new ASG Senators to fill the previously vacant seats will help eliminate problems such as this. " If we would have been having meetings all along, we wouldn't have had a problem wi th any of this, that's why we need more people on this board." Additionally, other ASG mem-

Greg Armstrong Major: Business Admin.

Antonio Munoz Major: Physics

Scott Teer/ink Major: Biology

"It was on the agenda a month ago, but we haven't had a meeting. No one came fonvard to talk with me [concerning the legislation}." - Matthew McNamara ASG Vice-President of State Affairs

bers raised concerns abou t the pric rities of money allocationed during the three week gap between meetings. According to ASG Senator Cecilia DeLeon. fuilds were used illegally to produce the Lobby Day Reception, yet Palomar students that were selected to attend the Nov. 19 Insights '94 conference at the San Diego Convention Center were unable to attend because funds could not be appropriated. Upset at the fact that the ASG had the money, but could not appropriate it, DeLeon even went as far a~ to question the necessity of the ASG's existence. "When we have the money here, I don't understand this," said DeLeon.

CORRECTION ASG Treas urer Sharon Hubbard was quoted incorrectly in the Nov . 18 Telescope . Her blame for the lack of quorem in past ASG meetings should have been directed at the ASG members absent from the meetings.

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SENATORS: New officers describe their goals Continued from Page 1

After being sworn-in at Wednesday's ASGmeeting, the new senators immediately joined the current ASG officers in voting and making decisions at the meeting. Most of the senators expressed opti mism for a more

active student government. "I want to be able to put more power for the student body to change things on campus," said Noonkester, who is the president of Phi Theta Kappa, an international honor society. She said one her goals is to eliminate Palomar theater's set-up fees, which are charged to campus organizations who use the faci lity.

Munoz said he would try to organize more activities to educate students about the "real world" by having the ASG sponsor resume workshops and more guest speakerss. He also wants the ASG to provide more services for studen ts returning to college from the work force. Teerlink said ASG mee tings could be run more efficiently if

members became more versed with Robert's Rules of Order. "I would like the ASG meetings to be more organized and to the point than they are now." said Teerlink. Armstrong agreed and said "I take insults fairly well, so I'm not going to play their games," referring to inter-personal conflicts which have plagued past ASGs.

Palomar designates land for Wilderness Area John Conzemius Opinion Editor

Making good on a vow to the U .S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Palomar College recently set aside some land on Palomar's San Marcos campus to be free of any further construction. According to Mike Gregoryk, assistant superintendent and vice president for finance and administrative services, the deal with the agency was to leave 6.9 acres of land to be undeveloped in exchange for the parking lot 9 being expanded by 3.45 acres in 1992. The undeveloped land, located on the northern side of the campus near the landmark "P" mountain, is for now on officially called "The Palomar College Wilderness Area." The land consists of coastal sage scrub habitat and was designated by the PalomarGoverningBoardNov. 8. The action was taken after the board proclaimed the week of Nov . 13-19 to be "National Geography Awareness Week." Palomar Earth Club president Antonio Manoz praised the college' s actions. "It's definitely a step in the

righ t direction for the preservation of the coastal environment," he said. On Wednesday, November 16 Governing Board members President/S uperintenden t George Boggs, board President Rita White and college trustee Harold Scofield met with local junior high school students to officially dedicate the land, According to theSanMarcos BladeCitizen, National Geographic Society member Charles Regan wrote a letter that expressed the importance of the set aside land which was read at the dedication: "One of the key components of geography is the study of how hu mans interact with and influence the environment. In preserving these 6.9 undeveloped acres, you are ensuring that future generations of students will be able to witness firsthand what the land was like before development. You are giving them a unique and living gift." Accounting major Michele Colson concurred with Regan's sentiments . "With all the massive construction in the city, I feel it's important that there is land undeveloped and space in our community." Students who wish to visit the

Students observe some of Palomar's undeveloped areas, including the "P " landmark on Owen's Peak, located north of the San Marcos campus. The Governing Board recently designated the area below the "P" as a wilderness area to be left free of construction. "wilderness" area can do so by taking the one-way Comet Drive north off Mission Road to Lot 9. It may also be reached taking the college

entrance south off Borden Road which runs between Las Posas Road and Twin Oaks Valley Road under Palomar College's "P" mountain.


4

The Telescope

NEWS

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

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Unplanned Pregnancy? Decisions to Make?

Brian Wallace I The Tekscope

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Ten years in the making, the Palomar College Transit Center will provide students with easier access to bus transportion, beginning in February 1995. In 1985, a San Diego County project idea was presented to Palomar College. The plan was to make mobility by bus to the college an ideal option. No longer would student's have to dodge cars in hopes of quickly getting across Mission Road to their first class. Students would instead be treated to frontdoor service, at the main entrance of Palomar college. During the past1 0 years, delays

and misfortune took a toll on progress of the project. Lack of funding paired with the death of the designer of the center meant major set-backs. Fmally, the contract was awarded to Soltek Co., with a $1.4 million price tag for construction. Total cost for the project is $2.2 million. North County Transit District provided the additional $960,000 from federal transportation funds and $240,000 from state transportation bonds. Palomar College will lease the land to San Diego County for 20 years, during which the center will be reviewed every five years for maintenance problems. Because non-students will be on

Palomar College property, there may be unwelcome guests, according to school officials. "A Palomar College security guard will be visible to all, as a deterrent to crime," said Mike Ellis, Director of Facilities. "People will undoubtedly think twice before causing any problems," he added. "I think the transit center is a great idea," said David Clark, member of the Undefeated Club. "It will be beneficial for the handicapped and blind who take the bus and require easier access." Other advantages to the project included a new traffic light on Mission Ave. at the college entrance to alleviate congestion. A new entrance sign will also be installed at the beginning of next semester.

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The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

REP. FEE: ASG continues lobbying efforts

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NEWS 5

Liberal arts major Kristen Eadeh, 20, was also unsure about what the fee was for. She guessed it was for representing student interests. "I would like to see it spent to improve the library," Eadeh said. Student Ryan Tagliapietrn, 18, said he did not know the purpose of the fee but wished it could be used to improve campus parking. Black said spending is very restricted according to the law. One of the items paid for by Palomar's fund was not within legal limit, according to Black. That item was the bumper stickers that said "Raise Hope, Not Fees."The law states the fee can only be used for lobbying and lobby-related expenses in order to provide direct support for student representatives wishing to state their opinions to the government. Student Activities Director Jim Bowen said previous uses of the fee have been used for travel expenses for students to visit Washington, D.C. and Sacramento to participate in marches, protests, conferences and lobbying. In addition, the fee has paid for California Student Association of Community Colleges (CalSACC) expenses, the bumper stickers, post cards to be sent to elected officials and a computer purchase so students can access ''Legitech," a data base which provides information on proposed legislation. So far this semester the ASG has used about $12,000, mostly for travel expenses, with another $15,000being requested for 10 students to attend Washington, D.C. in March, according to records. Last spring, Palomar participated in a protest in Sacramento on the State Capitol steps against raising tuition fees. Sending Palomar students to the protest was funded by the Student Representation Fee, and Tyler said he believes this protest was instrumental in preventing the tuition fee hike. Tyler said that without the fee, funds for the trip would have had to come out of the ASG budget, and that would ultimately effect the other sources of money that are covered in the budget. Currently, the ASG budget runs about $90,000 per year and is funded from such sources as Palomar ID card sales and profits from the bookstore and food services. Money from the ASG's general budget budget can be used for

Spent Fall '94 $11,152.62 Collected funds from the Student Rep. Fee through December 1994 equal $187,858.57. Greg Skinner I The Telescope

lobbying, but according to the law the representation fee cannot be used to help the ASG budget or the services it provides. The use of funds does not necessarily have to benefit all students, as shown when Palomar's Gay and Lesbian Association was granted funds to travel to Washington, DC to participate in a march for gay rights last April. Any club, group or organization on campus can apply for use of the funds as long as the use falls within the perimeters of student lobbying. To take advantage of the fee money, a group must subntit a proposal and travel agenda for the funds requested. Bowen said expenses are approved by a majority vote of the student government. Former ASG President Lowell Keptics prepared a Student Representation Fee workshop last year. His data was prepared to assist other colleges in initiating their own fees. In this workshop data, Keptics said the two proposals turned down so far at Palomar were a request for funds for a campaign contribution and an attempt to purchase advertising in The Telescope to supply students with information on pending legislation. According to Black, neither of the aforementioned proposals were legal useofthe funds. In fact, Black said that it is questionable whether the Student Representation Fee is

constitutional. Students at UC Berkeley sued the university, citing the collection of a fee for political purposes was unconstitutional. The students won, and their decision was upheld, Black said. Palomar's student registration telephone recording does not state that the fee is optional and unless the small print is noticed on the on the back of the PAR enrollment verification form, the option not to pay could be ntissed. Another notice is printed on the forms to add/ drop classes. Both of these notices fall within the current Education Code requirements. About one-fourth of California's community colleges implement a representation fee, according to Bowen. Most colleges have a student activities fee which supports the student government, which in turn pays for lobbying and lobbyrelated expenses. While Mira Costa College in Oceanside does not have a Student Representation Fee, for example, the campus daes have a Student Center Fee with the specific purpose of paying for the construction of their new student center, according to Mira Costa Student Body President Bruce Hoskins. Unlike the representation fee, the Student Activities Fee can be initiated without an election, and the money can be used for whatever is needed by the school.

'Bravura' to be offered as a class Angela A. Logan Staff Writer

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471-0050

Once a year, Palomar College presents "Bravura," a student-run magazine made up entirely of poems, poetry, short stories, essays and artwork subntitted by students. "This year there will be quite a few changes, including more art," said Judith Stafford, associate professor of English and faculty advisor for Bravura for the next two years. Next semester, Bravura will be offered as a learning community, which means it will be offered as a class taught by teachers from different departments. In the past, students volunteered to be on a panel of editors and decided as a group which entries subntitted by students would be published. Next semester, students

will still make those decisions, but they will also be learning every aspect involved in producing and publishing a professional magazine. Neil Bruington will be teaching students the aspects of graphic arts and how to work with the computer. Bob Barry will teach students about photography. Together, the three professors will alternate teaching the class. "We wanted to appeal to everybody, not just an elite few," said Charles Ingham, past adviser to Bravura This semester's issue included works in languages other than English. "For instance, Jim Adams, who is an English major, wrote a poem in Japanese and in English. We printed both side-by-side in the magazine," said Ingham. Stafford wants students to know that they don't need to be enrolled

in the class to subntit works or be published. "We want it to be representative of the entire student population which is extremely diverse. Students don't even need to be English majors. We want art of all kinds," said Stafford. Bravura has won several awards including Best of Show at the Del Mar Fair for '93 and '94. Also, the magazine along with The Telescope won an award in an international competition sponsored by "Signature Magazine." The class will be offered as English 197A for two credits, Photography 197CA for .5 credits, and Graphics 197AJ for .5 credits. The class will be held on Mon. and Wed. from 12 p.m. to 1 50 p.m. in room GJ-12. For more information, contact Judith Stafford Ext. 2752 in room ST-20.


Friday. Dec. 2. 1994

The Telescope

6

I

:·.

E

DURING FINALS SOLD DOLLARS SOLD $10.00-$14.99 $15.00-$24.99 $25.00-$34.99 $35.00-$44.99 $45.00-$54.99

i;g\11ri2~

64.99 .00-$74.99 $75.00-$84.99 $85.00-$94.99 $95.00-$104.99

BUCKS RECEIVED $6.00 $7.00 $8.00 $9.00 $10.00

COMET BUCKS HELP REDUCE PRICE PAID FOR NEXT SEMESTERIS BOOKS. ACCEPTED JANUARY 9, 1995 THROUGH JANUARY 21, 1995/ GOOD AT PALOMAR BOOKSTORE: SAN MARCOS & ESCONDIDO CAMPUSES ONLY/ CHANGE NOT GIVEN.

SAN MARCOS CAMPUS DECEMBER 13 - 15 DECEMBER 16 Friday DECEMBER 17 Saturday DECEMBER 19 Monday

8:30am - lf:OOpm 5:00am - 7:00pm 8:30pm - Lf:OOpm 9:00am- Noon 8:30am - Lf:OOpm

E.SCONDJDO EDUCATION CENTER DECEMBER 1lf- 15 8:30am - 11 :OOam 5:30pm- 7:45pm 8:30am - 11 :OOam DECEMBER 16 Friday


NEWS

The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

7

San Diego looks ahead at Insights '94 â&#x20AC;˘ Business and political leaders speak about future prospects on the Pacific Rim Francis T. Crowley Co-Editor-in-Chief

locally but act globally." He explained how he runs his two businesses and writes books from his home in Telluride, Colorado. "You don't have to go to the office," he explained after telling the audience he hasn't been to his Washington, D.C. office in five years. "We are being liberalized by the telecommunications industry," he said.

"I do coffee, I do dog walking, I do windows, I do grandchildren, but I don't do press interviews," former president George Bush told theaudienceat"Insights '94." Along with the 41st president, the almost 5,000 listeners heard ideas about the future from a cast of heavy hitters in the political, media and business arena during a po"Through our alliances, we can litical forum in San make lasting peace for future Diego Nov. 19. generations. " Presented by the Greater San Diego -George Bush Chamber of Commerce at the San Diego Convention Stating how business trends are Center, the program was intended to promote ideas concerning the fu- going "smaller and stronger," he tureoftheSanDiegoandBajaCali- gave figures to back up his belief fornia area. The Chamber believes that the next revolution will be in this area will be a major center for telecommunications. international trade within the PaMulroney spoke of unique opcific Rim early during the next cenportunities available in the posttury. Bush entered stage left, inter- Cold War world. He related several rupting comedian Dana Carvey who anecdotes about being a world leader was impersonating George Bush and along with Bush, Ronald Reagan, Ross Perot. The real Bush gave a Boris Yeltsin and Margaret lighthearted description of his Thatcher. He pointed out how Canada and present life outside of politics. Bush described himself as an the U.S. are each others largest tradoptimist, citing the crumbling of the ing partners, while suggesting Berlin Wall and new freedom that future trading with Mexico throughout eastern Europe as rea- will total billions of dollars. He sons not to be cynical_ He congratu- feels that NAFT A will be one lated Brian Mulroney, the former Canadian prime min"Mexico does not want a hand ister as well as other out, Mexico needs a hand up. world leaders for helping bring about Foreign aid is not the answer." the latest Mideast peace agreements. -Brian Mulroney Bush stated emphatically that the President of the United States must be consistent ofthemostsignificantdevelopments and lead the world without turning in our time. "Today, Canada buys more problems over to the United Naproducts than the 12 countries in the tions, or Congress. Bush gave some insights on Op- European Union combined, includeration Desert Storm injecting an- ing the United Kingdom, France, ecdotes about Generals Germany and Italy," he said. "Trade creates jobs, good jobs, Schwartzkopf and Powell, in addition to Margaret Thatcher and other high paying jobs. Every billion dolworld leaders that only a president lars in trade abroad means 15 to 20 thousand new direct jobs at home. could give. Bush finished his speech by pro- That's what the NAFT A and GAIT moting the GAIT agreement and debate has been about," he said while telling how Mexico's President acknowledging protestors in front Carlos Salinas de Gartari and Prime of the convention center. "Mexico does not want a hand Minister Mulroney along with the United States have proved trade out, Mexico needs a hand up. Foragreements can improve the wel- eign aid is not the answer, foreign trade is," he said. ''The results of the fare of nations on both sides. He also proposed improving re- prosperity of creating new jobs will lations with Russia as an ally and assure that young Mexicans suggested that open relations with will remain at home, to build China will help in our own future a country there, rather than trade and may influence their posi- seeking to emigrate to other tion on human rights. "Through our "it costs $61,000 a year to house alliances, we can an inmate, and less than $7,000 a make lasting peace for future generato keep a child in school. " tions," Bush said. -Jesse Jackson "Youdon'thaveto be big to be competitive in the global market," said author John industrialized nations. The answer Naisbitt, the first of 11 notable to the problems of immigration lie in the creation of great wealth in speakers. "On the Internet, theydon'tknow Latin America and Mexico," if you're a dog ornot," Naisbitt said Mulroney said. "This is a bonanza for American while telling entrepreneurs to "think

exporters and American technology and American know-how. My simple message to the American Congress is, vote yes to GATT," he said.

Carville also spoke about the "lack of institutional trust in America." He pointed out a Time magazine cover "reporting to capture White House personnel in the throes of Whitewater despair." In fact, as pointed out by an angry administration, the photo shown had nothing to do with Whitewater but had been taken the past November. "The defense by a Time spokesman from Time magazine said, 'I don't think the readers of Time expect the cover photo is going to be a representation of that event." Carville said. Carville also spelled out many statistics about real wages for young people in America. "Forty-fourpercent of all young people who work, full time, work at or below the poverty line. "In a country that was predicated on growth," Carville s a i d . "People ask why? With the companies we work for, the unions that represent us, the media outlets that are supposed to tell us. Why has this corrosive effect been happening for the past 20 years." Carville asked how many people get to participate in a recession, as opposed to those who get to participate in the recovery. ''This all affects us in the elections."

Adding liberal perspective to the day was Reverend Jesse Jackson who spoke about the effects of social spending cuts upon children and neighbors, Mexico, South, Central society. He andLatinAmerica. To lift their stancriticized the dards and not lower ours, we should "Contract for pull down the trade barriers for them, America" then build bridges," he said. "Unwhich is be- even playing fields lead to hostility ing touted by and hate." many of the Republican politicians in Washington D.C. A political analysis was added He called for an end to the welfare state by implement"Forty-four percent of all young ing "capital formation," a plan he said people who work, full time, work at was used to join the or below the poverty line." economies of East and West Germany. -James Carville "I believe in work as the alternative to welfare." While calling for an end to "bank red- by husband and wife team and polining, mortgage red-lining, insur- litical opposites James Carville and ance red-lin- Mary Matalin. Matalin spoke about ing" and sug- the growing cynicism in America gesting we which she said was being driven by should, "target the media. capital for "There is a built-in conflict bedevelop- tween what the media considers a ment" good story and what we need for Jackson good democracy and good governRounding out the political speaklisted sta- ment," she said. tistics "In my political lifetime, politi- ers was Republican Dr. Jeane about the cal sound bites have gone from 42 Kirkpatrick, former U.S. Ambassaplight of seconds to seven seconds, and ev- dor to the United Nations. Hermescitizens erybody wonders why we cynically sage centered on change being a caught in don't know what the candidates are great part of our society. She related this to the recent elecurban de- talking about. cay, while highlighting public edu"The mainstream press," she tions, emphasizing the great numcation, daycare and Headstart pro- said, "won't even give you news bers of people who voted Republican, changing grams in addition to the moral crisis anymore, they give you interthe party system we face in our nation. pretive journalism. Instead of "which was He said the cost of Aid to Fami- just reporting on events they shaped by FDR lies with Dependent Children is 1 tell you whattheeventsmeant. during the percent of the fedgreat deeral budget while pression," comparing that to "I think it is going to be quite she said. amounts we spend awhile before the Democratic "I think it bailing out Ameriparty manages to regain control is going to be can corporations quite awhile and on our military over the Congress. " before the budget. He claimed -Jeane Kirkpatrick Democratic that saving a dollar party mantoday will cost five ages to redollars tomorrow. "Last year, in Rikers Island in Matalin listed several top news gain control over the Congress," New York, it cost $61,000 a year to stories about Bush, Clinton and she said. Noting how dramatic changes in house an inmate, and less than Newt Gingrich, that she claimed $7,000 a year to were just not true. "They just are Europe are shaping the growing Eukeep a child in making up things to validate their ropean Union, she said European business leaders have begun disschool." interpretive analysis." Speaking "In the 1960s, 65 percent of the cussing the creation of a 'North about crime, coverage on television or what you Atlantic Free Trade Area and aNorth he said, "if the read was the candidates words. In Atlantic Security System,' to keep crime is vi- the 1990s, 80 percent of what you pace with America's trade agreecious enough hear is the reporter telling you what ments. Discussing the changing busiand the per- the candidate said," she added. son is sick Noting how the press focuses on ness world she said, "Business is enough, one negativity while shaping their analy- the principal of progress, which drives economies and people to strike is sis, Matalin said, enough." "From Labor Day to Oct. 20 a greater discovery and greater stanOn the non-partisan independent media dards of living. Today nobody besubject of trade, he said "I did not monitoring outfit analyzed all net- lieves socialism is the road to ecosupport NAFTA and I do not sup- work coverage and found that nomic development," Kirkpatrick port GATT. I believe in regional Clinton received 69 percent nega- said. "Except maybe Fidel Castro," and global balanced development. I tive coverage while Gingrich rebelieve we should have a regional ceived 100 percent negative cover- she concluded. hemispheric relationship with our age."

INSIGHTS


The Te

8 FEATURE

Greg Armstrong Advenising Manager

mily Snow, a pioneer hotel keeper, said it best when she described the Yosemite Valley as "about as near to heaven as you'll ever get." John Muir arrived in 1868 and, among other eloquent comments wrote, "No description of heaven seems half so fine." Long before such comments were made, the Native Americans used Yosemite Valley as a seasonal sanctuary. Experts estimate that they were living in the Valley as long as 3,000-4,000 years ago. TheAhwah-ni-chi, a small tribe ofMiwoks, who settled there about 800 years ago, lived harmoniously with the environment Jn a sense, Native Americans were the first conservationists, for they pro~ted the unusual environment with only limited usage. Inevitably, miners were the ones to damage the country surrounding the Valley by damming creeks and rivers, engaging in the wholesale killing of deer and other wildlife, and cutting down trees. Such practices added to the wanton shooting of the natives and rape of their women. Some retaliated with raids on the miners. Later, the Indians were rounded up with nearly no resistance and taken to the Fresno River reservation when need for the valley's protection was at its greatest, and the lndi-

ans now in a strange land. Israel W. Raymond, a respected San Francisco businessman, was among the most active of early conservationists. He attracted the interest of U.S. Senator John Connes, by giving him a set of Carleton E. Watkins â&#x20AC;˘ photographs of the area. The outcome of all the pioneer lobbying was the congressional enactment of the Yosemite Grant. This act, signed by President Lincoln on June 30, 1864, gave the State of California both the Mariposa Grove and the Yosemite Valley to cherish for "public use, resort, and recreation .. .for all time." Trespassing, homesteading, tree-cutting,. indiscriminate fires, and other injuries to natural features were declared unlawful. John Muir was one of the rare, but increasing, type of people who walked, hiked, and explored Yosemite's oatural beauty. "The valley," Muir thundered, "looked like a frowsy, backwoods pasture." The garish. three-story .hotel that had replaced pioneer inns had "a silly look amid surroundings so massfve and sublime." They climbed the mountains to Tuolumne meadows and found that nature's peace had been diminished by sheep and cattle even there. Muir was heartsick. In 1869 he was powerless to stop the pasturing of cattle in the valley. Now, with his reputation as a preservationist, people would be sure to read and listen to his persuasive words. Robert Underwood Johnson, editor of Century magazine and a man who had access to influential citizens, including politicians all over the East Coast, would be his strongest ally. That night, warmed by a campfire and their hostility, the two men planned a campaign to make the high country surrounding Yosemite Valley into a national park. Their labors were rewarded almost 13 months later when, on October 1, 1890, the U.S. Congress created Yosemite National Park. John Muir then worked with Edward H. Harriman and the lobbying of the Sierra Club, which Muir had helped found in 1892. Together they persuaded the House of Representatives and Senate to add the areas of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove to the National Park bill, which was signed into law on June 11. 1906 by President Roosevelt. Today, millions of travelers visit Yosemite National Park throughout the year to absorb its glacially formed rock fa

and many other natural wonders. Most vacationers choose to frequent the Yosemite Valley floor, which is easily congested during summer. A popular attraction is Tenaya Lake, which rests at the base of a 7 ,000-foot bowl gouged by a tributary of the Tuolumne Glacier, is the most accessible lake in the Park. Windsurfers, sailboaters, swimmers, fishermen, campers, picnickers, and guils enjoy its mile-long, half mile-wide expanse during summer days. May Lake, at the base of Mt. Hoffmann, is another post-glaciallake of interest. All of Yosemite's 300-400 lakes are destined to become meadows over time, as have many before them. Besides the sequoia groves, Yosemite embodies a tree-lover's paradise. Its terrain varies in elevation from 2,000 feet in the Merced River Canyon, where live oaks, buckeyes, and digger pines cling to the rocky slopes, to ponderosa pine, Douglas fu, incense cedar, scattered sugar pines around Wawona and Yosemite Valley. Red ftr, and aspen above thrive at 6,000 feet, while white and red fu and a prevalence of lodgepole pines grow around Tuolumne Meadows and Glacier Point. The tenacious whitebark pine survives just below the treeline. Ponderosa pines are the prominant trees in Yosemite Valley. Their neatly furrowed bark, resembling pieces of a puzzle, encases a stately trunk that smells like vanilla. Campers pitch tents or park recreation vehicles under their shade, and love to hear the wind sing in the boughs. Yosemite has harbored 232 species of birds whose songs, antics, and appetites interest even the most casual visitor. Two endangered species, the great gray owl and the peregrine falcon, are migratory visitors. For centuries, falcons liave awed observers with their speed, up to 200 m.p.h., aerial displays, and fierce appearance. o account of Yosemite's native inhabitants would be complete without the mention of the vast array of wildflowers. From early spring, when baby blue eyes, goldfields, and popp1es cover the slopes of the- Merced River Canyon, till the last bloom of rabbit-brush and goldenrod in the high country, Yosemite boast a bloom of o er 1,400 types of flowers. Even on a busy holiday weekend in Yosemite Valley when traffic is hea y and campgrounds are full, it is po ible to be alone. Pirl< your car and walk, or ride a bike, away from the visitor complex. Within ftve minutes you can be alonein the f<>rest, a rocksheltered crevice, or tree enriched meadow. Hidden Yo emite is never very far away. Sightseers by the hundreds hike to Glacier Point to ogle at the spectacular panoramic vistas of over 7,214-foot height. Nearby boulders, trees, and grassy hollows offer retreat, and trails lead away into quiet woods. As the hub of the high country, Tuolumne Meadows features a Visitor Center, gas station, mountaineering center, tent store, camps, and stables .. A grassy, river-threaded landscape exists b$>nd those facilities, and provides com-

plete solitude. Within minutes of even the most popular trail, the John Muir in you can be alone with nature. Altliough off the beaten path, White Wolf is a. popular destination due to its lodge, tent ca .p, large public campground, and stables. Wawona, on the south side of the Park, is a popular yearround resort, but there are many peaceful retreats in the proximity of the golf course or in the forest behind the hotel. During the summer, an array of wildflowers animates the meadows of the Badger Pass ski area. More sedate cross-country skiers find solitude in the adjacent forest along hundreds of miles of trails. Trails carry sightseers through the magnificent Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias, but walkers fmd an awesome silence and sense of isolation on trails through the massive forest. Experienced backpackers seek the less-traveled trails


[elescope

Friday. Dec 2, J 994 9

CAMPING INFORMATION ENTRANCE FEES PRICE NOTES $5 Good for 7 days. $3 In a bus, on foot, bicycle, motorcycle or horse. Good for 7 days. Yosemite Pass $1 5 Good for 1 year in '(osemite. Golden Eagle Pass $25 Good for 1 year in all national parks. Golden Age Pass $10 For U.S. citizens or permanent residents 62 and over. Golden Access Pass Free For blind or permanently disabled U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

TYPE Vehicle Individual

~

RECORDED

----- -- --

PARK INFORMATION

1(209) 372-0200 MISTIX Reservations

1(800) 365-2267 YOSEMITE VALLEY CAMPGROUNDS Elevation 4,000 feet, Reservations Required CAMPGROUND DAILY FEE FEATURE North Pines $14/site April-October Upper Pines $14/site April-November Lower Pines $14/site All Year Upper River $14/site Late AprilTent Camping Only

October

Lower River

$14/site

Early AprilOctober

' Sunnyside Walk-in

$3/person

all year

Walk-in, no reservation. First come, first served. Limited parking.

YOSEMITE VALLEY LoDGING

(209) 252-4848 Curry Village, Housekeeping Camp, Yosemite Lodge, and The Ahwahnee.

and in this way can be alone for days at a time, but they rarely reveal the location to others for fear of discovery. One favorite and exhilerating ¡ the a11-day hike atop Half Dome, which pror ¡ es for an eagle's eye view of the valley and surrounding formations. For the inexperienced visitor who craves space and needs nature's peace, the "stay on designated trails" signs appears restrictive, but along the 700 miles of park trails, there are many secluded viewpoints. Every season, Yosemite has something to offer the visitor. A visit to the Park can be a very different experience depending on the time of year. Summer provides a multitude of outdoor activities such as hiking, horseback riding, swimming, climbing, rafting, bicycling, and photography. The colors of fall are a promise of upcoming brisk weather. Days are shorter, visitors are few, and the trails are relatively uncrowded. All over

the park, wildlife of every kind prepares for the long winter ahead. Before long, the first big snowfall on the Sierra Nevada transforms Yosemite into a winterpostcard scene. Snowshoeing, ctoss-country and downhill skiing are day&' activity follow&! by good food and conversation by a toasty fire. Eventually, melting ice and snow transpose into springtime. Yosemite Falls, Bridalveil Fall, Nevada, Vernal, and Illilouette explode into joyful, musical existence, once again. The excitement of reemerging nature is one of the awards of seeing Yosemite in springtime. Every visit to Yosemite is a reminder of our national treasure, and the need to safeguard it for our children. To echo the wording of the original 1864 Yosemite Land Grant, "we must preserve these wilderness areas for public use, resort, and recreation, inalienable for all time."

...


lO OPINION

The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

OPINION Does welfare need drastic â&#x20AC;˘ Stop living off the state & get a job

â&#x20AC;˘ A humanitarian approach is best

Wendy Crafts

Rochelle R. Samilin

Staff Writer

Copy Editor

American taxpayers have footed the bill for welfare recipients long enough. It is time for the United States Government to reform the welfare system in order to discourage women from the dead-end street called AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children.) AFDC was originally designed as temporary help to women and their dependents who have fallen upon economic hardship. However, this "temporary" aid has became quite permanent for the majority of women who receive it The GOP's plan for welfare reform gives the AFDC recipient two years to fmd a way to support his or her family. This is plenty of time for a woman to fmd a better way of supporting her family than the life that welfare offers. How many people do you know that need two years to fmd a job or get vocational training? The GOP's plan would also ban welfare benefits to unwed mothers younger than 18. The idea is to discourage out-of-wedlock births and teenage pregnancy. But if a teenager is still dependent on her own parents for financial support, what business does she have getting pregnant with a child she knows she is unable to support? When a juvenile commits a crime, his parents are held accountable for his actions. The same should be true of juvenile pregnancies. The parents, not the taxpayers, should be held financially accountable for the actions of their child. The GOP's plan intends to deny benefits for new babies born to welfare mothers. If a mother cannot afford to support the children she already has, there is no explanation for having more. Unless you consider thatmany of the people receiving aid use it as a money-making opportunity. Having additional children provides them with extra income. The bottom line is that women need to be more responsible in their decision to bring a child into the world. If a woman knows that she cannot afford to have a child, yet she gets pregnant anyway, why should the taxpayers have to support the child? Too many women are taking advantage of a system that was designed to help women in extreme need, not women who forgot to use birth control.

THE

TELESCOPE Friday, Dtctmbtr 2, 1994

Volum< 48, N""'bn 11

reform~

SeiVing the Palomar College community

Joom-

Mtmbor: C.cmla ~ 1'\JiliohonA-. .,dlho Aoooc ... c.nm.rly c.logoo

The Teltscopt is publlshed Fridays except during final exams and holidays. LetteB to the editor and other correspcndence can be brought or mailed to the newspaper office, TCIH, on the northside ofcompus,orcall (619) 74+1150, Ext. 2450or FAX us at (619) 744~123. Signed opinions are thase of the individual writers and do not necessarily represent thaw! of The Tel<scopt. Staff editorials do not reflect the views of Paioma:r faculty, staff, the Publications Board or the Paloma:r Community College Governing Board or their agents.

Kelley Brewer Opinion Editor

Both Republicans and Democrats agree that Welfare Reform is necessary; however, the manner in which we attempt to achieve change has sparked heated debate.

Editors-in-Chief............................................................................ Francis T. Crowley Daniel Kwan Opinion Editors .................................................................................... Kelley Brewer John Conzemius Photo/ Entertainment Editor .............................................................. Brian Wallace Campus Beat Editor .............................................................................. Kate Nelson Feature Editor ..................................................................................... James Hatch Sports Editor .... .. ................................................................................ Chris Gleason Copy Editor................................................................................. Rochelle R. Samilin Staff Cartoonist... ................................................................................... Steve Troop Advertising Manager ....................................................................... Greg Armstrong Journalism Adviser ........................................................................... Susan Deacon Special Assistant. .............................................................................. Roman Koenig Staff ................................................... Wendy Crafts, Diana Hooper, JasmineJurling, Jeanne LeDoux, Angela Logan, Jeremy Lynch, Carla Mays, Bob Mcloughlin, Sherry Pipenburg, Chad Rebmann, Stephen Rubin, Peter Sansom, Greg Skinner, Levi Travis, Jeff Vize and Judy Wind. Graphic Communications ................................................... Neil Bruington, advisor; Margie Adcock, Letty Brewster, Bernice Hart, Mark Hopkins, and Anita Spare.

The newly-elected GOP majority's proposed welfare reform contradicts their traditional stance on family values. How can they claim to champion family values while at the same time promoting the establishment of orphanages as a reform measure? The truth is their proposal will break up families if single mothers are unable to find work within the two year allotted time. This strategy will do more damage than good to the social fabric of our communities. Placing children in unfamiliar orphanages away from their mothers is cruel and heartless. Welfare must be reformed, but it needs changes of a different nature such as increasing job training programs, providing child care centers and ensuring opportunities for educational advancement. Approaching welfare from this angle will be more beneficial to improving social ills than the GOP proposal. Recipients of welfare need marketable skills to make enough money to support themselves and their families. The majority of welfare recipients are innocent children born into poverty. The programs which currently provide health care and food supplements save millions in the cost of treating children born with problems because of the mother's poor health. If we are going to have effective welfare reform we must deal with the underlying issues that create the need for these programs. Cutting off assistance to needy families without considering alternatives that will enable them to become productive members of the social system will undermine the overall effects of reform and facilitate further decay of the social structure. The governmentmanages to provide funding for other causes. According to the Fifth Edition American Government text (p.558), the U.S. spent more in the frrst28 hours of the Persian Gulf War than the federal government spends in an entire year for maternal and child health. While welfare reform is necessary, the actual implementation of reform measures should not punish women and children but should instead seek to uplift and empower them, not bring them down and destroy them.

The Telescope welcomes all letters to the editor. Letters must be typewritten (no more than 150 words) and include the author's name, major and telephone number. The Telescope reserves the right to edit letters for space, and to not print letters which contain lewd or libelous comments. Send letters to The Telescope, 1140 West Mission Road, San Marcos CA 92069. Letters may also be delivered to our offices located at the north end of campus in room TCB-1.


The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

OPINION ll

In

My World Angela A. Logan

When activism turns to terrorism bat does it mean to be an activist in today's society? Webster's defines an activist as "one who participates in direct vigorous action (as amass demonstraPU&I.K~TION Of~ lNCR\MlN~TING PHOTO AIM-tlT M£ ~OKID POT tion) in support of or opposition to one side of a controversial issue." In the '60s, people protested the Vietnam War by marching, singing, burning the flag and participating in sit-ins. ' When it was discovered that dolphins were being killed in fishing nets, people responded by boycotting the tuna companies who were responsible. Activists today are taking things one step Today' s menu: roast chicken wings, other studem who knew about tlw actlVlt) . conferences in Sd.cramentu and Washingfurther by encouraging and condoning viomeatballs, carrot sticks, cheese and aackThe result of this failed lobbying effon ton, D.C. lence. One need not look any further than ers and lemonade. Your cost for this. raises doubts aboUL the effecti vcness of the $1 Lobbying i - indeed a necessary cause, California during the recent protests over Prop. $2,000. Student Representation Fee which nearly ev- but students should stop paying the fee 187 to find people destroying property as well The Associated Student Government ery student pays at the beginning of each unless the ASG can provide positive reas perpetrating violence against those unforturecently spent $2,000 to cover catering semester. The fee is automatically charged to sults of their ·'lobbying." nate people who choose not to agree with costs for a Nov. 23 legislative reception, students unless they indicate on registration Instead of a rep. fee, perhaps a Student them. In some extreme cases, abortionist Dr. but the effort to lobby recently elected forms that they do not wish to pay the fee. Activities fee should be offered, which not Gunn comes to mind, bard-core activists are state and local legislators became a nonThe ASG currently has about $85,000 in only could support the necessary lobbying encouraging followers to commit murder. event when no elected officials attended. money raised from the fee, but the effective- efforts, but bring major name speakers to We as a society need to take a long bard The event became nothing less than a ness is questionable when most of the funds campus, support school activities or give look at this disturbing trend. Should people catered lunch for ASG members and any are used to send a few ASG members to more funding for whatever students need. who are passionate about their cause be allowed to continue committing acts of violence? Should they be punished as ordinary citizens would be, or should they be able to claim temporary insanity? It is understandable for people to get excitedaboutsomething they feel strongly about. Like most liberals today, Kelley Brewer is But is that passion an acceptable excuse to still in a state of shock, denial and hysteria. violate the rights of others? This is clearly shown in her Nov. 18 article, Some activists use the excuse that their "Republicans are the root of all evil." rights are being violated, so that gives them the Il is obvious that Brewer could not list any rigbtto violate the rights of anyone they choose. Has the GOP ever been right for facts because the facts totally contradict her I am writing in regard to your Nov.18 This should be called by its true name, terrorleft-field accusations on the 1980's. America? issue and would like to clarify and correct ism. Here are some real facts as reported by the some misinformation in your article about Stephen Rubin's and Kelley Brewer's If we allow these fanatical few to do whatessays were disappointing, symbolic that U.S. bureau of the Census and the Federal the Rolling 20's event. First of all, it was ever they please in the name of a cause, we neither party is capable of intellectually Reserve: Student-to-Student that provided beverwould have chaos and uncontrollable vio• The average family income increased by ages that day. WearenottheCometCenter honest discourse. lence. This is not what our forefathers had in Rubin's conservative pop-Christian, over 15 percent from 1982-89. nor are we affiliated with MADD. mind when they wrote the Constitution. • The percentage of families eaming less retro-Dark Age mysticism, manifests in Palomar's Student-to-Student is a 5 Freedom of speech means just that, the his misdirected defense of the religious than $15,000 dropped during the '80s. member student team, was and formed to freedom to say what's on your mind. It doesn't • Taxpayers were five times more likely to reduce the incidence of impaired driving "stealth" candidates on the Vista school say anything about becoming part of an angry increase their income than have it fall during among college age students. This brings board. Oh well. mob and destroying anything that gets in your Brewer, however, wonderfully illus- the '80s. me to my response to Sharon Hubbard's way. It also doesn'tgive people the right to kill trated the liberal crux: financial responsiletter. Hubbard, ASG Treasurer, never once someone who doesn't agree with them. Jon Dunn bility. approached any of us to find out what we How would these terrorists feel if the shoe English Liberal contempt for a balanced budwere doing. Perhaps ifH ubbard had talked was on the other foot? If members of their get amendment insinuates much about to us she could have had her information family were harmed, and the people responEditor's note: All statistics can be ma- straight before making assumptions and our national debt while a liberal congress sible were not brought to justice, would they nipulated, and Mr. Dunn failed to put hisfacts criticizing our efforts. had the wallet. still be able to condone their actions in the in context. For example, average income may name of a cause? have increased, but only for the most wealthy. Kelly Lupro Ben Casey The United States has a judicial system that (National Joumal, April21, 1990, p. 990.) History Palomar College Student-to-Student is set up to decide what's legal and what isn't. If people use this system, along with legal protests, a lot more would be accomplished, ,.__.u:;:;; iiii"'="'.:----, and no one would get burt.

W

· · Staff Editorial

Student rep. money could be better spent

Letters to the Editor

GOP debate was disappointing

What do you think the $1 student representation fee is used for?

We're Student-toStudent, not MADD

Melody Garcia

Ray Brookins

April Smith

Slobodan Gajic

Ralph Santoro

Undecided

Business

Accounting

Communications

Undecided

"It's for the student government representatives for whatever they want."

"It's used for sports."

"To go for rebuilding the Student Union."

··I don· t know and I don't pay it."

''To make the Student Union two stories."


12 ENfERTAINMENT

The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

ENTERTAINMENT Thinking

Out Loud Kate Nelson

Kids and Vampires just don't mix Tom Cruise has never scared me so much in my entire life. I'm sure he also scared the little girl wllo sat across the theater from me and watched the flrst ten minutes of his new fllm, "Interview With the Vampire." I thought "Interview" was an excellent fllm. It brought together the talents of director Neil Jordan (''The Crying Game") and Cruise, who is cast totally against type, and manages to pull off the role. "Interview" is an appropriate fllm for moviegoers in their mid-teens to see, but not for audiences younger than 15 or 16. The moviewasgivenanRratingbytheMPAAfor violence, nudity and what are clearly adult concepts. The child who I saw being taken out of "Interview" by herfathercouldnothave been more than 7 or 8 years old; I'm sure she was scared by the frrstreally frightening scene in the movie, where Lestat (Cruise) transforms Louis (Brad Pitt) into a vampire. The scene was bloody and violent, and I don't think it should have been seen by eyes as young as those of an 8-year-old girl. I support the rights of filmmakers to express their creativity by letting their imaginations reign. They can blow up buildings, kill people and commit whatever mayhem they choose. But the MPAA gives ratings for a reason: to alert people to the content of fllms. 8-year-olds should be taken to movies appropriate to their age1evel. They should not see R-rated movies. MPAA ratings protect filmmakers as well as viewers. Since moviegoers can choose which movie they want to see based upon its rating, they don'thave to be disappointed or offended when they see a movie. This saves the filmmakers from having to tone down their movies for younger viewers. Take Quentin Tarantino's newest movie, "Pulp Fiction." Would it have been as big of a hit if he had had to make it accessible to 10year-olds? Movie critic Michael Medved went on a crusade last year to make movies kinder and gentler. He wanted to make movies more accessible to viewers of all ages. In doing so, he disregarded the opinions of viewers who like watching adult-themed movies. Medved can't expect all adults to watch movies that were made for an audience of 8-year-olds. The United States would be pretty boring if the only movies we were allowed to watch were "Bambi"-like cartoons, or feature-length versions of "Barney." I think "Barney: The Movie" would be the cause of more violence by irate viewers than say, "Terminator 2: Judgment Day." Filmmakers deserve the right to express their creativity in whatever way they see fit. They should not have to worry about offending anyone, particularly children who should not be seeing their movies in the frrst place. Anyone who knowingly takes their 8-yearold daughter to an R-rated movie and then complains about its violent and sexual content needs to take a good long look at themselves. 1bat' s almost as irresponsible as the woman who tried to drive with a cup of hot coffee between her knees and then sued McDonald's when the coffee burned her.

Photo Courtesy or Hollywood Pictures

In "A Low Down Dirty Shame," ex-cop turned investigator, Andre Shame (played by Keenen Ivory Wayans) specializes in retrieving stolen goods for insurance companies that are reluctant to involve the police.

'A Low Down Dirty Shame' that's exactly what this movie is Peter Sansom Staff Writer

If guessing lottery numbers was as simple as foreseeing the plot twist in "A Low Down Dirty Shame" I doubt I would be writing this review. Unfortunately, lady luck isn't so easy, so I'll cut the cinematic garble and lay down the basics. Written and directed by Keenen Ivory Wayans, the movie consists of Andre Shame's (played by Wayans) quest for redemption and riches amongst a perverse love triangle. Shame is a tough ex-cop who works high risk jobs for small pay. Gosh darn! How unique. Between tlrrowing Latinos through fish tanks and bun gee jumping in malls, Shame's character develops a subtle complexity best left unexplored. Jada Pinkett, who plays Shames's enthusiastic secretary Peaches, is infatuated with Shame as he crusades tlrrough his explosive adventures. All the while she plays the little sister that can't go play with the big kids and is resigned to sitting out the action.

MOVIE REVIEW A Low Down Dirty Shame Rated R Starring Keenen Ivory Wayans

**

Pinkett plays her role to nauseating perfection and displays a hilarious temper that even won me over by the end. The other comer of the triangle is ftlled by Salli Richardson who plays Shame's lost love, Angela Flowers. Shame tracks Flowers down while he is on special assignment from DEA agent Rotbmiller (Charles S. Dutton) to recover $20 million in lost drug money. During Shame's quest for the money there are tons of-maybe too many-special effects and flying glass. This is super neato if you're related to Beavis and Butt-head, but it really turned me off to the film. Some scenes are ftlled with highly entertaining off-the-cuff comedy-undoubtedly

from Wayans' "In Living Color" successwbile others flounder in flaky predictability. During one of the climactic scenes of the film, Peaches pauses on her way to escape and utters "I love you" to Shame. Right on cue, like a nifty dog that can shake hands, he answers in compliance with "I love you too." Awh, bow cute ... Please!!! The only redeeming value of the fllm is the all too infrequent catchy one-liners that brighten some moments like diamonds in a waste land of deserted predictability. Still, even the slickest comic relief couldn't save the movie from being insultingly trite. Perhaps if the movie were remarketed as a spoof on Hollywood action films, then it might garner some respect, but that would require some vision. A vision beyond the pocket books of consumers and the status quo of the film industry. If Saturday morning cartoon action and mind-numbing plots are your forte, then check "A Low Down Dirty Shame" out. On the other hand you could save yourself the $7 admission price and do something more entertaining. Like nothing.

New Queensryche CD delivers on its promise Kate Nelson Campus Beat Editor

When Dr. Martin Luther King said that he bad seen "the promised land," he was talking about Heaven. Queensryche' s newest album, "Promised Land," isn't Heaven, but is a worthy follow up to 1990's multi-platinum "Empire." On "Promised Land," Queensrycbe carries on the activist tone that it introduced on "Empire." The title track of "Empire" laced a rock song with what in effect was a public service announcement for increased funds for law enforcement. The song "Della Brown" told the story of a homeless woman. On "Promised Land," "Out of Mind" laments the plight of the mentally ill. "My

CD REVIEW Queesryche "Promised Land" EMI Records

**** Global Mind" and "One More Time" both examine the effect of television and other media informing the world of such tragedy as starvation in Africa and other changes going on in the world. Keyboards are strong suits on both "Someone Else" and "Lady Jane," blending in nicely

with guitars and the strong voice of lead vocalist Geoff Tate. "Someone Else" tells the story of a man examining his life and the changes he's made. "Here I stand at the crossroads' edge,/afraid to reach out for eternity./ One step when I look down,/I see someone else not me." With much deeper meaning than an ordinary rock ballad, "Someone Else" is a powerful song. On ''Lady Jane," Tate's singing is darker and more sinister. He pushes his voice low and then brings it back up again, with great results. The first single off the album, "I AriJ. I," with its Eastern-sounding melody, covers the same ground as "My Global Mind:" the information overload experienced by ordiSee PROMISED LAND, Page 13


Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

The Telescope

ENTERTAINMENT 13

'Wind of a Thousand Tales' blowing through Brubeck Angela Logan Staff Writer

"The Wind of a Thousand Tales" is a mesmerizing play that is short enough to hold a child's attention with a plot that adults will enjoy. Children from elementary schools all over North County are being bussed in to see this play. Directed by Jim Cooper, the play is centered around little Kimberly Kay, a cynical child who doesn't believe in fairy tales. She would rather read her encyclopedias than listen to her mother tell her stories that "couldn't possibly be true." During the night, Kay (Annette Homewood) is visited by strong winds that take her from her room and deposit her in "Nowhere," a place where winds and breezes can take on the shapes of anything they please.

In "Nowhere," three different breezes visit her and, one by one, show her three different stories. These stories, set in Mexico, Japan and Europe, are acted out in front of the serious little girl. As the stories unfold, Kay starts to wonder if maybe there is more to life than the black and white world she lives in. Through the romance of the story set in Mexico, the drama of the story set in Japan and the comedy of the European tale, the breezes convince Kay to believe in the magic of fairy tales and stories. "The Wind of a Thousand Tales" runs from Dec. 1 to Dec. 4, with the curtain rising at 7 p.m. the first three nights and 2 p.m. Dec. 4. Tickets are $9 for adults, $7 for seniors and $5 for students. With a donation of a toy and $9, two tickets can be purchased. For more information, call Ext. 2453.

Elizabeth Emge/ For The Telescope

Brisa (played by Nikyta Pamasani,left) takes disbeliever Kimberly Kay (Annette Homewood) on a romantic trip of the imagination in a Mexican setting.

Pearl Jam's new CD 'Vitalogy' proves they are here to stay â&#x20AC;˘ Band continues to head in the heavier musical direction seen on their last album 'Vs.' Brian Wallace Photo I Entertainment Editor

Less than a year after the release of their multi-platinum sophomore effort "Vs.," Pearl Jam has churned out their third album, "Vitalogy," certain to be one of this winter's hottest releases. This album is much in the same vein as their last release, in that it displays a more stripped-down rock n' roll approach rather than the somewhat pop-tinged feel of their debut album ''Ten." "Spin the Black Circle," the second track on the album, jumps out at you and kicks you in the teeth with its all-out ferocity. It's PearlJ am on

heavy doses of caffeine and it's as punk as they've ever gotten. Lead singer Eddie Vedder sounds like he's gonna lose his voice as he extols the virtues of vinyl: "Pull it out I paper sleeve I oh my joy I only you I deserve conceit I oh so big I my whole world I rather you I than her." "Not for You," a song which Pearl Jam played live on Saturday Night Live earlier this year, addresses the demands that fans put on Vedder and the group as a result of their superstardom. This theme is hinted at in some of the other songs as well. On this album, as in the past, Vedder has succeeded in writing lyrics that only he could ever really

CD REVIEW Pearl Jam "Vita logy" Epic Records

**** know the true meaning of. Lyrics like: ''Don't need a hand! I there's always arms attached I Oh don't get behind I I can't tum back I Why must we trust/all these rusted nails?" The song though, "Whipping," is so cool that you don't need to understand the lyrics to enjoy it. With the

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horsepower of guitarists Stone Gossard and Mike McCready, the song gallops along at a breakneck speed. Kicking off the second side of the album is a little ditty called "Pry To" in which Vedder just sings "PR-I-V-A-C-Y" over and over for about ten seconds. The message is clear. This little ''mini-song" is only one of many quirks on this albumquirks only granted to well-established groups who, no matter what they do, will sell millions of copies. For example, the very last track on the album consists of a little girl's voice talking about spankings and molestation and all sorts of things, while the band makes noises on their instruments in the background. It's not a song you want to hear again and again (thankfully it's the last track on the album) and certainly nothing that any major record company would allow a less successful band to waste money and studio time on. One of the greatest oddities of the album, though, is the artwork on the inside. It's set up like some sort of19thcenturymedicaljoumal with old clippings and illustrations throughout, as well as bassist Jeff Ament's photographs. Where the lyrics for the song "Bugs" should be (in which Vedder ponders what to do with the bugs in his

apartment... kill them, eat them, join them, etc.) there is a picture of a large dead cockroach on its back in place of the lyrics. Most amusing though, are the lyrics for the song "Corduroy," which consist of a sheet of Vedder's dental x -rays from two years ago. In direct contrast to this are the lyrics to "Aye Davanita." The song itself contains no lyrics except for the words "Aye Davanita," yet there are lyrics listed for it in the album liner. The real joy, no matter how interesting it is to dissect the album's liner notes, is in listening to the album. "Vitalogy" rocks, and that's all there is to it. This album firmly establishes the fact that Pearl Jam is no flash in the pan. They continue to put out thoughtful, well-written rock songs with plenty of kick. Despite being panned by some critics, the band remains popular with fans. Their last album went multi-platinum without the support of any music videos. Their new album looks to be even more popular. It was pre-released on vinyl two weeks before the CD and cassette release and in its flrst week, the vinyl version of "Vitalogy" managed to sell 38,000 copies. A feat unheard of in today' s record-less society.

PROMISED LAND: Continued from Page 12 nary people. "Damaged" is the account of a man who has uncovered repressed memories from his childhood through hypnosis: "Driving the nail into my head,lmemory flows like a riverJWith the one who lays beside me,!l'mhealingscarsfrommychildhood memories." "Out of Mind," a song about the mentally ill, is softer than most of the other songs, such as "I Am I'' and "Damaged." "Out of Mind" follows a man through a mental institution, meeting a little girl and an old man. Easily the weakest song on the CD is "Bridge," in which a father tries to reach out to the son he never knew, but it's too late. Unfortunately this track closely parallels Harry Chapin's "Cat' sin the Cradle" in its theme and tone. "Bridge"

doesn't detract from the other songs on the CD, but it could have been left off without anyone missing it. "9:28 am." is a decent instrumental written by drummer Scott Rockenfield, but doesn't serve much more purpose than to be the first song in the mini-suite which also includes "I Am I'' and "Damaged." Queensryche fans should be pleased with this new album after a long drought of no large amount of new music. Besides ''Last Time in Paris" from the soundtrack to "The Adventures of Ford Fairlane," and "Real World" from the soundtrack of "Last Action Hero," Queensryche has not released any new music since "Empire." "Promised Land" quenches the thirst of fans: ten high quality songs and one song that's only halfway decent.


14 CLASSIFIEDS

The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

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16 SPORTS

The Telescope

Friday, Dec. 2, 1994

SPORTS

• Comet football gains· bid after defeating Cerritos Chris Gleason Sports Editor

Palomar tromped the Cenitos Falcons 213 Nov. 19 on a chilly night. The questions from the reporters to head coach Thorn Kaumeyer, however, were not related to the game. The question on everyone's mind was, "Will Palomar's football team make it to a bowl game this year?" But even with the victory, the answer to that question was still up in the air. But not for long. Two days later an answer would come Palomar's 7-3 record, strong as it is, was no guarantee. The Comets had to receive an invitation. Kaumeyer said that Palomar's chance of making it to a bowl game related directly to what the opponent would be willing to face. In essence, is an opponent be willing to face a no-huddle offense in exchange for the honor of playing a national champion? An c; ••·nent is. Palomar will play Grossmont at the Hall of Fame Bowl at Mesa College Dec. 3 at 3 p.m. "(Getting the) bowl bid is something we can really build on. We love it," said Kaumeyer. This marks the Comets' sixth straight bowl season. Should Palomar win, it will also be their sixth straight bowl victory. Palomar's victory over Cenitos became the clincher. All of Palomar's scoring in the game came in thefrrst quarter. The Comets started off the frrst quarter with a touchdown pass to wide receiver Jason Mehaffey from four yards out. The remaining points came when Palomar defensive end Cory Minshew intercepted a Gary Tessitore pass and carried it 37 yards for the score. It was followed shortly by another touchdown-interception by Comet defensive back Calvin Walton, this one for 51 yards.

Tekscope file photo

Palomar running back Marc Crnkovic (32) races for a touchdown. Crnkovic led the Comets in rushing this season.

Walton also knocked Tessitore out of the game with a rocking sack late in the quarter. "I was just thinking, 'I wanna kill him,"' said Walton. "No one picked me up in coverage and BOOM!" The Falcons' only points came on a second-quarter field goal. Comet defense played a large part in this. Cenitos is considered a runnning team, and Palomar kept their opposition's running yards to 139 on 46 carries. That's an average of three yards a play for one of the best ground offenses in the state. Forcing the Falcons to abandon their gameplan forced the situations that allowed

for the interceptions. Comet star running back Marc Crnkovic suffered a pulled Achilles' tendon during the game and sat out most of the second half. Crnkovic is expected to play in the bowl game. The change from ex-head coach Tom Crafto to Kaumeyer had brought some doubts as to whether the Comets could function without Craft. "Going 7-3 is a lot more than some people expected us to do," said Kaumeyer. Winning a sixth straight bowl would be galaxies more.

Comet basketball falls to Arizona Western • AWC Matadors defend their No. 10 national ranking Jeremy Lynch Staff Writer

Arizona Western's men's basketball team brought something even more valuable than a No. 10 national ranking with them when they visited the Dome Nov. 19 to face the Comets. Experience. The Matadors used their experience to escape with a 75-66 victory. Issac Hilker and Brian Smith led the Comets with 14 points apiece. The loss dropped Palomar's record to 2-3 on the season. Comet head coach Richard Johnson knew going in that his team of only two sophomores and 12 freshmen would make some mistakes against a highly regarded team like AWC. ''We didn't play as smart as we could have," he said. "We seemed nervous in the

frrst half. We rushed things and made some mental errors, but that's to be expected being that we are so young," he added. Guard Todd Johnson commented, "Coach told us at halftime that we had nothing to lose. People said this was going to be a down year for Palomar, I think this gamesaysalotfor the program." He also added, "If we play like we did in the second half, we can handle any team in the nation." Palomar trailed much of the frrst half, but a tlrree pointer by Smith late in the half brought the Comets to within three points at 31-28. AWC came out of the ensuing timeout and turned up the pressure, converting two Comet turnovers into points to take a 35-28 lead into the locker room. In the second half, Palomar handled Awe· s

pressure defense, getting numerous shots from close range. The Comets' Palomar QB Gregg Wilbur (7) fires a bullet. only problem-the shots didn't fall. The Matadors took advantage of the Palomar shooting woes, increasing their lead to 58-41 midway through the second half. Palomar needed a lift ence down the stretch and six points is as to get them back in the game. Oddly enough, close as the Comets would get. Hilker did all they got it from an Arizona Western player. he could to keep Palomar close, scoring 10 of With 9:12 remaining, former Kearny and his 14 in the second half. Scott Taylor led the Matadors with 19 Madison High School star Donnie Collins was assessed a technical foul, his fifth foul of points. Craig Dixon added 15 to the cause the game, for elbowing a Palomar player on including tlrree big free throws late in the game. In his homecoming, Collins scored his way off the floor. The technical foul sent the Comets on an eight points before fouling out. Palomar now hits the road for almost a 19-8 run, with two Hilker free tlrrows cutting the lead to66-60with 3: l5left. Unfortunately month, before returning to the Dome Dec. 17 for the Comets, AWC showed their ex peri- to play Mt. San Antonio.

The Telescope 48.11  

The Telescope 48.11 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 48 / Issue 11 / Dec. 02, 1994 / the-telescope.com

The Telescope 48.11  

The Telescope 48.11 The Telescope Newspaper / Volume 48 / Issue 11 / Dec. 02, 1994 / the-telescope.com

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