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RIC-6385 4.4/66


Lower themes – Needs (Ages 5–7) Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2008 Copyright© R.I.C. Publications® 2008 ISBN 978-1-74126-666-5 RIC–6463

Additional titles available in this series:

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

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For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase.

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Lower themes – Changes Lower themes – Moving Lower themes – Places

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

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Date of Purchase:

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Signature of Purchaser:

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School Order# (if applicable):

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Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


Foreword Needs is one of a series of four books designed specifically for lower primary students. Needs utilises the personal experiences of students to investigate needs and wants and the people, products and services used to satisfy them. The widely-varied activities in this book cross many major learning areas but in particular connect to units in the key learning areas of Human Society and its Environment (HSIE), Science and Technology, Personal development/Health/Physical Education (PDHPE), Creative Arts (Visual Arts, Music, Drama, Dance) and English.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Contents

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Titles in this series: • Places • Needs • Changes • Moving

Teachers notes .............................................................................iv – v Connected Outcomes Groups overview.......................................... vi – vii

Who’s who at your house? .................................2–3

Money buys needs and wants ........................42–43

What are needs? ............................................4–5

Where does the money come from? ................44–45

Families meet our needs.....................................6–7

Things from the bank .....................................46–47

What are wants? .............................................8–9

Pocket money interview .................................48–49

Jobs for everyone .........................................10–11

Our wants and needs—art projects..................50–51

What’s the difference?...................................12–13

Bread: from the farm to your table–1 ................52–53

Considering others at school...........................14–15

Bread: from the farm to your table–2 ................54–55

Classroom wants and needs ...........................16–17

Investigating bread dough ..............................56–57

Things in our classroom .................................18–19

Goods and services ......................................58–59

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Care in the classroom role-plays ......................20–21

Buy – buy! ..................................................60–61

Classroom monitors.......................................22–23

Friendly food ...............................................62–63

Classroom rules............................................24–25

We’re going on a picnic! ..............................64–65

Feelings bingo .............................................26–27

More fun than food! ......................................66–67

Friends at school ..........................................28–29

Why do I need a home? ...............................68–69

I’m special! Who am I? .................................30–31

Homes here and there ...................................70–71

Picture sort ..................................................32–33

Why should I exercise? .................................72–73

What is my name? .......................................34–35

Everybody needs a friend! .............................74–75

In my school ................................................36–37

Same needs—Different ways ..........................76–77

A thank you gift ............................................38–39

Plant interview .............................................78–79

People who help us ......................................40–41

Animal needs ..............................................80–81

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Lower themes – Needs

iii


Teachers notes The pages in this book follow a similar format. A teachers page on the left-hand side accompanies a student page on the right-hand side.

Teachers page

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The teachers page has the following information:

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The title of the text is given.

Worksheet information details any background information required by the teacher or presents specific details regarding the use of the worksheets.

One or more indicators are given for each activity, providing the teacher with the focus of the activity and the behaviours students should demonstrate by completing the activity.

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Answers are given for all activities, where applicable. Most activities which are open-ended tasks require the teacher to check the answers.

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Additional activities suggest further activities to develop the topic in the same, or another, learning area.

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Outcome links are given for the particular learning area relating to the topic. These learning areas are predominantly English, Human Society and Its Environment, Science and Technology, Personal Development/Health/ Physical Development and Creative Arts. However, other learning areas have been included.

The information provided on the teachers pages gives complete details about using the worksheets during a lesson. This includes what the teacher could do before, during and after the lesson. Any additional materials or equipment needed other than lead pencils are mentioned. iv

Lower themes – Needs

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Teachers notes

Student page

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The student page has the following information.

The title reflects the type of activity to be completed. Answers are provided on the teachers page for this page if needed.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The activities on the student •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y page• are age-

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appropriate, requiring students to read, write, cut and glue, match, copy or draw in order to complete them.

o c . che e r o t r s super Age-appropriate artwork provides a visual reference for the activity and asists students who are visual learners or less capable readers.

Teachers should use their discretion when selecting and using the student pages in this book. It is expected that some of the worksheets will be completed with support from the teacher, rather than expecting early readers to be able to read the worksheets independently. R.I.C. Publications®

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Lower themes – Needs

v


Needs

Connected C onnected Outcomes Groups Overview

English

Human Society and Its Environment

Science and Technology

Creative Arts

PD/Health/ PE

Other

2–3

4–5

6–7

—–

8–9

10–11

12–13

14–15

16–17

22–23

24–25

28–29

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26–27

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20–21

©• R. I . C.P bl i ca i ons —u —t — Maths •f orr vi ew —pur pos son y•— — •e • e —l

18–19

vi

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Pages

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30–31

32–33

34–35

36–37

38–39

40–41

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Needs

Connected C onnected Outcomes Groups Overview

English

Human Society and Its Environment

Science and Technology

Creative Arts

PD/Health/ PE

Other

42–43

44–45

46–47

48–49

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50–51

52–53

54–55

56–57

58–59

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Pages

62–63

64–65

66–67

68–69

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70–71

72–73

74–75

76–77

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78–79

80–81

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© R•. I . C.Pu—bl i cat i ons — — f rr ev ew pu pose•sonl y 60–61 • •o •i —r —•

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Lower themes – Needs

vii


Who’s who at your house? Indicator • Identifies family members and their roles.

Worksheet information • Read a story about different types of families, such as Noisy Nora by Rosemary Wells or Let’s eat by Julie Vivas.

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• Ask the students to indicate the number of people in their family by raising their hands. Differentiate also the number of grown-ups and children. Discuss extended families such as grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins etc. (or as culturally appropriate).

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• Students complete the worksheet after reading the information and instruction with the teacher. Some students may need assistance to write words. • For students with large families, extra house shapes may be drawn on the back of the worksheet or students may be given another copy of the worksheet.

Additional activities

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• Talk about the jobs (roles) that people have at home and how everyone helps.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • View paintings of different types of families by different artists; for example, ‘Habitant family’ by •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Krieghoff, ‘The feast of St Nicholas’ by Jan Steen or ‘Portrat der famillie Lomellini’ by Anthonis van Dyck. • Ask students to paint a family portrait containing lots of details about each person.

Discuss the people in the families, their clothing and the colours, shapes, textures and techniques used in each painting.

Curriculum links

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• Ask students to design and make a set of Babushka dolls representing their own families, using readily available materials. Ensure that students think about the heights/sizes of each family member.

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English

HSIE

NSW

RES1.5, RES1.7, WES1.10

CCES1

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.7

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

CI 1.5

Vic.

ENRE0101, ENRE0104, ENWR0101

SOSE0101

WA

R1.1, R1.3, R1.4, W1.1

C 1.3

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Who’s who at your house? We all have families but they are all different.

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Write the names of all the people who live at your house and what they do.

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What are needs? Indicators • Identifies basic needs. • Matches basic needs to correct pictures.

Worksheet information

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• Discuss basic needs and write student suggestions on the board. Use numbers to find the three or five most important ones. Discuss how families satisfy these needs.

• Look at and discuss each picture and read and discuss the words. • Students draw a line to match the words to the pictures. • Check answers as a class and allow the students to colour the pictures.

Additional activities

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• Read the sentence at the top of the page with the students and the instruction.

• Students use role-play to show people eating and drinking, washing, hanging clothes on the line, ironing clothes, opening door and entering house, pulling on clothes to dress, putting clothes away etc.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Students draw a simple plan of a house with the only the basic necessities in it—beds, cupboards, fridge, • Cut out pictures from magazines of different types of food and sort them into basic foods and ‘extras or treats’.

Curriculum links

SA Qld Vic. WA

4

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table and chairs etc.

English

HSIE

RES1.5, RES1.7, RES1.8, WES1.10

SSES1

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1.3, 1.4, 1.8

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENRE0101, ENRE0103, ENRE0104, ENWR0101 R1.1, R1.3, R1.4, W1.1

Lower themes – Needs

1.10

CI 1.3, SRP 1.1 SOSE0101

R 1.1, C 1.2

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What are needs? We have basic needs which we must have to survive. Match the need to the correct picture.

food

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(b)

shelter

(c)

clothes

(d)

physical activity

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(e)

love

(f)

friendship

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Families meet our needs Indicators • Reads a poem with the teacher. • Identifies words from a poem relating to basic needs. • Identifies people in the family who help to satisfy needs.

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Worksheet information

• Revise the information about what needs are.

• Read the poem with the students, assisting them with any unfamiliar words.

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• Read the instructions for Question 3 and, if necessary, write names on the board for students to copy. • When the worksheet is completed, students may colour the picture. • To complete the lesson, discuss ways that people other than adults help at home and how these jobs are important too.

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• Discuss the instruction for Question 2 and complete Question 2 (a) as a class then allow students to complete (b) to (d) independently.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. (a) tummy (full)• (b) roof (over head) pyjamas (d) kiss, cuddle f or r e vi ew p(c)u r poses on l y• Answers

1. Teacher check

3. Teacher check

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Additional activities

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• ‘What would happen if ... ?’ Discuss scenarios such as ‘What would happen if the person who normally cooks dinner couldn’t do it?’ or ‘If the person who pays the bills forgot to do it?’ etc. • Sing songs such as ‘This is the way we wash the dishes’ etc.

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• Use common household items such as sponges, kitchen utensils etc. and brightly coloured paint to print artworks then write captions to accompany them. For example, ‘Mum uses the potato masher to make my favourite dish’.

Curriculum links

English

HSIE

NSW

RES1.5, RES1.7, RES1.8, WES1.10

SSES1

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld Vic. WA 6

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENRE0101, ENRE0103, ENRE0104, ENWR0101 R1.1, R1.3, R1.4, W1.1 Lower themes – Needs

CI 1.3, SRP 1.1 SOSE0101 R 1.1, C 1.2 www.ricpublications.com.au

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Families meet our needs 1. Read the poem with your teacher. When I am snuggled up in my soft, warm bed With my tummy full and a roof over my head, I wriggle in my pyjamas and wrestle and chuckle,

r o e t s Bo r e ptell about ... ok 2. Copy words which u S (a) food

(b) shelter

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As Mum and Dad say goodnight with a kiss and a cuddle.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(d) love

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(c) clothes

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3. Write the names of the people at your house who ...

(c) pay for the house (c) wash the clothes (d) buy the clothes (e) pay the bills (f) give love R.I.C. Publications®

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What are wants? Indicators • Reads information about wants. • Identifies wants and needs.

Worksheet information

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• Read the sentences at the top of the page with the students and discuss to ensure understanding. Ask students to give examples of wants.

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• Students put a cross on the wants and circle the needs to complete the worksheet. Check the answers as a class and allow the students to colour the pictures. • Ask questions such as: ‘Bob’s dad works from home on a computer. Does he need one? Why?’

Additional activities

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• Discuss different types of food which may be considered wants (such as treats and takeaway food). Consider also how some people want big, luxurious homes and many clothes but they don’t need them to survive.

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• Provide a collection of magazines and scissors and ask the students to cut out pictures of things they consider to be wants. Have the students glue them onto an enlarged printout of the word ‘wants.’ The students may need to cut off parts of the pictures which go outside the shape of the word. • Make a list of computer games which the students want to have at home.

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• The students draw a design for a magical machine which provides all the things they want.

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• As a personal development task, discuss why it may not be good for people to get everything they want and questions such as ‘What are people like who get everything they want? Do you think they are happy? Are they nice people? Are they selfish or do they share with others?’

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Curriculum links

HSIE

NSW

RES1.5, RES1.7, RES1.8, WES1.10

SSES1

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld Vic. WA

8

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English

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENRE0101, ENRE0103, ENRE0104, ENWR0101 R1.1, R1.3, R1.4, W1.1

Lower themes – Needs

CI 1.3, SRP 1.1 SOSE0101 R 1.1, C 1.2

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What are wants? Wants are things we do not need to survive. Wants make life more interesting or comfortable.

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Put a cross on the wants and circle the needs.

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Jobs for everyone Indicators • Writes the name of the person at home who regularly does each chore. • Indicates whether he or she helps with any of the chores and writes ideas for increasing his or her contribution.

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Worksheet information

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• Discuss domestic chores and who does them. How much does each student help in the home? Are there some jobs they cannot do for safety reasons; e.g. clearing the gutters, mowing the lawn? Make a list of jobs they could help with; e.g. tidying their belongings, watering plants, clearing the table after meals, collecting newspapers for recycling. • Make a collection of magazine pictures of people doing different domestic chores. Label each picture and display.

• Discuss why it is important for all family members to pull together to run the home and why this makes the difference between a house and a home. By helping in the home, each person is showing respect for the family unit and not expecting one or two people to do all the work. Having designated jobs to do can also provide a sense of worth; the knowledge that each person’s role is important.

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• Discuss ways in which chores can be incorporated into routines which encourage family members to spend time together and even have fun while they are working. Explain that spending time with people is the important thing whether it’s time raking the leaves from the lawn or fishing together.

Additional activities

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• On individual sheets of paper, write jobs in the home that can be done safely by each student. Each week, each student draws out a job and promises to do/help with that job for the whole week. At the end of the week, students report on their success and the response from their families. • Write an advertisement for a person to join the family. Write the skills he or she must possess and the chores he or she would be expected to do.

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• Draw and colour a number of pictures of each person in the house doing his or her regular chores. For each person, arrange the pictures in a frame and present it as a sign of appreciation.

Curriculum links

10

English

PDHPE

NSW

RES1.5, WES1.9

IRES1.11

SA

1.1, 1.3, 1.4

1.3

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

EPD 1.1

Vic.

ENWR0101

HPSR0102

WA

V 1.4, W 1.1

IPS 1

Lower themes – Needs

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Jobs for everyone Everyone in the house can help to make running the home an easy task. 1. (a) Under each picture, write the name of the person who does this job most of the time.

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(b) For each job, draw a happy face if you help or a sad face if you don’t help.

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2. How good are you at helping in the home?

Good

Not bad

Terrible

3. What could you do to help more at home?

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What’s the difference? Indicator • Compares aspects of life and records differences between home and school.

Worksheet information • Before the students complete the activity, discuss each aspect, asking questions to help them determine the differences between home and school. Write each question word on the board and encourage students to use them as they complete the task.

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• What? When? Where? Who? Why? How? Not all questions will be relevant for each aspect and some will be relevant for only school or only home. Encourage students to consider why the differences occur and give as much information as possible

• Explain that although there are many practical differences between home and school, there are many similarities; e.g. It is important to be considerate of others at all times and to this end there are rules at home and at school.

Additional activities

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f o r r e vi wnotp u p ose onl y• • Students give reasons why they would ore would like tor be schooled at s home. • Make a series of game cards asking questions to which the answer will be either ‘At home’ or ‘At school’. Use the cards to play Snap! or Pairs in which two At home or two At school cards must be matched to make a call or a pair.

English

HSIE

TES1.1, WES1.9

ENES 1

1.1, 1.3, 1.4

1.4

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

PS 1.4

Vic.

ENSL0101, ENWR0101

SOSE0101

WA

LS 1.1, W 1.1

PS 1.2

NSW SA

12

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• Create a labelled display of home/school images; e.g. Clothes—students in casual clothes/students in school uniform; Working—students performing domestic chores/students working in the classroom.

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What’s the difference? Fill in the table to show the differences between home and school. At home

At school

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Clothes

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Working

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Playing •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Rules

People

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Considering others at school Indicators • Writes possible consequences of the removal of some school rules. • Writes two rules which he or she believes to be important, giving reasons for the choice.

Worksheet information

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• Discuss the importance of rules: rules at home, in school and in the wider community. Why do they exist? Who creates them? Are they really necessary? For what reasons are they made?

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• Discuss the rules in your classroom. Do the students appreciate them? Do they obey them? Which rules do they agree/disagree with? What are their reasons? • Discuss what would happen without these rules. Do they think the possible consequences are worth risking? • Which rules do the students think are the most/least important? Arrange them in merit order. • Record keywords from the discussion on the board.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Additional activities

• Write a disaster story about a chain of events that occurred as a result of the absence of any school rules. • Use the computer to write a list of classroom rules.

NSW

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English

PDHPE

o c . che e r o t r s super

TES1.1, WES1.9

IRES1.11

1.1, 1.3, 1.4

1.3

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

EPD 1.4

Vic.

ENSL0101, ENWR0101

HPSR0102

WA

LS 1.1, W 1.1

IPS 1

SA

14

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• Write a list of jobs and a roster for doing them. Explain the importance of everyone taking his or her turn and performing the jobs correctly and promptly.

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Considering others at school School and classroom rules are made to make sure that everyone in school is safe and has a fair go at all things. 1. Read the school rules and write what could happen without each rule.

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Return all resources to their correct places.

Report any damaged equipment.

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Do not eat or drink at your desk.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f or r ev i ew pur posesonl y• Keep• your things on

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Raise your hand to ask or to answer a question.

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your desk.

o c . Write two rulesc in the classroom and why they are important. e her r o t s s r u e p Rules Reasons

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Classroom wants and needs Indicators • Labels items as ‘needs’ or ‘wants’. • Gives reasons for categorising items as ‘needs’.

Worksheet information

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• Explain that determining needs and wants is not always clear-cut as it can be difficult for younger students to understand that they are not the same.

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• In most classrooms in Australia, students are fortunate in that they have all the basic requirements for learning and a lot more besides. If possible, display pictures of classrooms in areas of the world where they have only the basic requirements. How is their classroom different?

• Take a selection of classroom equipment such as scissors, a ruler, and examples of maths and science equipment. Ask students if they are essential for learning, giving their reasons. Could anything else be used in their place? • What ‘needs and wants’ do the students and teacher have for the classroom? Make lists and justify the requests.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Research schools third world countries which rudimentary resources forl learning. •inf or r e vi e whaveptheumost r p oses on y• Compare and contrast the conditions in their own school with such a school. Additional activities

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• Make contact with a school in a third world country and, with the help of the local community, raise funds or send parcels to the school. Maintain contact with the school through a penpal system.

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• Choose a ‘need or want’ item for the classroom and write a story about life in the classroom before and after this item.

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Curriculum links

HSIE

RES1.5, WES1.9

ENES 1

SA

1.1, 1.3, 1.4

1.4

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

PS 2.3

Vic.

ENWR0101

SOSE0203

WA

V 1.4, W 1.1

PS 1.2

NSW

16

o c . che e r o t r s super

English

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Classroom wants and needs ‘Needs’ are necessary for survival. ‘Wants’ are things that make life more comfortable and fun but we would still survive without them. In the classroom, we have needs to survive in the learning environment.

2. (a)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

1. Look at each item. Is it a want or a need? Write W or N in the box.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• In the table, list any items you have marked as needs.

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Needs

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R.I.C. Publications®

Reason

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(b) Explain why you think they are needs.

o c . che e r o t r s super

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

17


Things in our classroom Indicators • Identifies the source of classroom resources. • Identifies the approximate cost of classroom resources. • Identifies who provides each resource.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

Teac he r

• Ask students to point to or hold up an item they need to use in the classroom. Discuss a couple of the items, talking about where each may have been purchased, what it is made from, how and where it was made and who provided it; e.g. school, government, parent.

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• Discuss the objects pictured on the worksheet. Students can draw or write what each is made from and circle the more realistic price of each item. • A blank space has been left for students to fill in one of their own choice.

Additional activities

• Compile and display flow charts of how a specific item needed in the classroom gets there; e.g tree to paper.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Make labels to attach prices of items needed in the classroom. Look in catalogues, magazines, newsagents etc. to find realistic prices.

Curriculum links

o c . che e r o t r s super HSIE

Mathematics

SSES1

ES1.1

1.10

1.6

Qld

SRP 1.1

N 1.1

Vic.

SOSE0101

MAMA0111

WA

ICP 1, NSS 1.3

N 6.1

NSW SA

18

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m . u

w ww

• As a personal development task, discuss that while specific items are needed in the classroom, should the price be taken into consideration? For example, a more expensive type of glue might stick things together better than another a less expensive type. Would it be worth spending the extra? Is it a need or a want? What about a ‘fancy’ pencil case compared to a ‘plain’ one? Is it worth spending the extra? Is it a need or a want?

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Things in our classroom Complete the table. Add one of your own. Object

What is it made from?

How much could it cost?

$2

$9

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p o u scissors k S

50¢

lead pencil

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons$1.50 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

$5

$7

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glue

desk

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pencil case

$2

o c . che e r $15 o t r s super

$6

$180

$

Talk about who provides you with each thing in your classroom. R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

19


Care in the classroom role-plays Indicators • Identifies and role-plays appropriate and inappropriate ways of using classroom resources. • Identifies safety, hygiene and organisational issues involved in using classroom resources.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

• Suggestions for using the role-plays:

Teac he r

– Distribute pairs of role-plays to pairs of students. Ensure they understand what is written on each card. Together, the two students work out suitable role-plays to perform to the class. Props can be used and words added. The class then discusses the appropriate and inappropriate behaviours in each role-play and the consequences.

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– Read the role-play pairs to the class. After listening to each of the pair, discuss the appropriate and inappropriate behaviour and the consequences for each; e.g. ingesting the lead in a pencil is bad for your health, sharpening into the student’s tray means the dirty sharpenings will also dirty books, papers etc

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Discuss the importance of using classroom resources properly; e.g. they cost money, they were provided •f or vi e wthem ptou r p os so l y for us so we should take carer ofe them, we want last as long as e possible so n others can• use them and money will be saved, it is important to appreciate things done for or given to you.

– As above, but only show the inappropriate role-play. Guide a discussion on what should happen, then ask the other student to perform the appropriate role-play.

Additional activities

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• Students give other suggestions for appropriate and inappropriate ways to use classroom resources and perform role-plays for them. • Create reminder posters that show appropriate and inappropriate ways to use resources in the classroom. Include consequences.

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• Students can help create merit certificates to distribute to students who demonstrate appropriate behaviours with classroom resources.

Curriculum links

20

HSIE

Creative Arts

NSW

SSES1

DRAES1.1, DRAES1.3, DRAES1.4

SA

1.10

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

Qld

SRP 1.1, SRP 1.4

DR 1.1, DR 1.2, DR 1.3

Vic.

SOSE0101, SOSE0102

ARPA0101, ARPA0102

WA

ICP 1, NSS 1.1, NSS 1.2, NSS 1.3

AI 1, ASP 1

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Care in the classroom role-plays A. Person 1 is carrying a pair of scissors back to the desk with the pointy ends sticking out.

r o e t s Bo r e B. Person 2 has finished a jigsaw. p ok for recess and Person 1 has The siren sounds u finished a jigsaw. S he/she quickly and carefully The siren sounds

Teac he r

B.

A. Person 2 is carrying a pair of scissors back to the desk with the pointy ends pointing down towards the floor.

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puts it back in the box and places it on the shelf.

for recess and he/she leaves it on the floor.

C. Person 2 is © R. I . C.Pub l i c at i onas sharpening over •f orr evi ew pur ppencil o s e sonl y• the classroom

C. Person 1 is sharpening a pencil into the tray in his/her desk.

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m . u

bin.

D. Person 1 keeps chewing on the end of his/her lead pencil while thinking.

D. Person 2 places his/her lead pencil on the desk while thinking.

E. Person 1 is using marker pens and doesn’t put the lid back on when changing colours.

E. Person 2 is using marker pens and puts the lid back on when changing colours.

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R.I.C. Publications®

o c . che e r o t r s super

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

21


Classroom monitors Indicator • Identifies the roles and responsibilities of classroom monitors.

Worksheet information • Explain the term ‘monitors’ if your class is familiar with the term ‘helpers’.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Students then complete the worksheet, writing (or having scribed) a brief sentence about the job and illustrating it. Share in a small group or with the whole class.

Additional activities

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Teac he r

• Read the introductory text on the worksheet about Grace’s and Jack’s monitoring role in their class. With the students, compile a list of monitoring jobs in their class. Discuss why it is important to have monitors, why is is important to have turns being a monitor and the role and responsibility of each type of monitor.

• Students help design and create a new monitor chart if the present one needs replacing. Explain how they are often laminated so names can be written on, wiped off and replaced or name tags are put into slots or attached with velcro™.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Discuss what should be done if a monitor is not doing his or her job properly. Also discuss the responsibility of• each class member to i assist the monitor inr doing hiss ore hers job;o e.g. closing f o r r ev ew pu po n l ypad •ready to be collected, making sure glue pot lid is on properly ready to be collected. • Students suggest other jobs that could be added to the monitoring roster.

SA Qld

22

PDHPE

English

COES1.1, DMES1.2, INES1.3, IRES1.11

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5, RES1.6, WES1.9

w ww

NSW

m . u

Curriculum links

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1.3, 1.5

1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9

o c . che e r o t r s super

EPD 1.1, EPD 1.2, EPD 1.4, DEPD 1.5

Vic.

HPSR0101, HPSR0102

WA

SMS 1, IPS 1

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENRE0104, ENWR0101, ENWR0103, ENWR0104 LS 1, R 1, W 1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Classroom monitors Hi! Our names are Grace and Jack. We have monitors in our class who do special jobs. The monitors change every two weeks. This time it is our job to give out books and pads and collect them.

r o e t s Bo r e p oclass. Write the names u of two types of monitors in yourk S Explain each job and draw a picture about it. Monitor(s) name(s):

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Teac he r

What monitors do you have in your classroom?

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Monitor(s) name(s):

R.I.C. Publications®

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

23


Classroom rules Indicators • Understands the reasons class rules are made. • Identifies his or her classroom’s rules.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Read the introductory text on the worksheet about what Grace and Jack say about classroom rules. Discuss. Ask: ‘Why do we have classroom rules?’ ‘What would happen if we didn’t have certain rules?’ ‘What happens when someone doesn’t obey a classroom rule?’

• Students then complete the worksheet, writing (or having scribed) a brief sentence about two rules and illustrating each. Share in a small group or with the whole class.

Additional activities • Perform role-plays of breaking and following classroom rules.

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Teac he r

• With the students, revise their classroom rules.

• Communicate with another class in the same year, or a year lower or higher in the school. Compare rules and see which are the same and which are different.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Curriculum links

SA

24

w ww

NSW

m . u

• Tally the number of days everyone in the class follows the class rules. After a set amount, allow the class to participate in a treat as an acknowledgment of their achievement. Students can decide with the teacher what a suitable treat would be; e.g. being allowed out to recess early (under teacher guidance until duty teacher arrives), a free activity session, having a story read to them while they ‘relax’, making healthy treats in a cooking session (fruit kebabs etc.).

PDHPE

English

COES1.1, DMES1.2, INES1.3, IRES1.11

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5, RES1.6, WES1.9

1.3, 1.5

1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Qld

EPD 1.1, EPD 1.2, EPD 1.4, DEPD 1.5

Vic.

HPSR0101, HPSR0102

WA

SMS 1, IPS 1

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENRE0104, ENWR0101, ENWR0103, ENWR0104 LS 1, R 1, W 1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Classroom rules Hi! Our names are Grace and Jack. We have a list of classroom rules to follow. They make our classroom a happy, healthy and safe place to be. One of our rules is remembering to say ‘Please’ and ‘Thank you’.

r o e t s Bo r e p o your classroom Write a sentence u and draw a picture about two ofk S rules.

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Teac he r

What are some of your classroom rules?

Rule:

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Rule:

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

25


Feelings bingo Indicator • Plays a bingo game using words and illustrations showing different feelings.

Worksheet information Introduction

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss some of the ways we know how other people are feeling; e.g. what they say, what they do and how they look.

Preparation

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Demonstrate this by asking students to identify the eight different feelings shown on the cards from your facial expressions; supported, if necessary, by some appropriate actions.

• Photocopy page 27 onto A3 or A4 paper or light card. One page will be needed for each group of up to five students; that is, a card for each player and a set of eight cards for the group leader to read out. • Each set of cards should be cut out and distributed to a group. (Note: If laminated, they will be more durable.) • The four players in each group will each need six counters.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The game • or r e v i ew po se s on l y • The leader turns thef eight cards face down on the p desku in r random order and selects and reads• them in • Allow time for students to familiarise themselves with the words and the illustrations on their cards.

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turn, leaving the cards he or she has read face up. The players place a counter over each feeling as it is read out. The first player to cover all the feelings on his or her board and to call out ‘bingo’ is the winner and becomes the group leader for the next game.

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Additional activities

• Students listen to different scenarios and work with a partner to discuss and decide how a particular character would probably be feeling.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

• Feelings cards are placed in a bag and individual students take turns to select a card and describe when, why or how they had this feeling or what could happen in the future to make them feel like this. • Students draw faces on paper plates showing a particular feeling. Invite other students to identify the feeling then use the plates to make a class ‘feelings’ collage.

Curriculum links

26

English

PDHPE

NSW

TES1.1 RES1.5

COS1.1 INS1.3

SA

1.1

1.3

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

1.4 D1.5

Vic.

ENSL0101 ENRE0101

HPSR0101

WA

LS1.4 R1.1 R1.3

IPS1

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Feelings bingo happy

surprised

confused

sad

sad

excited

scared

worried

excited

scared

worried

surprised

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Teac he r

worried

r o e t s Bo r e pangry o u happy k S

angry

w ww confused

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happy

scared

R.I.C. Publications®

sad

excited

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr ev i ew pur po sesonl yconfused • angry happy surprised scared

o c . che e r o t r sads worried surprised s uper confused

www.ricpublications.com.au

angry

Lower themes – Needs

excited

27


Friends at school Indicator • Completes a ‘My schoolfriends’ poster providing visual and written information about friendships.

Worksheet information Introduction

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Read a book about friendship, such as The very best of friends by Julie Vivas or Rose and the midnight cat by John Brown. Discuss why the characters are friends, the things they do together and what they think of each other.

Teac he r

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• Ask students to think about their schoolfriends. Working with a partner, they should take turns to describe what their friends look like, the things they do and why they like them. Encourage students to ask their partners clarifying questions about the friends they describe. Activity

• Students should draw one, two or three of their schoolfriends and identify them by printing their name near each drawing. They can then finish the worksheet by completing the sentences and drawing a picture of one of the activities from the list of those they share with their friends.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional activities

• The students’ My schoolfriends’ pages could then be compiled in a class ‘Book of friends’ or displayed on a board.

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• Draw a story map of the book about friendship that was read to the class. They could focus on how the friends worked together to reach a resolution.

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• Make a ‘Wanted—a friend’ poster featuring a drawing of an imaginary friend and a list of characteristics required of this friend; e.g. My friend must have a sense of humour, like swimming, love animals, be kind. Some students may choose to advertise for a less realistic imaginary friend with, for example, superhuman abilities and/or unusual appearance.

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Note: Positive characteristics for the posters could be discussed, brainstormed and listed on the board for student reference prior to this activity. • Write an class acrostic using the letters in the word ‘friends’.

Curriculum links

English

Creative Arts

NSW

TES1.2 TES1.3 RES1.5 WES1.9

VAS1.1

SA

1.4 1.5

1.2

Qld Vic. WA 28

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101 ENSL1012 ENWR0101 ENWR0103 ENRE0101 LS1.1 LS1.3 LS1.4 R1.1 W1.1 W1.3 Lower themes – Needs

VA1.1 ARVA0101 ASP1 www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Friends at school

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1. Draw your schoolfriends and write their names.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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2. (a) I like

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My schoolfriends because

o c . (b) We like to c do these things: (c) Draw one thing you do e her r together. o t s super • • • • R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

29


I’m special! Who am I? Indicator • Solves riddles to identify adults who are special.

Worksheet information Introduction

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Explain that there are adults who are special in our lives. These people care about us and try to help look after us. They are people we can trust and if we had a problem or were in some sort of trouble we know that we could ask them for help. Encourage students to nominate and categorise some adults who are special to them and make a list on the board. Ensure these include ‘teacher’, ‘neighbour’, ‘brother’, ‘grandfather’, ‘mother’ as they are the answers to the riddles. Students may also include personal names for these people such as ‘Grandpa’ or ‘Mum’. Activity

• A discussion about the relationship between family members and some practice in working them out will assist students to solve the riddles. For example: Grandfather is Mum or Dad’s father and Mum is Grandfather’s daughter. After solving the riddle and copying (or having scribed), students should draw a picture of each person in the space provided.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f opairs rr vi e pu r p o se sgroups on l ythen•be • Further opportunities for ofe students to w share their stories with other small should provided. • The students then work with a partner to complete the questions.

Additional activities

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• In a small group, students take turns to explain about a person who is special in their lives and what makes this person special to them. • Make a collage of student ‘My special person’ drawings and add name and relationship labels.

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• Role-play scenarios in which students are required to seek assistance from an adult.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Brainstorm and make a list of characteristics of ‘special’ adults.

Curriculum links

English

PDHPE

NSW

TES1.2 TES1.2 RES1.5 WES1.9

COS1.1 INS1.3

SA

1.3 1.4 1.8

1.3 1.5

Qld Vic. WA

30

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101 ENSL1012 ENWR0101 ENWR0103 ENRE0101 LS1.4 R1.1 W1.1

Lower themes – Needs

1.2 1.4 HPSR0102 IPS1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


I’m special! Who am I? 1. I work in a school. You are in my class. Who am I? You are my Could you ask me to help you?

r o e t s Bo r e I live in a home. p o u k My home is next to yours. S Who am I? Yes

No

You are my Do you think I’m special?

Yes

.

No

3. I am a boy. We have the same mum and dad. Who am I? You are my Are we in the same family?

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Teac he r

2.

.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons . s •f orr evi ew pur po esonl y• No

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4. I am a man. My son is your dad.

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Who am I? Am I older than Dad?

Yes

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Yes

.

5. I am a female. You are my son. Who am I? Am I older than you?

Yes R.I.C. Publications®

.

No www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

31


Picture sort Indicators • Identifies products and services that help to meet our needs. • Identifies the source of a variety of products and how each is made. • Identifies where a product can be bought or where a service can be found.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

• The pictures on the worksheet show a variety of products and services that help to meet our needs. Discuss how each does this.

Teac he r

Suggestions for using the worksheet

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• Students first identify which pictures answer the following question examples given by the teacher. The aim is to get the students to identify the source of the product, what a service is, where it can be purchased/found and how it is made. – Which picture(s) show(s) someone who helps us? – Which picture(s) show(s) something that comes from an animal? – Which picture(s) show(s) something that comes from a plant?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Which picture(s) show(s) something that can be delivered to your home?

– Which picture(s) show(s) something that has been made in a factory (manufactured)?

– Which picture(s) show(s) something that we can buy in a supermarket/butcher/florist/department store/bakery? –

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• Students then colour and cut out the pictures so they are ready for sorting. They can glue appropriate pictures under headings in a scrapbook or on a sheet of butcher’s paper. Headings could include: ‘Comes from an animal’, ‘Comes from a plant’, ‘Someone who helps us’, ‘Has things that are made in a factory’, ‘Bought at a shop’.

Additional activities

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• Find pictures of products and services in magazines to add to the collection above.

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• Tally objects in the classroom to show examples of things made from plants and things made from animals.

Curriculum links SciTech

32

HSIE

English

NSW

PSES1.5

SSES1

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5

SA

1.1

1.10

1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, 1.9, 1.11

Qld

MAT 1.1

SRP 1.1

Vic.

TEMM0101

SOSE0101

WA

TP 1.1

ICP 1, NSS 1.3

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENSL0103, ENRE0101, ENRE0104 LS 1, V 1, R 1.1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Picture sort

doctor r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

newspaper

police officer

carrot

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Teac he r

water

library

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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. te

T-shirt

shoes

o c . che e r o t r s bread flowers sup er

electricity R.I.C. Publications®

meat

m . u

car

www.ricpublications.com.au

milk

house Lower themes – Needs

33


What is my name? Indicator • Identifies and matches the name of the person who helps provide a product or service.

Worksheet information • This activity can be used as a follow-up activity to the one on pages 32–33. If the previous activity has not been completed, students will need more discussion about what a product and a service is, the source of a variety of products, where a variety of services can be found and how they help to meet our needs.

Teac he r

• Discuss each of the people on the worksheet who help provide a product or service. Assist with reading the sentences. Ask students to suggest the name of the person who provides the product or service. Students colour the pictures, cut out the labels at the bottom and place them on the correct picture. Initial letters etc. will assist them in recognising each name.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss how more than just the person named on the worksheet helps to provide each product or service; for example, a car dealer has to buy cars from a factory where they are manufactured by other people and equipment. The various components of a car come from metals mined from under the ground.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Tally and graph thef occupations of v students’ parents and thes service they provide or the product • orr e i ew p uidentify r po es o nl y • they help produce. Additional activities

Curriculum links NSW SA

34

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• Role-play purchasing a product, with students taking turns to be the shop assistant and the customer. Pay attention to how each character should behave; e.g. being polite to customers, asking if they need help, the correct way to take money and give change, a customer waiting patiently if the shop assistant is busy, handling products carefully and being aware of ‘Do not touch’ signs.

o c . che e r o t r s super HSIE

English

SSES1

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5, RES1.6

1.10

1.1, 1.3, 1.7, 1.9, 1.11

Qld

SRP 1.1

Vic.

SOSE0101

WA

ICP 1, NSS 1.3

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENRE0103, ENRE0104 LS 1, V 1, R 1

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R.I.C. Publications®


What is my name? Cut out the labels below and place them on the correct picture. I look after sick people.

I sell bread and cakes.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

I sell flowers.

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Teac he r

I sell meat.

I sell houses. I keep people safe.

I sell cars.

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I sell newspapers and magazines.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• I let people borrow books.

o c . che e r o t r s super

butcher

librarian

police officer

doctor

baker

real estate agent

florist

newsagent

car dealer

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

35


In my school Indicators • Identifies a variety of people who work in a school and their role. • Identifies a variety of facilities found in a school and their use.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Instructions for making the booklet: Enlarge sheet to A3 size if desired. Cut along all dotted lines. Fold along all solid lines. Holding the ends, push the middle pages outwards to form an eight-page booklet.

Teac he r

Additional activities

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• The booklet gives some examples of people and facilities that can be found in most schools. Compare what is the same and different in their school. Students could go for a walk around their school to compare these places and find out some facilities or people (not just teachers!) who work there that they may not be aware of. Other facilities or helpers could include the school library, the computer room, the music room, parent helpers in the classroom or canteen/tuckshop, sporting coaches, swimming pool, oval, staff room, uniform shop, undercover area, wet areas attached to classrooms, toilet blocks, car parks, bike racks, netball/basketball courts, gardener’s shed and so on.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •off o rr e vi ew uforr p es onl y• • Take photographs the people above and make p labels eacho to s identify them.

• Compile a list of school helpers on a large chart or whiteboard. Write notes about where they can be found, who they help, how they help and if their work is voluntary or if they are paid.

NSW SA Qld

36

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Curriculum links

m . u

• Create verbal or written directions to explain how to get from the students’ classroom to a specific school helper or facility.

HSIE

English

SSES1, ENES1

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5, RES1.6

1.4, 1.10,

1.1, 1.3, 1.7, 1.9, 1.11

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o c . che e r o t r s super

SRP 1.1, PS 1.4

Vic.

SOSE0101, SOSE0103

WA

ICP 1, PS 1.2, NSS 1.3

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENRE0103, ENRE0104 LS 1, V 1, R 1

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R.I.C. Publications®


1. This is the cleaner.

7. And this is the principal’s office!

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 2. This is the gardener.

In my Teac he school r

In my school

5. This is the sickbay.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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4. This is the sports storeroom.

R.I.C. Publications®

m . u

6. This is the photocopy room.

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3. This is the canteen.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Lower themes – Needs

37


A thank you gift Indicators • Identifies a person who helps him or her. • Designs and makes a thank you gift for that person. • Evaluates the success of the gift.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• With the students, discuss why gifts are given; e.g. for birthdays, Christmas, when babies are born, weddings, engagements, house warmings, as a thank you gesture of appreciation. Ask them for examples of the types of gifts they like to receive (they want or need that item).

• Identify someone who has helped them and think of a simple gift they could make that person. Ask them to think about what the person likes or likes to do, so the gift will be suitable. Brainstorm some ideas. • Students can discuss with others how they will make the gift, the materials they will need and draw pictures of their design plans on scrap paper. Other students can suggest changes.

• Students make their gift and draw a picture of the completed gift on the worksheet. After they have given the person their gift, students write about (or have scribed) what happened when they gave the person their gift. They can share responses with the class and talk about any changes they would make (if any), or consider any class member’s suggestions, if they made it again.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional activities • Role-play how students should behave if receiving a gift they didn’t really want.

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• Compile a chart of the type of people the students chose to make their gift for (Mum, Dad, coach, teacher, tutor, grandfather, grandmother, friend, cousin etc.) and the types of gifts they made.

• Conduct a survey to tally the gift each student would like to receive for their next birthday and graph the ‘top ten’.

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Curriculum links

SciTech

NSW SA Qld Vic. WA

38

o c . che e r o t r s super

PSES1.5, DMES1.8, UTES1.9 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 TP 1.2, TP 1.3, TP 1.4, MAT 1.1, MAT 1.2 TEMM0101, TEMM0102 TP 1

Lower themes – Needs

HSIE

English

SSES1

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5

1.10

1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.9

SRP 1.1 SOSE0101 ICP 1, NSS 1.3

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENRE0101, ENWR0101 LS 1.1, LS 1.4, V 1.1, R 1.1, R 1.4, W 1.1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


A thank you gift It is nice to give a thank you gift to people who have helped us. •

Who will you make a thank you gift for?

What will you make ?

Think about what you will need to make your gift. Talk to a friend about it.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Make your S gift and draw a picture of it in the box.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Give your gift to the person.

What happened?

R.I.C. Publications®

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

39


People who help us Indicator • Identifies how a variety of workers in the community help to meet his or her needs.

Worksheet information • Discuss the type of work students’ parents do and make a list. Include any voluntary work; e.g. a parent might help with reading in the classroom or be on roster in the school canteen. Ask students to identify which work is paid and which is unpaid (voluntary).

Teac he r

• Identify how a variety of jobs performed help to meet our needs. Discuss the jobs on the worksheet. Students complete the worksheet by writing a sentence about what each person does. A blank space has been left for students to choose their own example to label, draw a picture of and write a sentence about.

Additional activities

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Organise parents or members of the community to visit the class and explain what they do. Students could help to write focus questions to ask each person. They could take turns in asking the visitor a question. Include questions about why he or she chose that job, how long he or she has had that job, why he or she still does it and so on.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Brainstorm to list occupations in a class alphabet search, where occupations are listed under each letter •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• of the alphabet. • Students role-play a variety of jobs for the class to guess the occupation or voluntary work.

Curriculum links

Qld Vic. WA

40

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English

SSES1

TES1.1, TES1.2, RES1.5, WES1.9

1.10

1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.9

m . u

SA

w ww

NSW

HSIE

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0101, ENSL0102, ENRE0101, ENWR0101

o c . che e r o t r s super

SRP 1.1

SOSE0101

ICP 1, NSS 1.3

Lower themes – Needs

LS 1.1, LS 1.4, V 1.1, R 1.1, W 1.1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


People who help us There are many people in the community who help to meet our needs.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Write a sentence to explain how each of these people helps us.

A police officer

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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A surf lifesaver

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A shop assistant

o c . che e r o t r s super

Your choice: R.I.C. Publications®

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Lower themes – Needs

41


Money buys needs and wants Indicators • Reads information about how needs and wants are obtained. • Identifies needs and wants which require money to obtain. • Identifies the people who provide money to buy needs and wants.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

• Revise the meaning of ‘needs’ and ‘wants’.

• Read and discuss the information at the top of the student page.

Teac he r

• The students complete the answers to Question 1 independently. • The students read the instructions and complete Question 2. • Students may colour the pictures when completed. If desired, students may colour the needs and wants which require money one colour and those which do not require money another colour.

Additional activities

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• Read the instruction for Question 1 with the students and discuss the pictures.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Students design and make a set of notes and coins for use in monetary transactions in the class shop. • Students cut pictures and prices of goods from colour magazines and glue them to paper to create a collage. Use a computer program to create and print an appropriate label to attach to the collage.

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Curriculum links

English

HSIE

RS1.5, RS1.6, RS1.7, WS1.9

SSS1.7

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

SRP 1.1

Vic.

ENRE0201, ENWR0201

SOSE0203

WA

R2.1, R2.3, W2.1

ICP 2.2, R 2.1

NSW SA

42

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m . u

• Use a monetary system of reward for classroom behaviour and work, where ‘pretend money’ can be earned and exchanged at the end of a given time frame for things such as time on a computer, free reading time etc.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Money buys needs and wants Our parents use money to get many of the things that we need or want. To get some things, like love, friendship and physical activity, we do not usually need money.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

1. Write ‘M’ next to all the needs and wants which need money to get them.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

2. Write the names of the people at your house who work to get money to buy needs and wants. R.I.C. Publications®

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Lower themes – Needs

43


Where does the money come from? Indicator • Completes information about own family’s income.

Worksheet information • Some discussion should take place before completing the worksheet.

Teac he r

• Read the instructions and information with the students and encourage them to complete as many answers as possible independently. • Since answers will vary for individual students, select a few students to offer their own answers for specific questions.

Additional activities

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Students may also need to gather some information from home to complete the worksheet. Students should be told not to divulge any personal financial information which parents may not want others to know. For example, students may need to write down words such as ‘credit union’ or ‘building society’ but not specific information about which company. If desired, the worksheet can be completed as a homework activity.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • View and discuss the artwork on banknotes: Who may have drawn them and why? What details are shown on • eachf different Discuss design forp each to create hisl or her• own orbanknotes? r evi e wap ur ostudent ses on y banknotes. What would he or she put on it? Using a specific medium, students draw a design for one or

• Role-play using play money to buy goods at the class shop. Give the students a specific amount of money and ask them to buy ‘needs’ first and then ‘wants’ with any remaining money.

more denominations. Repeat with coins.

Curriculum links

44

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• Read books about money, including A bargain for Frances by Russell Hoban; A quarter from the tooth fairy by Caren Holtzman; Alexander, who used to be rich last Sunday by Judith Viorst; or The Berenstain Bears’ trouble with money by Jan and Stan Berenstain.

o c . che e r o t r s super

English

HSIE

NSW

RS1.5, RS1.6, RS1.7, WS1.9

SSS1.7

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

SRP 1.1

Vic.

ENRE0201, ENWR0201

SOSE0203

WA

R2.1, R2.3, W2.1

R 2.1

Lower themes – Needs

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R.I.C. Publications®


Where does the money come from? Money that goes into a bank for a family to use to buy needs and wants is called income. Income may come from earning wages or a salary, a pension or benefits from the government, running a business, or other sources.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok 1. Write words to complete u S the sentences.

(a) The people who live with me who earn money are ...

.

(b) They get the money to buy needs and wants from ... (Copy words from above or write one or more of your own.)

2. Answer the questions.

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(a) Where can a family put its money to keep it safe?

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o c . che e r (b) What things doesr a family spend its income on? o t s super

(c) Do families need to be careful how they spend their income?

Yes R.I.C. Publications®

No

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Find a partner and discuss why. Lower themes – Needs

45


Things from the bank Indicator • Identifies and discusses things involved in getting or using money from a financial institution.

Worksheet information • Read the instructions and then look at the pictures.

Teac he r

• Students complete the worksheet by colouring the relevant items.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss each picture, deciding what it is and how it relates to the subjects of money and financial institutions. Students should indicate whether they have ever seen people using each item to work with money. Items such as the computer for Internet banking and the telephone for telephone banking may need to be explained. As students may have seen some, but not all, of the items shown, a discussion of who would use what (and why) should occur; for example, the money bag may be used by a small shopkeeper to deposit money in a night safe etc.

• Discuss how often people actually go into a financial institution to complete transactions and how often banking is done by ATM, Internet, telephone etc.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Discuss what a• PINf number and howi andw why itp is used. orisr ev e ur posesonl y• Additional activities

• Count the number of students who have seen people use each item, then tally and graph results.

Curriculum links

w ww

English

HSIE

RS1.5, RS1.6, RS1.7, WS1.9

SSS1.7

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

SRP 1.1

Vic.

ENRE0201, ENWR0201

SOSE0203

WA

R2.1, R2.3, W2.1

ICP 2.2, R 2.1

NSW SA

46

m . u

• Set up a financial institution in the classroom with as many of the items shown as possible. Include an outside ATM and a computer and telephone in the ‘home section’.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Lower themes – Needs

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R.I.C. Publications®


Things from the bank Colour the things that you have seen people use to get, or use, money from the places which look after money.

ATM card

cheque book

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

passbook

statement

© R. I . C.Pubwithdrawal l i cat i ons form •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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deposit slip

Automatic teller machine (ATM)

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money bag

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safety deposit box

o c . che e r o t r s super

computer

R.I.C. Publications®

bank vault

telephone

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

47


Pocket money interview Indicator • Completes an interview sheet about a classmate who receives pocket money.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Ensure that the students have plenty of time to write answers and have a firm book or sheet of cardboard to lean on when filling out the interview sheet. • When the interview sheets have been completed, some students may share responses if the interviewee is happy to allow it.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Read and discuss the information at the top of the page. Ask the students to indicate if they receive pocket money by raising their hands. The number of hands raised will determine the form of the interview. If a limited number of students raise their hands, a small group of students may interview one student rather than doing it in pairs. Care must be taken when discussing this topic that no students feel embarrassed, due to strained family financial circumstances, if they do not receive pocket money.

• Discuss what people do with pocket money. Have the students indicate whether they save or spend their pocket money. Discuss the concept of saving for an item which costs a lot.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Some children do not receive pocket money. Ask students to offer reasons for this.

• List other ways to earn money. For example, some students may receive money as a reward for doing well in a spelling or maths test or piano exam or eisteddfod, while some may receive money from the tooth fairy when a tooth falls out. • Discuss ways to keep money safe.

m . u

Additional activities

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• Play maths games about money including Money! Money! Money! by Richard Korbosky (a lower primary maths game published by R.I.C. Publications).

• Role-play purchasing goods from a supermarket, including collecting bags, wallet/purse, checking money, shopping for goods, counting out money to pay the sales assistant, collecting the sales receipt and carrying the goods home and putting them where they belong.

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• Using drawing, painting or sketching skills and techniques and their memory, students create an artwork of their parent’s financial institution or their most frequently-used local ATM.

Curriculum links

48

English

HSIE

NSW

RS1.5, RS1.6, RS1.7, WS1.9

SSS1.7

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.10

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

SRP 1.1

Vic.

ENRE0201, ENWR0201

SOSE0203

WA

R2.1, R2.3, W2.1

ICP 2.2, R 2.1

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Pocket money interview Some children earn a regular amount of pocket money by doing jobs for their family at home. Find a classmate who gets pocket money. Interview him or her and write the answers on the sheet.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Spocket money? Who pays your Where does he or she get the money to pay you? How often are you paid pocket money?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Name of person

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

What jobs do you have to do to earn your pocket money?

. tdo with the o What do youe c . money you earn?c e her r o t s super Do you think that the money you earn is a fair amount? If your answer is ‘No’, say why and what would be a fair payment. R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

Lower themes – Needs

49


Our wants and needs—art projects

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Indicators • Creates artwork using mixed media to represent people’s needs and wants. • Writes an artist’s statement describing the artwork. Worksheet information • Prior to this lesson, collect the materials listed on the worksheet and organise them into separate trays for each project. Arrange the classroom into four work stations. Set up a project at each station. Depending on the time and materials available, students rotate through more than one station. • Ask the class what the difference is between a ‘need’ and a ‘want’. Divide the board in half. Students offer examples of each. Record their ideas, helping them to see that some things they may believe to be needs are actually wants. A ‘need’ is something we use to survive (e.g. water, food, clothing, air, shelter, love). A want is something we would like to have but is not essential for our survival (e.g. a new toy, TV). • Read each of the project procedures with the class. Clarify each to ensure understanding. • Divide the class into four groups, allocating each group a project. Decide if the students will work individually, in pairs or small groups. Students complete the projects. • Note for Project 1: Wants – Aluminium foil art Students use aluminium foil and shape it to create models of the different objects people want. Cardboard can be used to strengthen the objects and to make straight edges. • Note: Project 3: Needs - Lettering art If students are familiar with using word processing programs and illustrating programs, have computers available to them to type words and change their look with the use of artistic fonts. • Once the projects are completed, explain the meaning of an ‘artist’s statement’. An artist’s statement includes: name of the artist; how and when the artwork was created; the materials it is made from; and why the artwork was created (its purpose). • Students write drafts and once they have been checked by a teacher, publish their statements. The statements are displayed next to their artwork. Additional activities • Combine all of the ‘needs and wants’ art projects to compile a whole-class artwork. Students give the combined art piece a title and, as a class, write an artists’ statement about the piece. Invite other classes to come and view the work. • Take photographs of the individual art pieces and use them to create a Powerpoint™ presentation about needs and wants. • Discuss the ‘wants’ shown in the artwork. Consider and discuss people who live in Third World countries. Would their ‘wants’ be different to the ones shown in the artwork? Make a class list of the possible ‘wants’ of people from Third World countries. How do they differ from our own? Curriculum links

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50

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Creative Arts

HSIE

NSW

VAS1.4

SSS1.7, ENS1.6

SA

1.3, 1.2

1.10, 1.11, 1.4

Qld

VA 1.1, VA 1.2, VA 1.3

PS2.1, PS1.1, PS2.2

Vic.

ARVA0101, ARVA0102

SOSE0101, SOSE0201

WA

ASP 1, AR 1

R1.1, R2.1, PS1.2

Lower themes – Needs

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Our wants and needs–art projects 1. Follow the procedures to create one or more of the art projects. 2. Write statements about your art to display with your work.

Project 1:

Wants – Aluminium foil art

Needs – Modelling clay art

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u What to do: S • Work and

What to do: • Work and shape aluminium foil to make models of a variety of different items that people want; for example: jewellery, cars, TV, toys, boats.

Materials: • modelling clay

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Teac he r

Materials: • aluminium foil • clear tape • cardboard • markers

Project 2:

shape modelling clay to make models of a variety of different items that people need; for example: shelter (homes), healthy food, water, clothing and shoes.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i o s Project 3:n Wants – Magazine •f orr evi ew pur poseson l y• collage Needs – Lettering art

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Materials: • lettering book • white art paper • coloured card • thin black marker • word processing computer program • stencils

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Materials: • magazines • glue • scissors • coloured card

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Project 3:

o c . che What to do: e r o t 1. Brainstorm words of ther needs we s super have that can’t be seen—such as love, friendship, hugs etc. 2. Using either stencils, a lettering book or a computer program, write one of the words in a creative style. 3. Cut it out, glue it onto coloured card and outline it with a black marker. R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

What to do: 1. Look through magazines for pictures of items that people want; for example: toys, sweets, electrical goods, jewellery, cars, holidays etc. 2. Cut out the pictures and glue them onto coloured card (making sure there are no gaps) to make a ‘wants’ collage. Lower themes – Needs

51


Bread: from the farm to your table – 1 Indicators • Learns about the process of growing and grinding wheat to make bread. • Matches text to accompanying pictures and creates a flow chart.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Note: Pages 52–53 and 54–55 are to be used in conjunction with each other. • Begin the lesson by asking the class the following two questions: – Where does bread come from?

• Discuss with the class that certain foods have a number of steps to go through before they reach the supermarket shelves; for example, bread begins as a small grain of wheat, which is obtained from a field where it is grown. • Read the text with the class. Clarify meaning to ensure understanding.

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Teac he r

– Who is having a sandwich for lunch?

• Students work individually or in pairs to decide which picture matches each text box. The matching number is written in the box in the picture.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • o r r e i ew pthem ur se so n l y • The students cut outf the text and thev pictures and glue inp theo correct order on an A3 sheet• of paper. • Explain to the class that a flow chart is a diagram which shows the step-by-step operation of a system. If available, show the class other examples of flow charts. Arrows are drawn between the pictures to indicate order of process.

• Students colour their flow charts.

m . u

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Additional activities

• In small groups, students use the library and the Internet to determine how wheat was harvested and ground to make flour in the past (before the invention of big machines and factories). Groups report their findings to the class.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

• Draw, label and colour a wheat grain, showing its main parts. Include which part of the grain is used to make white flour and wholemeal flour. • Read and discuss the story ‘The little red hen’. Ask the class questions such as: What did the wheat need to germinate?; What had to be done so the wheat could be eaten as bread? etc.

Curriculum links

52

Science and Technology

HSIE

NSW

ESS1.6

SSS1.7, ENS1.6

SA

1.8, 2.8

1.10, 1.11, 1.4

Qld

NPM1.2, NPM2.2, E+B1.3

PS2.1, PS1.1, PS2.2

Vic.

SCSC0101, SCSC0201

SOSE0101, SOSE0201

WA

NPM 1, NPM 2

R1.1, R2.1, PS1.2

Lower themes – Needs

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Bread: from the farm to your table – 1 Follow your teacher’s instructions to create a ‘Bread: from the farm to your table’ flow chart, on a separate A3 sheet of paper. 1. A farmer uses a tractor to pull a machine which plants the wheat seeds (the grain).

2. Rain and sunshine help the seeds to grow into tall stalks of wheat.

r o 4.e The farmer transports the wheat t s B r e oo in a truck to be sold to a flour p mill. u k S Inside the mill, the wheat is 6. The flour is put into bags and sold

5.

cleaned and ground into flour.

7. The baker mixes the flour with other ingredients and then bakes it into loaves of bread.

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3. When it is dry, the farmer harvests the wheat using a combine harvester.

to bakeries and supermarkets.

8. The loaf of bread is sold to consumers (you and me) and eaten.

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Bread: from the farm to your table – 2 Indicator • Considers the ramifications if one step of the bread making process is altered.

Worksheet information Note: Pages 52–53 and 54–55 are to be used in conjunction with each other.

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• Review the process of how wheat becomes bread. Students will need to have completed, and to be able to refer to, the worksheet on page 53 to complete the activity on page 55.

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• Students work individually, in pairs or in small groups to discuss and record their ideas about the consequences of each problem on the bread making and selling process. • Once completed, students share and discuss their ideas with the class.

Additional activities

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• Read each of the problems listed on the worksheet with the class. Clarify each problem with the class to ensure understanding.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Students create and conduct a survey to find out how past generations bought, baked and ate bread. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Students choose one of the problems listed on the worksheet and draw a cartoon strip showing the problem and what they think the consequences would be.

Science and Technology

HSIE

ESS1.6

SSS1.7, ENS1.6

1.8, 2.8

1.10, 1.11, 1.4

Qld

NPM1.2, NPM2.2, E+B1.3

PS2.1, PS1.1, PS2.2

Vic.

SCSC0101, SCSC0201

SOSE0101, SOSE0201

WA

NPM 1, NPM 2

R1.1, R2.1, PS1.2

NSW SA

54

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Curriculum links

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• Create a class list of other foods which require processing before they can be eaten (such as rice and milk). Extend this to products which are extracted from the ground and require processing before they can be used (such as object made from metal). Discuss.

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Lower themes – Needs

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Bread: from the farm to your table – 2 Now that you know how bread is made, what do you think would happen if one step of the process changed?

FRESH BREAD

Read each problem and write your ideas in the table. Problem

What could happen?

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(b) The rollers at the mill which grind the wheat into flour, break down and are not fixed for a number of days.

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(a) A drought means the grain in the ground does not receive enough rain to grow to become big wheat stalks.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (c) The • flour mills raise the price of a f o r r e v i e w p ur posesonl y• bag of flour.

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(d) The truck drivers who deliver the flour to the bakeries and supermarkets go on strike for a week.

(e) Bakeries and supermarkets raise the price of a loaf of bread.

$ 2.90 $ 3.50

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Investigating bread dough Indicators • Conducts an investigation to discover which conditions cause bread dough to rise the fastest. • Investigates by observing, predicting, testing, collecting and recording data. Worksheet information • Have all ingredients measured and in small containers ready to use. Alternatively, if time permits, have measuring cups and spoons available so students can measure the ingredients themselves.

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• Baked goods rely on carbon dioxide bubbles created by mixing yeast, sugar and warm water for them to rise. Yeast is a fungus which converts sugar to carbon dioxide gas. The carbon dioxide expands and create bubbles that cause the bread to rise. This process takes time, so bakers use yeast in the dough which they then leave for several hours.

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• The students are testing to see which conditions cause the yeast to produce carbon dioxide the fastest, making the bread rise (double in size) faster.

Safety note: If the dough mixtures are to be baked and eaten, strict hygiene must be adhered to at all times. Remind students to wash their hands at all stages. All working spaces and equipment must be washed with hot, soapy water and dried thoroughly before the experiment begins. • To bake 12 rolls: Extra ingredients—milk for glazing; margarine for greasing. Extra equipment—pastry brush for glazing; greased oven trays. Procedure (continued from worksheet):

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

8. Punch down dough mixture (with one firm punch with fist) and knead for one minute. 9. Divide each lump of dough into four and roll into a ball and shape as you wish.

10. Arrange on lightly greased tray. Cover with a clean tea towel for 20 minutes to rise. 11. Brush with milk and bake for 15–20 minutes. Makes 12 rolls.

• While tasting, students can compare the quality of the rolls from the three different dough mixtures.

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1. Observation: The yeast mixture will look foamy

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Answers Prediction: The dough left near the warm heater will double in size first, followed by that on the counter top and then the fridge. The dough in the fridge may never actually reach the size of the others, as the cold temperature may kill the yeast. Additional activities

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• Organise an excursion to a local bakery so students can see first-hand how bread is made.

• Visit a local supermarket and record the different varieties of bread available (such as pizza bases, pitta bread, soda bread etc.) Find out which types of breads originated from different countries. • Students repeat the procedure but create their own novelty bread design (such as in the shape of an animal or car etc.) • Alter the experiment by adding water of different temperatures to the dough mixture. Try cold water, warm water and very hot water. Which produces the best results and why? Curriculum links

56

Science and Technology

HSIE

NSW

ESS1.6, INVS1.7

SSS1.7, ENS1.6

SA

1.8, 2.8

1.10, 1.11, 1.4

Qld

NPM1.2, NPM2.2, E+B1.3

PS2.1, PS1.1, PS2.2

Vic.

SCSC0101, SCSC0201

SOSE0101, SOSE0201

WA

NPM 1, NPM 2, I 1.2, I 1.3

R1.1, R2.1, PS1.2

Lower themes – Needs

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Investigating bread dough Follow the procedure to make bread dough. Ingredients

Equipment

• 1 tsp dried yeast

• 1/2 tsp caster sugar

• 5 bowls

• 2 cups plain flour

• 1/2 tsp salt

• chopping board

• 1 tbs milk powder

• 2 tsp caster sugar

• plastic wrap

• 3 tbs warm water

• 1/2 cup warm water

• watch or clock

r o e s Bo • 3 tea towels •t extra oil r e p ok • extra flour u S Bowl 1

Procedure

1. Combine the yeast, 1/2 tsp sugar and 3 tbs warm water in a bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap and leave for 10 minutes. Your observations:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Bowl 2 Make well inr the centre of the mixture and •af or ev i ew pu r po sesonl y•

2. Mix the flour, salt, milk powder and 2 tsp sugar in a bowl. 3.

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• 11/2 tbs oil

add oil, yeast mixture and 1/2 cup warm water.

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5. Place mixture on chopping board and knead for 10 minutes. Use extra flour if needed. 6. Divide mixture into three lumps and place each in oiled bowls. Cover with tea towels. 7.

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4. Mix to a soft dough.

Bowl 3

. te on counter. Bowl 2: In refrigerator. o Bowl 1: Place c . ch Bowl 3: Place near a heater set at its lowest e r er o temperature. st super

Your prediction •

Write the order in which you think the dough mixtures will double in size (1–3).

The results

Bowl 1 Bowl 2 (counter) (fridge)

Bowl 3 (heater)

Order

Record your results on a separate sheet of paper. R.I.C. Publications®

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Goods and services Indicator • Differentiates between goods and services.

Worksheet information • To start this lesson, read the students a book such as ‘Let’s get a pup!’ said Kate by Bob Graham. After reading the story, ask the students what kind of things the family might need for their new pet. Write their suggestions on the board, on either side of a vertical line; goods to one side (such as pet brush, bowl, toys, collar, lead, food) and services on another (such as vet, grooming and clipping).

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• Explain to the students that when we spend money, sometimes we buy things that we can touch and use, the sorts of things we buy at the shops. These things are called ‘goods’. (Label the column on the board with the goods in it ‘goods’.) Some things we spend money on are activities that people do for us, like when we pay someone for mowing the lawn or cleaning. These things are called ‘services’. (Label the column on the board with the services.) Ask the students to suggest other goods and services, and write these on the board under the appropriate headings. Before sending students back to their desks, remove these suggestions from the board.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional activities

• Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Students fill in the missing words to complete the sentences, then label the pictures as either ‘goods’ or ‘services’. To complete the worksheet the students write as many other goods and services as they can think of in the table under the appropriate headings.

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• Students could interview a parent whose job involves providing a service. Students could ask what sort of activities this person does, and which needs or wants are met through the provision of this service.

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• Students could decide which goods and services they would need if they got a new pet.

Curriculum links

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English

HSIE

RES1.5, RES1.6

SSS1.7

1.3

1.10, 1.11

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

SRP1.1

Vic.

ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104

SOSE0203

WA

R1.1, R1.3, R1.4

R1.2, R1.3, ICP1.1, ICP1.3

NSW SA

58

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Goods and services Goods and services are the things we spend money on. 1. Complete the sentences using the words from the box. activities

for

shops

things

r o e t s Bo r . e p ok u that other people do (b) Services Sare we can buy from

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(a) Goods are

us.

2. Look at the pictures. Below the pictures, write if you think they are goods or services.

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3. Write other goods and services in the table. goods

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services

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Buy-buy! Indicators • Understands advertising affects they way people spend money. • Creates a newspaper advertisement for a fictitious cereal aimed at a specific market.

Worksheet information

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• For this activity, teachers will need to prepare A3 sheets of paper and paints in a variety of colours.

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• Take a newspaper (with colour ads) to the classroom. Flick through the pages and stop on the colour advertisements. Talk about what the ads are for—when people make goods, they want as many people to buy them, so they make advertisements to encourage people to buy those goods. Talk about what pictures and colours are used, the wording that is used and the information that is presented in the ad: Why are the colours bright? Why are there few words? Why is the writing large? If there are people in the ad, how do they look? Who do you think the advertisers want to buy the product?

• Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Explain to them that they are going to be advertisers, making a newspaper or magazine ad for a new product called ‘Crispy Crunchies’. They need to think carefully about who they think will most likely buy this cereal: young children, teenagers or adults. Then they can decide what images they will use (cartoons, young or older people, healthy fruits, bikes or surfboards, etc.), the colours, the text and the size of that text.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • After drawing a plan for his or her ad, each student paints it on a sheet of A3 paper. Encourage the •page f o rcolour. r ev i e w pocan se so n l y • students to fill the with Once the ads p are u dry,r students discuss them with the class, explaining their choice of colours, images and words.

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Additional activities

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• Students could sort ads cut out from magazines or newspapers according to their target market. Label three boxes; children, adults and teenagers. Students sort the ads and put them into the appropriate box. • Ask students to bring an ad for food to class to examine critically, looking at the different ways the advertisers try to sell the foods (looking at the different colours and messages, if the price is displayed or not, if there are pictures of people in the ad etc.)

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• Students could plan a television or interactive Internet advertisement for a product of their choice.

Curriculum links NSW SA Qld Vic. WA 60

English RS1.5, RS1.6, RS1.7, WS1.10, WS1.13 1.3, 1.7, 1.11 Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104, ENWR0103, ENWR R1.1, R1.3, R1.4 W1.1, W1.2, R1.2, V1.2 Lower themes – Needs

HSIE

Creative Arts

SSS1

VAS1.1, VAS1.4

1.10

1.1, 1.3

SP1.1

VA1.1, VA1.2, ME1.2

SOSE0203

ARVA0101

R1.1, NSS1.3

AI1, ASP1, AR1, AIS1

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Buy-buy!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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‘Crispy Crunchies’ is a new breakfast cereal. Your job is to make an advertisement for Crispy Crunchies to put in a newspaper or magazine. Think about: • who you think will eat the cereal • what colours and pictures you will put in the ad • what words will be in the ad, and how big the words will be. Draw a plan for your ad in the box below. When you have finished, paint your ad on a separate sheet of paper.

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Friendly food Indicators • Understands the need to eat healthy food. • Identifies healthy foods and snacks.

Worksheet information

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• Prior to introducing this worksheet, obtain a copy of The Australian guide to healthy eating (available to download for free from <http:// www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/Publishing.nsf/Content/healthpubhlth-publicat-document-fdcons-cnt.htm>). It is similar to the ‘food pyramid’; however, fats and sugars are listed separately and fruit and vegetables are separate categories.

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• Remind the students that one of our needs is food. Explain that there are different types of food, some of which we need to eat every day and others we don’t. Display the poster and ask the students what they can see. Ask the students what groups of food are shown and why there are more of some foods and less of others. Explain that the poster shows us what sort of foods, and how much of these foods, we should eat. Discuss the need to eat from all the food groups to stay healthy, ensuring they understand different foods contain different vitamins and minerals that we need to maintain good health (our bodies cannot make these vitamins and minerals).

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional activities • Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Read the text with them and explain the tasks. Students follow the instructions to complete the worksheet.

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• Students could investigate particular vitamins, which food sources each come from and their function in the body. They could present their research to the class as a an oral presentation.

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• Students can play nutrition games in the Internet at <http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/kids/activitiesmain.asp>. • Discuss some of the dangers of eating too many unhealthy foods. Students could contribute to writing a class song or poem that helps people understand healthy eating.

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Curriculum links

English

PDHPE

NSW

RS1.5, RS1.6, WS1.9, WSS1.11

PHS1.12

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.6, 1.8

Qld Vic. WA

62

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Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENWR0103, ENWR0104, ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104 W1.1, W1.3, R1.1, R1.3, R1.4

Lower themes – Needs

PHIC1.2 HPIP0101, KU1

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Friendly food Food contains vitamins and minerals our bodies need to stay healthy. Some foods are full of good things our bodies need, and these are the foods we need to eat most of. Other foods, like some fatty and sugary foods, we don’t need to eat because they have few vitamins or minerals.

Teac he r •

2. Draw three healthy snacks you like to eat.

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r o e t s Bmost r e we need to eat ooof. 1. Write the types p of foods u k S •

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3. Find and colour the healthy foods in the apple. eggs

meat fish

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milk cereals vegetables legumes fruit R.I.C. Publications®

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We’re going on a picnic! Indicators • Plans for a class picnic. • Incorporates knowledge of healthy foods into food selection.

Worksheet information • As an introduction to this worksheet, read a picture book to the students about a picnic, such as This is the bear and the picnic lunch by Sarah Hayes, The most perfect spot by Diane Goode, The Bears’ picnic by Stan and Jan Berenstain or We’re going on a picnic by Pat Hutchins.

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• Discuss what picnics are: Why do we have picnics? What happens during a picnic? Where do we go and what do we take on picnics? What makes picnics special?

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• Tell the students that they are going to have a class picnic. Ask the students what decisions they will need to make—when and where the picnic will be, who will come to the picnic, what food should be taken and what activities there will be to make it a fun occasion. Refresh the students’ knowledge of healthy foods. Write these decisions and suggestions on the board (be aware of any food allergies among the students).

• Give each student a copy of the worksheet to complete. Once they have finished, compile the ideas on the board and with the students reach a consensus as to when and where the picnic should be held, what food and equipment will be necessary, and what games will be played. Together with the students, work out what food and drink you will purchase from the shop and who will prepare the foods.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Together, prepare and conduct the picnic as planned and reflect on it afterwards. Additional activities

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• On a paper plate, students could paint their favourite thing from the picnic.

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• Play a game with the students. One student starts by saying ‘I’m going on a picnic and I’m bringing a (e.g. blanket)’. The next student repeats this and adds one item of his or her own; e.g. ‘I’m going on a picnic and I’m bringing a blanket and some cake’. Continue with each student adding one item to the list until it is too long to be remembered!

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• Cover paper plates with a square of red and white checked tablecloth (paper or plastic) onto which students glue pictures cut from magazines of healthy picnic foods. • Look for famous artworks of picnics. Students can analyse the styles of painting (such as the impressionistic works of Monet and Cézanne) and paint their own picnic scenes.

Curriculum links NSW SA Qld Vic. WA 64

English RS1.5, RS1.6, WS1.9, WSS1.11 1.3, 1.4, 1.8 Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENWR0103, ENWR0104, ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104 W1.1, W1.3, R1.1, R1.3, R1.4 Lower themes – Needs

PDHPE PHS1.12, PSS1.2 1.6, 1.8

Science and Technology DMS1.8 1.3

PHIC1.2

TPI1.1

HPIP0101

TEMM0102

KU1

TP1.2

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R.I.C. Publications®


We’re going on a picnic! Write your plans for a great picnic. What ingredients do I need to buy?

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What activities will there be to make it fun?

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What healthy food and drink do I take?

What equipment do I need for the activities?

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Where, when and how will I have What utensils (tools) do I need? the picnic (on blankets/chairs, under a tree/inside etc.)?

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More fun than food! Indicators • Identifies fun social activities other than eating. • Creates a short play about initiating and participating in social activites other than eating.

Worksheet information

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• Discuss how eating is something we tend to do with others, such as family and friends; it is a social activity.

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• Discuss other social activities that students could do which might be more fun than eating food! Ask for suggestions as to other activities that people do together, such as going for walks, going for bike rides, going to the beach, ball games, treasure hunts, playing marbles, cards and dancing.

• Give each student a copy if the worksheet. Read the poem with the students. They then write (or draw if necessary) four social activities that they could do as an alternative to eating. Once they have completed Activity 1, they then go around the class and try to find, through questioning other students, someone else in the class who enjoys doing each activity.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional activities

• With one of these people they create a short play, starting with the suggested (or a similar) introductory line, to demonstrate how they could suggest an activity different to eating next time they are invited to do something by a friend.

• Chart the different activities enjoyed by the class. Work out which activities are the most popular.

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• Make a class collage of pictures from magazines of fun things to do other than eating.

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• Students could write an invitation or email to a friend suggesting the things they could do together other than eating.

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Curriculum links

PDHPE

NSW

RS1.5, RS1.6, WS1.9, WS1.11,

PHS1.12, COS1.1, PHS1.12

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, 1.10

1.5, 1.7

Qld Vic. WA

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English

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENWR0104, ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104, ENSL0101, ENSL0102

W1.1, W1.3, R1.1, R1.3, R1.4, LS1.2

Lower themes – Needs

EPH1.1, EPD1.2, EPD1.3, PHIC 1.1 HPIP0101 IS1, SMS1, KU1

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R.I.C. Publications®


More fun than food! Sharing a snack or meal together Can be enjoyed in every weather! But what else could you do for fun Next time you catch up with someone?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u 2. Find one person in your class who also enjoys doing S each activity. Write their name in the box.

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1. In each box write four ‘social’ things you could do instead of eating.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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this activity, too.

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this activity, too.

enjoys

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this activity, too.

enjoys

this activity, too.

enjoys

3. With one of the classmates from above, create a short play about suggesting an activity other than eating. Start the dialogue with one person saying ‘Hi, do you want to come over for afternoon tea/lunch?’ Write your dialogue on the back of the worksheet, if you wish. Act out your play for the class. R.I.C. Publications®

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Why do I need a home? Indicator • Identifies different features of homes and how these features help us survive.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Read the text with them and explain that they are required to label each feature of the home, then write how that feature fulfils a need/needs. Students then write any other features they can think of that a home has that fulfils a need, such as cupboards to store clothes, electricity, heating and cooling, and a place to be with family.

Additional activities

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• Review the needs we have as humans. Focus on shelter—why do we need shelter? Talk about homes and how the various features of houses fulfil some of our needs; the roof and walls provide shelter from the sun, wind, rain and cold. Houses keep us warm in winter and shaded in summer, protect us from dangerous animals or people, and help give us light when it is dark. There is a place in our homes to keep clothes and homes provide us with a place to store food, to eat and drink, and to be with our loved ones.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Make a die with a different feature of a home on each side: door, window, light, wall, roof, kitchen/

• Students could paint an imaginary house with as many special features to keep them safe and secure as they can incorporate.

Curriculum links NSW SA Qld Vic. WA

68

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bedroom. Students take turn rolling the die and draw the feature they roll on a sheet of paper, continuing until they have drawn a complete home. Students evaluate the home they have drawn and decide what this home would be good for; e.g. for protecting people from the sun, for keeping people warm, keeping unwanted visitors out.

English

HSIE

RS1.5, RS1.6, WS1.9, WSS1.11

ENS1.6

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.5, 1.10

o c . che e r o t r s super

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENWR0103, ENWR0104, ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104 W1.1, W1.3, R1.1, R1.3, R1.4

Lower themes – Needs

SRP1.1

SOSE0101

ICP1.1, PS1.1

www.ricpublications.com.au

R.I.C. Publications®


Why do I need a home? Our homes keep us safe and protected. Different parts of our homes do different things to help us survive.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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1. Label each part of the house. Write how each part helps to protect us or meet our needs.

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2. Write any other features of homes that help us meet our needs.

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Lower themes – Needs

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Homes here and there Indicators • Understands that people adapt their homes to suit the environment. • Draws homes with features suitable for different environments.

Worksheet information

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• As an introduction to this lesson, you may wish to play the song ‘Home among the gum trees’ (by B Brown/W Johnson; popularly sung by John Williamson) for the students, encouraging them to join in (a copy of the lyrics can be found at <www.australiaday.gov.au/ pages/images/give_me_a_home.pdf>). Ask the students to describe some of the features of the home in the song. Where is this home? How do you know? What special features does it have? Why does it have a verandah? Is it the same or different to your home? Are homes everywhere like this home?

• Explain that homes are different from place to place. A major reason homes differ is because of the environment. People build their homes differently in order to survive in different environments. Things such as temperature, rainfall, winds, landforms and available building materials in the area affect the way homes are built. Give the students the example that, in many parts of Australia, the weather can be quite hot, so many houses have verandahs, pitched roofs and air-conditioning. Importantly, mention that in places where heavy rains or flooding occurs, houses are built on stilts so the people and their belongings can stay dry. In countries with heavy snow, the roofs are often sharply pitched to help the snow to fall off them.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Read the text with them and ensure they understand the

procedure. Students then draw a house that they think would suit each child, to meet his or her needs in that particular environment.

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• To conclude, students may wish to share their drawings with the class and explain the features they have drawn and how these features suit the specific environment.

Additional activities

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• Students could investigate the school buildings and appliances used at school and discuss how they suit the local environment.

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• Students could select a country and research how homes are traditionally built in that country. How are the homes built to keep people safe and comfortable?

Curriculum links

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English

HSIE

NSW

RS1.5, RS1.6,

ENS1.6

SA

1.3

1.4

Qld

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au>

PS1.1

Vic.

ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104

1.1

WA

R1.1, R1.3, R1.4

PS1.2

Lower themes – Needs

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Homes here and there We need homes to keep us comfortable, dry and safe. The way homes are built to do this depends on the environment. The shape of roofs, the number and size of windows and the building materials and appliances used depend on the environment where people live.

r o e t s r 2. Draw a house to suit the environmentB where e ooeach child lives. p u k My name is S Santoso. I live in a

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1. Read about the places where the children live.

village in Malaysia. It rains a lot here and sometimes it floods. There is lots of wood and bamboo near our village. It is hot, too, but we dont have airconditioning to cool us down.

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Hi, I’m Sienna. I live in outback Australia, on a cattle station. It hardly ever rains here and it gets really hot. We have electricity which we use to help keep us cool in summer and warm in winter. There are lots of rocks and stones near our place.

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Why should I exercise? Indicators • Describes the physical and emotional benefits of exercise. • Identifies and draws three enjoyable ways to exercise.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Ask the students to reflect on our needs, one of which is exercise.

• Ask the students why they think exercise is a need. What might happen if we don’t exercise? What does exercise do to us to help us stay alive?

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– a reduced the risk of developing heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, some kinds of cancer, diabetes, obesity, depression and anxiety – reducing or maintaining body weight or body fat – building and maintaining healthy muscles, bones and joints and flexibility

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons sleeping better. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

– improving psychological well-being

– enhancing performance during work, recreation, and sport –

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• Ask the students to list some of the ways exercising helps us to be healthy and happy. Some of these include:

• Ask for some suggestions as to ways we can be active and exercise. Write the suggestions on the board.

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• Give each student a copy of the worksheet and read the text with them. Following the instructions, they draw three of their favourite ways to exercise, then write a description of how each activity is beneficial to them.

Additional activities

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• Each student could paint his or her favourite form of physical activity. When dry, students could write what the activity is, and its benefits. These could be collated as a class book.

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• Students could design and make posters encouraging other students in their school to exercise.

Curriculum links

English

PDHPE

NSW

RES1.5, RES1.6, WES1.9, WSES1.11

ALS1.6

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.8

1.6, 1.7

Qld Vic. WA

72

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENWR0103, ENWR0104, ENER0101, ENER0103, ENER0104 W1.1, W1.3, R1.1, R1.3, R1.4

Lower themes – Needs

DCSPA1.3, PHIC1.1 HPIP0101, HPMP0202 SMS1, KU1

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Why should I exercise? Exercising helps our bones, lungs and muscles to be strong, stops us becoming overweight, helps stop us getting some diseases and can make us happier and more confident. Exercise doesn’t have to be hard work ... it can be great fun! Jumping on the trampoline, bushwalking, swinging, kicking a football with friends or going for a swim are all great ways to exercise. 1.

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how it is good for you.

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2.

r o e t s Bo r e pfavourite ways to exercise.ok Choose three of your u In each box,S draw a picture of you doing these activities and write

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Everybody needs a friend! Indicators • Understands that people join or form groups to satisfy the need for friendship and a sense of belonging. • Identifies a variety of groups children could belong to.

Worksheet information

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the statement ‘Everybody needs a friend’. Ask students how they would feel if they had to be on their own all the time. Talk about the groups they form at school to play games or ‘hang out’ with during break times.

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• Students write about a group they belong to in the speech bubble and draw themselves discussing the group. The group may not be an organised club. For example, it could be a friendship group the student has at school. Students share what they wrote with a small group.

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• Read and discuss the groups the children on the worksheet belong to and what they enjoy most about being part of that group. Students can relate more information about the groups if any of them are in a similar group or club.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Create posters that explain what a particular group/club does and why it would be good to join that Additional activities

• Create a class display of photographs, uniforms, equipment, trophies, badges and so on from groups students belong to. group.

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• Brainstorm to list groups in the community available to only children, adults and children and only adults.

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• Sort the groups above into categories such as sporting, religious, artisitic, cultural or leisure.

Curriculum links

o c . che e r o t r s super HSIE

English

SSS1.7

TS1.1, TS1.2, R1.5, RS1.6, WES1.9, WS1.11

SA

1.10, 1.11

2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.9, 2.12

Qld

SRP 1.1, SRP 2.2

Vic.

SOSE0202, SOSE0203

WA

ICP 2, R 2.1, R 2.2, NSS 2.3

NSW

74

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Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0201, ENSL0202, ENSL0204, ENRE0201, ENRE0202, ENRE0204, ENWR0201, ENWR0204

LS 2.1, LS 2.4, V 2.1, R 2.1, R 2.2, W 2.4

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Everybody needs a friend! Everybody needs a friend! Of course, there are times when we do things on our own. But we all have the need for friendship and to belong to a group. One way to do this is to join a group or club. Read about the groups these children belong to.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Hi! I’m Anil. I belong to the South Park Football Club. Our coach teaches us skills such as how to dribble and pass the ball. We play a proper game on Sunday mornings. It’s great fun!

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Hi! I’m Riley. I belong to Cub Scouts. We have great fun learning new things each week. Last week we made model racing cars from recycled materials. This week we’re racing them against each other!

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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My name is Jorja. I’m a nipper at Beachton Surf Lifesaving Club. We learn how to be safe in the surf and get fit at the same time. My favourite activity is beach sprinting.

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Write about a group you belong to in the speech bubble and draw yourself speaking.

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Same needs–Different ways Indicators • Understands that people from different cultures and places can satisfy their needs in different ways. • Compares the way a culture or country satisfies its needs with his or her own.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

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• Revise the basic needs as described on the worksheet. If possible, show pictures from magazines, prepared charts etc. of foods, houses, clothing and physical activities from other countries and cultures. Discuss how the majority of cultures do not wear their traditional clothes every day of the year, only on special occasions or by certain sections of their culture. Also discuss how things such as weather, climate and geography are factors that determine the type of clothing worn and houses built.

• Provide students with books to look through about other countries to find information about other cultures. Students could work in pairs or small groups to find examples and report it back to the class. Findings could be collated on the whiteboard for students to choose a country or culture, which they then copy onto their worksheet. They then write notes to explain how their own family satisfies similar needs.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Create collages of f different foods,p clothing ando people doing different physical • orhouses/shelters, r evi ew ur p se so nl y•activities to display in the classroom. Additional activities

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Curriculum links

HSIE

English

SSS1.7, CUS1.3, CUS1.4

TS1.1, TS1.2, R1.5, RS1.6, WES1.9, WS1.11

SA

1.4, 1.7, 2.7, 1.10, 2.10, 1.11

2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.9, 2.12

Qld

PS 2.1, CI 2.1, CI 2.3, CI 2.3, SRP 1.1

Vic.

SOSE0202, SOSE0203

WA

ICP 2, PS 2.2, R 2.1, R 2.2, NSS 2.3

NSW

76

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• Look into why houses can be built in specific ways. For example, in snowy places, houses are usually built with steep, pointed roofs so the snow will slide off; in swampy places with lots of rain, houses are often built on stilts.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0201, ENSL0202, ENSL0204, ENRE0201, ENRE0202, ENRE0204, ENWR0201, ENWR0204

LS 2.1, LS 2.4, V 2.1, R 2.1, R 2.2, W 2.4

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Same needs–Different ways Everybody around the world has the same basic needs of food, shelter, clothes, physical activity, love and friendship. Different cultures satisfy these in different ways; for example, many people in India wear the traditional ‘sari’, while people in places like America wear ‘Western’ clothing.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Choose a country or culture of your choice and find out how it provides the basic needs listed below. Compare it with your own.

Food

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Shelter

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Physical activity

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Plant interview Indicators • Identifies the basic needs of plants required in order for them to grow. • Identifies that different plants require those needs in different proportions. • Identifies that plants have adapted to provide those needs according to their environment.

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Worksheet information

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• To complete this activity, students will need to choose a plant they know about or would like to know more about. They will need to locate and read information about the plant. This could be done individually, in pairs, in groups or as a whole class.

• Before they do this, discuss what plants need in order to grow: air, water, soil and sunlight. Ask why they need these things. Also discuss that different plants need different amounts of each need. Plants have made adaptations according to their environment. For example, plants such as cacti that live in a dry, hot environment have fleshy leaves that hold water; plants that live in a dark environment do not need direct sunlight for photosynthesis to take place (the process of turning sunlight into food and energy). The amount of water needed, which also contains minerals and nutrients, varies among plants. Plants also grow in different soil. They get nutrients from the soil and grow different root systems according to the type of soil. Note: This is a complex issue, but the main idea is for students to identify plants’ basic needs and how they have adapted to suit an environment that is lacking or has an overabundance of a need.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • When students• have the information they need, work in p pairs tos complete f o rr ev i e wtheyp ur o estheointerview. nl yOne • student is the ‘plant’ and the other is the ‘interviewer’. The interviewer asks the questions and records the

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answers. Students swap roles. They then draw a picture of their plant. The interview can be repeated to the class (this time, without recording answers). Interview sheets can be displayed for others to read and view.

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Additional activities

• Create charts of pictures from magazines, photographs or those students draw of plants with different adaptations. Include appropriate labels and explanations.

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• Grow fast-growing seeds such beans or wheat and vary the amounts of light, water and food given to each. Observe what happens and record and compare results. • Observe plants in the school grounds to see if any aren’t growing properly and why their needs are not being provided for.

Curriculum links

78

Science and Technology

English

NSW

LTS1.3, ESS1.6, INVS1.7

TS1.1, TS1.2, R1.5, RS1.6, WES1.9, WS1.11

SA

1.5, 2.5

2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.9, 2.12

Qld

LL 2.1, LL 2.2, LL 2.3, DLL 2.5

Vic.

SCSC0201

WA

I 2.1, I 2.3, LL 2 Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0201, ENSL0202, ENSL0204, ENRE0201, ENRE0202, ENRE0204, ENWR0201, ENWR0204 LS 2.1, LS 2.4, V 2.1, R 2.1, R 2.2, W 2.4 www.ricpublications.com.au

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Plant interview What kind of plant are you?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

How much water do you need to grow?

How do you get water?

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What kind of environment do you live in?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f o rr e vi ew r p os es ndo l y •need to How much sunlight do you needp tou What kind ofo soil you grow in?

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grow?

. te o c What else do you need to help you Draw a picture. of yourself (as a che e grow? plant). r o r st super

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Animal needs Indicators • Identifies the basic needs of animals. • Compares the basic needs of animals with those of people’s. • Compares how different animals obtain their needs.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Worksheet information

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• To complete this activity, students will need to choose two animals that are quite different from each other; i.e. have different coverings and habitat. They may have some prior knowledge but will need to find extra information about each animal to answer the questions in the table. This could be done individually, in pairs, in groups or as a whole class.

• Before they do this, discuss what animals need—food, water, shelter. Ask why they need these things. Compare with people’s needs. Discuss how these needs are the same but animals obtain them differently; for example: they don’t buy, grow or cook their food—they catch it or forage for it. Also discuss how pet animals, such as dogs, have other needs—love, grooming and physical exercise.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • When students have the information they need, they can work in pairs or individually to complete the f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• worksheet. • • Types of covering are included in the table as that provides a type of ‘shelter’, either to control body temperature or for protection against enemies.

Additional activities

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• Sort animals into categories according to how they get their needs; e.g. shelter: burrow, nest, tree hollow, cave; food: hunt in packs, graze on grass, sting/poison; water: absorb through skin, drink. • Construct models of animal shelters. Label appropriate parts and display.

• Make a list of different types of pets and what people have to do to provide for their needs.

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Curriculum links

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Science and Technology

English

NSW

LTES1.3, LTS1.3, ESS1.6, INVS1.7

TS1.1, TS1.2, R1.5, RS1.6, WS1.9, WS1.11

SA

1.5, 2.5

2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.9, 2.12

Qld

LL 2.1, LL 2.2, LL 2.3, DLL 2.5

Vic.

SCSC0201

WA

I 2.1, I 2.3, LL 2

Lower themes – Needs

Refer to curriculum documents on <http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au> ENSL0201, ENSL0202, ENSL0204, ENRE0201, ENRE0202, ENRE0204, ENWR0201, ENWR0204 LS 2.1, LS 2.4, V 2.1, R 2.1, R 2.2, W 2.4

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Animal needs Like us, animals are living things and have needs, too. They need food, water and shelter. Some need to live in a group or pairs to help provide these needs. Others can provide for themselves.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Choose two animals that are quite different from each other and answer the questions in the table below.

How does it get its food?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons How does orr evi ew pur posesonl y• it get its •f

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What kind of shelter does it need to find or build?

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water?

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What kind of covering does it need?

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Lower Themes - Needs, Changes, Moving and Places: Needs  

The widely-varied activities in the books cross many major learning areas, with particular attention given to connecting to outcomes of unit...

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