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RIC-6454 4.3/772


Total health Ages 5–7

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2010 Copyright© Kevin Rigg 2010

Copyright Notice

ISBN 978-1-74126-926-0 RIC–6454

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For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase. Name of Purchaser:

Date of Purchase:

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Titles available in this series: Total health (Ages 5–7) Total health (Ages 8–10) Total health (Ages 11+)

Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Supplier:

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Signature of Purchaser:

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School Order# (if applicable):

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Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


Total health (Ages 5–7) Foreword Total health (Ages 5–7) is one title in a three-book series designed as a complete health program for primary students. The book is divided into five categories: Human development, Safety, Food and nutrition, Relationships and Community health. Titles in the series:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Total health (Ages 5–7)

Total health (Ages 8–10) Total health (Ages 11+)

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Contents

Teachers notes .............................................................................................................. iv – v Curriculum links ................................................................................................................... v Human development .............................. 2–25

Food and nutrition ............................... 52–61

Ageing .................................................................... 2–3

Five food groups .................................................. 52–53

A new baby ............................................................. 4–5

Plants we eat – 1 ................................................ 54–55

Body parts .............................................................. 6–7

Plants we eat – 2 ................................................ 56–57

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Make a healthy choice .......................................... 58–59

All about me ........................................................ 10–11

Traffic light food ................................................... 60–61

Being healthy....................................................... 12–13

Relationships ...................................... 62–77

What makes you healthy? ..................................... 14–15

What makes a friend? .......................................... 62–63

A healthy home .................................................... 16–17

Making friends ..................................................... 64–65

Hard work and me ............................................... 18–19

Things we should do ............................................. 66–67

My senses .......................................................... 20–21

Class rules.......................................................... 68–69

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What my body parts do ............................................ 8–9

Teeth .................................................................. 22–23

Right or wrong in the classroom ............................ 70–71

Tooth care........................................................... 24–25

Which rules? ....................................................... 72–73

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Safety ................................................ 26–51

Rules for groups .................................................. 74–75

Stay safe – 1....................................................... 26–27

Working in a group............................................... 76–77

Stay safe – 2....................................................... 28–29

Community health ............................... 78–81

Stay safe – 3....................................................... 30–31

Carers ................................................................ 78–79

Feeling safe at school ........................................... 32–33

Carers at work .................................................... 80–81

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Being sun safe ..................................................... 34–35

Safety at home .................................................... 36–37 What keeps us safe? ............................................ 38–39 Safety signs ........................................................ 40–41 Using medicines .................................................. 42–43 About medicines .................................................. 44–45 My ‘Rules for medicines’ poster ............................. 46–47 Emergency calls................................................... 48–49 First aid kit ......................................................... 50–51 R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

Total health

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Teachers notes About the book The book has been organised into five sections, covering the following aspects: • Human development—basic needs such as food, shelter, safety and cleanliness; body parts and uses; being healthy and tooth care • Safety—main safety rules for children at home, at school and in the wider community; equipment designed for safety; the use and care of medicines; emergency calls and first aid kits • Food and nutrition—food grouping, making healthy food choices and ‘traffic light’ food labelling

r o e t s Bo r e p ok About the lessons u S

• Relationships—developing friendships, making and understanding rules, and working in groups • Community health—health workers and their role in the community.

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About the student activities

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The lessons require a minimum of easily-acquired equipment. Teachers notes accompany each student page. The notes include information about resources needed, lesson notes, follow-up ideas, websites (where appropriate) and answers. The practical lessons are clearly set out and easy for teachers and students to follow. The lessons are capable of being divided into two or more separate lessons, if necessary. Many of the worksheets are suitable for enlargement to A3-size for class modelling, prior to student completion. The lesson plans can be extended into other cross-curricular activities.

Completing the lesson plans and worksheets will engage the students in the following types of activities: • reading and drawing

• illustrating and labelling

• matching sentences to illustrations

• identifying pictures for cutting and pasting

• writing, including explaining, sentence completion, sentence matching, sentence writing, and writing descriptions

• following written instructions

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• writing and drawing about opinions

• cutting and pasting labels and information

• identifying correct descriptions or illustrations • answering yes or no-type questions

• classifying using pictures and descriptions

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• collecting, classifying and analysing simple data

• checking off items in a list

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• writing lists

• evaluating activities, including written evaluations and rating on a scale.

• predicting outcomes

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Presenting the worksheets after completion

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A variety of suggestions for presenting and displaying the worksheets when completed are provided. These extend the lesson and add emphasis to the topic. Here are some suggested display activities. • Collect and display items used for each lesson with the worksheets. The students could create labels to accompany the items. • Create a frieze of drawings, cut-out pictures and worksheets used in a particular lesson. Select different students to create labels to display with them. • Take digital photographs of an activity and print them for use with a language activity. Ask the students to create labels for the photographs, which can be collated into a class book for display in the school library. • Select students to give oral presentations to other classes, using the worksheets as a guide or aid. • Display the posters and projects together. • Suspend models used to demonstrate aspects of lessons from wire in the classroom and ask students to create labels. • Combine the poster, model and worksheets for a particular lesson as a single display. • Present the whole activity as a class assembly item, using the posters, graphs and data collected. • Display the posters created by the students around the school, library or local community. iv

Total health

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Teachers notes Teachers notes pages All the teachers pages follow a similar format:

Before the lesson provides information about any preparation which needs to be completed prior to the lesson.

The section and title of each corresponding student page are given.

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Answers are provided for student pages where necessary. Opened-ended activities require the teacher to check the answers as individual answers may vary.

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A list of websites provides suggestions for obtaining resources to help you conduct the lesson.

The lesson provides a suggested plan and information for introducing and presenting the lesson.

After the lesson provides information about extending the lesson into the same, or another, curriculum area.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Student activity pages

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Clear, concise instructions for completing the student activities are supplied.

The section and title of each student page.

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All student pages provide an activity relating to one of the five sections of the book. These usually relate to discussion with, and input from, the teacher.

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A variety of different activities are used, with relevant artwork where applicable, to reinforce student understanding of the concepts discussed.

Curriculum links WA Ku 1, KU 2, SMS 1, SMS 2, IPS 1, IPS 2

SA

NSW

Vic.

Qld (2)

1.3, 2.3, 1.4, 2.4, 1.5, 2.5, 1.6, 2.6, 1.7, 2.7, 1.8, 2.8

COS1.1, INS1.3, GDS1.9, DMS1.2, IRS1.11, PHS1.12, SLS1.13, V4

Refer to Victorian Essential Learning Standards, Levels 2 and 3.

Refer to Health & Physical Education (HPE) Essential Learnings by the end of Year 3.

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Ageing

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

1. Teacher check

• Collect the resources: glossy magazines; a poster showing the life cycle of a butterfly; 2 large sheets of paper (one labelled ‘adults’ and the other labelled ‘young’).

Review relevant websites: (showing life cycles)

• <http://www.crickweb.co.uk/animal-english.html> (interactive animal matching activity) • <http://www.enchantedlearning.com/ coloring/lifecycles.shtml> (worksheets about the life cycles of many animals)

• Present pets or young animals for viewing (optional).

After the lesson

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chick/young butterfly/adult cow/adult tree/adult caterpillar/young seedling/young calf/young hen/adult

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• Image search for ‘baby animals’ and ‘old animals’ on the internet.

The lesson

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

• Create a class chart of names for different adult and young animals and make additions over time as new words are learnt. The students can cut out magazine photos or draw pictures of animals or plants to match the words.

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• Introduce the worksheet and discuss the animals shown. Read the words underneath each picture and the labels at the bottom.

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• Have the students cut out the labels and glue them underneath the appropriate pictures.

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• The students cut out pictures of animals from magazines and glue them onto the correct sheet labelled ‘adults’ or ‘young’.

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• The students join the pairs of pictures (e.g. chick/hen, butterfly/caterpillar).

• The students circle the correct word (‘adult’ or ‘young’) beneath each picture.

• Study a website displaying different animal life cycles. Identify both adults and young animals.

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1. Cut and paste the correct label for each picture.

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2. Circle to show if each is an adult or young. (b)

(d)

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adult/young

adult/young

adult/young

adult/young

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (f) (g) (h) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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adult/young

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(e)

(c)

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(a)

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seedling

butterfly

cow

hen

tree

caterpillar

chick

calf

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A new baby

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Answers Before the lesson

1.–2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Invite a parent with a baby to visit the class. Have a digital camera available to take photographs.

After the lesson

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• Collect the resources: magazines with pictures of babies in various situations, such as in the bath, in clothes, playing etc. and pictures of baby equipment; a collection of baby clothes, toys and other items.

• Use the photographs of the baby visit to write a report about the activity.

Review relevant website:

• <http://www.clubnutricia.com.au/pregnancy/ practical_info_and_advice/article/ baby_things_to_buy_in_advance> (shows a list of what to buy a new baby)

The lesson

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• Internet image search ‘babies’.

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• As a class, discuss babies and show pictures of various babies. • Ask: What do babies need? Utilise the students who have baby brothers or sisters to lead the discussion.

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• Talk about the correct way to hold and nurse a baby and how delicate a baby is. Have the students recall personal experiences. The students complete Question 1 (a). Students who have not nursed a baby can write what they think it would be like. If a parent brings a baby to visit the classroom, have these students hold the baby first.

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• On the board, list the things that babies need.

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• Ask the students to look for magazine pictures of baby clothes. Alternatively, have students examine the collection of baby items. For Question 2 (a), students draw pictures of two types of baby clothing and describe how they are needed to keep babies warm. • View and discuss items needed to help babies sleep and things they play with, then ask the students to complete parts (b) and (c) of Question 2. • Cut and paste the labels of the basic needs of babies to complete the sentences in Question 3. On completion, the students can read the sentences aloud.

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A new baby 1. Write a sentence telling what it is like to nurse a baby.

r o e t s Bo (c) plays with. r (b) needs to help e p it sleep. ok u S

2. Draw and label two things a baby …

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(a) wears.

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3. Cut out the words and paste them to complete the sentences.

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(d) A new baby will need

to feel warm.

to feel safe.

to have food.

to feel clean.

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Body parts

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

1.

• Collect the resources: magazines with pictures of people; posters of body parts; A3 photocopy of worksheet.

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hair

face

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.songsforteaching.com/biologysongs/> (follow links: songs for teaching about body parts)

finger

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neck

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• <http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/ htbw_main_page.html> (interactive activities about body parts)

wrist

knee

The lesson

• Introduce the names of human body parts by using flashcards, labels, pictures, songs and poems.

foot

toe

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons After the lesson •f orr evi ew p ur p os esonl y•

• After modelling, the students cut out the words and paste them in the correct boxes on their own worksheets.

• Read the instructions and select different students to complete the activity on the modelling sheet.

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• The students can use the instructions to complete their own worksheets.

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2. Teacher check

• Divide a large sheet of cardboard into sections to create a poster of body parts. Label each section with a different body part name, then have the students go through magazines to find and cut out pictures to glue on the poster in the correct place.

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• Cut out the words at the bottom of the modelling sheet and select different students to paste them in the correct places.

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Body parts

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1. Cut out and glue the body part labels in the correct boxes.

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o c . che e r o t r s 2. Follow the instructions: s uper (a) Colour his hair yellow. (c) Draw shoes on his feet. (e) Draw sunglasses on his face.

(b) Draw a hat on his head. (d) Colour his eyes blue.

wrist

face

toe

neck

knee

finger

hair

foot

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What my body parts do

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: magazines; body part songs and poems (refer to websites)

knee finger neck foot hair toe wrist face

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• Internet search: ‘body parts songs for children’. Review relevant website:

• <http://www.songsforteaching.com/biologysongs/> (follow links: Songs and poems etc.)

2. Teacher check

After the lesson

The lesson

• Write the names of the body parts from the worksheet on the board. • Have the students indicate or use these body parts, reciting a poem or song at the same time.

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1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

• Ask the students to write their own clues for other students to solve.

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• Read aloud the first clue and ask the students to suggest possible answers. Say the correct answer and ask the students to write it on their worksheet.

• Work through a few examples in this manner and then allow the students to complete the remaining answers.

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• Students look at magazines, finding examples of each body part, cutting them out and gluing them on the worksheet. If desired, the students can draw pictures to match.

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What my body parts do

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wrist

1. Write the name of the body part which matches each clue.

face

toe

knee

finger

hair

foot

(b) used to point with:

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(c) holds the head up:

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(a) used to kneel on:

neck

(d) a part we walk on:

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(e) found on the top of the head: (f) found on the foot:

o c . che e r o (g) used to move the hand: (h) the front t r s part of the head: super

2. Draw or cut and paste a picture of each part. R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

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All about me

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: small mirrors for the class (two students may share a mirror if an insufficient number are available); measuring equipment, including to measure height, such as a growth chart or tape measures; adult helper (optional).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

• The students can label their self-portraits with specific body parts such as chin, ears, forehead etc.

The lesson

• Using the mirrors, the students draw portraits of themselves on the worksheet. • Ask the students to write sentences about their hair, eyes and mouth. Select some students to read them aloud to the class. List some of the descriptions on the board. Later, these can be written as a class chart or book titled ‘About us’. • Measure each student in centimetres while they are completing their sentences. A parent helper or other adult may be enlisted to assist.

• Ask the students to make individual books titled ‘All about me’ to keep a record of photographs, memorable personal experiences and data such as changing height, date teeth are lost etc.

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• Discuss the difference between ‘is’ and ‘are’ and when to use each.

• Make paper ribbon skeletons with the students to hang around the room.

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• Use the results to complete a list of the tallest student, the shortest student, those who are the same height, the student with the longest or shortest leg etc., or place the students in order from tallest to shortest or shortest to tallest.

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All about me 1. Use the mirror to help you draw your head and

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face.

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(b) My eyes are …

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(a) My hair is …

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2. Describe the body parts.

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3. Everyone has different-sized body parts. Choose a friend to help you complete the questions about yourself.

(b) How long is your leg? (c) How long is your arm? (d) How long is your pointing finger? R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

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dev elopment

Being healthy

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Use a search engine to find images of ‘healthy people’, or display a poster of people playing sport or exercising.

The lesson

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• Discuss the image or poster and record some ideas on the board about what things make a person healthy (looks happy, having fun, being active, looks clean, nice smile etc.). • Ask the students to draw pictures of three different things that help make a person healthy. • Students write sentences explaining each of the three pictures. Make a list on the board of the healthy features the students identified and discuss why they show things people can do to help them be healthy.

• The students cut the images from the bottom of the worksheet and paste them onto a class collage titled ‘Our healthy people’.

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• Select an image or use a poster to show a healthy person (playing sport or exercising) as the basis for a class discussion.

After the lesson

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• The students search magazines to find and cut out pictures showing clean teeth, clothes and hair.

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dev elopment

Being healthy

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What special things make people healthy?

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1. Write about and draw three different things that help make a person healthy.

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(a)

(b)

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(c)

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2. Cut and paste three pictures of healthy people in the boxes.

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a person with clean teeth R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

a person with clean clothes

a person with clean hair Total health

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dev elopment

What makes you healthy?

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Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e After the lesson p ok u S

Review relevant website:

• <http://www.goforyourlife.vic.gov.au/hav/articles. nsf/pracpages/Kids_Go_for_your_life?open> (This website contains helpful downloadable resources and provides teaching ideas.)

The lesson

• Discuss the ideas presented at the website—students should drink more water, eat fruit and vegetables, limit ‘treats’, be physically active, reduce television and computer time, and walk and/or ride. • Ask the students to discuss their ‘healthy routines’ before school (showering, brushing or combing hair, cleaning teeth, putting on clean clothes, eating breakfast etc). Make a list on the board.

2. Teacher check. Answers may vary.

• Cut out the healthy things from Question 2 on the worksheets and paste them onto a class chart titled ‘Our healthy habits’.

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1. Answers may vary slightly but the answers most likely ticked will include: clean hair, clean teeth, happy smile, clean clothes, washed face and brushed hair.

• Survey, tally and graph the most common healthy habits which the students have.

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• Students discuss with a partner the things they do to stay healthy, then draw and write about four of them to complete Question 2.

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• Read through the list in Question 1. The students raise their hands to indicate whether each is a sign of a healthy person or not. The students then tick those which show a person is healthy. Mark the answers together as a class.

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What makes you healthy? 1. Tick the things that show a person is healthy. clean hair dirty fingernails clean teeth

clean clothes dirty hands washed face

brushed hair r o e t s Bo dirty clothes r e happy smile p o u khealthy. 2. Write and draw about four things you do to stay S

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dirty feet

(a)

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(c)

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(b)

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(d)

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dev elopment

A healthy home

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Teacher notes

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Answers 1. Teacher check

• Collect the resources: poster or images of home interiors from Internet sources or magazines; list of things that make a person healthy (see previous worksheet ‘Being healthy’); and of ways the students stay healthy (see previous worksheet ‘What makes you healthy?’).

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

The lesson

vacuum cleaner washing machine first aid kit toy box toothbrush

r o e t s Bo r e p o u After the lesson k S

• The students discuss their homes and any equipment or devices there which help to keep the home healthy. These may include brooms, sponges, bucket, rags, cleaning liquids, mops, vacuum cleaner, water sprayer, rubbish bins etc. • Look at the worksheet, read aloud the four ideas for having a healthy home and discuss them. Ask the students to draw pictures to complete Question 1.

• The students collect pictures from magazines of devices which help keep homes healthy and glue them onto a class chart.

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Before the lesson

• The students select a particular household cleaning device as the subject for a piece of artwork. Encourage the students to attribute human features to an inanimate object to create a sketch of a ‘Super cleaner’ (household device). They may also wish to add speech bubbles to the caricature. Display each next to a picture of the ‘real’ thing.

• The students match each job description to the correct picture, then colour the pictures.

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• Select students to read the descriptions in Question 2.

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A healthy home

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1. Draw pictures to show one way to …

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r o e t s Bo r e p o u keep your home keep k your home S clean and tidy. warm in winter.

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2. Match each thing to the sentence that tells how it helps keep your home healthy. (a) keeps the floor

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o c . washes clothes • che • e r o r st super clean from dirt

(b)

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons keep dangerous things keep medicines safe. •f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s esonl y• locked away.

(c) keeps emergency •

medical supplies (d) keeps toys tidy

(e) keeps teeth clean • R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

• • Total health

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dev elopment

Hard work and me

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Teacher notes

Hu

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: lesson plan and tools for having students complete a vigorous activity (e.g. skipping ropes, run around the school oval, swimming laps, push ups); pictures or poster displaying the human heart.

r o e After theB lesson t s r e oo p u k S

Review relevant website:

• <http://atenmedicalart.com/anim/heart.htm#>: (animation of a beating heart)

The lesson

• Have the students try to locate their pulses. Assist those students having difficulty. Discuss how it feels and, over a given number of seconds or minutes, ask the students to count how many times it beats.

• The students complete ‘heart’ art by cutting and pasting heart shapes to create a collage. • With a classmate or friend, students take turns to record each other’s pulse after different types of activities. Record the number of beats each time and discuss possible reasons for changes.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1.–3. Teacher check. Possible answers for Question 3 may include: sit quietly, walk around, have a drink of water, breathe deeply and slowly etc.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• For Question 1, students write a sentence telling what their pulse feels like. Select some to read their description to the class.

• Discuss and show pictures of the heart and, using simple language, explain how it works.

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• Ask the students to write and draw two things which changed after the exercise (e.g. faster pulse, feeling hot, sweating, puffing).

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• Discuss what students should do to recover after vigorous exercise (sit quietly, have a drink of water, close eyes, breathe slowly and deeply etc.).

m . u

• Have the students complete a vigorous activity, then repeat the pulse-taking activity. They can now describe the difference.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• The students can use some of these discussion ideas to write and draw two things they can do to feel better.

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dev elopment

Hard work and me

m

an

Our body changes after exercising.

Hu

1. Answer the questions. Before exercising (a) Can you feel your pulse?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u SAfter exercising (c) What does it feel like now?

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Teac he r

(b) What does it feel like?

2. Draw and write about two changes that happened to your body. (a)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(b)

o c . che e r o t r s super

3. Draw and write about two things you can do to feel better after exercising. (a)

(b)

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dev elopment

My senses

m

an

Teacher notes

Hu

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: Items that stimulate each sense—for example: taste (a piece of fruit), sound (a bell), touch (wool), smell (perfume), sight (a poster, painting or book); a large sheet of butcher’s paper or card; images of ‘the five senses’.

eye/seeing ear/hearing nose/smelling tongue/tasting fingers/touch

• <http://www.warrinerprimaries.com/ Topic/ourselves.htm>

• <http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/ chsense.html>

The lesson

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

eyes tongue ears fingers nose

After the lesson

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites: (There are many websites that cover the five senses.)

Teac he r

1. (a) – (b) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v)

• Divide the butcher’s paper into five sections and label each with a sense. Ask the students to cut out and glue (or to draw) examples of things they observe using each sense. • Conduct a taste test with several pieces of fruit, or have a ‘touch’ test with a small bag and some hidden ‘mystery’ items to identify.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Introduce each sense using the five sensory items. As each sense is introduced, write its name on the board and add other examples of things to taste, hear, feel, smell and see as suggested by the students.

• The students cut out the words for body parts and senses at the bottom of the worksheet and glue each in the correct place on the diagram at the top.

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• Read and discuss the five senses used in Question 2 and ask the students to copy the word that corresponds to each sentence.

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m . u

• Prior to students starting the worksheet, discuss Question 1.

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dev elopment an

My senses

m

1. (a) Cut and paste the label for each body part in the correct box.

Hu

(b) Cut and paste the sense it uses in each box.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (i)

(iii)

(iv)

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Teac he r

(ii)

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w ww

2. Write the name of the body part we use to:

m . u

(v)

. te o c (b) taste an apple. . che e r o t (c) hear the television.r s super

(a) see ourselves in a mirror.

(d) feel for a light switch in the dark. (e) smell smoke from a fire. sense body parts

hearing

seeing

smelling

tasting

touching

eye

ear

nose

tongue

fingers

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dev elopment

Teeth

m

an

Teacher notes

Hu

Answers Before the lesson

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

The gums cover the bone and hold the tooth. The enamel is the hard shiny white layer. The roots are in the bone and anchor the tooth. The crown is the part you can see at the top of the tooth.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/ interactives/science/teethandeating/default.asp> (interactive activities about teeth) • <http://www.kidspot.com.au/School-HealthTeaching-your-child-to-care-for-his-teeth +146+40+article.htm> (care of teeth)

The lesson

crown gum enamel roots

After the lesson

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Teac he r

• Collect the resources: dental health information; images of a child’s tooth (type ‘children’s teeth’ into a search engine); teeth brought in by students who may have saved them after falling out (make sure they are clean—rinsed with bleach and water); A3 copy of the worksheet.

1. (a) (b) (c) (d)

• Display and discuss ‘Kids’ dental care’ posters from the Internet or dental health sources. • Collect pictures from magazines relating to teeth, dental care and dental care materials.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Show the diagram of a tooth on the worksheet and discuss its structure.

• Using the A3 modelling sheet to demonstrate, glue the labels onto the diagram.

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• Select students to cut out the labels and paste them in the correct place on the modelling sheet.

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• Cut out the sentences parts (a) to (d) in Question 2 and then cut each part in two. Select students to take turns to match the parts for the class. If desired, write, copy or use other methods such as overhead projector or interactive whiteboard to demonstrate.

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• Compare the diagram to a real tooth, if possible, and introduce the labels.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Allow the students to complete the matching activity on the worksheet independently. • The students can read out the answers as you point to the diagram.

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dev elopment m

an

Teeth

Hu

1. Cut and paste the labels for the tooth.

(a)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

(b)

(c)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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m . u

(d)

2. Join the name of the tooth part to its meaning.

. te (a) The gums

• is the hard shiny white layer.

(c) The roots

• cover the bone and hold the tooth.

o c . che is the part your e can see at the top of o (b) The enamel • • t r s sup r the etooth. (d) The crown •

crown

gum

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are in the bone and anchor the tooth.

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dev elopment

Tooth care

m

an

Teacher notes

Hu

Answers Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

Review relevant websites: There are many and varied sites with good information to share with a lower primary class: • <http://smilenepal.com/ downloads_and_resources/BrushChart.pdf> (Dr Rabbit’s Brushing Chart)

• <http://www.alfy.com/teachers/teach/ thematic_units/Dental_Health/Dental_1.asp> (interactive activity)

3.–4. (a) (b) (c) (d)

Brush the front, around the sides. Brush the inside of the teeth. Brush across the front. Brush the top of the teeth.

• Create a ‘Brushing diary’ with the students. Ask them to fill it in for a week. • Write reports about the toothbrushing activity using the photographs as a guide.

• Show the toothbrushes and discuss what makes a good brush (small brush head; straight, soft bristles; and a comfortable handle).

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• Ask the students to complete Question 1 independently. • Discuss the results and select some students to give the reasons for their choices.

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• Show the apple, carrot and the water and explain why they are important for tooth care. (Fibre-rich foods massage the gums and the hardness of them also removes food particles; drinking water after eating reduces acidity in the mouth [acid damages enamel], tap water also contains fluoride.) • The students complete Question 2.

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• <http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmiles BrightFutures/AU/EN/HomePage.cvsp>

The lesson

2. eating an apple or carrot, rinsing the mouth with water

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Collect the resources: a variety of tooth care products, including some old toothbrushes; apples; carrots; water bottle; a toothbrush supplied by each child; a model of teeth in gums or a poster display of same; digital camera; internet images and ‘Brushing your teeth’ chart.

1. (a) The second and third brushes should be ticked. (b) Teacher check. Answers will vary.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Show the model teeth or the diagram. Demonstrate the correct method of brushing teeth. Select some students to demonstrate using their own toothbrushes. Take photos of the activity for use at a later date. • Ask the students to cut out the sentences for Question 3 and glue them next to the correct picture. • Select some students to read their answers aloud.

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dev elopment an

Tooth care

m

1. (a) Tick the two toothbrushes which would be best to use.

Hu

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo them. r e (b) Write a sentence to explain why you chose p ok u S

Sometimes you don’t have a toothbrush to use.

2. Write two ways you could clean your teeth without a brush.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 3. Look at the pictures below that show how to brush your teeth. •

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(b)

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m . u

4. Cut and paste each sentence to match the correct picture. (a)

o c . che e r o t r s (c) super

(d)

Brush across the front.

Brush the top of the teeth.

Brush the inside of the teeth.

Brush the front, around the sides.

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 1 Teacher notes

Part 2: Around water • Show and discuss the poster about water safety.

• Collect the resources: safety posters for walking and swimming (search the internet for suitable material); A3 copy of the worksheet; safety items for each category to show to the students, such as helmets, strong shoes and a hat, flotation devices, rope, kick boards etc.; glossy magazines; swimming instructor to visit (optional).

• Model completing the ‘Around water’ section of the worksheet.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.racv.com.au> (follow links: road safety products and travel tips)

• <http://www.royallifesaving.com.au/www/html/481water-safety-at-the-swimming-pool.asp> (water safety at the pool) • <http://www.childsafetyaustralia.com.au/ children/roadsafety/roadsafety.htm> (pedestrian safety)

• Display the water safety devices and how to use them. (A qualified swimming instructor could be utilised for this activity.)

Answers 1. (a) Stop, look, listen (b) edge (c) safe 2. Teacher check 3. (a) (b) (c) (d)

deep end Look run, Teacher check remainder of sentence Close, Teacher check remainder of sentence

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons After the lesson •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y•

(Note: This lesson can be completed in two parts, with Parts 1 and 2 separated.)

• Ask the students to write accounts of personal experiences relating to road and water safety.

Part 1: Crossing the road

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• Show and discuss the posters for pedestrian safety. • Model completing the ‘Crossing the road’ section of the worksheet.

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• Ask the students to find safety pictures in magazines to cut and paste onto a class chart.

• Demonstrate the correct procedure for crossing the road and practise with the students using strips of yellow tape on the floor. Discuss the best places to cross the road, where it may be difficult to know where to cross (busy roads, fourways etc.), and the role of the traffic warden near the school (if used).

m . u

The lesson

• After the students have completed the worksheets, check the answers.

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Teac he r

Before the lesson

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask the students to complete Questions 1 and 2. Check answers. • Demonstrate on a nearby road where to walk and how to cross.

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 1 Part 1: Crossing the road

1. Write the word that fits best. edge (a)

look

listen

, before you cross the road.

safe

Stop

and

r o e t s B r ofo the road. e p o u k place. (c) Cross in a S

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Teac he r

(b) Don’t wait near the

2. Draw pictures showing how to cross the road correctly.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Part 2:• Around water f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y•

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of the pool.

(a) Stay away from the

. te

(b)

(c) Do not

m . u

3. Cut and paste the correct words to complete each sentence, then complete (c) and (d).

o c . che around the pool e because r o t r s super before you jump in.

.

the pool gate because

(d)

.

run

deep end

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 2 Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

1. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: safety posters for riding and travelling in vehicles (search the internet for suitable material); A3 copy of worksheet; glossy magazines.

Wear your seatbelt. Don’t disturb the driver. Sit quietly. Get out of the car on the footpath side.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u After the lesson S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.racv.com.au> (follow links): road safety products and travel tips)

The lesson

(Note: This lesson may be completed in two parts.)

3. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Ask the students to find safety pictures in magazines to cut and paste onto a class chart.

ew i ev Pr

• <http://www.childsafetyaustralia.com.au/children/ bicycles/bicycle_rules.html> (safe cycling information)

Teac he r

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

• Ask the students to write accounts of personal experiences relating to bus and car safety.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Part 1: On the bus

• Show and discuss the poster relating to bus safety.

• Model completing the section ‘On the bus’ on the worksheet, then ask the students to complete it. Check answers.

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• Repeat the bus safety discussion before going on a bus trip. Part 2: In the car

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• Show and discuss the poster relating to travelling in a car. If posters are unavailable, make a list with the students of ‘safe things’ to do when travelling in a car; e.g. wear seatbelts, be quiet so as not to distract the driver. The students may also like to make a list for the driver—don’t use a mobile phone while driving (unless a ‘hands-free’ model), keep hands on the wheel, keep to the speed limit etc.

m . u

• Demonstrate the correct use of seatbelts, how to sit back in bus seats and hold onto the seat in front, and other bus safety features.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Model completing the section ‘In the car’ on the worksheet, then ask the students to complete it themselves. Check answers.

• Revise the correct use of seatbelts and make a list of items which the students might take with them on a long car trip. These may later be used with labels for a display.

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 2 Part 1: On the bus 1. Draw pictures of these rules.

(a) Always wear your seatbelt.

(b) Sit quietly on the bus.

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (c) Keep your bag out of the way (d) Don’t distract the driver. of others.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Part 2: In the car •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. Join the sentence beginnings to their correct endings.

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(b) Don’t disturb the (c) Sit

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• quietly.

• the footpath side.

• driver.

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(a) Wear your

o c . ch e 3. Draw three things you would take on a long car trip. r er o st super (d) Get out of the car on •

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• seatbelt.

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 3 Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

2. Teacher check: The cyclist should be on the left-hand side of the road. 3. (a) on the footpath (b) right-hand side, towards you

4. Teacher check: The person should be on the right-hand side.

After the lesson

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Teac he r

• Collect the resources: safety posters relating to riding bicycles and pedestrian safety (search the internet for suitable material); A3 copy of worksheet; safety items relating to bicycles (helmets, closed shoes) and walking (strong shoes, hat, sunglasses, bottle of water etc.); nearby street to practise walking along the right-hand side; a bicycle with good safety features (working headlights, brakes and flashing lights etc.) or poster of one; experienced cyclist or bike seller to visit students (optional); glossy magazines or safety pamphlets.

1. (a) Teacher check. Answers will vary. (b) left

Review relevant websites:

• The students find pictures relating to bicycle and pedestrian safety in magazines to cut and paste onto a class chart.

• <http://www.racv.com.au> (road safety products and travel tips)

• Ask the students to write accounts of personal experiences relating to bike and pedestrian safety.

• <http://www.childsafetyaustralia.com.au/ children/roadsafety/roadsafety.htm> (pedestrian safety)

The lesson

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

(Note: This lesson may be completed in two parts.)

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• Display the bike (or poster of one) and indicate the safety features. (If desired, an experienced bike owner or seller can come to the class to do this activity. Many state police departments also carry out bike education programs in schools.)

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m . u

Part 1: Riding your bike

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Show and discuss the bike safety poster.

• Model completing the section ‘Riding your bike’ on the worksheet then ask the students to complete it themselves. Check answers. • Display the helmet and discuss how to tell if a helmet fits correctly. Refer to <http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/ articles/bicycle+helmet.html> for suggestions. Part 2: Walking • Brainstorm ideas for ways to walk around the local community safely. • Show and discuss a poster showing safe walking. • Model completing the section ‘Walking’ on the worksheet then ask the students to complete it themselves. Check answers.

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Saf ety

Stay safe – 3

Part 1: Riding your bike 1. Complete the following:

(a) Draw three things that keep you safe when riding a bike.

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u (b) Always ride -hand side of the road. S on the

2. Draw a cyclist riding on the correct side of the road. Use an arrow to show which way he/she is cycling.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Part 2:• Walking f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(a) If there is one to use, walk

m . u

3. Cut and paste the correct endings to the rules.

. te o . you face cars coming c . che e r 4. Draw a person walking on the correctt side of the road. Use an o r s s r u e p arrow to show which way he/she is walking. (b) If there is no footpath, walk on the

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Saf ety

Feeling safe at school Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

1.–2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: a collection of equipment used during break times (such as balls, bats, hoops, skipping ropes etc.); photographs or computer images of large play equipment, such as climbing frames etc.

3. (a) (b) (c) (d)

if you need help in the bin inside the building trees or buildings

r o e t s Bo r e p ok After the lesson u S

Review relevant website:

• <http://www.gameskidsplay.net/>

The lesson

• The students complete Question 1 by drawing and writing about one playground rule they are familiar with. When completed, have students tell the class their answers. Write a list of the rules on the board.

• Paint, draw or create a collage of a playground scene with equipment and children playing. The students could write the rules on the artwork next to the children playing.

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Teac he r

• Internet image search for ‘playground equipment’.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Show the small equipment (bats, balls etc.) and the images of the large play equipment (or take them outside for a walk through their own play area, identifying large pieces of fixed equipment).

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• When Question 2 has been completed, have some students show their pictures and read out their rules in groups or to the whole class.

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• The students complete Question 3. Mark the answers as a group.

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• The students then select three pieces of equipment to draw and write one rule about. Prompt those students having difficulty.

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Saf ety

Feeling safe at school To be safe in the playground, we all must follow some rules.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

1. Write and draw about a playground rule you know.

2. Draw and label three things you can play on, or with, at school. Write a rule for each. (a)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(c)

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m . u

(b)

o c . che e r o t r s super

3. Join the sentence parts to make school rules. (a) Find a teacher

• inside the building.

(b) Put your rubbish •

• if you need help.

(c) Don’t run

• trees or buildings.

(d) Don’t climb on

• in the bin.

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Saf ety

Being sun safe Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

1. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: a collection of sun-safe equipment such as sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, T-shirt, sun protective shirt etc.; Internet images of posters on sun safety; A3 copy of the picture at the bottom of the worksheet; magazines.

2. (a) The students should have circled: the child putting on sunscreen lotion; the children wearing hats, glasses and long sleeves; the child sitting in the shade of a cubbyhouse. (b) Teacher check. Answers will vary.

r o e t s Bo r e p o u After the lesson k S

• <http://www.chw.edu.au/parents/kidshealth/safety_ factsheets/pdf/sun_safety_and_heat_stroke.pdf> (sun-safe fact sheet) • <http://www.actcancer.org/ sun-smart/resources.aspx> (downloadable resources and information)

The lesson

• The students collect magazine pictures of people being sunsafe and of equipment to use to be sun-safe and create a collage.

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Teac he r

Review relevant websites:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Show the students the sun-safe equipment and ascertain which students use them, how they use them, when and why. • The students complete Question 1 by drawing and labelling four things that protect people from the sun.

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• The students complete Question 2 on their own and list the sun-safe activities.

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m . u

• Study the picture of children playing in the playground and select some students to identify each sun-safe activity.

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Saf ety

Being sun safe

1. Draw and label four things that people can use to help protect themselves from the sun. (a)

(b)

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Teac he r

(c)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u (d) S

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

+

o c . che e r o t r s super 30+

30

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2. (a) Circle the children in the picture being sun safe.

(b) Write what the children circled are doing correctly. • • • R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

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Saf ety

Safety at home Teacher notes

Answers

Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Ask the students to research at home to find and write a list of safety devices used.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Review relevant websites: • <http://www.sparky.org/> (interactive safety activities)

• <http://www.recalljunction.com/tips/1/> (tips to keep the home safe)

• <http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/seniors-aines/ publications/public/injury-blessure/ safety-securite/safety-securite-eng.php> (poster showing safety issues in the home)

• The students write narratives such as ‘If there were no rules …’, ‘The day we played on the roof!’ about rules at home • The students complete a painting titled ‘My home’s rule’. The students select one home rule to illustrate what could happen if the rule was not followed. Paintings can be humorous or serious. When completed and dry, the students use black paint or marker to write the rule.

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• Collect the resources: a variety of home safety devices to discuss, such as a power outlet cover, fan cover, fire guard, toy box, door lock, cupboard safety lock, medicine bottle lid, smoke detector, child safety locks etc.; Internet images of ‘home safety devices’ and posters of ‘home rules for kids’; large sheet of butcher’s paper or card.

After the lesson

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

The lesson

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• Show and discuss the safety devices and find any already present in the classroom. • Collate and record on the board the list the students brought from home.

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m . u

• <http://www.readysetsafe.com.au/> (images of safety equipment)

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Divide the list into specific rooms of the house.

• Ask the students to complete Question 1, then report back about what they wrote.

• Discuss rules at home and make a list on the board. (These may include rules for playing, eating, sleepovers, sleeping etc.). • Discuss why there are rules and how they keep people safe. • The students form small groups to discuss any home rules they know of, then write and draw about them to complete Question 2.

• Make a combined class list of home rules on a chart. These can be cut into individual rules for selected students to illustrate for display.

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Safety at home 1. Write and draw about something that makes each room at home safer.

(a) kitchen

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(b) bathroom

(c) bedroom

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(d) living room

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(a)

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(b)

m . u

2. Write and draw about three rules you have at home.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(c)

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What keeps us safe? Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

batting pads/cricket player helmet and shoes/bike rider knee and elbow pads/skateboard rider soft mattress/high jumper catcher’s mitt/baseball player

r o e t s Bo r e p o u After the lesson k S

Review relevant website: • <http://www.safekids.co.uk> (safety activities)

The lesson

• Discuss the collected safety equipment and have students identify each and tell what it is used for and tell about other types of safety equipment they may have at home.

2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Ask the students to bring unusual examples of safety equipment from home for viewing and discussion.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Collect the resources: various safety equipment (such as gloves, helmets, pads etc.) relating to sports and other more common items such as a hat, garden gloves, art shirt; images of large-scale play equipment such as trampolines, swing set, fixed climbing frames etc.

1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

• Set up a display of the equipment and ask the students to create labels for them saying what part of the body is protected by each. • Ask the students to paint or draw a scene set on the oval or in the playground at school of students using safety equipment.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Combine the safety equipment and the common items with the images of the larger play equipment and ask the students to sort the safety equipment from the others. Discuss. Lead the students to the concept that the safety equipment is specially designed to protect them.

• As a science activity, create a chart of different types of materials used to make safety equipment and explain why that material was used. • Ask the students to search magazines for examples of safety equipment to glue onto a mural for a class display.

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m . u

• The students can then complete the worksheet by matching and drawing.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Saf ety

What keeps us safe? 1. Match the safety equipment to the activity.

(a)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(b)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(c)

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(e)

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m . u

(d)

o c . che e r o t r s super

2. Draw and label two other pieces of safety equipment.

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Safety signs Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: pictures of a variety of safety signs (Internet image search); digital camera

• <http://www.safeny.com/Kids/kidssign.htm> (interactive traffic light quiz: US site)

The lesson

• Take the students for a walk around the school and use the digital camera to take photographs of any signs they see. • While pointing to the signs, select different students to tell what they mean. • Discuss the signs on the worksheet and ask the students which ones they have seen before.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

Review relevant website:

Teac he r

1.–2. (a) First aid station/You can get help here if you are injured. (b) No dogs allowed/You can not bring a dog with you. (c) No smoking/People can not smoke here. (d) Toilets/There are toilets here. (e) Do not cross the road/You can not cross the road yet. (f) No bike riding/You can not ride your bike here.

• Ask the students to draw signs (such as a ‘slippery road ahead’ sign) relating to other safety-type situations. • Display a set of safety signs in the room and ask the students to write labels for them. Examples may include: avoid wet floor; danger: electric powerpoint; avoid sharp edges. • Print the digital photographs of signs around the school and have the students write descriptions of what each means.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• The students cut out the labels and paste them under the signs.

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• Select different students to read the meaning of each sign and match it to its description.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Saf ety

Safety signs 1. Cut and paste the labels to match the correct signs. 2. Match the sign to the words which describe its meaning.

(a) •

You can not ride your bike here.

You can not cross the road yet.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • • There are toilets here.

(c)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• •

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(e)

. te

(f)

You can get help if you are injured.

m . u

(d)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(b)

You can not bring a dog with you.

o c . che e r o t r s super People can not •

smoke here.

No smoking

Toilets

No bike riding

No dogs allowed

First aid station

Do not cross the road

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Saf ety

Using medicines Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/druginfo/fact_ sheets/pharmaceutical_drug_misuse/using_ medicines_safely.html> (Follow link to download ‘Using medicines safely’ fact sheet.) • <http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/medicine_ cabinet/index.html> (children’s medical information)

The lesson

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

doctor chemist adult kept

3. Teacher check. Answers will vary but may include: lie down, wash face with water, drink some water, ‘wait out’ a cold, use heat pack.

After the lesson

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Collect the resources: a variety of different medicine containers (especially childproof); eye-dropper, inhaler, a bottle and packet of capsules or tablets, cough syrup, tube of ointment; a variety of other containers such as a drink bottle, lunch box, pencil case etc.; pictures of medical containers gathered from the Internet; products to use instead of medicines such as a bottle of water, a wet face cloth, a pillow, a heat pack etc.

1. The students should have ticked the tablets, cough syrup, capsules and inhaler.

• Select one interesting medicine container to sketch as the subject of a still-life artwork.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

• The students can then complete Question 1 to identify the different items. Correct as a class. • Ask the students to relate personal experiences about medicines they take. (Be aware that some students may be reticent to relate this type of information!) Ask them what sort of medicine it is, how much they take, how often they take it, who gives it to them (but only ask them to say why they take it if they feel comfortable about doing so).

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m . u

• Display the medicine containers and the non-medicine containers. Select students to take turns to sort them.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Write the words for the cloze activity in Question 2 on the board, then select students to complete them orally before the whole class completes the activity on their own. • Discuss and demonstrate different alternatives to taking medicine; for example: cleaning a wound or drinking water, using a heat pack, bathing one’s face with a damp wash cloth, resting one’s foot or arm on a pillow, resting etc. • For Question 3, the students write and draw about two different medical alternatives which appeal to them.

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Using medicines People use medicine when they feel unwell. 1. Tick the pictures which are medicines.

r o e t baby’s bottle tablets s B r e oo p u k S crayons

cupcakes

inhaler

capsule

cough syrup

glue

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

chalk

spray cleaner

2. Write the correct word to complete each sentence. chemist

kept

doctor

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons . •buy f or e vi ewfrom pu r posesonl .y• (b) We ourr medicine the

(a) When we are unwell, we go to see a

adult

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(d) Medicine should be

m . u

looks after our medicine for us.

(c) An

in a safe place.

You don’t always have to take medicine if you feel unwell.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

3. Draw and write about two things you could do instead of taking medicine. (a)

(b)

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About medicines Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

1. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: a variety of different medicine containers (especially childproof); eye-dropper, inhaler, a bottle and packet of capsules or tablets, cough syrup, tube of ointment and/or pictures of medical containers gathered from the Internet.

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

drops inhaler capsules cough syrup ointment

r o e t s Bo r e p o u After the lesson k S

• <http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/druginfo/ fact_sheets/pharmaceutical_drug_misuse/ using_medicines_safely.html> (Follow link to download ‘Using medicines safely’ fact sheet.) • <http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/ medicine_cabinet/index.html> (children’s medical information)

The lesson

• On a poster, list some rules for the care and use of medicines. In particular, include those suggested by students using medicines regularly. Ask the students who supplied the suggestions to explain why they have to be careful of medicines.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Review relevant websites:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

• Ask students who regularly take medicine if they have any rules regarding them and, if so, what these rules are. This may simply be a comment such as ‘Mum pours my medicine for me’. List some of these rules on the board. • Read the rules listed in Question 1 on the worksheet with the class, then allow them to complete the illustrations on their own.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Write a list of types of medicine on the board and show actual samples of each. The students can now complete Question 2.

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• Discuss the medicine containers, childproof lids and the correct storage of medicines. Discuss why many medicines are ‘childproof’ and the importance of this.

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Saf ety

About medicines 1. Draw a picture to show you understand each rule.

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e (a) Only adults should give (b) Never o take a friend’s p u k medicine. medicine. S

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f or r e vi ewdifferent pur po ses nl y• There are many types ofo medicine.

(c) At school, the teacher can look after medicine.

(d) Follow the instructions on the medicine container.

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(a)

m . u

2. Cut out the labels and paste them below the correct medicine.

o c . (c) che (b) e r o r st super

(d) capsules

ointment

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(e) cough syrup

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My ‘Rules for medicines’ poster Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

The lesson

• Show some internet images of safety posters to introduce the students to the activity and to offer suggestions. Look at the similar elements of each (the title, illustrations, border etc.) where applicable. • Discuss planning a poster. The students can form small groups to discuss and decide which rules they will list on their poster.

After the lesson

• Display the completed posters in the library. • The students can present their poster to their or another class.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Collect the resources: a poster or list of rules regarding the use and care of medicines (such as that completed on pages 44–45); resources on the subject of safe use of medicine, such as books or posters from the library; applicable Internet pictures; a computer and printer to create labels; magazines for cutting out appropriate pictures; a sheet of art paper; pencils, scissors, glue, felt pens etc.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Ask the students to complete Question 1.

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• The students can show how their poster will look by drawing a draft plan and ticking off the items on the checklist as they include each. (The gathered pictures and drawings are kept for the final poster on art paper.)

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o c . che e r o t r s super

• When the plans are completed, the students can then collect the resources they need to complete their poster and make it on art paper, either in class or at home.

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• Discuss the materials students will need to complete the poster and show those collected and available for use. Students may have some of their own resources to use as well. Write a list on the board to help students select features to include on their poster.

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Saf ety

My ‘Rules for medicines’ poster Complete a plan for a poster showing four rules for the use or care of medicines.

1. Write your four rules. (a) (b)

(d)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(c)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

2. Write a list of materials needed to make your poster.

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of your poster. Tick each item as you include it. poster title

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four rules

drawings pictures

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 3. Draw• af draft orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

labels border

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Emergency calls Teacher notes

The lesson Before the lesson • Collect the resources: a variety of telephones (such as a desk phone, mobile, cordless etc.); a chart showing an emergency checklist.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://scoutsfirstaid.stjohnqld.com.au/index.php? option=com_content&task=view&id=42&Itemid=73> (General information about the ‘shout and squeeze’ method and for downloadable resources about ‘Scouts in action: First aid’.) • <http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/ STANDARD..PC/pc=pc_100575> (information about dialling 000)

• After the demonstration, students return to their desks, discuss the steps and number them in order (Question 1). • Mark and explain the correct order.

• Discuss and role-play making a zero, zero, zero (000) call, then ask the students to complete Question 2 (a) – (c).

ew i ev Pr

• <http://www.ambulance.nsw.gov.au/PDF/ zero_teacher_resource_kit.pdf> (teacher resource kit)

Teac he r

• Demonstrate the ‘Shout and squeeze’ emergency method using a volunteer, then students form pairs to practise the technique.

• In groups or with a partner, the students should practise telling each other their name and address. Explain that the address they give must be the one where the emergency has occurred. • With a partner, the students discuss which situations are real emergencies and tick the relevant boxes.

Answers

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1. The correct order is: 1—Call out, ‘Can you hear me?’ 2—Call out, ‘Can you open your eyes?’ 3—Hold the person’s hand and ask ‘Can you squeeze my hand?’ 4—Squeeze the hurt person’s shoulders gently. 5—Ring ‘000’ and ask for an ambulance. 2. (a) You should call zero, zero, zero (000) in a situation where a person’s life or property is threatened. (b) zero, zero, zero (000) (c) police, fire or ambulance (d) Teacher check

m . u

w ww

• Research and/or revise the ‘shout and squeeze’ method developed by St John Ambulance Service: Gently (but firmly) squeeze the shoulders of the person who is sick or injured and shout his/her name. Call: ‘Can you hear me? What is your name?’ (If the person is unknown.) If the injured/sick person does not respond or wake up, find an adult to help and/or call an ambulance. If no adult is present, then the child will have to call for an ambulance: – Dial zero, zero, zero. (Say ‘zero, zero, zero’ with students, as saying ‘triple O’ may confuse them.) – You will be asked for which emergency services is needed: police, fire or ambulance. – You will be asked for the exact address of the emergency. – You will be asked for the phone number you are calling from. – You will be asked to describe the emergency problem and to say what happened to cause the problem. – You will be asked if the injured/sick person is conscious, and if he/she is breathing. – You will then be told to not hang up and that an ambulance is on its way, and to make sure it is easy for the ambulance workers to reach the inured/sick person (unlocked doors etc.).

3. The emergencies which should be ticked are: (b), (d) and (e).

o c . che e r o t r s super After the lesson

• The students write narratives about emergency situations they may have witnessed or experienced.

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Saf ety

Emergency calls If you find a person who is sick or hurt, there are steps you should follow to help.

1. Number the steps in the correct order. Call out, ‘Can you open your eyes?’

r o e t s Bo r e Call out, ‘Can pyou hear me?’ ok u Sthe hurt person’s shoulders gently. Squeeze

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Ring zero, zero, zero (000) and ask for an ambulance.

Hold the person’s hand and ask, ‘Can you squeeze my hand?’

2. (a) When do you need to call zero, zero, zero (000)?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (b) In an emergency, dial … (c) You will be asked if you need … •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• •

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m . u

o c . che e r o 3. Which of these emergencies are important? t r s Tick those which are. super (d) You will need to give your name and address. Practise telling this to a friend or the teacher.

(a) You have a flat tyre on your bike. (b) Someone is breaking into your house. 4

(c) A cat is stuck in a tree.

*

1

7

2 8

0

3 6

5

#

9

(d) There is a bad car accident. (e) Someone fell and can’t talk or move. (f)

A dog is barking too much.

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First aid kit Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: a selection of different first aid kits (if possible) or internet images of different first aid kits.

1. (a) (b) (c) (d)

tweezers to remove a splinter bandages to wrap a bad cut Band-Aid® to cover a small cut thermometer to take your temperature

r o e t s Bo r e p ok After the lesson u S 2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

Review relevant website:

Teac he r

• The students write a narrative in which a first aid kit is used.

ew i ev Pr

• <http://www.safetyculture.com.au/ FirstAidKits/First_Ald_Kits.php> (shows a variety of available first aid kits)

• Select students to present talks about first aid kits, telling what items they contain and the uses for the items.

The lesson

• Show and discuss the contents of a first aid kit. The students can suggest what different items may be used for. • Display a pair of tweezers, some bandages and Band-Aids®, thermometers, scissors, antiseptic and cottonwool balls, and ask students to suggest what each may be used for. Relate some situations when these items may be used or ask the students for times when they have used them, or had them placed on them.

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• The students complete Question 1. Discuss and mark the answers.

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• The students then draw and complete Question 2. Select individual students to read out their answers.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Saf ety

First aid kit A first aid kit can be used if you are hurt. It contains many useful items.

1. Copy the names of the items and match each to its use. Band-Aid®

bandages

r o e t s B•oto wrap a bad cut r • e p ok u S

(b)

(c)

tweezers

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(a)

thermometer

to take your temperature

• © R. I . C•.Publ i cat i otonremove s a splinter •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

(d) •

to cover a small cut

w ww

m . u

2. Draw each item and write its use. Choose the last item yourself.

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o c . che e r o t r s super (b) antiseptic: (a) scissors:

(c) cottonwool balls:

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nutrition

Five food groups Teacher notes

Fo

The lesson Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/ static/pyramid.php> (information about the ‘Healthy living pyramid’)

• <http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopic DetailsKids.aspx?p=335&np=284&id=1443#3> (discussion of food groups, including simple interactive games)

• Show a diagram of a food pyramid and explain how much of each type of food it is advisable to eat. • Read the names of the food groups at the bottom of the worksheet, then ask students to cut them out and glue them in the appropriate places to match the five food groups.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Collect the resources: a variety of food from each food group (grains: bread, cereal, rice, pasta; fruit, vegetables and legumes; dairy: milk, cheese, yoghurt; meat and protein: fish, nuts, eggs; fats, oil and sugar); posters and/or books showing the five food groups; colour magazines displaying types of foods.

• Display and discuss the foods collected. Ask the students to suggest names to group the food, and then classify each food item. Ask which would be the healthiest to eat and which should be consumed less.

• The students complete the worksheet by drawing food from each group and writing a favourite food from each group. • Mark the answers as a group or in pairs.

Answers 1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

bread, cereals, rice and pasta fruit and vegetables dairy and dairy products meat, fish and eggs fats, oils and sugar

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• <http://www.nourishinteractive.com/hco/free_ printables#food_groups_worksheet> (free printable worksheets and posters about nutrition)

2.–3. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

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After the lesson • Ask the students to paint or draw a food group poster and add descriptions.

m . u

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• NOTE: For the purposes of this lesson, fats, oils and sugar have been included as one of the food groups. Some food pyramids will show the five food groups as: bread, cereal, rice, pasta and noodles; vegetables; fruit; milk, yoghurt and cheese; lean meat, fish, poultry, nuts and legumes.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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od and

nutrition

Five food groups

Fo

1. Cut and paste the names of each food group in the correct place. 2. Write your favourite food from each group. 3. Draw some food for each group.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(a) Eat most of:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

My favourite is:

(b) Eat lots of: My favourite is:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons My • favourite is:e f orr vi ew pur posesonl y•

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m . u

(c) Eat plenty of:

(d) Eat some:

. te

My favourite is:

o c . che e r o (e) Eat very little of: t r s super My favourite is:

bread, cereals, rice and pasta

dairy and dairy products

fats, oils and sugar R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

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meat, fish and eggs Total health

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Plants we eat – 1 Teacher notes

Fo

Before the lesson • Collect the resources: at least two of each type of edible plant parts (refer to table below for examples); internet images of root vegetables, leafy vegetables, edible stems, fruits and edible flower parts of plants; basic diagram of a plant, showing roots, stem, flower, fruit and seeds (if one is not available, a simple diagram can be drawn on the board and labelled); six labels on cardboard—root, leaf, stem, seeds, flower and fruit.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

carrots, beetroot, turnips, parsnips, sweet potatoes, radish

asparagus, celery, rhubarb, potato (underground stems), sugar cane

Teac he r

Stem

The lesson

Leaves

Seeds

Flower

Fruit

spinach, cabbage, lettuce, chard, brussel sprouts, collard, kale, onion (layers of hollow leaves)

nuts (walnuts, pecans, almonds, peanuts), cereals (barley, millet, oats, rice, rye, wheat, corn), beans, peas, soya beans

broccoli, cauliflower, artichoke, cloves, nasturtium

lemon, apples, grapes, pears, peaches, oranges, grapefruit, lime, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes

ew i ev Pr

Root

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Show the plant diagram and discuss the different parts and what each does.

• Display the examples of food obtained from plants and ask the students to suggest which part of the plant each comes from. Place the prepared labels on the floor and select students to sort them into the six different categories.

m . u

• Look at and name the food from plants on the worksheet. Have the students suggest which part of the plant each comes from. The students then can cut and paste the six labels at the bottom near the correct foods.

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• Discuss and write a list on the board of foods that can be eaten from each plant part. The students can use this list to complete Question 2. (Retain this list for use with the lesson on page 57 as well.) • When the worksheet is completed, the students can colour the pictures.

Answers 1. (a) seeds

. te

(b) leaves

o c . che e r o t r s super (c) roots

(d) stems

(e) fruit

(f) flower

2. Refer to table for possible answers for types of food from each plant part.

After the lesson

• Divide the class into six groups representing the six plant parts and have each group create one large artwork by drawing, cutting, pasting and labelling types of food from each plant part. • Ask the students to collect or write recipes which use their favourite plant parts. • At lunchtime, ask the students to identify parts of their lunch which are plants.

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Plants we eat – 1

Fo

1. Cut and paste the labels which match each plant part. 2. Write two types of food we eat from each plant part.

r o • B e t s r e oo p u k S •

(b)

(c)

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Teac he r

(a)

© R. I . C.Publ i c t i ons • a •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(d)

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(e)

m . u

o c . che e • r o t r s super •

• (f)

leaves

flower

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seeds

stem Total health

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Plants we eat – 2 Teacher notes

Fo

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: a variety of edible plant parts (refer to the table on page 54 for suggestions); internet images of foods from each plant part category; cooking or gardening magazines.

(seeds) almonds, peanuts, flour, beans (leaves) cabbage, lettuce, spinach, onions (roots) turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes (stem) celery, asparagus (fruit) tomatoes, apples, oranges (flower) cauliflower, broccoli

r o e t s Bo r e p o After the lesson k u S

• Revise the parts of plants and foods from each part. Read the list from the previous lesson to remind the students, if necessary. • Read the labels at the bottom of the worksheet. Show images of any unfamiliar foods.

• The students cut and paste the food labels in the correct boxes. If desired, they could also find pictures of plant food in magazines and paste them in the correct box (worksheet may need to be enlarged to A3).

• The students draw or cut and paste diagrams of plants (showing roots, stem, flower, fruit, leaves and seeds), showing the food obtained for each from each relevant category.

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The lesson

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)

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• When completed, the students total the number correct and colour the worksheet.

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Plants we eat – 2

Fo

Cut and glue the food labels in the correct boxes.

(a) seeds

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(b) leaves

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(c) roots

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(d) stem

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(e) fruit

(f)

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almonds

cabbage

turnips

asparagus tomatoes

lettuce

apples

carrots

cauliflower

beans

broccoli

peanuts

flour

celery

oranges

sweet potatoes

spinach

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Make a healthy choice Teacher notes

Fo

Answers Before the lesson

1. Teacher check

• Collect the resources: a selection of foodstuffs which fall into the categories of ‘healthy’, ‘not very healthy’ and ‘not healthy at all’; magazines with pictures of food; poster of traffic light food labelling,

Teac he r

• <http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/foodlabels/trafficlights/> • <http://www.fooducate.com/blog/2009/05/09/ across-the-pond-uk-looking-for-single-foodlabeling-system/#more-1556> • <http://www.healthyoptions.health.wa.gov.au/ resources/index.cfm> (poster)

3. Teacher check

After the lesson

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

The lesson

2. (a) green (b) orange** (c) red (d) green (e) red** (f) green (g) green (h) orange** (i) orange** (j) red (k) orange** (l) green NOTE: **There will be discussion about some answers and this is to be encouraged.

• Use some of the products brought in to create a meal, such as healthy sandwiches. • Divide the class into three groups and have the students in each group draw or paint food from the green, orange or red food category for a class display.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• This lesson is an introduction to ‘traffic light’ food labelling.

• Discuss how some foods are healthier for you and why. Lead the students to the conclusion that some foods are very healthy, some not so healthy and some very unhealthy.

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• On the worksheet, show and explain the three faces and have the students suggest which of the faces would be most suitable for each type of food. Then have the students try to match the faces with the food examples you brought (or those found in magazines).

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• Lead a class activity in which students look through a food magazine (or supermarket catalogue) and identify healthy and unhealthy foods.

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• Brainstorm to list foods for each category (green, orange or red) to write on the board. • Ask the students to complete the worksheet activity in pairs or small groups. Discussion is important as some foods are not clear-cut as to their categories; for example, red meat. • Discuss the answers and have the students colour the worksheet.

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Make a healthy choice

Fo

1. Colour:

(a) the ‘healthy food face’ green. .................... (b) the ‘not very healthy food face’ orange. ....

healthy food— eat lots not very healthy food—eat some

r o e t s Bo r e p or red to colour eachoface 2. Choose green, orange for each food u k to show how Shealthy it is. (b) cheese

(a) broccoli

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(c) the ‘not healthy at all food face’ red. .......

not healthy food at all—eat very little

(c) potato chips

PS

I CH

© R. I . C .P ub i cat i on segg (e) muffi nl (f) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• BREAD WHOLEMEAL

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(g) apple

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(j) biscuit

(h) hamburger

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(d) wholemeal bread

(i) white bread WHITE BREAD

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Traffic light food Teacher notes

Fo

Answers Before the lesson

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/foodlabels/trafficlights/> • <http://www.fooducate.com/blog/2009/05/09/ across-the-pond-uk-looking-for-single-foodlabeling-system/#more-1556> • <http://www.healthyoptions.health.wa.gov.au/ resources/index.cfm> (poster)

• <http://www.parentsjury.org.au/tpj_browse.asp? ContainerID=what_s_all_the_fuss> (a good layperson’s description of the health problems associated with fat, sugar and salt)

2. Teacher check 3. (a) salt (b) sugar (c) fat

4. (a) can of soft drink—fat: green, salt: orange, sugar: red (b) apple—fat: green, salt—green, sugar: orange (c) hot chips—fat: red, salt: red, sugar: green

After the lesson

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• Collect the resources: a can of soft drink, an apple and a packet of chips; magazines or supermarket catalogue with pictures of food; a chart or drawing of the three traffic light faces in the correct colours; a large picture of a set of traffic lights; a poster of traffic light food labelling (refer to websites below).

1. red—contains a very high amount of fat, sugar or salt orange—contains a medium amount of fat, sugar or salt green—contains a very low amount of fat, sugar or salt

• Look at the products brought in (the can of soft drink, the apple and the packet of chips) and find healthier substitutes for each. • Have students look through colour magazines and cut out pictures of food. Students then create a class poster in which the foods are grouped in different ways.

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• Discuss traffic lights and what the different colours mean. Ask the students to complete Question 1.

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• Discuss fat, sugar and salt and explain how it is unhealthy for us to eat too much of each (see final website listed).

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• Ask the students to colour the lights according to the instructions and relate the colours to the descriptions for ‘lots of’, ‘not much’, and ‘very little’.

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The lesson

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• Show and discuss the can of soft drink, the apple and the packet of chips, then ask the students to colour the lights in the correct colours.

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Traffic light food A colour key can help people make healthy food choices.

Fo

1. Colour the traffic lights, then match each light to its description. RED

contains a medium amount of fat, sugar or salt

contains a very low amount r o t s •eB r of e ofat,osugar or salt p u ka very high contains • S • amount of fat, sugar or salt ORANGE

GREEN

2. Colour:

(a) the ‘fat’ circle green (b) the ‘salt’ circle red

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3. Complete the sentences to tell about the food label in Question 2. (a) This food has lots of

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons . •f orr evi ew pur p(b) os es on l y •much FAT This food has not

(c) the ‘sugar’ circle orange.

.

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SALT

(c) This food has very little SUGAR

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4. Colour red, orange or green for each circle to tell about the fat, salt and sugar amounts of each food. (a) FAT

FAT

SALT

SALT

SALT

SUGAR

SUGAR

SUGAR

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What makes a friend?

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Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

1. (a), (c), (e)

The lesson

2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

r o e t s Bo r e p o After the lesson k u S

• Read a story about friendship (see ‘Before the lesson’ for suggestions). Afterwards, list on the board the actions that showed the characters in the story were friends. Retain this list for the next lesson. • Look at a series of pictures showing friends together. Discuss and compare and add friend-like characteristics to the list on the board. • Have the students read aloud the action statements on the worksheet, then discuss those relating to good friends. Ask the students to tick the boxes which show the actions of a good friend.

3. Answers may be similar to: (a) The children are cooperating. They are happy together. (b) They are talking in a friendly way. They are sharing.

• Make a class chart about what makes a friend. The students could collect pictures of friends together and use them as illustrations for the statements.

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• Collect the resources: storybooks about ‘friends’, such as Frog and Toad are friends by Arnold Lobel or The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister; pictures of friends together collected from magazines and websites.

• Have the students role-play situations where they needed a friend and someone showed friendship.

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• Look at the pictures in Question 3 and have the students write an explanation to say why the children in the pictures are friends.

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• Ask the students to draw and write two actions friends do. These could also be chosen from the list on the board.

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What makes a friend? 1. Tick three things that make a good friend. (a) Friends listen to what you are saying. .................. (b) Friends run away from you and hide. .................. (c) Friends tell the truth about things that happen. .

r o e t s Bo r e p o............................... (e) Friends only say good things. u k S 2. Draw pictures of two things that make a good friend. Write a sentence next to each picture to describe it. (a)

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(d) Friends lie about things that happen. .................

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3. Write why these children may be friends.

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(b)

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Making friends

Re

Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: storybooks about ‘friends’, such as Frog and Toad are friends by Arnold Lobel or The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister; pictures of friends together collected from magazines and websites.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

2. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) sit with them and talk to them (b) ask them to join in with their playing (c) tell them to come with them away from the others; tell the others to leave them alone 3. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

After the lesson

The lesson

• Read another story about friendship and revise the list on the board of actions shown by people who are friends. • Look at other pictures showing friends together. Discuss the friends’ actions and add to the list if necessary.

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• Other stories about friendship: Friends by Helme Heine, How do dinosaurs play with their friends? by Jane Yolar, Wombat stew by Marcia Vaughan and Pamela Lofts, Charlotte’s web by EB White

Teac he r

1. Teacher check. Answers may be similar to: Good friends listen to each other, understand each other’s feelings, give each other compliments, are dependable, are trustworthy, care about each other.

• Have the students relate personal experiences about their friends showing the qualities that are listed. They may also like to relate times when they have been a good friend to someone else.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• The students should be able to complete the worksheet independently. Select some students to read out their answers. They should choose those actions which have particular relevance to themselves.

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• The students need to interview friends to answer Question 3. An adult such as the teacher, aide, parent helper or an ‘imaginary friend’ could also be interviewed.

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• Role-play the situations in Question 2 with the students and ask for suggestions about what someone could do to console a lonely or distressed child.

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Making friends 1. Write three things you can do to be a good friend. (a)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok (c) u S

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(b)

2. Write a sentence to show how you can be more friendly to others who are:

(a) sitting alone eating their lunch

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f or evi ew pur posesonl y• (b) playing byr themselves

(c) being teased by other children in the playground

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o c . che e r o 3. Draw your two t r s super best friends doing their favourite thing. Ask them why they like doing it and write their answers.

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Things we should do

Re

Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Ensure that a list of class rules is compiled and visible to the students. Refer to this often.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

• Use the three lists to make class charts about common rules.

The lesson

• Discuss and make a list of any rules the students have at home. Highlight any common to a number of students. • Ask the students to complete Question 1 independently. • Discuss rules the students follow when shopping with an adult or on their own. Make another list then ask the students to complete Question 2. • Discuss rules they follow when visiting another person’s house. Make a third list.

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• Revise class and school rules.

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• Ask the students to complete Question 3.

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Things we should do

Re

We need rules to keep us safe.

1. Write about and draw two rules you have at home. (a)

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(b)

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2. Write about and draw two rules you follow when shopping. (a)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(b)

3. Write about and draw two rules you follow when visiting a person’s house. (a)

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(b)

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Class rules

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Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: research, collect and print (or cut out) internet and magazine images of ‘children in a classroom’.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

Review relevant website:

2. Teacher check. Answers will vary 3. (a) (b) (c) (d)

(iii) (iv) (ii) (i)

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• <http://raisingchildren.net.au/ articles/family_rules.html> (ideas for setting rules)

Teac he r

1. (a) safe (b) work together

• Make an A4-sized poster of the class rules, which can then be laminated for the students to place in their trays or under their desks.

The lesson

• Brainstorm to list (or revise) rules the students already use in the classroom. • The students can complete the worksheet independently. • View and discuss the internet images to see which rules the children are following and compare to the list.

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Class rules 1. Write the correct words in each sentence. safe

work together

(a) A classroom has rules to help make it .

r o e t s Bo r e ok 2. Draw pictures forp these important class rules. u S (a) Put your hand up to speak. (b) Always say ‘please’ and

to make the

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(b) Everyone can classroom a happy and safe place.

‘thank you’.

© R. I . C.Pub(d) l i cBe at i ons friendly and kind to others. •f orr evi ew pur po sesonl y•

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(c) Always do your best work.

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3. Draw a line from each picture to its correct listening rule.

(b) Sit in my place. • (c) Look at the speaker.

• (ii)

(d) Think of • questions to ask. R.I.C. Publications® – www.ricpublications.com.au

• (iii)

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Right or wrong in the classroom

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: a list of classroom rules; internet images of students working together well in class.

sitting down and working sitting and listening not touching others holding up one’s hand to speak or answer questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S After the lesson

Review relevant website:

2. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) speaking in class (b) whispering secrets

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• <http://raisingchildren.net.au/ articles/family_rules.html> (ideas for setting rules)

Teac he r

1. (a) (b) (c) (d)

• As a class, think of times when it may be important to break certain rules, such as in an emergency.

The lesson

• Revise the classroom’s rules. • Discuss the worksheet, then allow the students to complete Question 1 independently. • Discuss what the students are doing wrong in Question 2, then allow the students to write their answers to complete the worksheet.

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Right or wrong in the classroom 1. Write a sentence telling how the children are doing the right thing in the classroom.

(a)

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(b)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(c)

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2. Write a sentence telling what the children are doing wrong in the classroom. (a)

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(d)

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(b)

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Which rules?

Re

Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson • Collect the resources: a list of classroom rules, the list compiled from page 68.

moving talking safety learning

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

Walk in the classroom. Put your hand up to speak. Push chairs under tables. Try your best.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant website: • <http://raisingchildren.net.au/ articles/family_rules.html> (ideas for setting rules)

3. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

After the lesson

The lesson

• Using the list of rules compiled on the board (from the previous lessons), divide them into what type of rule they are—rules of learning, safety, talking or moving. • The students select the correct words to complete Question 1.

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1. (a) (b) (c) (d)

• As a class, or in pairs, students read the list of class rules and decide which category (rules of learning, safety, talking or moving) each rule belongs to.

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• The students cut and paste the actions at the bottom of the page in the correct category, then complete the worksheet.

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• Mark the answers as a class.

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Which rules? 1. Write what type of class rule each is. A rule of ... learning, safety, talking or moving.

(a) Line up quietly. (b) Speak politely and always use good manners.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok (c) Pass and use equipment properly. u S (d) Ask for help and help others.

2. Cut and paste the class rules next to the type of rule it shows. (a) moving

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(b) talking

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(d) learning

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(c) safety

3. Write one rule of your own for each of the following.

(b) talking (c) safety

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(d) learning

Walk in the classroom.

Push chairs under tables.

Try your best.

Put your hand up to speak.

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Rules for groups

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Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Collect the resources: internet images of children in groups cooperating and carrying out activities together or at school.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

• <http://www.hrea.org/pubs/rules-discussion.html>

The lesson

• As a class, or in small groups or pairs, ask the students to review and discuss pictures of children working together or cooperating, and decide which rules the children are following.

• Select students to create illustrations of the rules on the worksheet to glue onto a labelled chart titled ‘Rules for discussion’. Revise the ‘Rules for discussion’ chart often. • Divide the class into small groups and choose a whole-class discussion topic. Select an observer for the class who has a tally sheet of the rules. Hold the discussion and ask the observer to mark on the tally sheet each time a student uses one of the rules mentioned. Reward the group which uses the most rules.

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• <http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/ schemes2/citizenship/cit01/01q2>

After the lesson

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• Have a class discussion about the rules and list them on the board.

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• Read the worksheet with the students, explaining the instructions, then allow them to complete the worksheet independently.

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Rules for groups

When a group has a discussion, it needs rules.

1. Draw a picture to show each rule. 2. Write a sentence to tell why it is important.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(b) Listen to others.

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(a) Take turns.

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(d) Use a quiet voice.

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(c) Join in.

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Working in a group

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Teacher notes

Answers Before the lesson

Teacher check. Answers will vary.

• Organise playing an activity involving group work, such as planning a topic discussion, playing a board game, conducting a group science experiment, researching specific information about a topic etc.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Review relevant websites:

Teac he r

• <http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/ collaborative.html>

• <http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/intech/ cooperativelearning.htm> (information about many cooperative learning strategies)

The lesson

• Give numerical values to the scores; for example: not very well = 1, very well = 10. Use the results to create line graphs. • Select a group leader or spokesperson to give a report on the group’s self-assessment.

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• <http://www.teachingexpertise.com/articles/ make-classroom-groups-work-560>

After the lesson

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• Carry out a group activity (see suggestions above), then complete this worksheet as a follow-up activity. • Discuss the outcome of the group activity.

• The whole class should complete Question 1 together, but complete their own individual assessments (Question 2).

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• Discuss the results by completing a tally of each category on the board or use Question 2 displayed on a projector.

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• Reuse the worksheet each time a group activity is completed, encouraging the students to work well together to improve their scores on the group assessment sheet.

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• Read the worksheet with the students.

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Working in a group

hardly ever

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often

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Sdid you wait for your turn to speak? (a) How often

2. How well did you work in the group? Tick a box for each item.

sometimes

1. Write what your group activity was.

(b) How often did you listen to others in the group? (c) How often did you join in? (d) How often did you speak in a quiet voice?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 3. How • well did go? Place tick on line the f o rthe r egroup vi ew p ur pao se sthe on l yin• (e) How often did you ask questions?

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Not very well

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Okay

4. (a) Write about and draw one thing your group did well.

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correct place.

Very well

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(b) Write about something your group did not do well and then suggest how it could be improved.

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health

Carers Teacher notes

Co

Answers Before the lesson

doctor dentist teacher chemist nurse

r o e t s Bo r e p o u After the lesson k S

Review relevant website:

• <http://www.coloring.ws/people.htm> (games about people in a community)

The lesson

• Read stories involving people who work in the community. • Discuss and compile a list of well-known jobs in the community, including those of the students’ parents (if the students know the titles), on a class chart.

3. Teacher check

• Ask the students to write their own descriptions of carers and have others try to name them.

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Teac he r

• Collect the resources: an A3 copy of the worksheet for modelling; posters and pictures of people working (especially a doctor, dentist, chemist, nurse and teacher); stories involving carers such as Community helpers from A to Z (Alphabasics) by Bobbie Kalman and Jobs people do by DK Publishing.

1.–2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

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• Read each of the descriptions of the carers on the modelling sheet with the students, and the words at the bottom of the sheet.

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• Mark the answers for Question 2 as a class, while the students are completing their drawings.

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• Ask the students to cut and paste the names above the correct descriptions and draw a picture of each carer in the appropriate place on the worksheet.

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Carers

1. Read each clue.

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2. Cut and paste the name of each carer above the correct clue. 3. Draw each carer.

(a)

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(b)

This person will help you when you have a bad toothache.

(c)

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This person will help you when you are feeling very sick. He or she works in surgeries and hospitals and makes you well.

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(d)

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This person cares for you at school and helps you learn new things.

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This person will help you when you need to buy medicine.

(e) This person helps the doctor and works in a hospital, surgery or school.

dentist

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Carers at work Teacher notes

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Answers Before the lesson

1.–2. Teacher check. Answers will vary.

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Review relevant website:

• <http://www.coloring.ws/people.htm> (games about people in a community)

The lesson

• Read a story about people who work in the community.

After the lesson

• Make a list of other occupations and the tools or equipment used by each. Ask the students to select three or four from the list to complete similar sentences to those for Question 1. • Ask the students to make up ‘Who uses me?’ clues for other students to answer; for example, ‘I am a hammer. Who uses me?’ Answers may vary so allow for more than one correct answer.

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Teac he r

• Collect the resources: an A3 copy of the worksheet for modelling (optional); posters and pictures of people working (especially a doctor, dentist, chemist, nurse and teacher); stories involving carers such as Community helpers from A to Z (Alphabasics) by Bobbie Kalman and Jobs people do by DK Publishing.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Revise the list of community jobs on the class chart (from the previous lesson).

• Read the instructions for Question 1, then brainstorm ideas for sentences to complete the activity.

• Select students to read their sentences for Question 1 and writing for Question 2 to the class.

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• Ask the students to write the sentences and complete Question 2 independently.

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Carers at work

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1. Using the words given, write a sentence about what the carers are doing.

(a) chemist, tablets

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(c) dentist, tooth

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(e) doctor, mouth

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (d) nurse, helping •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . c e her r 2. Draw and write about a visit to one oft the o s carers above. super

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Total Health: Ages 5-7