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RIC-6441 4.7/1354


Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life (Year 1)

A number of pages in this book are worksheets. The publisher licenses the individual teacher who purchased this book to photocopy these pages to hand out to students in their own classes.

Published by R.I.C. Publications® Copyright© R.I.C. Publications® 2013 ISBN 978-1-922116-38-3 RIC–6441 Titles available in this series: Australian Curriculum History: Personal and family histories (Foundation) Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life (Year 1) Australian Curriculum History: The past in the present (Year 2) Australian Curriculum History: Community and remembrance (Year 3) Australian Curriculum History: First contacts (Year 4) Australian Curriculum History: The Australian colonies (Year 5) Australian Curriculum History: Australia as a nation (Year 6)

Except as allowed under the Copyright Act 1968, any other use (including digital and online uses and the creation of overhead transparencies or posters) or any use by or for other people (including by or for other teachers, students or institutions) is prohibited. If you want a licence to do anything outside the scope of the BLM licence above, please contact the Publisher.

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This information is provided to clarify the limits of this licence and its interaction with the Copyright Act.

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Copyright Notice

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All material identified by is material subject to copyright under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) and is owned by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority 2013. For all Australian Curriculum material except elaborations: This is an extract from the Australian Curriculum. Elaborations: This may be a modified extract from the Australian Curriculum and may include the work of other authors. Disclaimer: ACARA neither endorses nor verifies the accuracy of the information provided and accepts no responsibility for incomplete or inaccurate information. In particular, ACARA does not endorse or verify that: • The content descriptions are solely for a particular year and subject; • All the content descriptions for that year and subject have been used; and • The author’s material aligns with the Australian Curriculum content descriptions for the relevant year and subject. You can find the unaltered and most up to date version of this material at http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/ This material is reproduced with the permission of ACARA.

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School Order# (if applicable):

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Date of Purchase:

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Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


Foreword Australian Curriculum History – Foundation to Year 6 is a series of books designed to support the national curriculum. Each topic is introduced by a text to support the ‘Historical Knowledge and Understanding’ strand, and followed up with activities that provide opportunities to answer the key inquiry questions and practice the historical skills expected of the year group. Historical skills are used to answer the key inquiry questions about the content descriptions given in the ‘Historical Knowledge and Understanding’ strand, providing the framework for investigating Australia’s history.

Contents r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teachers notes ........................................... iv – vi

Why are birthdays important? ................. 34–36

Historical skills class record ..............................vii

Birthday narrative ........................................... 37

Overview of historical skills, key inquiry questions, general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities ........................ viii

How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? ...................................... 38–40

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Historical skills overview..................................vi

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How to use this book ................................ iv – v

Language of time/ Important events ...................... 34–61

Birthday inquiry ............................................... 41

Time line templates ............................................ix

What other special days do we celebrate? ........................................... 42–44

Family structures ......................... 2–33

Other special celebrations ............................ 45

Who’s in my family? ...................................... 2–4

What other changes are important? ...... 46–48

My family tree ................................................... 5

Talk about changes ....................................... 49

What are our families like? ........................... 6–8

How does the calendar teach us about time? ........................................... 50–52

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Time line of my family ....................................... 9

An important month ........................................ 53

Find people who do the job .......................... 13

Order the seasons ............................................ 57

What was it like when my parents were children? ............................ 14–16

What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? ....................................... 58–60

My parents vs me ........................................... 17

What’s the same? What’s different? ................ 61

What was it like when my grandparents were children? .................. 18–20

The present and past ................ 62–73

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What are seasons?..................................... 54–56

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What roles do we have in our families? .............................................. 10–12

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Questions for Grandpa Xiong ....................... 21

What was leisure time like in the past? ................................................ 62–64

What are Indigenous Australian families like? .............................................. 22–24

Games and toys of my parents ..................... 65

Post-a-question ............................................... 25

How did people communicate in the past? ............................................... 66–68

How do people in Indigenous Australian families work together? ............................. 26–28

What’s the same and what’s different? ......... 69

Tools and weapons ........................................ 29

What is a family tradition? ....................... 70–72

Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine? ..................... 30–32

My family tradition ........................................... 73

What’s the same and what’s different? ........... 33

Quiz questions ......................... 74–82 Quiz answers ................................. 83 Answers ................................... 84–85

Warning: This series may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Teachers notes How to use this book Each book is divided into sections based on the number of Historical Knowledge and Understanding content descriptions for the year group. Each content description has been given a general title which is used on the contents page and also in the shaded tabs on the outside edge of each page throughout the book. The tabs provide easy access to pages within each content description. Topics within each section follow a similar four-page format comprising a teachers page followed by three student pages. The student pages may all be related to one aspect of an historical event or connected activities associated with one historical event. Features

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• An historical skills overview with a brief explanation of their meaning. (page vi) • An historical skills class record. (page vii)

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• An overview of historical skills, key inquiry questions, general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities, is provided on page viii. It shows at a glance how the topics in each book, including the ‘Additional activities’ provided on the teachers pages, cover the requirements of the national curriculum for the Year group. • A template for two time lines is provided on page ix.

• A set of four or five multiple choice quiz questions plus answers for each topic is provided on pages 74–83.

• Answers or possible answers have been given for the student pages of each section. As certain activities require research, discussion and opinions, some answers are open-ended and are marked as ‘Teacher check’. Answers are located at the back of the book on pages 84–85.

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Four-page format Teachers page

The first page in each four-page unit is a teachers page which provides the following information: The title of the unit

The content description with its code

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A time line places important people and events in context Suggested resources

Additional activities offer suggestions of how the topic may be extended to develop the historical knowledge and understanding of the unit

An elaboration describing the focus of the unit in relation to the content description

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A shaded tab giving the general title of the Historical Knowledge and Understanding content description

The key inquiry questions which will be answered in part or whole by the activities within the unit

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The historical skills that can be practised while completing the unit The historical concepts that can be highlighted while completing the unit Background information provides teachers with relevant facts that put the text and activities in context with what was occurring in Australia and the rest of the world at the same time Teaching notes highlight specific details of the activities that need to be prepared, revised or understood before beginning the unit

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Teachers notes How to use this book Student page 1 This page introduces the topic with an historical literacy text. Its features include: The title of the unit

A shaded tab giving the general title of the Historical Knowledge and Understanding content description

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Relevant artwork is used to enhance the text and to aid understanding of the subject

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The historical literacy text, which can take the form of different genres

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The content description with its code

Student page 2

This page requires students to work together to discuss questions and activities before recording their own answers. Its features include:

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The title of the unit

The content description with its code

A shaded tab giving the general title of the Historical Knowledge and Understanding content description

Student page 3

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This page usually requires students to work together, developing their historical skills, to complete the activity and present their work to an audience. Its features include:

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A number of questions or activities that students can complete after discussion

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The title of the page, which may be different from but still related to the unit A shaded tab giving the general title of the Historical Knowledge and Understanding content description

An introductory sentence, paragraph or instruction followed by an activity that requires the application of a number of historical skills

A fact file with an unusual, interesting or relevant fact that may help students better understand or appreciate the topic

The content description with its code

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Teachers notes Historical skills overview

Chronology, terms and concepts

The development of historical skills is essential if students are to become proficient in leading their own historical inquiries and forming a balanced opinion of past events.

Use pictures, photographs or numbers to order people by ages

• Distinguish between the past, present and future

Identify an ‘old’ or a ‘present day’ object; use the terms such as ’yesterday’ and ‘last weekend’ to denote the passing of time

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It is important that history is seen as an investigative subject with students encouraged to not just accept what they are told but to constantly question and investigate people and events from different perspectives using a range of sources. They will then develop a balanced view as they mature and be able to form their own educated opinions.

(ACHHS032)

Historical questions and research

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033)

Ask parents or grandparents about their lives as children. For example, ‘What toys did you play with when you were a child, Grandma?’

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It is not possible for us to know exactly what life was like in a time or place of which we have no direct experience. But we can study evidence of past events and eras to reach some understanding of our history and how we have arrived at the present.

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• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

Analysis and use of sources • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Locate and use sources such as photographs, objects, internet images and oral narratives from parents and grandparents

• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035)

Compare objects such as toys and oral narratives or photographs to find similarities and differences

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Perspectives and interpretations

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

‘The very ink with which history is written is merely fluid prejudice.’

Explanation and communication

• Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

Relate stories about the past and present in oral or pictorial form

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies

Present ideas about the past in written, oral or digital form

(ACHHS038)

It is possible to bring the study of people and events of the past alive, kindling a genuine interest in history. This can be achieved by incorporating many learning areas into the investigation of an historical event as students practise different historical skills.

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This quote from American writer, Mark Twain, describes quite clearly that history is generally written from one aspect. While certain data may be absolute fact, the greater part of the text will be based on opinion.

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Compare similarities and differences between aspects of daily lives or events of themselves and others

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Touching on all content descriptions, historical skills and inquiry questions of the national curriculum, Australian Curriculum History – Foundation to Year 6 provides a comprehensive starting place for an in-depth study of Australian history. For the most effective outcome, students need to be given the opportunity to undertake guided research on topics and discuss the activities before recording their own responses. The internet has many reliable sites with a range of images of primary sources such as old documents, equipment, letters, photographs and general ephemera that give an insight into life in the past. Information is presented in many forms such as graphs and tables of statistics, reports, diaries and letters.

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Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

(ACHHS036)

Explore a point of view

Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035)

Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

(ACHHS033)

Pose questions about the past using sources provided

Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

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Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

Name

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Historical skills class record

Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


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✓ ✓

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• skill is included in an additional activity on the teachers page

pp 70–73

The present and past

General capabilities

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Family structures

Explanation and communication

Language of time/Important events

Perspectives and interpretations

✓ skill is included in pages (2 or 3 student pages) of a four-pages set

pp 66–69

Key:

pp 62–65

pp 54–57

pp 58–61

pp 50–53 ✓

pp 46–49

✓ ✓

pp 42–45

pp 38–41

pp 34–37

pp 26–29

✓ ✓

pp 22–25

pp 30–33

pp 18–21

Analysis and use of sources

pp 6–9

Historical questions and research

pp 14–17

pp 2–5

Historical knowledge and understanding Chronology, terms and concepts

Sequence familiar objects and events

Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present

Explore a point of view

Develop a narrative about the past Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies

How has famnily life changed or remained thesame over time?

How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the past? How do we describe the sequence of time? Literacy Numeracy

Information and communication technology (ICT) capability Critical and creative reasoning Personal and social capability Ethical understanding

Key inquiry questions

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Historical skills

pp 10–13

Distinguish between past, present and future Pose questions about the past using sources provided

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Explore a range of sources about the past

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Intercultural understanding

Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability


Time line templates Title:

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Title:

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line (examples of a personal history)

Elaboration My family size and structure.

Grandfather born

Key inquiry questions How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

Grandmother born

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Father born

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Uncle born (father’s brother) Mother born

Aunty born (father’s sister) I am born

My sister is born

My brother is born

Historical concepts

• Continuity and change

Background information

• Before students compare sizes and structures of different families, they need to be aware of their own family size and make-up. This will differ from student to student. Care should be taken with students who may have suffered a recent family break-up. • Some students may not be aware that their grandparents are the mother and father of their own mother and father.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Teaching points

• Families by Ann Morris (Full colour photographs of families around the world)

• Who’s in a family? by Robert Skutch

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• Me and my family tree by Joan Sweeney

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• Family trees are one method of organising information in a time line format. They show a sequence of births of people in the family in order and connections between family members. • Students who have stepbrothers, stepsisters, stepfathers or stepmothers should be allowed to create their own family tree similar to that on page 5 by drawing extra boxes on a sheet of paper and cutting and pasting pictures onto a large sheet of paper. The supplied family tree components are intended as a suggestion only.

Additional activities

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Resources

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

Who’s in my family?

• Survey, tally and graph the sizes and make-up of the students’ families. Refer to page 7 for examples.

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• Ask the students to describe their families. This develops the idea of a simple historic narrative about the past.

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grandfather

grandmother

grandfather

grandmother

uncle

aunt

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father

mother

uncle

aunt

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cousin

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

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Pretend your family makes a family tree that looks like this. It shows everyone in the family. The lines across show brothers and sisters. The lines down show parents. The hearts show couples like mums and dads who are married.

brother

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sister

cousin

Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Read the information.

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Who’s in my family? – 1


Use the information on page 3 to complete the answers. Write the names the people on the diagram are called. (a) your father’s mother (b) your father’s father

r o e t s Bo r e (d) your mother’s father p ok u (e) the brother Sof your mother (g) the wife of your uncle (h) the husband of your aunt (i) the child of your aunt and uncle

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(f) the sister of your father

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •it’sf o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• (but not you!)

(j) the male child of your mother and father

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(k) the female child of your mother and father

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(but it’s not you!)

Write the name you call:

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o c . (b) your grandmother. che e r o t r s super Write the name of: (a) your grandfather.

(a) an aunt. (b) an uncle. (c) a cousin.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

(c) your mother’s mother

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

Who’s in my family? – 2


FAMILY STRUCTURES

My family tree Draw and write about the people in your family. Write the names you call them.

My father’s father

My father’s mother

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My father

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My mother

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

My mother’s mother

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My mother’s father

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Me My sisters and/or brothers

A family is a group of people like parents and children who may live together. They are closely related.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line (examples of a personal history)

Elaboration Family sizes and structures.

Date of birth

Key inquiry questions

First tooth

How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Historical skills

First crawled

• Sequences familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

First steps Birth of brother or sister First day of school First day in Year 1 Lose first tooth

Resources

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts

• Continuity and change

Background information

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• Students need to be aware of their own family structures and roles in order to be able to make comparisons with others.

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• All families are different by Sol Gordon • A ride on mother’s back: A day of baby carrying around the world by Emery Bernhard

Teaching points

• Ideally, students should develop questions for their own interview sheets to gather, record and develop conclusions about their own data. Fictitious data has been provided to show how family sizes and structures differ and that data can be collated in tables or graphs. Totals have been made easier to see, since the task is to consider the information rather than learn how to read tables and graphs. • Gluing the pictures of family members on a strip of paper helps students develop the concept of time lines. Use words such as ‘first’, ‘next’, ‘then’ and ‘after’ to encourage the language of order.

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Additional activities

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are our families like?

• Ask the students to write questions for other information they would like to find out about families. • Students in another Year 1 class could compile similar information for students to compare.

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• Students create a collage by drawing, cutting out and gluing pictures of their families onto a large sheet of cardboard.

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Read the information. Year 1 interviewed each other to find out about their families. They put all the information together in tables and graphs. This is what they found out.

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10

5 3 1

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2

3

4

5

6

Families that have …

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Number

One parent living at home

Two parents living at home

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stepbrothers or stepsisters

8

stepmothers or stepfathers

12

grandparents, aunts or uncles living at home

2

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Number of people in family

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

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Number of families

20

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are our families like? – 1


Use the information on page 7 to complete the following. Use graph

. How many families in the class have:

(a) two people in the family? (b) three people in the family?

r o e t s Bo r e p o u k (e) six people in the family? S (c) four people in the family? (d) five people in the family?

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Use graph . How many have: •f or r ev i ewfamilies pur p osesonl y• (a) one parent living at home? (b) two parents living at home?

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Use graph

. How many families have:

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(a) stepbrothers or stepsisters?

Write a sentence or two about how families are made up.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Write a sentence or two about the size of families.

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are our families like? – 2


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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

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Use the boxes to draw and label pictures of all the people in your family. Draw more boxes on a new sheet of paper if you need to.

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Glue them on a strip of paper or cardboard in order from oldest to youngest person in the family.

na No

Dad

Mum Me

o Marc

A lady from France was over 122 years old when she died!

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

Time line of my family


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line (examples of a personal history)

Elaboration The roles of family members.

6 am

Wake up

6.15

Shower and dress

Key inquiry questions How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

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6.30 am Change baby’s nappy

Historical skills

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

6.45 am Eat breakfast and feed baby

7.30 am Leave home

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts

• Continuity and change • Perspectives

7.45 am Drop baby at day care 8 am

Work

4.30 pm Leave work

• Family groups are very different but they all have something in common—the family members work together and help each other.They each have roles or responsibilities which help the family unit run smoothly. Helping each other allows the family unit to meet its basic needs.

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5 pm

Change, feed baby, play with baby Set table

6.30

Help clean kitchen

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6 pm

6.45 pm Bathe baby

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Put baby to bed

7.30 pm Read or watch television 9.30 pm Bedtime

Teaching points

• A fictitious interview has been used as a different source of information. Students need to be aware that they may obtain information from a variety of sources, including each other. • By comparing roles taken by family members in different families and offering valid reasons why different family members do different jobs, students will begin to develop an appreciation of different points of view.

Additional activities

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4.45 pm Pick up baby at day care

7 pm

Background information

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7.15 am Clean up baby and dress him for day care

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What roles do we have in our families?

• Make a class list of jobs that need to be done at home. Write who does each are then find out who does the most. Is this fair? Why/Why not? Think of ways others can help share the workload. • Write sentences like ‘I can’t … yet because I’m too small’ or ‘When I am older, I can help by …’

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Resources • Visit <http://learnenglishkids. britishcouncil.org/en/word-games/ order-the-words/chores> to write simple sentences about chores at home. • Fancy Nancy: Bonjour butterfly by Jane O’Connor

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What roles do we have in our families? – 1 Read the text. Interviewer: Good morning, Mum. Thanks for talking to me. Mum:

You are welcome. I am happy to be here.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e Interviewer: We want to fi nd out p o u k what jobs people do S at home. What jobs need to be done at your house? Who does them?

My job is chief cook. I cook all the meals. I make lunches for the children for school. I like cooking!

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f o rr e vi e w pur p olikes ses nl y•I get Dad helps sometimes. He to o barbecue.

Interviewer: Doesn’t anyone else help with the cooking? Mum:

home first so it’s easier for me to do it!

Mum:

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Interviewer: Who does the ironing and cleaning?

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Mum:

Dad and I both iron and help clean up. It’s quicker that way!

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o c . Yes, c they do. We all have to help.e The children pack h r er away their toys. They help me ofold the washing, too. t s s r u e p They put their clothes away like Dad and I do. They

Interviewer: Do the children help at all? Mum:

take turns putting out the rubbish. They feed the dog, but we all take him for a walk. Interviewer: It’s good that everyone helps. Mum:

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Yes. We help and care for each other. But I wish the children could make their beds without lumps in them! R.I.C. Publications®

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Use the information on page 11 to complete the first column. Write about your own family in the last column.

r o e t s BoYour own family r e p ok u S

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cooks

irons

cleans

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons packs toys •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• away

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puts away clothes

. t puts out e rubbish

feeds the dog

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folds washing

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walks the dog makes their own bed Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

The family on page 11

Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What roles do we have in our families? – 2


Ask other students in your class to write their names in a box. Find someone who cooks

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

feeds the dog

puts away clothes

makes their own bed

walks the dog

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wipes dishes

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

washes dishes

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Teac he r

puts out the rubbish

packs away their toys

o c . che e r o t r s super

Lots of homes have dishwashers so many children do not know how to wash up and dry dishes by hand!

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Find people who do the job


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line (examples of a personal history) 1980, 22 July

Date of birth

1982, 6 August

Little sister born

Elaboration Family structures and roles when my parents were children.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Historical skills

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Start school

1986, 10 October

Younger brother born

1988

Move to the city

1992

Start secondary school

1999

Start university

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives

Background information

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1986, January

Teac he r

• All families are unique. The accounts of families of one generation may differ from or be similar in ways to those of a present generation.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

2003

Start work

Teaching points

Married

• Children should be able to identify aunts and uncles as brothers or sisters of Mum or Dad, and grandparents as their parents’ Mum or Dad.

2007

First child born

• The fictitious account and photograph illustrate another example of possible sources of information about the past. The childhood of the students’ parents will have some similarities to and differences from to the childhood of the students in the class.

2009

Second child born

2005

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Resources

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• When dads grow up by Marjorie Blain Parker

• When Mum was little by Mini Goss (Set in the 1960s)

• Page 17 may be carried out using hoops for the Venn diagram with children standing in an area and relating an idea for that section.

Additional activities

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my parents were children?

• Ask the students to write some questions to ask their parents in order to find out about the size and make-up of their families when they were children. (Literacy)

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Compare the lives of parents from different cultural backgrounds to see how different their childhoods were. (Intercultural understanding)

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Read the text and look at the photograph.

Dadʻs memories

Teac he r

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Most children rode bikes up and down the footpaths. We didn’t even have to wear helmets! Sam had a scooter that he used to zip around on. We had a slippery slide and swing set in our garden. We were really lucky.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

I was eight in this photo. I’m wearing the checked shirt! My sister, Janine, is in the front. My little brother, Sam, is wearing his favourite jumper. We were on a camping holiday. We loved hiking© and being R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons outside. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

We had. jobs to do at home. We didn’t have a dishwasher t e o c until I was older. Mum washed up and we took turns . c e them he r clearing the table, wiping the dishes and putting o t r s s r u e p away.

Lots of families had three or more children. We played at each other’s houses. We were lucky to have a computer and coloured television. The neighbours’ children liked coming over! www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my parents were children? – 1


Use the information on page 15 to complete the following. How many: (a) people were in Dad’s family?

r o e t s Bo r e pwere in lots of families?ok How many children u S

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What games did the children play outside?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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m . u

What jobs did the children have to do at home?

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o c . Dad says ‘We were lucky …’. Why? ch e r er o t s super

Why would it be good to have families with three or more children in the neighbourhood?

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

(b) children were in Dad’s family?

Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my parents were children? – 2


FAMILY STRUCTURES

My parents vs me Use the diagram to write or draw things that are the same as or different from when your parents were children.

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© R. I . C.P ubl i cat i ons The same •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Parents–different

o c . che e r o t r s super Me–different

Some popular toys when your parents were children were Cabbage Patch® dolls, Care Bears®, Micro machines® (tiny vehicles), My Little Pony®, Pogo balls®, Roller Racers® and Pound Puppies®.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line

Elaboration Family structures and roles when my grandparents were children.

Grandpa Xiong is born

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Historical skills

Grandma Chan is born Grandpa Xiong and Grandma Chan’s son is born

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033) • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035)

Wu and Mei’s mother is born

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

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Teac he r

Wu is born

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Mei is born

Historical concepts

Grandpa Xiong and Grandma Chan babysit Wu and Mei

Resources

• Continuity and change • Perspectives

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Cherry pies and lullabies by Lynn Reiser

• The accounts of families of one generation may differ from or be similar in ways to those of a present generation. There may be similarities or differences in roles and responsibilities, and the size and make-up of families.

• Isabella’s bed by Alison Lester

• Tortillas and lullabies by Lyn Reiser

Teaching points

• Days with Gran by Catherine Farthing Knight

• Children should be able to identify grandparents as the parents of their own parents.

• How to babysit a grandpa by Jean Reagan

• A story of a fictitious Asian family provides some background information about another generation and also recognises the multicultural nature of Australian society.

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my grandparents were children?

• In the text, the informal Chinese forms of address for Mum and Dad are given as m ma and bàba. • Read the text with, or to, the students, identifying and discussing similarities and differences between the children of Grandpa Xiong and the students.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• Draw, or find, pictures of household appliances like Grandpa Xiong’s black and white television and a colour television. Place the pictures in groups labelled ‘Then’ and ‘Now’. • Cut out pictures of different generations of families. Discuss which are the ‘older or ‘younger’ generation.

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Read the text. Grandpa Xiong and Grandma Chan were looking after their grandchildren, Mei and Wu.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u ‘You’re really old, Saren’t you, Grandpa!’ said Wu.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Today Wu was staring at the wrinkles on Grandpa Xiong’s face.

‘Yes, very old!’ laughed his grandpa. ‘But I was a young man and a child once!’ he replied with a smile.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons orr e e wofp r pos eson l y • ‘Well … • wef didn’t sitv ini front au colour television or play

‘Grandpa Xiong, what was it like when you were a child? Did you have toys like us? What games did you play?’

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computer games for hours each day!’ he said sternly. ‘We had simple toys. We had bikes, dolls, puzzles and lots of books to read, just like you. We played lots of board games. We had a park near our house so we played on the swings and slides. We climbed trees and ran around a lot. We got a big black and white television when I was ten. We felt like we were a very rich family indeed!’

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Mei looked at him. She had never thought about her grandpa being a child.

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o c . ch e ‘What else did you do, Grandpa?’ asked Wu. r er o t s suptime, er ‘We didn’t have a car for a long so we walked or caught the bus to go places. I remember that we had a big vegetable patch in our back garden. We had fruit trees and a chook pen as well. ‘My m ma and bàba worked very hard, so we all helped after school and on the weekends. But we still had time to be kids!

‘And if you’re very lucky, Wu, you’ll grow old and get lots of wrinkles like Grandpa Xiong!’ he chuckled. www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my grandparents were children? – 1


Use the information on page 19 to complete the following. Circle the things that Grandpa Xiong had that are still used.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S swing

doll

bike

puzzle

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Teac he r

slide book

boardgame

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f o rr evi ewand pu r posesonl y• How do• you get your fruit vegetables?

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Which appliance still in homes today was used by Grandpa Xiong?

. te o How has it changed? c . che e r o t r s super Write Yes or No.

(a) I climb trees. (b) I run around a lot. (c) I go to the park. (d) I watch television. Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

How did Grandpa Xiong and his family get their fruit and vegetables in the past?

m . u

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What was it like when my grandparents were children? – 2


Write a question to ask Grandpa Xiong about each thing to find out what life was like when he was a child. jobs or work

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S cooking

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

washing

cleaning

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• the children

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looking after the children

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

gardening

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the house he lived in

o c . che e r o toys and games t r s super clothes

Many Australian children have grandparents or great grandparents who were born in another country.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Questions for Grandpa Xiong


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line Elaboration ~ 50 000 to 70 000 years ago Australia is joined to New Guinea and Tasmania by land bridges

The relationships and family structures of Indigenous Australian families.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Key inquiry questions

How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

> 60 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have arrived in Australia

35 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have reached Tasmania 1788 First European settlement in Australia led by Captain Arthur Phillip; Conflict between Europeans and Indigenous Australians begins

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033) • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035) • Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Background information

• The kinship system of Indigenous Australians was similar to and differed in some ways from that of the families of other Australians.

• When dads grow up by Marjorie Blain Parker

• When Mum was little by Mini Goss (Set in the 1960s)

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. te

• The kinship system varied from place to place and was quite complex. In this system, those people of the same generation were considered of equal rank. An Aboriginal male’s father’s brothers were all regarded as ‘fathers’, rather than uncles. Their male children were ‘brothers’, rather than cousins. On his mother’s side, her sisters were regarded as ‘mothers’, and their daughters as ‘sisters’. However, his father’s sisters and mother’s brothers were regarded as ‘aunts’ and ‘uncles’.

Teaching points

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Resources

Historical skills

ew i ev Pr

~ 40 000 BC Indigenous Australians migrate to Australia

Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are Indigenous Australian families like?

• Two different photographs have been provided as sources of information.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Read the text on page 24 with, or to, the students. Discuss, asking students their opinions. • The T-chart activity on page 25 may be completed in pairs, in small groups or individually. The questions will guide future class study.

Additional activities

• Invite a local Indigenous Australian person to speak to the students about their life as a child. Ask the students to compare their life to the one described by the speaker. • Listen to Dreaming stories from the past including Dunbi the owl at <http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=Pcmvu7tsic4> and Kangaroo and the porpoise at <http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=7mRFollDm4u>, both written by Pamela Lofts.

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are Indigenous Australian families like? – 1 Read the text. Many Indigenous Australian people live in Australia. They have lived in Australia for thousands of years.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Others live in cities and towns.

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m . u

Many follow the kinship system. Everyone in the family is linked. Each person is given a name relating them to everyone else. There may be many ‘sons’ or ‘daughters’, ‘mums’, ‘dads’, ‘grandmothers’, ‘grandfathers’, ‘brothers’ and ‘sisters.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Some still live the ‘old’ life like they did hundreds of years ago.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Indigenous Australian families can be very large. They all live together and help each other. Kinship told Indigenous Australians how to treat each other. www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Use the text on page 23 to complete the following. Which group of people have lived in Australia for thousands of years?

ew i ev Pr

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

What is the name of their family grouping called?

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o c . che Write what it means. e r o t r s super

Colour the best word. Indigenous Australian families were Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

24

small

large

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.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s B r e Draw two picturesp to show how they live.o ok u S Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What are Indigenous Australian families like? – 2


Write three questions on Post-it® notes for each column to find out more about Indigenous Australian life. Stick them onto the T-chart.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

new way (today)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

old way (past)

o c . che e r o t r s super

Years ago, Indigenous Australians lived in simple shelters which white people called humpies. They were often made from bark and tree branches.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Post-a-question


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Teacher information

Time line Elaboration Around 50 000 to 70 000 years ago Australia is joined to New Guinea and Tasmania by land bridges

35 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have reached Tasmania 1788 First European settlement in Australia led by Captain Arthur Phillip; Conflict between Europeans and Indigenous Australians begins.

Key inquiry questions

How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

Historical skills focus

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032) • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035)

ew i ev Pr

Around 40 000 BC Indigenous Australians migrate to Australia

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change

Background information

• The kinship system of Indigenous Australians was similar to and differed in some ways from that of the families of other Australians.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• The extended Indigenous Australian family enabled customs, beliefs and practices to be handed down from one generation to the next. These are still practised today. • ‘Aunts’ (father’s sister) and ‘uncles’ taught the children about the rules and punishments, and disciplined them. Often, grandchildren lived with grandparents, aunts, uncles and their immediate family.

• Nardika learns to make a spear by Chris Fry • Australian Aboriginal culture Ages 5–6 Published by R.I.C. Publications

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Teaching points • Read the text to, or with, the students. Discuss the content and compare the pictures.

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Resources

The relationships and family structures of Indigenous Australian families.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

> 60 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have arrived in Australia

Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

How do people in Indigenous Australian families work together?

• After completing page 28, ask the students to discuss what other jobs may need to be done in an Indigenous Australian family and decide who does them. • The images on page 29 show the importance of artefacts to find out about the past. Actual objects or real life photographs should be used if possible.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• NOTE: The Indigenous Australians had many different languages. The words on page 29 would not be used by all Indigenous Australians.

Additional activities

• Ask the children to suggest items they would use at home for digging in the garden, carrying water, a food bowl or for grinding herbs. Make a display of these next to enlarged pictures form page 29. • Look at artefacts or photographs of Indigenous Australian life today and in the past. Visit <http://www.ozoutback.com.au/Australia/index.html>

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Read the text. Indigenous Australian families lived together and helped each other. Different people had different jobs to do. The men hunted animals like birds, kangaroos, emus and fish for food. They used spears and boomerangs.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The women collected fruit, f o rr ev i ewof pur posesonl y• berries, • nuts and the roots

m . u

plants. The children caught small lizards and insects to eat. Everyone shared the food. Many Indigenous Australian people still collect food this way today.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Picture 1

. teand parents o Grandparents c . taught the children how ch e r er to collect food. They told o t s super them stories and taught them songs and dances. They taught them their language. They taught them how to talk to each other and how to behave. These rules told them how to look after each other. www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

How do people in Indigenous Australian families work together? – 1


Use the information on page 27 to complete the following. What job did the men do in Indigenous Australian families?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S What did they use to help them do this job?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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The children helped by How did grandparents help?

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.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Circle the correct word and number. Which picture shows: (a) the present? PICTURE 1

PICTURE 2

PICTURE 1

PICTURE 2

(b) the past?

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

What job did the women do in Indigenous Australian families?

m . u

FAMILY STRUCTURES

How do people in Indigenous Australian families work together? – 2


Cut out the words and glue them under the correct picture. (a)

(b)

(f) © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

m . u

(e)

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(c)

r o e t s Bo r e p o u k (d) S

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o c . wira (food bowl) piti (bowle for carrying water) che r o r st super kulata (spear) kali (boomerang)

wanna (digging stick)

tjungari (grinding stone)

Log on to <http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/uluru/culture/ culture/pit-tools.html> to hear Indigenous Australian words for these tools and weapons. Traditional Indigenous Australians used a stick called a woomera to help a spear go further.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Tools and weapons


Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

Elaboration

Time line

The relationships and family structures of Indigenous Australian families may be the same as or different from other families.

Around 50 000 to 70 000 years ago Australia is joined to New Guinea and Tasmania by land bridges

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

> 60 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have arrived in Australia

Around 40 000 BC Indigenous Australians migrate to Australia 35 000 BC Indigenous Australians are thought to have reached Tasmania

1788 First European settlement in Australia led by Captain Arthur Phillip; Conflict between Europeans and Indigenous Australians begins.

How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

Historical skills focus

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031) • Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives

Background information

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• The lives of Indigenous Australian children may be similar to or different in some ways from those of other Australian children.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Teaching points

Resources

• Same, but a little bit diff’rent by Kylie Dunstan • Ernie dances to the didgeridoo by Alison Lester

• It is important to include a variety of cultures when studying Australian history. Teachers should consider the family histories of the students in their class. Asian and Indigenous Australian families should be included to support cross-curricular priorities. • This text is a fictitious account of the life of an Indigenous Australian child and may be considered an historic narrative. It gives white Australian students perspectives of life from the point of view of other children.

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• Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan

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Additional activities

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine?

• Ask the students to rewrite the events (as they are on page 33) in simple sentences including language such as ‘First …’, ‘Then …’, ‘Next …’, ‘After …’ to show everyday terms about the passing of time.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask the students to write a sentence or two about a special treat they like to have or do after school. • Become email ‘buddies’ with a class of Year 1 students in a completely different region of Australia to gain further perspectives of life.

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Read the text.

© R. I . C.Pub l i cat i ons I get up early every day so I can basketball with •f orr evi ew puplay r po seson l ymy •cousins

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and friends before we all go to school. Because it is so hot, school starts at 7 am. At school, I like to use the computers and do maths best.

m . u

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

My name is Matthew. I am six years old. I live in an Aboriginal community called Warburton. I live in a house with my mum, dad, older brother and younger sister. Mum and Dad share a room and I share a room with my brother and sister. My aunty lives next door and my uncle and his family live two houses down.

o c . che e r o t r s super As a treat, when it cools down, Mum and Nanna take us out bush. We collect berries, yams, grubs and honey ants. We sometimes save them to have with our dinner, but we mostly eat the honey ants when noone is looking. www.ricpublications.com.au

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FAMILY STRUCTURES

Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine? – 1


Use the information on page 31 to complete the following. Write the numbers 1 to 4 to show the order Matthew does things.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u (c) Matthew S gets up. (a) Matthew goes to school.

Draw pictures to match each event.

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(d) Matthew plays basketball.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Matthew gets up.

Matthew plays basketball.

Matthew goes to school.

Matthew collects bush food.

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

(b) Matthew collects bush food.

Teac he r

FAMILY STRUCTURES

Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine? – 2


Use the table to show how Matthew’s life is the same as or different from yours. Matthew Where does this person live?

Teac he r Who does the person share a room with?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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What things does the person like to do? What does the person eat as a a treat?

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What time does school start?

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Differences in family structures and roles today, and how these have changed or remained the same over time (ACHHK028)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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How many people live in the house?

Me

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Honey ants store honey inside their own bodies. They can be eaten to get the honey.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

FAMILY STRUCTURES

What’s the same and what’s different?


Why are birthdays important? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration Birthdays are important celebrations which show the passing of time.

Born

Key inquiry questions

First birthday

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How do we describe the sequence of time?

Historical skills focus:

Second birthday

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033)

Third birthday

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

Fourth birthday

• Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

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Teac he r Fifth birthday

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Sixth birthday

Historical concepts

Seventh birthday Eighth birthday

• Continuity and change • Significance

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Ninth birthday

• Birthdays are celebrations which indicate change, and the passing of time. They are significant events for the person having the birthday and the family.

Tenth birthday

Teaching points

Resources • Happy birthday to you by Dr Seuss

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• Birthdays: Celebrating life around the world by Eve Feldman • Celebrating birthdays in Australia by Cheryl L Enderlein

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• Students will be aware that ‘before’ their birthday they were one age, and ‘after’ their birthday they are a different age—or one year older. They may also use the words ‘then’ and ‘now’. (I was five then, but now I am six.) They should also be aware that they will be one year older when they celebrate their ‘next’ birthday. They may refer to themselves as being ‘six or seven years old’.

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line

• Not everyone celebrates birthdays, and not everyone celebrates birthdays in the same way. • When discussing birthdays, include language such as ‘last’, ‘next’, ‘before’, ‘after’, ‘then’ and ‘now’.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• Ask the students to bring in photographs of birthdays of family members, especially ones taken when their parents or grandparents were children. If the students also bring in photographs of their own previous birthdays, ask them to compare them and talk about the differences. • Set the students the task of finding ways to hold an enjoyable birthday using recycled materials; for example, making cards, decorations and party hats using recycled materials. • Create a display using suggestions from the children about how to group and display their birth dates along the months of the year in order.

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Why are birthdays important? – 1

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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• Families celebrate many special occasions. They may celebrate them differently or in the same way.

• Birthdays are celebrated by people in families in many different cultures. • • •

. te o Birthdays are the day when you turn one yearc older. . c e herand cardss r People receive presents on o their birthday. t s r upe Birthdays fall on the same day each year.

• Many people have a party to celebrate. They may have a cake with candles on top. The number of candles matches the age. They may send out invitations to ask friends to come. At the party, they play games and eat lots of food. • Having a birthday says that you are special and important to the other people in the family. www.ricpublications.com.au

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Look at the picture and read the text.


Why are birthdays important? – 2 Use the information on page 35 to complete the following.

Copy the word that best fits each sentence. different

older

same

special

day each year.

(a) Birthdays fall on the

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (c) Birthdays are celebrated by people in families in many •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (b) Birthdays are the day you turn one year

.

ways. and

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(d) Having a birthday says that you are important to the other people in the family.

(a) Circle the names of things that are about birthdays.

o c . c e cards party cake candles presents her r o st super

(b) Tick those that could belong to another celebration. invitations

Write a question to ask a classmate, parent or grandparent about one of their birthdays.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Write the numbers 1 to 6 below the pictures to show the correct order.


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Teac he r

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

A man living in Japan celebrated 115 birthdays!

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Birthday narrative

Write about your last birthday inside the cake shape.


How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration Birthdays are important celebrations which show the passing of time.

Born

Key inquiry questions First birthday

How do we describe the sequence of time?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Historical skills focus

Second birthday

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

Third birthday

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Fourth birthday Fifth birthday

Sixth birthday

Seventh birthday

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives • Significance

Eighth birthday

Background information

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Ninth birthday

• Birthdays are celebrations which indicate change, and the passing of time. They are significant events for the person having the birthday and the family.

Tenth birthday

Teaching points

• Not everyone celebrates birthdays, and not everyone celebrates birthdays in the same way. One way is not better or worse than another. Students need to appreciate differences in others.

Resources

• Completing a table helps students compare information quickly and easily.

• <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthday>

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• Mr Birthday and Little Miss Birthday by Roger Hargreaves (use as a basis for writing)

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• Birthdays in many cultures (Pebble Plus: Life Around the World) by Martha E H Rustad

• Within the class, discuss different ways students celebrate birthdays. Be aware of students who do not celebrate because of religious or other convictions. Involve them by asking them to consider other significant days where their uniqueness is celebrated.

m . u

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line

• Encourage students to list good internet or book sources of information for their inquiry on page 41. These can be shared.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• As a class, discuss or write and draw about their next birthday or what they will do when they have a birthday celebration as a teenager. • As a class, select a day for the class’s birthday in the near future. Plan how you will celebrate it.

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How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? – 1 China

Indigenous Australians

In China a baby is one year old on the day he or she is born. A party is held thirty (30) days after the baby is born. Family and friends may have a meal at home. Long noodles may be ‘slurped’.

Many Indigenous Australian children have birthdays like other children. They have a party and get presents.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Celebrations may be different from one group to the next.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Japan

Ghana Children in Ghana are given special food on their birthdays.

wrapper has a picture of a crane and a turtle on it.

and friends. They eat stew with rice and ‘kelewele’ (fried bananas).

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When a child is three, five or seven, special celebrations are held. Children join in the ‘Shichi-go-san (seven-five-three) Festival’ held on 15 November. They visit a shrine to give thanks and pray for good health and a long life.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

The baby gets presents like food, coins, clothes and toys. Sometimes the baby is given an egg that is dyed red. Red is a very happy colour in China.

ew i ev Pr

Others celebrate in the ‘old way’.They may have a birth celebration. Just before or when a baby is born, it is given totems by the mother or father. Totems join the child to animals or plants. They may be handed down for generations.

‘Oto’ is a patty made from sweet potato and eggs that has been fried in palm oil.

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o c The children dress in . c e their best clothes. Theyh r e o t r are given long, thin, red s s r u e p The children have a party with family and white candy. The

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Some children wash themselves in the morning with leaves soaked overnight in water. They dress in white clothes.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Read the short texts about birthdays in other cultures.


How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? – 2 Use the information on page 39 to complete the following.

China

Indigenous Australians

Japan

Ghana

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Have a partyS

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with family or friends Dress up Get presents

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f or r evi e wp ur posesonl y• Which group of people have ‘old’ and

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Write the name of the country (or people) that has:

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‘new’ ways of celebrating birthdays?

o c . che e r o t r s sureceive. er (b) presents you would like top (a) food you would like to try.

(c) something you would like to do. What was the best thing at a birthday celebration you went to?

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Eat special food

Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Put a tick in the box if the country has that activity at birthday celebrations.


Choose a country or group of people to find out about other birthday celebrations. Write questions to help you find out about each thing.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Special food

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Gifts

People who celebrate

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Clothes

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o c . che e r Games or things tor do o t s super

The very first birthday cake may have been a round honey cake for a goddess.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Birthday inquiry


What other special days do we celebrate? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration

January

Chinese New Year

February

Valentine’s Day

People celebrate many different occasions to mark the passing of time. These occasions are of personal significance to individuals and families.

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

May

Mother’s Day

April-March

Easter

How do we describe the sequence of time?

Historical skills focus:

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033)

August

Eid-al-Fitr

September

Father’s Day

September-October

Trung Tur

October-November

November-December

Resources

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change

Diwali

• Perspectives • Significance

Hanukkah

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Christmas Day

• Holidays around the world by Deborah Heiligman—Hanukkah, Celebrate Diwali, Celebrate Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr, Celebrate Christmas, Celebrate Halloween

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• Holidays around the world by Carolyn Otto—Celebrate Chinese New Year, Celebrate Kwanzaa

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• Visit <http://www.esolcourses.com/topics/ world-festivals.html> for some online games for beginners about many different celebrations

Background information

• Individuals and families celebrate many different special occasions which mark the passing of time. These occasions are of personal and family significance.

Teaching points • The celebrations of other people should be respected because they are important to them. Students should be encouraged to share their family celebrations with others. • Special celebrations are celebrated at around the same time each year.

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25 December

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

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Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line

• Terms relating to time (such as ‘past’,‘next’,‘then’,‘before’, and ‘after’ and so on) should be used often in discussions and displayed for use by the students in their written work. • Special occasions of importance to the class as a whole should be marked on a calendar and counted down until the actual date.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• Have different students write or give oral recounts about special celebrations to share with the others in the class. Allow some time for other students in the class to ask questions of those giving presentations. Students may be required to show how well they listened by restating one interesting thing about a festival that they would like to experience. • The process of learning out how to find out (how to use different sources) and what to look for is as important as finding the information. When the students have completed page 45, they can compare tables and work in pairs or small groups to record the information they discover.

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Teac he r

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

What other special days do we celebrate? – 1

Read the texts.


What other special days do we celebrate? – 2 Use the information on page 43 to complete the following.

Festival with lights or candles

Festival about the moon

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. tsinging o Festival withe Festival longer than c . or dancing c one day e her r o t s s r u e p (a) Choose one of the celebrations. (b) Write one question to ask a person who celebrates this occasion.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Write the names of the celebrations in each circle.


Complete the table about the celebrations below. What do I want to find out?

Teac he r

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Valentine’s Day

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Father’s Day or

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Chinese New Year

How will I find out?

Mother’s Day

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Easter

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Halloween is a celebration where children dress up in costume and collect ‘treats’ or play ‘tricks’.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Other special celebrations


What other changes are important? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration Events that happen in our lives are important because they cause changes.

Move houses Start new school/Met Benjo

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How has family life changed or remained the same over time? How do we describe the sequence of time?

Baby sister born

Historical skills focus

Mum goes back to work

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034) • Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

‘Bluey’ (best dog friend ever!) dies

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Get new puppy ‘Red’

Historical concepts

Rode bike without training wheels for the first time

• Continuity and change

Grandad Wilson dies

• Significance

Resources

• Perspectives

Background information

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Teac he r

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• The website <http://simplemom.net/14books-to-help-ease-children-throughtransitions/> lists a number of books to help children cope with changes such as a new baby, starting school, moving, divorce and death in the family.

• Events in our lives are important because they bring about change to family life and ourselves. • Each change is one we remember because of its importance/significance.

Teaching points

• Information can be obtained from many different sources, including visual texts. • Changes in people’s lives will vary from person to person, as will the effect the same type of change has on different people. Changes are very personal.

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line

• Some changes in people’s lives can be good and some can be bad.

• The students should use terms such as ‘yesterday’, ‘today’, ‘tomorrow’, ‘past’, ‘present’, ‘then’, ‘now’, ‘next’, ‘before’ and ‘after’ in relation to events that resulted in change. • Students should not be expected to relate events which they find emotionally painful.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• Ask the students to use the questions on page 49 to interview two classmates to find out about important changes in their lives. Alternatively, they could write their own questions. • Ask the students to select one event that caused a change in their life and think about whether it was good or bad. Then have the students stand in two groups—one for good changes and one for bad changes. There may be some who think an event had some good changes and some bad changes as well. Discuss this aspect. • The students select four events that have caused a change, draw pictures of them, cut them out and sequence them in the correct order.

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Teac he r

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

w ww

How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

What other changes are important? – 1

Look at the pictures. They show important events in children’s lives that may cause changes.


What other changes are important? – 2 Use the information on page 47 to complete the following.

Picture 1

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Picture 3

Picture 4

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Draw or write about an important event that happened to you. Tell what changed after the event.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Picture 2

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Write what is happening in each picture and how this might change the child or children’s life.


Talk about changes Question 1

Teac he r

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ewQuestion pur po esonl y• 2s

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How did this event change your life?

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

What is an event that changed your life?

o c . che e r o t r s super

A change is something that makes things different.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Complete the speech bubbles to answer the interview questions. Then make the blank head look like you.


How does the calendar teach us about time? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration The calendar shows time in months, days and weeks.

January

Key inquiry questions

February

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How do we describe the sequence of time?

Historical skills focus

March

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

April

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

May

• Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r June

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

July

Historical concepts • Continuity and change

August

September October

November

Background information • We can follow the passing of time by using a calendar.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • We can use a calendar to track important months, weeks and days.

Teaching points

• There are twelve months in a year which follow each other in a set order.

December

• A calendar shows months, weeks and days. • A year is a very long time; a month is a long time; a week has seven days; a day is a short time. • We can use a calendar to find and show ‘yesterday’,‘today’ and ‘tomorrow’ and give them names.

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Resources

• The book calendar by Myra Cohn Livingston illustrated by Will Hillenbrand. The poem itself can be viewed at < http:// www.wordpower.ws/poetry/poetry-myracohn-livingston.html> Be aware that the poem is based around life in the northern hemisphere so January ‘shivers’.

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• Visit <http://donnayoung.org/calendars/ thrity-days-hath-september.htm> to see how to work out how many days in a month using the knuckles of your hands, and to view the poem ‘30 days hath September …’.

Additional activities

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line

• Create a calendar in class for the current month and track important events such as student birthdays and excursions, or class events such as library, ICT lessons and so on.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Create a student birthday time line to display in the classroom to track student birthdays over the year. • Plan how to make a calendar as a gift for a parent or grandparent.

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How does the calendar teach us about time? – 1 Look at the calendar for the year 2014. January Su

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o c . che November r e o December r st super 31

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July

Su

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Su

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April

How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

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March

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Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday www.ricpublications.com.au

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

2014


How does the calendar teach us about time? – 2 Use the information on page 51 to complete the following. Count and write: (a) how many months in a year.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Sof: Write the name (b) the last day of the week on the calendar.

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(a) the first day of the week on the calendar.

Tuesday

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (c) the day after Wednesday. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (d) the day before Saturday.

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Which month comes: (a) before May?

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o c . che (c) before November? e r o t r s s r u e p (d) after February? (b) after June?

Which month comes next? (a) February, March, April, (b) May, June, July, (c) August, September, October, Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

(b) how many days in a week.

Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

1.


An important month 1.

Look at the calendar on page 51.

Write the name of the month.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

If you know that date, write it too.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

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Write and draw to tell why this month is important to you.

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February is a short month. It has 28 days and 29 days every four years.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Choose a month that is important to you.


What are seasons? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration The seasons show the passing of time over a year.

Spring

Key inquiry question

Summer

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How do we describe the sequence of time?

Historical skills focus

Autumn

• Sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031)

Winter

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Summer Autumn Winter Spring

Summer Autumn

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change

Background information

• Time passing over the year can be observed through the changing seasons as they follow each other.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • The seasons follow a precise order, which continues in a cycle.

• Some seasons may be favoured by students or more important to them than others for some reason.

Teaching points

Winter

• The seasons change. This happens in a specific time order.

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Resources

• When the wind stops by Charlotte Zolotow

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• Red sings from treetops: A year in colours by Joyce Sidman • Sunshine makes the seasons (Let’s read and find out science series) by Franklyn M Branley • The reasons for seasons by Gail Gibbons (for Year 2 and 3 students) • Visit <http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=vDgUmTq4a2Q> and watch ‘Earth’s Tilt and the Seasons’ to see a short, simple explanation about the seasons.

Additional activities

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• There are specific features of each season.

• Ask the children to make up questions to find out more about seasons. For example, ‘What animals have babies in spring?’ ‘What sort of trees lose their leaves in autumn?’ ‘Do they have special names?’ ‘How is winter different from autumn?’ ‘How is spring different from summer?’ They may like to answer the questions by drawing, writing simple sentences or extra reading of additional books or digital texts.

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• Ask the students to think of ways to reuse fallen autumn leaves, use excess fruit from trees, create artworks using dead flowers or save water during a long, hot summer. This ensures students are always considering sustainable views. • Find out which months of the year fall into each season, and the season you are currently experiencing.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Spring

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Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Time line


What are seasons? – 1 • Most places have four seasons—spring, summer, autumn and winter. They follow each other in a cycle. • People wear different clothes in different seasons. They do different activities and like to eat different foods.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Summer is the hottest season. In most places, it doesn’t rain much.

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Spring comes after winter. New plants begin to grow. Leaves grow back on trees. Flowers grow. Many animals have babies.

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

• Seasons show time passing through the year.

Winter comes after autumn. It is the coldest season. Some places have snow. It rains a lot more.

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Autumn comes after summer. It gets cooler and rains more. Trees lose their leaves.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Read the text and look at the pictures.


What are seasons? – 2 Use the information on page 55 to complete the following. 1.

Write the season that comes next.

(b) autumn, winter,

r o e t s Bo r (d) summer, autumn,e p ok u S that comes before the one written. Write the season , autumn

(b)

, spring

(c)

, summer

(d)

, winter

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(a)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Choose a word to write in each sentence. •f o rr evi ehottest w pur p osesonl y• babies coldest leaves season.

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(b) Winter is the (c) In autumn, many trees lose their

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season.

(a) Summer is the

.

o c . che e Finish the sentence. r o t r s super The seasons show ... (d) In spring, many animals have

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

(c) winter, spring,

Teac he r

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

(a) spring, summer,


Order the seasons 1.

Cut out the pictures of the seasons at the bottom of the page.

2.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 4.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

3.

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Teac he r

1.

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Some places are always warm. They have a wet and a dry season.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Glue them in the correct order below.


What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Teacher information Elaboration

Bunuru

Indigenous Australians follow seasons which may be different from those of other Australians. The seasons have significance because of the way they relate to, and affect, their food supply.

Djeran

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How do we describe the sequence of time?

Makuru/Makurua

Historical skills focus

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

Djilba Kambarang Birak

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

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Teac he r

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives • Significance

Resources

• Walking with the seasons in Kakadu by Diane Lucas

Background information

• Indigenous Australians may have many seasons (from two to seven depending on the region in which the language group lives).

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• When I was little like you by Mary Malbunka

• Ernie dances to the didgeridoo by Alison Lester • Visit <http://science.org.au/ primaryconnections/indigenous/ipcurriculum.html> then click on ‘Weather in my world’ for Indigenous perspectives on this science unit.

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• Indigenous Australian seasons are important to them because knowledge of the sequence of events in the local environment helps them track their food supply. • The seasons of Indigenous Australians are different from those of other Australians.

Teaching points • The seasons are not the same for every Indigenous Australian language group. The seasons chosen for this unit are those of the Noongar people of the south-west of Western Australia.

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Order of seasons of the Noongar language group

• Students should not be expected to say the names of the Indigenous Australian seasons (unless they want to). It is sufficient if they are aware of the fact that they are used to follow food supply. • There are many different variations in Indigenous Australian seasons. Refer to the web links below to find others.

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• View a short film clip at <www.australianscreen.com.au/titles/5-seasons/clip1> • Discuss special foods the students like to eat during winter or summer. Compare to the seasons of Indigenous Australians.

Background information • <http://www.bom.gov.au/iwk/climate_culture/Indig_seasons.shtml> • <http://www.bom.gov.au/iwk/dharawal/index.shtml> (find more links to other seasonal calendars here) • <http://www.australiareviewed.com/id/1/6253/aboriginal_seasons/> • <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_Australian_seasons>

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What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? – 1 Indigenous Australian people use the seasons to help them find food to eat. These seasons are those of the Noongar people. Name of season

Weather

Teac he r

bulbs

fruit, fish, bulbs, seeds

cool, windy

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r o e t s Bfrogs, r fish, crayfish, e o p o tortoises, possums, u k hot, dry, windy fruit, flowers, roots, S

Djeran

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons swans, •f orcold, r evrainy, i ewwindy pur pwitchetty osesonl y• Makuru

Djilba

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Kambarang

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grubs, bulbs

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

Banuru

Food available

roots, possums, potatoes, emus, bandicoot, kangaroos

getting warmer

o c . yams, potatoes, che e r flowers, crayfish, o t r a little rain,s getting s r upebirds’ eggs, tortoises, warmer

frogs, birds, possums, kangaroos

Birak

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kangaroos, wallabies, pigeons, honey

hot, dry, windy

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

Read the text.


What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? – 2 Use the information on page 59 to complete the following. Circle the season that is: (a) Djeran

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Banuru Birak

cool and

(c)

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and

?

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(b)

Djeran

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Kambarang has little •af o rr evi ew pur po sesonl yDjilba •

When can I eat: (a)

Birak

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(c)

(d)

Makuru

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(d)

?

(e)

?

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

(b)

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LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

1.


What’s the same? What’s different?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

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e on is th

On ly i n

Dj il

ly i n

o is h t

ak

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Bi af r b• o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • O e n n

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How the present, past and future are signified by terms indicating time such as ‘a long time ago’, ‘then and now’, ‘now and then’, ‘old and new’, ‘tomorrow’, as well as by dates and changes that may have personal significance, such as birthdays, celebrations and seasons (ACHHK029)

in both

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Indigenous Australians in different regions may have different seasons with different names.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

LANGUAGE OF TIME/IMPORTANT EVENTS

On ly i n

e on s i th

Dj e

e on is th

On ly i n

u ur

n ra

Bu n

Write food names in the Venn diagrams to compare the two seasons.


What was leisure time like in the past? Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

Teacher information

Time line

Elaboration

Grandfather born

Leisure during the times of parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods may be similar to or different in some ways from the leisure time of the present.

Grandmother born

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

Father born

How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the past?

Historical skills focus

Mother born

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

Resources

• Toys and games – How have things changed? series by James Nixon • Australians at play – Australia then and now series by Jane Pearson • Having fun – Then and now series by Vicki Yates

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033) • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

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• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035) • Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Perspectives

Background information

• The things grandparents or parents did as children during their leisure time may be similar to or different from the things children do now.

Teaching points

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

Teac he r

We are born

• Leisure time means free time before and after school, during recess and lunch breaks at school and on the weekends. • Children of the past and present do some things the same during their leisure time and some things that are different.

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• Photographs give information about what life was like in the past. (NOTE: The photographs depicted on page 63 relate to the 1960s.Teachers may use others of their own that are suitable.) • For best results enlarge page 64 to A3 size. The class may be divided into six groups with each group completing the activities for one photograph each.

Additional activities

• Collect or take photographs or digital prints of the children doing things in their leisure time and discuss to compare. Include comparisons of the way memories and events are recorded in photographs or digital prints, videos etc. • Ask the children to bring in digital prints or photographs of themselves when they were younger playing games or with a favourite toy. They give a simple oral narrative about the photograph and its contents or the toy. Some children may still be able to bring the treasured (old) toy to use as a prop.

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What was leisure time like in the past? – 1 Look at the photographs. They show things that your grandparents may have done in their free time when they were children. 2.

3.

4.

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5.

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

THE PRESENT AND PAST

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

1.


What was leisure time like in the past? – 2 Use the photographs on page 63 to complete the table. What are the children doing?

PHOTO

1. 1

Do you do something like this?

r o e t s No Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

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PHOTO

5. 5

PHOTO

6. 6

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Yes

No

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

4. 4

No

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Yes No •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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PHOTO

Yes

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

2. 2

3. 3

What is the same as or different from your game?

Yes

PHOTO

PHOTO

What would you ask the children?


Games and toys of my parents Write questions to ask your parents about these two toys they may have used when they were children. Barbie™

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

When your parents were little, some children played with action figures called Transformers™ and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles™.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

THE PRESENT AND PAST

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Atari™


How did people communicate in the past? Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

Teacher information

Time line

Elaboration

1821 First regular postal service begins in New South Wales 1853 Morse code brought to Australia by Samuel MacGowen

Communication during the times of parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods may be similar to or different in some ways from communication of the present.

Key inquiry questions

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the past?

1882 First public telephone exchange based in Sydney

Historical skills focus

• Distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032)

1968 Australian telecommunications system linked to INTELSAT II satellite 1975 TELECOM established to take control of all public telecommunication services

1987 All areas of Australia have basic telephone services

• Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

• Identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035) • Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

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• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives

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1984 Australian domain (au) established 1993 First Australian internet provider (connect.com.au) available to the public

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Resources

• Visit <http://www.slideshare.net/rajb/ technology-and-communications-forkids> to see mainly visual images of communication through the ages.

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• Communication (Then and now) by Vicki Yates

Background information

• There are many ways in which people have communicated with each other in the past. Some of these forms may be similar to ones used in the present but they may have changed in some ways. Some, such as letters, may still be used in the same way. Technology has changed communication in a huge way so that a basic mobile phone now not only sends and receives calls, but also takes photographs, sends text messages, accesses the internet and sends and receives email.

Teaching notes

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

Teac he r

1934 Overseas airmail introduced

• For the purposes of this Year level only two main forms of communication have been selected— written (letters and telegrams/emails) and spoken (home telephone and public telephone/ mobile phones). Other forms of communication may be considered if the students show interest. They will also be covered in Year 2.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• An oral narrative example is provided as a source of information. Students may like to write their own historical narrative about how they use communication today to pass on to people in the future in a time capsule. • Ask the students to search among family photographs for images that show communication. They may also (with permission) be able to bring in old letters.

Additional activities • As a class, in small groups or in pairs, write other questions to ask Grandma about communication during her childhood. • Find images on the internet of the development of mobile phones such as those at <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone>, print them and sequence a few of the more obvious ones.

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How did people communicate in the past? – 1 Read the text in the speech bubbles.

your pocket. It was very big. Almost as big and heavy as a brick! It could only make and receive calls. It couldn’t take photos, or send email or text messages. It couldn’t be used to look on the internet.

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

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At school we learnt how to write letters. So I wrote letters to my grandparents and cousins in China. They wrote back to me. It was exciting getting a letter in the letterbox. I had a penpal in the US. We sent letters and souvenirs back and forth to each other. Sometimes it took weeks for a parcel or letter to get across the world. It’s much faster now. When you send an email to your friend in Sydney, it gets there in an instant. When we talked to each other, it was usually from one person to another or in a group. We liked getting together to chat. We talked face to face. Now people write something on Facebook™ or in a blog and it goes to hundreds or millions of people instantly. I don’t know if that’s a good thing or not!

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o c We also had telegrams which we sent from the post . che e office. They were short r messages that could be o t r s sents really quickly. We used them for emergencies r u e p or to say ‘Happy birthday!’ I like writing, Grandma. Can you show me how to write a letter? Then I can email it to my friend!

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

r o e t s Bwere lucky. We had one r e Well, Nadia, we o p telephone in our house.oAk lot of people had to u S use a public phone in the street. We also had a mobile phone to take out. You couldn’t put it in

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Teac he r

Grandma, how did you talk to other people when you were a child?


How did people communicate in the past? – 2 Use the information on page 67 to complete the following. 1.

Draw a line to match the object to the text that tells about it. (a) writing or printing to one person or lots of people

Teac he r

(d) a message sent and tapped out by a telegraph. It is then printed out and delivered Circle the ending that fits best.

(a) Grandma spoke to her friends on

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(b) Grandma wrote to her friends using

• a mobile phone. • the home phone. • letters. • email.

. te o c (c) Nadia writes to her friends using • letters. . che e •r email. o t r s super What is the big difference between getting together to chat and writing on Facebook™?

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

(c) a device in a home for sending spoken words a long distance using a microphone and a receiver in a handset

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r o e t s B r (b) a telephone inp ae big box or booth o ok in the streetu that anyone can use by puttingS in coins


What’s the same and what’s different? Nadia uses

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

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Tick the ones you use. A ‘blog’ is a site on the World Wide Web where people can discuss or find out things. The things people write are called ‘posts’.

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Grandma uses


What is a family tradition? Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

Teacher information

Time line Elaboration

Australia Day fireworks

Family traditions are an important part of the history of a family.

Easter camping trip and Easter egg hunt

Key inquiry questions How has family life changed or remained the same over time?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the past?

Soup Day

Historical skills focus:

Family portrait

• Pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033) • Explore a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034)

Cook Christmas sweets for gifts

Christmas Eve Carols by Candlelight

Open gifts Christmas morning

• Develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037)

• Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038)

Historical concepts • Continuity and change • Perspectives • Significance

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

New Years’ Eve movie and popcorn night

Background information

• Family traditions are activities that families do regularly over one or more generations. Traditions are special and have significance to the family. Other families may have the same, similar or completely different traditions.

Resources • Clifford’s winter spirit by Norman Bridwell (Available on DVD)

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• The Berenstain bears’ family get-together by Stan and Jan Berenstain(also view as two separate clips on YouTube) • The relatives came by Cynthia Ryland

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Teaching notes • Celebrating special religious or community holidays or events can be considered family traditions, but other more simple regular activities may also come under the heading. These may include activities such as going camping every Easter to a particular destination, eating pancakes on Sunday mornings, having a barbecue on the first day of summer, going out to dinner to celebrate a new job or promotion, following family members into a certain profession, getting together with other family members for a meal once a month and so on.

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

Decorate tree on the first day of December

• Explore a point of view (ACHHS036)

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Adventure Park day

o c . che e r o t r s super Additional activities

• Ask the students to find images (photographs or digital images) of a family tradition over two or more different years, compare them for similarities and differences, then sequence the images in time order. • Sort the students into groups of two or three with similar family traditions. Use the Placemat™* strategy and the diagrams below. Ask each student to write the things they do for their family tradition on their side of the diagram. After discussion, students decide which things are the same and write these in the centre section then report back to the class. Jessica

Jack

Jason placemat for two

Brinna

Tily

placemat for three

* Visit <http://ri.bne.catholic.edu.au/ree/RE/CLT/ite Resources/forms/Allterms.aspx> and click on Advent Placement strategy to read more about the strategy. Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

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What is a family tradition? – 1 Read about some family traditions.

In our family, you can choose your favourite cake and meal for everyone to eat on your birthday.

In our family, we go to the Australia Day fireworks every year.

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In our family, we always have an Easter egg hunt.

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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In our family, the first baby boy born is named after the father.

In our family, we always go to the Chinese New Year celebrations to see the dancing dragon.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

THE PRESENT AND PAST

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u In our family,S we have a family portrait taken every year.


What is a family tradition? – 2 Use the information on page 71 to complete the following. 1.

How often do family traditions happen? Circle the correct word or words. (a) sometimes

(b) not very much

(c) regularly

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Write the names of the people in your family who join in a S family tradition. Which word describes a family tradition? (b) special

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o c . che e r Write two questions to ask one childs int the class about his or o r s r u e p her family traditions. •

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Write why you think people have family traditions.

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THE PRESENT AND PAST

Teac he r

(a) ordinary


My family tradition 1.

Write and draw about a family tradition you have.

Write

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Find a classmate with an interesting family tradition. Write or draw about it. Say why you chose it.

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Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives and life during their parents’ and grandparents’ childhoods, including family traditions, leisure time and communications (ACHHK030)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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o c . che e r o t r s super

A family tradition is something your grandparents did, your parents do and you do. It is special to your family.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

THE PRESENT AND PAST

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Draw


Who’s in my family? pages 2–5

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Grandmothers are mothers of your father or mother. (a) True

(b) False

r o e t s Bo r e p ok (a) True (b) False u S The children of your aunts and uncles are called cousins. (a) True

(b) False

You are the child of your grandparents.

(a) True

(b) False

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Teac he r

Aunts and uncles are sisters or brothers of your mother or father.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew What pur p os es onl y• are our families like?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

All families are the same size.

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pages 6–9

. te (b) False o All families have the same number of parents living at c . che e home. r o r st super (a) True (b) False (a) True

All families have the same kinds of people in them. (a) True

(b) False

All families have stepbrothers, stepsisters, stepmothers or stepfathers. (a) True

(b) False

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What roles do we have in our families? pages 10–13

Choose the correct answers. 1.

There are many jobs to do in a family. (a) True

(b) False

r o e t s Bo r e (a) Yes (b) No p ok u The same people do the same jobs in every family. S (a) Yes (b) No All family members need to help at home.

(a) Yes

(b) No

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Teac he r

All families have the same jobs to do at home.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi e w pwas ur p ses onl y• What ito like when my parents were children?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

Bikes are an old invention.

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pages 14–17

(b) False . te o All children own a bike or a scooter. c . c e he r (a) True (b) False o t r s super Every home has a slippery slide and a swing set. (a) True

(a) True

(b) False

Computers and colour televisions are old appliances. (a) True

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(b) False

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


What was it like when my grandparents were children? pages 18–21

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Televisions are a new invention. (a) True

(b) False

r o e t s Bo r e p ok (a) True (b) False u S Everyone grows their own fruit and vegetables. (a) True

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Teac he r

Children in the past played with different toys from the toys of today.

(b) False

Old people were born old.

(a) True

(b) False

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons What are Indigenous •f orr evi ew p ur posesoAustralian nl y• families like?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

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pages 22–25

Indigenous Australians have lived in Australia for ten years.

. te (b) False o All Indigenous Australians live in towns. c . c e h r (a) True (b)e False o t r s super Kinship is like a big family. (a) True

(a) True

(b) False

Some Indigenous Australians live like they did in the past. (a) True

(b) False

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How do Indigenous Australian families work together? pages 26–29

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Indigenous Australian men hunted birds and animals and caught fish.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u (a) TrueS (b) False (a) True

(b) False

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Teac he r

Indigenous Australian women found fruit, nuts, berries and the roots of plants. Indigenous Australian children caught lizards and insects.

(a) True

(b) False

Grandparents taught the rules, stories, songs and dances.

(a) True

(b) False

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr e vi e w lives pur p sesonl y • Are the ofo Indigenous Australian children the same as mine?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

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pages 30–33

Indigenous Australian children go to school.

(b) False . te o Indigenous Australian children have brothers and sisters. c . che e r (a) True (b) False o t r s s r u e p Indigenous Australian children play sports and use (a) True

computers.

(a) True

(b) False

Indigenous Australian children are given treats. (a) True

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(b) False

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life


Why are birthdays important? pages 34–37

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Birthdays fall on the (a) different

day each year.

(b) same

(c) last

r o e t s Bo r e (a) same (b) next (c) different p o u k Birthdays are the day you turn one year S (a) older (b) same (c) younger Having a birthday says that you are important to the other people in the family.

(a) the same

(b) special

(c) cake

ways. .

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Teac he r

Birthdays are celebrated in many

and

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evHow i eware pu r poses onl y• in birthdays celebrated other cultures?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

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pages 38–41

Birthdays are celebrated the same way in all cultures.

. te (b) False o Most birthday celebrations have special food.. c ch e r (a) True (b) False e o t r s s r u e p Most birthday celebrations have presents. (a) True

(a) True

(b) False

Most birthday celebrations have a meal with family or friends. (a) True

(b) False

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What other special days do we celebrate? pages 42–45

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Trung Thu is the festival of the (a) moon

(b) sun

. (c) earth.

candles. r o e t s rone hundredBo (c) nine (a) ten (b) e p o u Eid-al-Fitr marks the end of a time of not k . S (a) drinking (b) eating (c) sleeping Songs sung at Christmas time are called

(a) carols

(b) jokes

(c) poems

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Teac he r

Hannukah has a candle stick with

.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons What changes are important? •f orr ev i ewother pur p oseso nl y•

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1.

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pages 46–49

Things that happen (events) can change our lives.

. te (a) True

(b) False

(a) True

(b) False

(a) True

o c (b) False . che e r o Changes may be r different for different people. t s s r u e p Some may be the same.

Some changes can be good and some can be bad.

Changes affect people in different ways. (a) True

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(b) False

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How does the calendar teach us about time? pages 50–53

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Calendars show days, weeks and months in a year. (a) True There are (a) 12 (a) 7

months in a year. r o e t s Bo r e (b) 7 p ok u S (b) 30 days in a week.

Calendars help us track the passing of time.

(a) True

(b) False

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There are

(b) False

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons What are seasons? •f orr evi ew pur po ses on l y•

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m . u

pages 54–57

Choose the correct answers. 1.

The four seasons are spring, summer, autumn and

(c) winter . te (b) cold o The season that comes right after summer is . c ch e r (a) autumn (b) spring (c) winter e o t r s s r u e p The season that comes right before autumn is

(a) hot

(a) summer

(b) spring

. . .

(c) summer

Which season comes next? winter, (a) autumn

(b) spring

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(c) summer

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What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? pages 58–61

Choose the correct answers. 1.

Indigenous Australians have seasons. (a) True

(b) False

r o e t s Bo r e p (b) False ok (a) True u S Australian seasons are about when food can Indigenous

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Teac he r

Indigenous Australian seasons are the same as other Australians.

be found.

(a) True

(b) False

Indigenous Australian seasons all have the same weather.

(a) True

(b) False

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi e w pwas ur pleisure oseslike on l y •past? What in the

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

Leisure time is when adults go to work.

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pages 62–65

(b) False . te o Children in the past did some things the same as children c . che e today. r o r st s uper (a) True (b) False

(a) True

Children in the past did some things differently from children today. (a) True

(b) False

Photographs about the past give information. (a) True

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(b) False

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How did people communicate in the past? pages 66–69

Choose the correct answers. 1.

The present and the past both have … (a) phones.

(b) internet.

(c) telegrams.

r o e t s Bocalls. r e (a) telegrams. (b) letters. (c) phone p o u kthem by In the past, people wrote and sent S post. (a) emails

(b) letters

(c) telegrams

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Teac he r

In the past, mobile phones were used to send and receive ...

Which form of present day communication reaches many people at once?

(a) letters

(b) telegrams

(c) Facebook™

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur p eson l y• What iso as family tradition?

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Choose the correct answers. 1.

How often do family traditions happen?

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pages 70–73

. te (b) not very much (c) regularly o Which word describes a family tradition? c . c e h r (a) ordinary (b)e special o t r s super Some families have family traditions the same. (a) sometimes

(a) True

(b) False

Some families have family traditions that are different. (a) True

(b) False

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Quiz answers Who’s in my family? .......... pg 74 1. (b) True 2. (b) True 3. (b) True 4. (b) False What are our families like? .................... pg 74 1. (b) False 2. (b) False 3. (b) False 4. (b) False

How did people communicate in the past? ...................... pg 82 1. (a) phones 2. (c) phone calls 3. (b) letters 4. (c) Facebook™

How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? ............. pg 78 1. (b) False 2. (a) True 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

What is a family tradition? ......................... pg 82 1. (c) regularly 2. (b) special 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

What was it like when my parents were children? ...... pg 75 1. (a) True 2. (b) False 3. (b) False 4. (b) False

What other special days do we celebrate? .............. pg 79 1. (a) moon 2. (c) nine 3. (b) eating 4. (a) carols What other changes are important? ....................... pg 79 1. (a) True 2. (a) True 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

What roles do we have in our families? ................ pg 75 1. (a) True 2. (b) No 3. (b) No 4. (a) Yes

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Why are birthdays important? ....................... pg 78 1. (b) same 2. (c) different 3. (a) older 4. (b) special

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What are Indigenous Australian families like? .................... pg 76 1. (b) False 2. (b) False 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

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What are seasons? ........... pg 80 1. (c) winter 2. (a) autumn 3. (a) summer 4. (b) spring What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? ............. pg 81 1. (a) True 2. (b) False 3. (a) True 4. (b) False

o c . che e r o t r s super

How do Indigenous Australian families work together? .................. pg 77 1. (a) True 2. (a) True 3. (a) True 4. (a) True Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine? .......................... pg 77 1. (a) True 2. (a) True 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

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How does the calendar teach us about time? ................. pg 80 1. (a) True 2. (a) 12 3. (a) 7 4. (a) True

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What was it like when my grandparents were children? .......................... pg 76 1. (b) False 2. (a) or (b) can be justified 3. (b) False 4. (b) False

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What was leisure time like in the past? ................ pg 81 1. (b) False 2. (a) True 3. (a) True 4. (a) True

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Answers Who’s in my family? – 2 ...... pg 4 1. (a) grandmother (b) grandfather (c) grandmother (d) grandfather (e) uncle (f) aunt (g) aunt (h) uncle (i) cousin (j) brother (k) sister 2.–3. Answers will vary.

What are our families like? .. pg 8 1. (a) 1 (b) 5 (c) 20 (d) 3 (e) 1 Teacher check sentences

My parents vs me ............. pg 17 Teacher check Venn diagram

Tools and weapons ........... pg 29 1. (a) tjungari (grinding stone) (b) wira (food bowl) (c) kali (boomerang) (d) wanna (digging stick) (e) piti (bowl for carrying water) (f) kulata (spear) 2. Teacher check

What was it like when my grandparents were children? – 2 .................... pg 20 1. All items should be circled. 2. They grew them in their back garden. 3. Answers will vary. Some will buy them all; some will grow some and buy some. 4. televisions 5. Televisions are colour now instead of black and white. 6. Answers will vary.

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5. They taught the children how to collect food and told them stories. They taught them songs and dances. They taught them the language and how to behave. 6. (a) Picture 2 (b) Picture 1

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

My family tree .................... pg 5 Teacher check

Are the lives of Indigenous Australian children the same as mine? – 2 .................... pg 32 1. (a) 3 (b) 4 (c) 1 (d) 2 2. Teacher check page 33 Column 1 answers in order from top to bottom— Wilcannia; 5; brother and sister; 7 am; play basketball, use computers, do maths; berries, yams, grubs, honey ants; Answers in column 2 will vary.

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3. (a) 8 (b) 12 (c) 2 Teacher check sentences

Time line of my family ......... pg 9 Teacher check

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What roles do we have in our families? ................ pg 12 1. (in order from top to bottom of column) Mum, Dad barbecues; Mum and Dad; Mum and Dad; children; children and Mum; Mum, Dad and children; children; children; Mum, Dad and children; children (Mum and Dad not stated)

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2. Answers will vary. Find people who do the job ......................... pg 13 Teacher check What was it like when my parents were children – 2 .. pg 16 1. (a) 5 (b) 2.3 or more 3. riding bikes and scooters, using slippery slide and swings

Questions for Grandpa Xiong .................. pg 21 Teacher check What are Indigenous Australian families like? – 2 ...............pg 24 1. Indigenous Australians 2. Teacher check 3. kinship system 4. Answers should indicate that everyone is related to each other and this linking makes the family unit. The names show how they are treated.

Why are birthdays important? ....................... pg 36 1. In order from left to right – 4, 5, 1, 2, 6, 3

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2. (a) 6 (b) 24

4. clearing the table, wiping dishes, putting dishes away 5. They were lucky because they had a computer and a colour television. 6. Possible answers: There were lots of children to play with./ The children had lots of friends.

2. (a) same (b) older (c) different (d) special 3. (a) All the words should be circled. (b) All the words should be ticked. 4. Answers will vary

o c . che e r o t r s super Post-a-question ................ pg 25 Teacher check

How do people in Indigenous families work together? – 2 ............ pg 28 1. They hunted birds and animals like kangaroos, emus and fish for food. 2. spears and boomerangs 3. They collected fruit, berries, nuts and plant roots 4. … catching small lizards and insects

Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

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Birthday narrative ............. pg 37 Teacher check How are birthdays celebrated in other cultures? .............. pg 40 1. Indigenous China Japan Ghana Australians

Eat special food Have a party with family or friends Dress up Get presents

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Answers 2. Indigenous Australians 3.–4. Answers will vary

An important month .......... pg 53 Answers will vary.

Birthday inquiry ................ pg 41 Answers will vary

What are seasons? – 2 ..... pg 56 1. (a) autumn (b) spring (c) summer (d) winter

What other special days do we celebrate? – 2 ........ pg 44 1. Festivals with lights or candles – Thrung Thu, Hanukkah, Diwali

2. (a) summer (b) winter (c) spring (d) autumn 3. (a) hottest (c) leaves

2. (a) the home phone. (b) letters. (c) email.

(b) coldest (d) babies

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Festivals about the moon – Eid-al-Fitr, Thrung Thu Festivals with singing or dancing – Thrung Thu, Christmas

Festivals longer than one day – Thrung Thu, Eid-al-Fitr, Diwali, Hanukkah

2. Teacher check

Other special celebrations ..................... pg 45 Answers will vary

3. Chatting face-to-face is usually with one or two people or a small group; Facebook™ usually is with many people at once.

4. Teacher check

Order the seasons ............. pg 57 Teacher check (As long as the seasons are in correct time order, it does not matter where the students start.)

What seasons do Indigenous Australians have? – 2 ....... pg 60 1. (a) Makuru (b) Bunuru, Birak (c) Djeran (d) Kambarang 2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

Kambarang Makuru Kambarang Djilba Birak

What’s the same and what’s different? ...........................pg 69 Teacher check. Answers will vary but may be similar to the table shown.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

How did people communicate in the past? – 2 ................ pg 68 1. (a) letters (b) public telephone (c) home telephone (d) telegram

Grandma uses

• • • • • • •

big only does one thing heavy used to talk to people can be carried big buttons slow

Nadia uses

• • • • • • •

small does lots of things light used to talk to people can be carried small buttons fast

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

PICTURE 5 – Mum is going (back) to work. Teacher check how these events may change a child’s life.

Talk about changes ........... pg 49 Answers will vary.

How does the calendar teach us about time? – 2 ... pg 52 1. (a) 12 (b) 7 2. (a) Sunday (b) Saturday (c) Thursday (d) Friday 3. (a) April (b) July (c) October (d) January 4. (a) May (b) August (c) November

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seeds

2. (b) special 3.–5. Teacher check. Answers will vary. My family tradition ..............pg 73 Teacher check

fish fruit bulbs

o c . che e r o t r s super

R.I.C. Publications®

Dj il

ba

On ly i n

2. Answers will vary.

in both

What is a family tradition? ...........................pg 72 1. (c) regularly

On ly i n

e on is th

roots potatoes emus bandicoot possums

Bi r

e on is th

. te

frogs crayfish tortoises possums flowers roots

Dj e

• fast • goes to one or more people • typed

ak

w ww

PICTURE 4 – A pet cat has died.

On ly i n

e on is th

e on is th

On ly i n

u ur

n ra

PICTURE 3 – The family is moving house.

What’s the same? What’s different?.................pg 61 Bu n

PICTURE 2 – Child has learnt how to ride a bike.

• slow • goes to one or more people • handwritten

m . u

What other changes are important? –2 ............. pg 48 1. PICTURE 1 – A new baby comes into the family.

in both

kangaroos

wallabies pigeons honey

What was leisure time like in the past? – 2 .......... pg 64 Answers will vary. Games and toys of my parents ....................... pg 65 Answers will vary.

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Australian Curriculum History: Present and past family life

Australian Curriculum History - Year 1  

Australian Curriculum History is a seven-book series linked to the requirements of the Australian National Curriculum for each stage of prim...