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RIC-6356 2.6/1294


Teachers resource book – Book B (7 years+)

Copyright Notice

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2012 Copyright© Diane Henderson and Rosemary Morris 2012 ISBN 978-1-921750-80-9 RIC–6356

Titles available in this series: Teachers resource book – Book A (6 years+) Teachers resource book – Book B (7 years+) Teachers resource book – Book C (8 years+) Teachers resource book – Book D (9 years+) Teachers resource book – Book E (10 years+) Teachers resource book – Book F (11 years+) Teachers resource book – Book G (12 years+)

Also available in this series:

Except as allowed under the Copyright Act 1968, any other use (including digital and online uses and the creation of overhead transparencies or posters) or any use by or for other people (including by or for other teachers, students or institutions) is prohibited. If you want a licence to do anything outside the scope of the BLM licence above, please contact the Publisher.

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This information is provided to clarify the limits of this licence and its interaction with the Copyright Act. For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase. Name of Purchaser:

Date of Purchase:

Supplier:

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The English workbook – Book A (6 years+) The English workbook – Book B (7 years+) The English workbook – Book C (8 years+) The English workbook – Book D (9 years+) The English workbook – Book E (10 years+) The English workbook – Book F (11 years+) The English workbook – Book G (12 years+)

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A number of pages in this book are worksheets. The publisher licenses the individual teacher who purchased this book to photocopy these pages to hand out to students in their own classes.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• School Order# (if applicable):

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Signature of Purchaser:

R.I.C. Publications® follows the guidelines for punctuation and grammar as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 2002, 6th edn. Note, however, that teachers should use their own guide if there is a conflict.

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Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


INTRODUCTION This teachers resource book provides information to support the implementation of The English workbook – Book B, designed to develop and improve students’ literacy skills, focusing on procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. The following sections are included within each format. • vocabulary • speaking and listening • proofreading and editing • language features • spelling • reading comprehension • student evaluation • writing activities

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Features of The English workbook – Teachers resource book • Descriptions of the five different writing formats • Photocopiable planning outlines for the five writing formats • Speaking and listening notes and photocopiable charts • Additional information about vocabulary, useful reference lists and spelling rules • Clear and concise explanations of the included language features • Photocopiable student editing and proofreading checklists specific to each writing format • Comprehensive integrated activity sheets provide cross-curricular extension to stimulate student interest • Class evaluation sheets to record information about student understanding and performance • Answers for student activities

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Introduction .......................................................................... 1 Writing format descriptions ..........................................2–3 Planning outlines.............................................................3–8 Editing and proofreading checklists .........................9–14 Class evaluation record sheet ..................................15–16 Speaking and listening ..............................................17–21 Speaking skills .......................................................... 17 Listening skills ........................................................... 17 Oral presentations .................................................... 17 Speaking chart .......................................................... 18 Listening chart .......................................................... 19 Vocabulary ....................................................................20–22 Compound words...................................................... 20 Homographs .............................................................. 20 Homophones ............................................................. 20 Synonyms................................................................... 20 Antonyms ................................................................... 20 Overused words........................................................ 20 Find a better word (good, nice, then) .................... 21 Find a better word (got, said, went)....................... 22 Spelling .........................................................................23–25 Syllables ..................................................................... 23

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Plurals...................................................................23–24 Adding suffixes (1-1-1 rule, dropping final ‘e’, adding ‘ly’) .......24–25 Language features .......................................................26–29 Parts of speech (verbs, adverbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions) ..............................26–27 Punctuation (capital letters, commas, apostrophes for possession, grammatical contractions, quotation marks, paragraphs) .................................................. 27 Sentence beginnings ........................................................ 28 Question words .................................................................. 29 Integrated activities ....................................................30–34 Graphic organisers......................................................35–40 Mind maps ................................................................. 35 Flow chart .................................................................. 36 Senses chart ............................................................. 37 Tree chart ................................................................... 38 Semantic web ........................................................... 39 Reading journal ......................................................... 40 Scope and sequence chart .............................................. 41 Answers ........................................................................42–50

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CONTENTS

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

1. Procedure

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The main purpose of a procedure is to direct, inform or explain how something is done. It usually includes: • a goal – tells what is to be done • a list of requirements • steps – a list of instructions in a particular order • a test – to see if the task was completed successfully. A procedure uses: • command verbs • present tense • short, clear statements. A procedure may be written in the form of instructions for a task such as playing a game, constructing something, operating an appliance, using a reference book, dealing with a problem, or as a recipe or an experiment.

2. Recount

The purpose of a recount is to retell past events in time order. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the recount is about • a setting – who was involved and where and when the events happened • the events – what happened in chronological order • an ending or comments – how the events ended and what the writer thinks about it. A recount uses: • the past tense • paragraphs to separate significant events. A recount may be written in the form of a diary, a letter, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account, a biography or autobiography.

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3. Exposition (Persuasive text)

An exposition is written or spoken to persuade others to think or do something. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the exposition is about • an overview – a brief summary of what the writer thinks about the topic • reasons – the arguments to persuade people • a conclusion – a final comment or summing up. An exposition uses: • persuasive language • facts to support the arguments • a new paragraph for each new argument. An exposition may be written in the form of an essay, a letter, an advertisement, a review, a speech or an editorial.

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WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

4. Narrative

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The main purpose of a narrative is to describe a series of events and circumstances often involving fictitious characters. It usually includes: • a title – gets the attention of the reader and indicates what the story is about • an orientation – introduces the main characters, the setting or location, the time of the story and the initiating event • a complication – a problem which involves the main character(s) • a resolution – how the problem is solved. A narrative uses: • descriptive vocabulary • interesting characters • suitable paragraphing. A narrative may be written in the form of a story, a play, a fairytale, a myth, a legend, a science fiction work, a ballad or a poem.

5. Report

The main purpose of a report is to give facts clearly without unnecessary information or opinions. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the report is about • a classification – provides information about the focus of the report • a description – expands on the focus • a conclusion – a summary or comment. A report uses: • facts, not opinions • no unnecessary information • the third person • the timeless present tense. A report may be written in the form of a review, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account or a scientific report.

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The following pages (4–8) are photocopiable planning outlines for each of the five writing formats, designed for students to use when planning their writing. They provide a structure for writing and include elements unique to each format. The planning outlines can be used in conjunction with the ‘Editing and proofreading checklists’ (pages 9–13) to encourage students to review and correct their writing. Teachers can assess and then record their students’ understanding of the elements of each writing format on the ‘Class evaluation record’ on pages 15–16.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

3


Planning a procedure Name:

Date:

Title: Goal: (What you need to do)

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Needs:

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Steps: (In order)

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Test: (How you’ll know if your procedure works)

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Planning a recount Name:

Date:

Title:

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Orientation: Who? Where? When? Why?

Events:

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Ending:

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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Planning an exposition Name:

Date:

Title:

Arguments:

2.

3.

5.

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4.

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Conclusion:

6

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1.

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Introductory statement: (What I think)

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Planning a narrative Name:

Date:

Title: Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Where are they? S When did it happen?

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Who is the story about?

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Events: © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (What happened?) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Complication: (What was the problem?)

o c . Resolution: Ending: che e r o (How was the problem fixed?) (How did the t r s story end?) super

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Planning a report Name:

Date:

Title:

Description:

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Classification: (What is it?)

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Conclusion: (What I think about it)

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EDITING AND PROOFREADING CHECKLISTS

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The primary purpose of writing and the use of language is communication—to get one’s message or ideas across to another person in an effective manner. It is important that the message is clear so that there are no misunderstandings. Ensuring that there are no barriers to effective communication, due to poor spelling and grammar or incorrect structure, is vital. Provided on the following pages is a series of checklists for each of the five writing formats: procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. Each of the writing formats has its own particular structure or elements which help the students communicate their ideas within the given format. The checklists allow students to ensure that these elements are included and that they have thoroughly checked and edited their work for any errors. The checklists, which list specific points, provide an opportunity for students and their peers to evaluate their writing and develop their writing and editing skills. Ideally, providing this opportunity for self-evaluation will allow students to develop a habit of always editing and proofing their work.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

9


Checking a procedure Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Did you say what you wanted to do or make? ..........

yes

no

Needs: Did you make a list of what was needed? ..................

yes

no

Steps:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

r o e t s Bo r Are the steps easye to follow? ...................................... p o u k Are they in the right order? ......................................... S Were any steps missed out?........................................

Test:

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Goal:

Did you say how it would look or work? ....................

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Words

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© R. I . CSpelling .Publ i cat i ons Did you check your spelling? .................................................... yes •f or r evi e w pur posesonl y • no

. te verbs? .................................................. oyes Did you use command c . che e r o r st super

no

Punctuation

10

Have you put a capital letter at the start of every sentence?....

yes

no

Did you remember full stops? ..................................................

yes

no

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Checking a recount Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r Did you tell when it happened? ................................................ e p o u k Did you tell where it happened? ............................................... S Events:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you tell who was there?......................................................

Did you tell what happened? ....................................................

yes

no

Were the events in the right order? ..........................................

yes

no

yes

no

Ending:

Did you tell how it ended? ........................................................

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons yes •f orr evi ew p u r p o s e s o n l y • Spelling

Did you say how you felt about it? ...........................................

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used capital letters for names? ................................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops? .........................................................

yes

no

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Words

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

. tinteresting words? ................................................ o Did you usee c . che e Did you use any ‘time’ words?.................................................. r o t r s super Punctuation

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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Checking an exposition Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Introductory statement:

r o e t s B r e oo Did you say what you thought about it? .................................. p u k Arguments: S

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you state what the topic was? ............................................

Did you explain your ideas clearly? .........................................

yes

no

Did you start with your strongest one? ....................................

yes

no

yes

no

Conclusion:

Did you say what you thought at the end? ..............................

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no

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

no

Punctuation

12

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops and question marks?.......................

yes

no

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Checking a narrative Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r Did you tell when it happened? ................................................ e p o u k Did you tell where it happened? ............................................... S Complication and events:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you say who was in the story? ...........................................

Did you say what the problem was? ........................................

yes

no

Did you say what happened?....................................................

yes

no

yes

no

Resolution and ending:

Did you tell how the problem was fixed? ................................

yes © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y• Spelling

Did you tell what happened at the end? ..................................

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used capital letters for names? ................................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops? .........................................................

yes

no

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Words

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

. tinteresting words? ................................................ o Did you usee c . ch e Have you used good describing words?.................................. r er o t s super Punctuation

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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Checking a report Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Classification:

r o e t s B r e oo Description: p u k Did you write interesting S things? .............................................

yes

no

yes

no

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Have you said what the report is about? .................................

Is your information true?........................................................... Conclusion:

Did you say what you thought about it? ..................................

yes

no

yes

no

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Words

yes

no

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

o c . Did you use interesting words? ................................................ yes ch e r er o st super

no

Punctuation

14

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Did you remember full stops? ..................................................

yes

no

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Class evaluation record

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Names

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Procedure Understands the format Uses clear concise language Sequences steps logically

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Self-edits Recount Understands the format

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Sequences events Uses past tense Self-edits Exposition Understands the format Presents persuasive arguments Supports arguments Self-edits

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Names

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Class evaluation record

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Narrative

Understands the format

Uses descriptive language

Imaginative ideas

Self-edits

Report

Understands the format

Accurate information

Self-edits

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SPEAKING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING SKILLS Students need to have a sense of audience and to learn how to engage and communicate effectively. The ‘Are you a good speaker?’ chart on page 18 can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It focuses attention on the preparation and presentation of information as well as oral communication skills. Opportunities are provided for students to organise and communicate their ideas to a partner, a small group or the class. Students should be encouraged to set individual speaking goals on which to focus and to evaluate their performance.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u LISTENING SKILLS S

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Providing opportunities for students to engage in active listening is essential, but some students may need to have explicit instruction to understand the requirements of effective listening. The ‘Are you a good listener?’ chart on page 19 can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It is suggested that teacher and students set a goal—e.g. sitting still—as a focus for a particular lesson and then evaluate how well this goal was achieved.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS

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Purpose 1. To inform the audience of the views, facts and news of the speaker. 2. To influence the audience to support the speaker’s perspective or cause. 3. To justify an action or proposed action. 4. To entertain a specific audience.

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An oral presentation is a talk or address delivered to an audience.

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Features 1. Ideas and facts must have a logical sequence. 2. Format may include: • introduction • description • conclusion 3. May include some visual presentation (objects and photographs). 4. Personal experience and humour may be used to maintain interest. 5. Short sentences may be used to enable members of the audience to remain focused and attentive.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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Are you a good speaker?

Good speakers …

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Organise: S • something to show Plan:

• interesting information

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Choose:

• their talk

Present:

• their ideas and tell who‚ when‚ where and © Rwhat‚ . I . C . Publ i cat i ons why

Look:

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Speak:

• • • •

at the audience good and stand tall interested confident

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Are you a good listener?

Good listeners:

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Look S at the speaker Sit still

Listen carefully

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about what the speaker is saying

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

19


VOCABULARY

An increased vocabulary develops the students’ ability to communicate their ideas, making their writing and speaking more descriptive and interesting to read or listen to.

COMPOUND WORDS

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HOMOGRAPHS

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‘Compound’ comes from the Latin meaning ‘putting together’. Each part of a compound word must be a word that can stand alone. For example: toothbrush, mother-in-law Note: As language changes, many words that were previously hyphenated no longer need a hyphen. Students should be encouraged to consult a recent dictionary.

Homo – same graph – write Homographs are words that are written in the same way, but have different meanings, origins and sometimes are pronounced differently. Homographs that sound the same include: sack, ruler, pupil, spring, squash, bear, saw, felt, train, fast, hold, park, club, duck, cape, chop, coach, grave, cricket, march, right, ring, table, watch, last, kind, cross, blind, iron

Homographs that are pronounced differently include:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons HOMOPHONES •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• row, subject, present, object, wind, wound, bow, tear, record, desert, close, number

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SYNONYMS

Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning.

ANTONYMS

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Homo – same phone – sound Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelt differently. For example: one/won‚ for/four‚ here/hear‚ write/right‚ sun/son‚ to/two/too

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Antonyms are words with the opposite meaning. Finding synonyms and antonyms helps students to develop a wider vocabulary and allows them to write more precisely and interestingly. Some antonyms are formed by adding a prefix; for example: un, dis, in, im, mis.

OVERUSED WORDS

Students should be encouraged to communicate more exact meaning by avoiding the overuse of some words; e.g. ‘asked’ and ‘said’. Words that can be used instead of ‘asked’ include: enquired, requested, queried, questioned, begged, quizzed, appealed, demanded Words that can be used instead of ‘said’ include: spoke, uttered, yelled, shouted, whispered, cried, sobbed, commented, replied, stated, talked, voiced, announced, remarked, repeated, breathed, declared, recited, expressed, protested 20

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Find a better word

good

nice

then

r o e t s Bo • before r • lovely e p ok u S • interesting • beautiful • after

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• well behaved

• excellent

• kind

• during

• fine

• enjoyable

• at last

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Find a better word

got

said

went

r o e t s Bo r • ran e p ok u • was given S • cried • walked • yelled

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• became

• won

• replied

• hurried

• received

• spoke

• travelled

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SPELLING

Because of the complexity of the English language, there are a number of exceptions to most of the spelling rules. After students have learned a rule, they should be encouraged to consolidate this learning by seeking exceptions to the rule.

SYLLABLES

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S swim/mer

con/test

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Breaking words into syllables is very useful for pronouncing and spelling words. A syllable has one vowel sound. The following is a list of rules to determine how words are divided into syllables. 1. When two consonants (same or different) come between two vowels, divide between the consonants.

2. When there is only one consonant between two vowels, divide before the consonant. fa/mous

mu/sic

3. When consonants make one speech sound, they are kept together. pro/phet

me/thod

dol/phin

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons me/tre sad/dle •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 5. Prefixes and suffixes are usually separated from the base word.

4. The letters ‘re’ and ‘le’ cannot stand alone at the end of a word and must take the preceding consonant.

joy/ful

sub/mit

dis/o/bey

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PLURALS

rain/coat

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6. Compound words divide between the small words. la/dy-/in-/wait/ing

• Most nouns form their plural by just adding ‘s’.

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• Words ending in ‘ch’, ‘sh’, ‘s’, ‘x’, and ‘z’ usually add ‘es’ to make the plural word easier to pronounce. churches, wishes, buses, boxes, quizzes exceptions include: stomachs, monarchs, matriarchs, patriarchs

Note: The ‘ch’ is pronounced like ‘ck’ in these words, so the ‘es’ is not needed for ease of pronunciation.

• Many words ending in ‘o’ also add ‘es’ in the plural form. tomatoes, potatoes, heroes, echoes But there are numerous exceptions, including words ending with ‘oo’ and some words associated with music. In many recent dictionaries, both endings are included. ‘oo’ words: bamboos, kangaroos, cockatoos, zoos, shampoos music: banjos, solos, duos, trios, pianos, sopranos, radios, altos, cellos, videos others: ratios, zeros, merinos, silos R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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SPELLING • Nouns ending in ‘f’ or ‘fe’ change the ‘f’ or ‘fe’ to ‘v’ and add ‘es’. knives, wolves, halves, selves Note: Both forms of some words are accepted: dwarves or dwarfs, wharves or wharfs, hooves or hoofs.

Exceptions include: words ending with ‘ff’: stuffs, puffs, skiffs, cliffs, staffs, sheriffs others: reefs, gulfs, chiefs, roofs, waifs

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• Nouns ending with a consonant and a ‘y’ change the ‘y’ to ‘i’ before adding ‘es’. babies, puppies, flies, spies, libraries

tooth – teeth oasis – oases person – people goose – geese parenthesis – parentheses criterion – criteria ox – oxen cherub – cherubim, cherubs

woman – women foot – feet die – dice cactus – cacti, cactuses radius – radii, radiuses fungus – fungi, funguses axis – axes crisis – crises emphasis – emphases louse – lice medium – media, mediums phenomenon – phenomena sphinx – sphinges, sphinxes child – children mouse – mice, mouses (computer)

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• Some plurals are made by changing some letters of the base noun or by adding an unusual suffix.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons fish, cod, salmon, trout, deer, sheep, reindeer, swine, elk, dozen, score, innings, gallows •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Some nouns have no singular form; many of them are thought of as ‘a pair of’.

• Some words may have the same singular and plural forms.

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trousers, bathers, spectacles, glasses, pants, tweezers, pliers, clippers, scissors, secateurs, bellows, tongs, measles, billiards

ADDING SUFFIXES

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A suffix can be described as a group of letters added to the end of a word. Suffixes changes the meaning of words. Examples of suffixes include:

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able, age, al, an, ance, ary, ate, en, ence, er, ery, ese, est, ful, fy, hood, ible, ic, ion, ish, ist, ive, less, ling, ly, ment, most, ness, or, ous, ship

• Suffixes are usually just added to the end of the word.

work, worked, workable, working, worker

• Sometimes the spelling of the base word changes. shut–shutting, happy–happily, shape–shaping

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SPELLING The one-one-one rule for adding suffixes beginning with a vowel requires understanding of: • consonants and vowels • short and long vowels • syllables.

one-one-one rule When adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to words of one syllable, with one short vowel sound followed by one consonant, double that consonant.

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cut–cutting

refitting

babysitter

outrigger

dropping the final ‘e’

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Note: Words of more than one syllable with a prefix or which are compound words also double the final consonant.

Another rule for adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to a word, usually with a long vowel sound and ending with a silent ‘e’, is that the ‘e’ is dropped before adding the suffix. shape – shaping

close – closing

Note: An interesting exception is ‘likable’. Macquarie dictionary prefers ‘likeable’, but also acknowledges ‘likable’. A simple way for students to remember part of this rule is:

© R. I C Pwhen ub l i catot i ons ‘e’. goes. away ‘ing’ comes stay orr evi ew pur posesonl y• adding ‘ly’•f ‘ly’ is usually just added to words. love – lovely

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quick – quickly

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There are some exceptions: 1. Whole – wholly. The ‘e’ is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 2. True – truly, due – duly. There are already two vowels at the end of these words so one is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 3. Horrible – horribly, simple – simply. These are two examples of words ending in ‘le’ after a consonant. The ‘e’ is changed to ‘y’.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

25


LANGUAGE FEATURES PARTS OF SPEECH Understanding the different parts of speech will help students construct effective sentences.

Verbs Verbs are words used to show actions or states of being or having; e.g. eat, was, has. Command verbs are imperatives and are often used in procedures at the beginning of a sentence; e.g. ‘Roast the meat’. Verb tense: There are three basic tenses. However, because there are so many irregular verbs in English, these can be complex.

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the present walk walks see sees

the future will walk should walk will see should see

Adverbs

Note: The future and past tenses often use auxiliary or ‘helping’ verbs to form a compound verb; e.g. have written, can open, may visit, were asleep.

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the past regular walked has walked irregular saw has seen

Adverbs are words that can modify or enhance the meaning of verbs; e.g. He swam slowly, I sang yesterday. There are adverbs of time, place and manner. time; e.g. tomorrow place; e.g. outside manner; e.g. quickly

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Nouns

Pronouns

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Pronouns are words substituted for nouns; e.g. We asked them to help us.

Adjectives

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Nouns are words used to name people, places, things, feelings or ideas; e.g. boy, school, book, joy, courtesy. Proper nouns are used to name particular people, places or things. Proper nouns are written with capital letters; e.g. John, Singapore, February.

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Adjectives modify or enhance the meaning of nouns and, less commonly, pronouns; e.g. deserted playground, lucky me.

Prepositions Prepositions are words that show the relationship between nouns and/or pronouns in the same sentence. Common prepositions include: during, for, between, in, up, on. He rode through the park. Sally slept until dawn. I would like one of those.

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LANGUAGE FEATURES Conjunctions Conjunctions are joining words. They can join different language units. one word with another one phrase with another one clause with another one sentence with another

PUNCTUATION

hot or cold on the land and in the air sitting on the beach while watching the birds There were dark clouds in the sky so I took my umbrella.

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Punctuation is used to clarify meaning and assist with reading and comprehension.

Capital letters

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Capital letters are needed for: • sentence beginnings; e.g. I like my teacher. She is kind to me. • proper nouns; e.g. people’s names (Bob Brown), names of places (Pacific Ocean), days of the week (Tuesday), months (May), countries (New Zealand), nationalities (French), languages (Russian), religious faiths (Christian), holidays and festivals (Passover). • titles; e.g. Red Cross, The sound of music, Note: R.I.C. Publications® employs minimal capitalisation for titles of books and other publications as recommended by the Style ‘Goldilocks and the three bears’. manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

Commas

Commas are used to separate items in a list or series; e.g. I like ice-cream, carrots, apples and chocolate.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Apostrophes are used to show that something belongs to someone or something. • f o rr e vbei e wp u r p orule se sito nl y The placement of the apostrophe can challenging but the simple is that is placed after• the owner or Apostrophes for possession

owners. (The ‘tail’ of the apostrophe ‘points’ to the owner[s].) the girls’ dresses (more than one girl) the babies’ shoes (more than one baby)

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Grammatical contractions

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the girl’s dresses (one girl) the baby’s shoes (one baby)

Grammatical contractions are words that have been made by joining and shortening two words. An apostrophe is used in place of the missing letters.

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Quotation marks

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he will – he’ll it has – it’s

Quotation marks (inverted commas) are used to enclose quoted speech or thoughts. Single or double quotation marks are acceptable but must be used consistently. ‘Please feed that noisy cat’, Mum shouted. ‘I fed him yesterday, it’s Ben’s turn’, Adam replied.

Note: R.I.C. Publications® punctuates speech as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

Quoted text must start on a new line, unless the same speaker is continuing.

Paragraphs Paragraphs separate text into meaningful sections to facilitate reading and understanding. Paragraphs start on a new line. A space is often left between paragraphs. R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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Sentence beginnings

• Once upon a time ... • Later that day ...

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• On my way home ...

• On the weekend ... • For my birthday ... • Walking along ...

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©R I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Yelling loudly ....

•f rr evi ew pur posesonl y• • While Io was ...

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• Looking around ...

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• Shivering with fright ... • •

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• Running towards ... • Hearing a loud noise ... • Slowly he ... 28

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Question words

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When? What? © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES These are a series of activities designed for each specific writing format as it appears in the student workbook. They will hopefully provide ideas as to how the formats can be used in relation to a variety of subjects other than English.

Procedure 1 – Playing hopscotch History 1. 2. 3. 4.

List the sports and games you and your classmates 1. play. Research to find sports and games played in the past. Choose one sport or game and find the origins of it. Hold a games day at school and play games from 2. the past.

3.

Design a new sport or game. You will need to include: – number of players – equipment needed – rules for the game Design a poster for your new sport or game. Make it interesting, bright and colourful.

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Keep a tally of the games and sports you play in a 1. week. 2. Compare your tally with your classmates and graph them to show the most popular sports and games. 3. Compare the time you spend playing sports and games with the time you spend watching TV.

Plan a daily routine to include fitness sessions. Research to find out how much time a day should be spent in physical activity. Compile a list of things to remember for your health and safety while doing sport and outdoor games. Include: – slip, slop, slap – drinking water – warming up – safety with equipment

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Design and technology • f o r r e v i e w pur posesonl y• Research to find some good fishing places near 1. Design a fishing rod. Research first to see what

Recount 1 – Going fishing Society and environment

2. 3.

Health 1. 2. 3. 4.

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your home. Compile a list of the fish caught in these areas. Compile a list of freshwater and saltwater fish found in your area.

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features need to be included. Research other ways of fishing. Include: nets, trawling, spears etc. Compare fishing in the past to today’s techniques. List the similarities and differences.

English

Find some easy recipes for cooking fish. 1. Choose a favourite and try it out at home or school. Research to find out why fish is a healthy food and which fish are better to eat. 2. Compare the benefits of fish with chicken and/or meat.

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Write a story pretending you are a fish. Don’t forget to include: – what sort you are – where you are – what happens to you etc. Write a story about an imaginary fishing trip. Include lots of exciting things that happened and lots of descriptive words.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Exposition 1 – Talking in class English

5. 6.

Compile a list of class rules. Discuss one you think is not necessary. Discuss any extra rules you think are needed. Talk to other classes and compare their rules to yours. Conduct a class debate on whether you should be able to talk in class. Compile a list of places where you think talking should not be allowed; e.g. in a theatre.

1.

2.

Research to learn about schools in the past. Visit a museum to experience school in the past. Compare and contrast today’s classroom rules with the rules of the past.

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Choose one class rule. Survey your classmates to find those who agree with it and those who don’t. Graph the results. Count your class rules. Compare to other classes’ rules. Graph the results to see which classes have the most rules.

1. 2.

Design a poster for one of your class rules. Make it bright and colourful. Mime some of your class rules and see if your classmates can guess what you are miming.

Narrative 1 – Prince Hal and the dragons Society and environment English 1. 2. 3.

1. l List many fairytales © R. I . C.Pub i casa t i o nsor stories as you can about princes or princesses. 2. Find some poems about princes or princesses. •f orr evi ew pur pChoose ose onl y• ones to learn.

Research to find out which countries still have princes and princesses. Research to find out other types of rulers. Make a list of the different types. On a world map, using a colour-code system, colour in the countries according to their rulers; e.g. king, prime minister, emperor, etc.

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Mathematics

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Write an acrostic poem using ‘prince’ or ‘princess’. Write your own narrative about a prince/princess. Find as many dragon stories or poems as you can.

English

Pretend you are a prince/princess and design a castle you would like to live in. Design a poster to advertise the story of Prince Hal and the dragons. Make it colourful and interesting. Make yourself a crown using cardboard and any sort of decorations you wish. Draw an imaginary dragon. Use collage to decorate your drawings.

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History

Fun with words 1. Choose six long words from the story and make a word snake. 2. Choose eight words from the story and compile a crossword puzzle. 3. Using the title ‘Prince Hal and the dragons’, find as many small words as you can (e.g. in, pin, pal, lap). 4. Write the names of the characters on cards and draw pictures on other cards and play a matching or memory game.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Report 1 – Ice-cream Mathematics

The arts

1.

1.

2. 3.

Survey your class to find their favourite flavour of ice-cream. Graph the results. Conduct a survey to find the most popular dessert apart from ice-cream. Graph the results. Check at your local deli and find the most popular flavours.

Science

2.

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Calculate the time it takes ice-cream to melt. Think of ways to keep it frozen longer without a freezer. Make ice-cream at school and calculate how long it takes to freeze. Try different ingredients and see if this changes the times. Ice-cream can freeze then melt, then freeze again. Think of other materials that are able to do this. Compile a list of materials that can melt but not be frozen again.

1.

Compile a list of healthy desserts. Compare and contrast their ingredients. Choose one of these desserts to make.

2.

English 1. 2.

Compose an acrostic poem for ice-cream. List all the flavours of ice-cream you can think of. Now put them in alphabetical order. List any flavours that are compound words; e.g. strawberry.

3.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Discuss the ingredients in the biscuits. Decide if they 1. Visit the local shop and list the prices of are healthy/unhealthy. ingredients for the biscuits. Write them in order • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • from the cheapest to the most expensive. Find some healthy recipes for biscuits and choose

Procedure 2 – Humpty Dumpty biscuits Health Mathematics

2. 3.

one to make. 2. Compare the ingredients for different biscuits you can buy. Which ingredients are the same/different? 3.

1.

2. 3.

2.

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Science

Draw some other faces you could make with the 1. biscuits; for example: an elf. List what you would need. 2. Design a colourful bag or box in which to carry your biscuits. Mime nursery rhymes and see if your classmates can 3. guess them.

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Weigh all the ingredients, then list them from the heaviest to lightest. Time how long it takes to make the biscuits. Compare and contrast to other biscuit recipes.

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Health

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Choose a new and interesting flavour for an ice-cream. Create a poster advertising your new flavour. Make it bright and colourful. Create a new and inventive way to serve and sell ice-cream; maybe a plastic bowl or a cardboard box. Remember, it needs to be waterproof.

Mix icing sugar with cold and hot water, noting how quickly it mixes in each. Find things that will dissolve in water and experiment to find the differences in time when using hot or cold water. Place Smarties® or M&Ms® in water to see which colours last the longest.

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‘Humpty Dumpty’ is a nursery rhyme. List as many nursery rhymes as you can. Survey your class to find the most popular. Make as many small words from ‘Humpty Dumpty’ as you can. Use each letter once only.

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Recount 2 – Sleepover Mathematics

English

1.

1.

2.

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Survey your class to see how old they were when they had their first sleepover. Graph the results. Make a list of all the things you would need for a sleepover. Choose the five most important and measure them to work out how large a bag you will need. Ask your classmates about their bedtimes and what time they wake in the mornings. Calculate the hours of sleep. Compare and contrast these with each other. Do weekends have different times?

2.

Write a description of your favourite toy. Don’t forget to use lots of adjectives. Keep a diary for your favourite toy for a week. Tell about what happens to it, where it goes, how you play with it, etc. Adopt a class ‘teddy’. Take turns in taking it home for a night and record its adventures. Write a story about a fantasy sleepover you would like—maybe at a castle or with a movie star. Make a word snake with the things you need for a sleepover and ask a friend to solve it.

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2. 3.

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Design and technology

Design a really fun bag to take on a sleepover. Make it bright and colourful. Does it have zips, velcro, a handle, buttons, decorations, etc.? Design an interesting box in which to carry your favourite toy to a sleepover. Design a fantastic pair of pyjamas or a nightie to wear at a sleepover. Make up some fun games to play.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Exposition 2 – Learn to swim orr evi ew pur pos eenvironment sonl y• Health •f Society and 1. 2.

4.

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Research to find the best age for children to learn to swim. Compile a list of water safety rules. Compare and contrast water safety at the beach to water safety at a pool. List other health and safety rules at the beach; for example: slip, slop, slap. Compile a list of water sports and games. Choose one to research, learn when and where it originated, what the rules are, where it is played etc.

Mathematics 1. 2. 3.

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List as many well known swimmers as you can. Research to find out how old they were when they learnt to swim. Choose a country and research to find out what water sports and activities they offer. Visit your local aquatic centre and find out what swimming lessons they offer and for what ages. Find out what other local water activities and sports are available.

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Survey the class to find out the ages when children 1. learnt to swim. Graph the results. Survey the class to research how often they swim at the beach and at a pool. Graph the results. 2. Compile a list of different swimming strokes. Place in order of the fastest to slowest. Find out the most 3. popular.

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Choose a well known swimmer and write a short paragraph about them. Include why they are well known. Choose ten words from the exposition and compile your own crossword. Use the same words to compile a wordsearch for a partner to solve.

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Narrative 2 – Our pets Mathematics

The arts

1.

1.

3.

Health

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Design an amazing home for your pet (or an 1. imaginary one). Remember, your pet will need 2. food, water, shelter and some things to play on or with. Design and make a safe carrying container for your pet. Make it easy to carry and comfortable for your pet.

Report 2 – Spiders Science 1. 2. 3. 4.

6. 7. 8.

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Discuss rules to stay safe when playing with pets. Compile a list of things you need to do to keep a pet healthy.

English

Find as many songs or poems about spiders as you © R. I . C.1.Pu bl i cat i ons can. Choose a favourite to learn. is a fictional hero. Think of and list as many •f orr evi ew2.pSpiderman u r p o ses o nChoose l y• other fictional heroes as you can. one to write

Compare and contrast spiders and insects. Choose one spider and draw it. Label the body parts. Research to find the largest and smallest spiders in the world. Research to find the most dangerous spiders. List the top ten. Find out how many of these are found near where you live. Collect information including pictures of as many different types of webs as you can. Choose five different types of spiders and research to find what they eat. Research to find the differences between male and female spiders. Research to find and compare the size and shape of different spider’s eggs.

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3.

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Design and technology 1.

2.

Design a poster to advertise a pet. Make it bright and colourful. Mime different pets and allow your classmates to guess what you are. Choose a pet, draw its outline in heavy card. Use the cutout to make patterns. Bring a pet to school and get the class to draw a portrait of it.

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a story about. Write a story pretending you are a spider. Don’t forget to say what type you are, what you look like, where you live, what happens to you, etc. Choose ten different spiders. Put them into alphabetical order. Choose ten words from the report on spiders. Jumble them up, then see if a classmate can unjumble them.

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Survey your class to find out which pets they own. Graph the results. Ask your classmates to weigh and measure their pets. Order them from longest to shortest, heaviest to lightest. Calculate how much your pet costs to feed each week. Compare cats/dogs/fish/birds to see which are the cheapest to feed.

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Design and technology 1. 2.

Design and effective way to catch a spider. Remember, it could be poisonous. Design a good pet house for a spider. Remember it needs water, food, shelter and space to move.

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GRAPHIC ORGANISERS

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Graphic organisers are visual frameworks that are used to represent ideas and to organise them in a way that promotes learning and facilitates understanding. They are particularly useful for planning the content, sequence and organisation of a writing task. Graphic organisers allow students to: • make connections and understand how things are related • develop their more complex thinking skills; e.g. analysing, categorising and evaluating • use visual representations to assist memory and facilitate recall • apply multiple intelligences simultaneously. Graphic organisers include: • mind maps • flow charts (page 36) • senses charts (page 37) • tree charts (page 38) • semantic webs (page 39).

MIND MAPS

Mind maps can be used for note taking and as visual prompts for oral presentations. They usually use keywords, colour, drawings and symbols linked with arrows and branches. They are intended to be understood only by their creators. Space should be left so further ideas can be added.

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Flow chart

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Senses chart Subject:

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Looks

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Sounds

Feels

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Smells R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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Tree chart

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Semantic web

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Reading journal Comment

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Title

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Ice-cream

Favourite toys

Spiders

vowels plus ‘r’ (ar, er, ir, or, ur)

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

tricky words, question words, spelling maths

Read missing words

Read joining sentences Read yes/no Read questions Read joining sentences Read questions, yes/no

Read yes/no Read yes/no

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compound words, alphabetical order, senses, word search

jumbled words, male/female, alphabetical order, opposites

rhyming words, animal coverings, word snake, unjumble pet, pet homes

compound words, homophones, word jigsaw, describing words

alphabetical order, opposites, jumbled words, ‘What am I?’

A trip with Dad or a friend

Chocolate

Report 2

prepositions

Report 2

Animal report

Narrative 2 Pet story

A sleepover

Narrative 2 adjectives, comparatives

Recount 2

Procedure 2 Making a hamburger

Report 1

Narrative 1 An animal nobody wants

Exposition 1 Whiteboards are better than blackboards

Recount 1

Procedure 1 Learn to skip

Report 2

Narrative 2

Exposition 2

Recount 2

Exposition 2 Everyone should play sport

proper nouns

similes, words and colours, alphabetical order, masculine and feminine

Procedure 2 hidden and jumbled words, crossword

Report 1

Narrative 1

Exposition 2 exclamation marks, conjunctions

Recount 2

Procedure 2 verbs, command verbs, adverbs

prepositions

Narrative 1 adjectives, direct speech

Report 1

Think poster Think timelines Think water activities

Read and think Think questions draw a scary pet, similarities and differences Read and think Think yes/no, sorting facts labelling

Read and think questions Read and think questions Read and think questions

‘er’ words, jumbled words, ‘What am I?’

matching games and pictures, game titles, jumbled sports

Activities

Exposition 1 homographs, word shapes, compound words

Recount 1

Procedure 1

Genre

Teac he r

Read and think Think draw and label games equipment Read and think Think sequencing, fishing questions Read and think Think questions poster Read and think Think questions similarities and differences Read and think Think questions ice-cream facts

nouns, pronouns

Exposition 1 conjunctions

Recount 1

Procedure 1 verbs, adverbs

Report 2

Narrative 2

Exposition 2

Recount 2

Procedure 2

Report 1

Narrative 1

Exposition 1

Recount 1

Read yes/no Read yes/no

Activities

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Report 2

Report 1

‘c’ as in ‘ice’ and ‘cat’, ‘g’ as in ‘giant’ and ‘gate’, plurals – ‘f’ to ’ve’ magic ‘e’, long vowels, two vowels making one Procedure 2 sound long ‘a’ (a-e, ai, ay), long ’e’ (e, ee, ea, ey, y), Recount 2 singular – plurals that don’t change, plurals with no singular long ‘i’ (i-e, ie, y), long ‘o’ (o-e, oa, ow, o), Exposition 2 contractions, plurals – ‘y’ to ‘i’ long ‘u’ (oo, ew, ue, u-e), air/ere, spelling maths, Narrative 2 rhyming words, words that change when plural

Narrative 1 silent letters, plurals ‘es’

‘ou’ and ‘ow’, ‘all’, ‘oo’ (book), au/or/aw, ‘alk’, Exposition 1 syllables

Recount 1

Procedure 1 tricky words, spelling maths, question words

Report 2

Narrative 2 Our pets

Exposition 2 Water activities

Recount 2

Procedure 2 Sandwiches, cakes and biscuits

Report 1

Narrative 1 Fairytales and dragons

Exposition 1 Talking and listening in the classroom

Going fishing

Reading

Recount 1

Procedure 1

Genre

Vocabulary

Procedure 1 Favourite games

o c . che e r o t r s super Language features

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Speaking and listening

Spelling

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Activities

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Genre

SCOPE AND SEQUENCE CHART

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ANSWERS Procedure 1 How to play hopscotch: pages 1–13 Page 2 Teacher check Page 3

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Read 1. (a) yes (b) no (c) yes (d) no Read and think 1.–2. Answers may vary. Teacher check.

Going fishing At the river Dad and the boy Answers may include: went to the river, baited the hooks, the hook went into Dad’s finger, put their lines in the water, yelled, brought in the fish, put more bait on, put the line back in the water, caught another fish, went home 5. Teacher check

Page 10

1. (a) Take (b) Throw (c) Hop (d) Jump (e) Pick (f) Miss 2. Answers may vary. Teacher check. 3. quickly – slowly, heavily – lightly, softly – loudly, happily – sadly, carefully – carelessly

Page 17

Read 1. (a) no (b) yes (c) no (d) yes (e) yes (f) no Read and think 1. (1) They went to the river. (2) Dad put the bait on his hook. (3) The boy felt a tug on his line. (4) The boy caught 10 fish. (5) Dad was sad. 2. Answers may include: (a) The hook could go in your finger, your eye, or hurt someone. Hooks are sharp, dangerous and hard to remove. (b) The hook went into it.

Page 13

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C (f) F (a) I (i)

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2. snakes – ladders, noughts – crosses, hide – seek, cat – mouse, cops – robbers, hot – cold 3. (a) tennis (b) football (c) basketball (d) running (e) swimming (f) hockey (g) golf (h) rowing

Test 1. (a) you (b) they (c) many (d) help 2. (a) your (b) done (c) where 3. (a) Where (b) Who (c) What (d) Why 4. (a) carefully (b) high (c) nicely 5. quickly – slowly, heavily – lightly, happily – sadly 6. (a) How old are you? (b) I live in a blue house. (c) Which one do you want?

o c . che e r o t r s super Recount 1 Going fishing: pages 14–25

Page 8 1. Teacher check 2. (a) ask (b) (c) want (d) (e) help (f) (g) her (h)

Page 11

once both his give

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Think Teacher check

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1. 2. 3. 4.

Teacher check ©R . I . C .Publ i cat i ons Page 12 •f orr e v i ew pur posesonl y• Teacher check

Page 5

Page 7

your (b) they none (d) done there (f) this where (h) many Who Which What Why/When/How Where

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Page 4

1. A (b) D (d) G (e)

3. (a) (c) (e) (g) 4. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. How to play hopscotch. 2. The procedure tells you how to play hopscotch. 3. chalk, an even surface, stones 4. 7 5. Take, Throw, Hop, Jump, Jump, Pick, Throw 6. verbs 5. Answers may vary

Page 6

Page 16

Page 9

Page 15 Teacher check

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

Page 18

Think 1. Answers my include: (a) He caught ten big fish. He caught all the fish. He learnt how to fish. (b) He didn’t catch any fish. The hook went into his finger. He didn’t do very well. (c) Teacher check 2. (a) – (b) Teacher check

Page 19 1. (a) mother (c) river

(b) father (d) finger

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ANSWERS (e) water 2. (a) put (c) very (e) soon 3. I am a fish.

Exposition 1 Talking in class: pages 26–39

(b) said (d) all (f) happy

Page 27 Teacher check

Page 20

Teac he r

dirt girl third fur hurt

Page 22

1. Places: home, beach, school People: mum, teacher, boy Things: ball, nest, cake 2. Answers may vary. Teacher check.

5. (a) paw (b) (c) claw (d) (e) saw (f) (g) corn (h) (i) storm (j) 6. Teacher check 7.

lawn fork short sport jaw

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(e) yes Read and think 1.–3. Answers will vary.

Teacher check Page 24

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Page 30

Teacher check Page 25

Page 34

1. Talking in class 2. He/She wants to be able to talk in class. 3. Answers may include: We learn by talking to people. His/Her brother learns a lot by using ‘Think, Pair, Share’. Listening is boring. Talking helps you to concentrate. If we weren’t meant to talk, why do we have tongues. 4. All teachers must let us talk.

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8. (a) 2 (c) 2 (e) 1

(b) 3 (d) 2 (f) 2

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Look wood

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3. (a) bird (b) (c) shirt (d) (e) skirt (f) 4. Teacher check 5. (a) burn (b) (c) purse (d)

ground brown cow

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. (a) – (e) bar, jar, star, far, car 2. herb, mother, perch, river, herd, father Page 21

Page 28

(e) shout (f) 2. (a) down (b) (c) clown (d) 3. Teacher check 4. (a) cook (b) (c) book (d)

Think Teacher check

Page 35 1. (a) (c) 2. (a) (b)

and (b) and and, but (d) because My friend is pretty and kind. My cat eats chicken but doesn’t eat fish. (c) We looked carefully as we crossed the road.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Test 1. (a) park (b) star (c) farm (d) car 2. river, fern, herb 3. (a) girl (b) bird (c) skirt (d) dirt 4. Teacher check 5. (a) hurt (b) furry (c) purse (d) nurse 6. Place: school, People: doctor, Thing: toy 7. Answers may vary. Teacher check.

Page 31 1.–2.

Teacher check

Page 32

3. (a) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (b) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v)

toothbrush cowboy seashell goldfish fire + place straw + berry home + work up + stairs scare + crow

Page 33 1. (a) house (c) round R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

(b) mouth (d) cloud

Page 36 Teacher check Page 37 Teacher check Page 38 Test 1. (a) mouse (c) south

(b) sound (d) shout

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

43


ANSWERS 2. (a) now (b) (c) crown (d) 3. Teacher check 4. (a) took (b) (c) foot (d)

town owl stood shook

Teac he r

1 (a) ice (b) snow (c) bat (d) owl (e) feather (f) night 2. grass – green, sky – blue, chocolate – brown, sun – yellow, elephant – grey, snow – white, tomato – red, grapes – purple, carrot – orange, tongue – pink

Page 46

Page 51

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3. (a) ‘Stop!’ called the police officer. (b) ‘Can you help me?’ asked Mum. (c) ‘Welcome back!’ my friend shouted. (d) Tom whispered, ‘Can you see it?’ (e) The boy yelled, ‘Come back here!’ 4. Teacher check.

Teacher check

Page 52 © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Teacher check Page •f orr evi ew pur pose s53onl y•

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Page 43 Read 1. (a) yes (b) no (c) yes (d) yes (e) no Read and think 1.–3. Answers will vary.

Page 47 1. lamb, half, palm, comb, knight, knot, calf, knee, climb, thumb 2. (a) knock (b) calm (c) knew (d) numb (e) gnocchi (f) limb

Test 1. thumb, knot, gnome 2. (a) half (b) climb (c) know 3. (a) lamb (b) calf 4. (a) boxes (b) crosses (c) lunches (d) wishes (e) buses (f) bushes 5. (a) tomatoes (b) potatoes (c) pianos (d) banjos (e) echoes (f) radios

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1. Prince Hal and the dragons 2. (a) Prince Hal (b) in the mountains 3. (a) He was sad and lonely. (b) He was mean and attacked people. 4. (a) Hal made friends with the sad dragon and had fun with him. (b) He had to find and slay a dragon. 5. (a) He found a friend. (b) He killed him. 6. Teacher check

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3. cave, dragon, fight, knight, prince, sword 4. king – queen, prince – princess, man – woman, boy – girl, father – mother, son – daughter, uncle – aunt, grandfather – grandmother

Narrative 1 Prince Hal and the dragons: pages 40–54

Page 42

Page 50

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5. (a) jaw (b) corn (c) torn (d) prawn 6. Teacher check 7. (a) 3 (b) 2 (c) 1 (d) 2 (e) 4 (f) 1 8. (a) We stopped as the truck passed. (b) I like tomatoes and carrots. (c) He is big and strong but he isn’t mean.

Teacher check

1. Teacher check 2. heavy – light, far – near, ugly – beautiful, big – small, short – tall, wet – dry, hot – cold, sad – happy

Think 1. Teacher check 2. Answers may include: Same: physical features, habitat Different: personality, size

Page 39

Page 41

Page 49

Page 44

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 48 3. (a) (c) (e) 4. (a)

gnome (b) knot (d) knee (f) (i) boxes (iii) crosses (v) lunches (vii) foxes (ix) dishes (b) (i) tomatoes (iii) potatoes (v) buffaloes (c) (i) pianos (iii) sopranos (v) radios

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

thumb knife climb (ii) buses (iv) wishes (vi) bosses (viii) beaches (ii) heroes (iv) echoes

Page 54

6. Teacher check 7. low – high, fast – slow, happy – sad 8. (a) ‘Slow down’, his friend called. (b) Bob asked, ‘Where are you going?’ 9. Teacher check

(ii) banjos (iv) cellos (vi) videos R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS Report 1 Ice-cream: pages 55–67 Page 56 Teacher check

Page 63

Page 59 Think Teacher check Page 60

Page 57

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Page 58

Read 1. Ice-cream is a sweet frozen dessert. Most ice-creams have some sugar. Ice-cream comes in many flavours. I like ice-cream. Ice-cream can be eaten anywhere. Read and think 1. The ice-cream would melt in the cupboard. 2. Answers may include: Most ice-cream is made from ice and cream. Ice-cream is frozen like ice and is creamy. 3. Answers may include: It would have been hot in summer and they didn’t have freezers. Freezers had not been invented. There wasn’t electricity then for freezers. They couldn’t keep it cold in summer. 4. Answers may include: He thought it was too good for ordinary people. He wanted to keep it for the most important people.

Page 61

3. Answers may include: sight: colourful, round, white, soft, melty hearing: crunch, slurp smell: nice, minty, sweet touch: sticky, soft, melty, cold taste: nice, tasty, minty, delicious, sweet, yummy, cold 4.

Page 64 1. Teacher check drawing. (a) inside (b) behind (c) near (d) over (e) above (f) between

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Ice-cream A sweet frozen dessert. cream, milk emperor, Polo, Charles I ways, toppings flavours 7. anywhere, time, ice-cream

Teac he r

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

1. strawberry, pineapple, eggplant, beetroot, pumpkin, mushroom 2. banana, caramel, chocolate, lime, neapolitan, strawberry, vanilla

3. (a) These words should be circled: gentle, giant, gym, germ, gypsy, ginger (b) e, i, y 4. (a) Teacher check (b) (i) cage (ii) page (iii) age (iv) stage 5. (a) wives (b) wolves (c) lives (d) calves (e) halves (f) shelves

Page 65

Teacher check

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1. (b) ‘c’ as in kite – cart, call, cub, cut ‘c’ as in ice – city, cent, cell, celery 2. place, space, trace 3. (a) Teacher check (b) These words should be circled: giant, giraffe, germ 4. (a) age (b) page (c) cage 5. (a) elves (b) knives (c) wolves

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Page 62

1. (a) Teacher check (b) ‘c’ as in kite – cut, can, call, cart, craft, cat, cake, count ‘c’ as in ice – cent, circle, cycle, centre, cell, celery, cyclone, circus (c) e, i, y 2. (a)–(b) Teacher check (c) face, race, lace, space, trace

Procedure 2 Humpty Dumpty biscuits: pages 68–81 Page 69 Teacher check Page 70 1. Humpty Dumpty biscuits 2. To make Humpty Dumpty biscuits

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

45


ANSWERS 3. These ingredients should be drawn and labelled: biscuits, Smarties®/M&Ms®, icing sugar, jelly beans, chocolate sprinkles, water, food colouring, a bowl, a spoon, a knife 4. 7 5. Place, Add, Add, Spread, Dip, Decorate, Enjoy 6. They look and taste good. Page 71

Page 75 3. (a) (c) (e) (g) (i) 4. (a) (c) (e) (g)

a e o i e tail seat tube rain

(b) (d) (f) (h)

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(b) (d) (f) (h)

toad tie dream pies

Page 72

Think Teacher check

Page 83

Teacher check

1. (a) These verbs should be circled: writing, putting, riding, watching, skipping, reading, climbing (b)–(f) Teacher check 2. Place, Add, Spread, Dip, Decorate, Enjoy 3. Teacher check

Page 77

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Recount 2 Sleepover: pages 82–94

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Read 1. (a) yes (b) no (c) yes (d) no (e) yes Read and think 1.–3. Teacher check

6. Teacher check 7. Answers may vary. Teacher check. 8. (a) outside (b) nearby (c) forwards.

1. Sleepover 2. At the boys’ homes 3. the boy, his mum, his brother, Owen and his mum 4. Answers may include: He felt happy. He ran home to tell Mum. He helped his Mum pack his bag. He picked up Stretch. He put him in the bag. His brother grabbed Stretch and pulled him out of the bag. His brother said Owen would laugh. He put Stretch back on the bed. He felt sad. He went to Owen’s house. They played football and had a swim. They had pizza for tea. They played computer games. He cleaned his teeth and went to bed. He hid Stretch. They talked and told jokes. Owen’s mum told them to go to sleep. She gave them a hug and said goodnight to Floppy and Stretch. 5. Teacher check

1.. Teacher check ©R I . C. Publ i cat i ons 2. (a) always (b) never 1. (a) biscuits (b) colouring (c)e today (d)u later f orr ev i w p r posesonl y• (c) decorate • (d) sprinkles 3. (a) outside (b) there

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(d) downstairs

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1. (a) mate (b) robe (c) tube (d) fine (e) cane (f) note (g) cute (h) pine (i) mane (j) ride 2. These pictures should be circled: shine, tune, race, face, rope, cake, drive, June, spade, bone 46

(c) nearby Page 78

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2. (a) spoon (b) (c) icing (d) 3. b m o u t w j e l l y b i s c u k n i t Page 74

Teacher check Page 79 Teacher check

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 80

Test 1. (a) rode (b) wine (c) note (d) tube (e) mate (f) shine 2. These pictures should be circled: snake, cube, rake, bone, rope, spine, kite, tune 3. (a) o (b) e (c) a (d) i 4. (a) ties (b) bait (c) load (d) dream

Page 81 5. (a) running (c) flying

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

(b) sitting (d) meeting

Page 85

Read 1. Owen 2. Answers may include: clean shorts, a T-shirt, some jocks, pyjamas, toothbrush, comb, bag, Stretch 3. Giraffe 4. Played football and had a swim. 5. He said Owen would laugh and think he was a baby.

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS Read and think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check 2. In bed with Owen. 3. He thought Owen would laugh. 4. She guessed he would bring a toy with him. Page 86 Think Teacher check

Page 90 4. (a) (b) (c) (d) 5. (a) (c) (e)

lots, sheep fish trout deer glasses (b) scissors binoculars (d) jeans trousers (f) pyjamas

Teacher check Page 97

1. (a)–(f) Teacher check 2. (a) Tom Brown, Australia (b) Frankston (c) Roald Dahl (d) Dick Jones, Monopoly® (e) Lake Griffin (f) Joe’s Pizzas 3. The following should be circled: Lake King, Africa, Paris, Jenny Black, Parkfield Primary, Gulliver’s travels, August

1. Learn to swim 2. The writer thinks that everyone must learn to swim. 3. People should learn to swim because hundreds of children and adults drown every year. Lives would be saved if more people had learnt how to swim. Very young people can learn to swim. Old people can learn to swim. If you are not frightened of water you can do great things. 4. You must learn to swim. It could save your life or someone else’s life and there are lots of great water sports you can do.

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1. after, before, morning, night, Saturday, week 2. before – after, night – morning, backward – forward, clean – dirty, asleep – awake, happy – sad, always – never, laugh – cry 3. (a) cat (b) dog (c) horse (d) giraffe (e) rabbit (f) tiger

Teac he r

Page 96

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Page 87

Exposition 2 Learn to swim: pages 95–109

Page 92 P © R. I . C. ubl i cat i ons Teacher check 4. (a) I am a giraffe. (b) I am• a rabbit. f orr evi ew pur posesPage on y• 98l Page 93 5. Teacher check Teacher check

Page 89

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1. (a) cake – a-e train – ai rail – ai way – ay play – ay main – ai bake – a-e mane – a-e sail – ai lay – ay stay – ay name – a-e hay – ay tail – ai gave – a-e (b) a-e, ai, ay 2. (a) cave (b) pay (c) away (d) same (e) mail (f) snail (g) wait (h) lake (i) clay (j) plain 3. (a) We, beach (b) She, feel, puppy (c) three (d) baby, me (e) see, seat (f) key (g) silly, monkey, tree (h) clean, green

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Page 94 Test 1. snake – a-e rain – ai day – ay trail – ai bake – a-e away – ay fake – a-e play – ay 2. (a) take (b) stay (c) plain (d) wait (e) make (f) today 3. (a) He, three (b) puppy, tree (c) monkey 4. (a) lots, fish (b) sheep 5. (a) glasses (b) pyjamas (c) jeans 6. (a)–(b) Teacher check 7. (a) West Springs (b) September

Read 1. Lots of people fall into rivers and dams. Lives can be saved if people learn to swim. Babies can learn to swim. People can drown in the sea and in pools. Water activities are fun if you’re not frightened. Learning to swim saves lives. Read and think 1.–3. Teacher check

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Page 99 Think Teacher check Page 100 1. (a) someone, sailboat, upstairs, today, playtime, sunshine, strawberry, scarecrow,

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

47


ANSWERS

Page 101

Page 103 2. (b) (i) (iii) (v) 3. (a) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (b) (i) (iii) (v)

rode (ii) tow know (iv) sew throne can + not he + will could + not there + is, there + has will + not won’t (ii) it’s Here’s (iv) Don’t We’ve

4. (a) (b) 5. (a) (b) (c) (d) 6. (a) (c) (e)

rode, road know, no we + have he + is, he + has do + not she + will parties (b) lollies tries (d) ponies spies

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

3. (a) swimming (b) surfing (c) canoeing (d) diving (e) fishing (f) sailing 4. Answers will vary.

Page 104 4. (a) (c) (e) (g) (i)

babies puppies lollies bunnies parties

Narrative 2 Our pets: pages 110–124 Page 111

(b) (d) (f) (h) (j)

daisies tries spies ponies berries

Page 105

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Teac he r

(b) Answers may include: (i) football, footpath, footprint, footstep (ii) toothbrush, toothpaste, toothpick, toothless (iii) anywhere, anytime, anyone, anyhow, anybody, anything (iv) raincoat, rainbow, rainfall 2. (a) for (b) sun (c) one (d) been (e) toe

Teacher check Page 112

1. Our pets 2. (a) at school (b) Jake and his pet (c) his teacher, his class and their pets 3. (a) It was pet day. (b) Jake’s pet was scary and looked as if it might bite. 4. Does it have a name? Another name? What might that be? 5. Jake’s pet was a crocodile.

lied – ie fry – y bike – i-e tie – ie by – y dried – ie (ii) cry (iv) mine (vi) spy (viii) like

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my – y ride – i-e dry – y spy – y line – i-e bite – i-e (b) (i) hide (iii) pie (v) tried (vii) why (ix) lie (c) (i) mine (iii) fine (v) like 2. (a) row – ow throw – ow throne – o-e toad – oa no – o go – o rose – o-e know – ow

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(c) and, but 3. (a) My bike is old but it can still go fast. (b) I love my teddy because it is soft and cuddly. (c) He was playing on his computer when Mum called him.

Page 113

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Teacher check ©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 106 1. (a) shine – i-e spied – ie 1. i and, but, and, but o f o r ev eand, wbut,p u r p sesonl y• wide – i-e • try –y r 2. (a) and (b) and

Page 102

Read 1. green 2. yes 3. no 4. Darwin 5. Miss Read and think 1. a crocodile 2. They saw his pet. 3. no 4. (a) – (b) Teacher check 5. It had lots of teeth and she thought it might bite. 6. It was on a lead. 7. (a) yes (b) It says that some pets had feathers.

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 107

Teacher check

Page 108

Teacher check

Page 109 Test 1. tide – i-e ride – i-e lie – ie 2. (a) drive 3. boat – oa hope – o-e throw – ow

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

try – y fried – ie my – y (b) line groan – oa tow – ow moan – oa

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS 7. (a) feet (b) teeth (c) children (d) men (e) geese (f) people

Page 114 Think Teacher check

Page 119

Page 115

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (b) (i) ugly (ii) green, leathery (iii) new (iv) hairless, scary (v) curly (vi) tall

Page 116

3. 12 4. (a) mouse (b) rabbit (c) dog (d) kitten (e) snake (f) frog (g) puppy (h) bird 5. (a) Answers may include: fish, tadpoles, turtles, snails, frogs (b) Teacher check

Page 124 5. (a) feet (b) teeth (c) men (d) geese 6. (a) scary, green (b) curly (c) ugly (d) leathery (e) new 7. (a) rich, richer, richest (b) poor, poorer, poorest (c) light, lighter, lightest (d) new, newer, newest (e) short, shorter, shortest (f) green, greener, greenest

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1. paws – claws, there – hair, tame – name, terrier – scarier, bite – might Teacher check additional rhyming words 2. Answers may include: (a) fish (b) dogs, cats, horses, cows, monkeys (c) birds

2. (a) pair, there (b) where, fairy (c) hair, fair (d) stairs, there 3. (a) wand (b) swan (c) wash (d) watch 4. feathery – leathery, bread – head, ready – steady, spreading – treading

Page 120P © R. I . C. ubl i cat i oReport ns 2 2. Teacher check pages 125–138 •f orr evi e phigher, ur p osesSpiders: onl y • 3. w (a) high, highest

Page 117

w ww

1. blue – ue true – ue glue – ue clue – ue untrue – ue 2. (a) grew (b) crew (c) chew (d) screw (e) drew (f) brew (g) threw (h) blew 3. moon, boot, shoot, cool, spoon, roof, pool, room 4. (a) chair, there (b) Where, pair (c) Somewhere, stairs

. te

(b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i)

bright, brighter, brightest warm, warmer, warmest poor, poorer, poorest dark, darker, darkest small, smaller, smallest green, greener, greenest deep, deeper, deepest full, fuller, fullest

Page 126

Teacher check Page 127

m . u

1. Spiders 2. Arachnids 3. Answers may include: (a) They have two body parts – abdomen and thorax, eight legs, skeleton on outside, can be many colours and females are usually bigger than the males (b) In almost every habitat in the world. (c) eat insects, spin webs, lay eggs 4. (a) spiders (b) insects, useful

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 118

Page 121

Teacher check

Page 122

Teacher check

Page 123

5. (a) swan (b) watch (c) wand (d) swamp (e) wasp (f) wash 6. (a) bread – head, ready – steady, weather – feather, treading – spreading, leathery – feathery (b) ‘ea’ should be circled R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

Test 1. blue – ue moon – oo pool – oo blue – ew untrue – ue crew – ew screw – ew loot – oo

grew – ew glue – ue clue – ue boot – oo soon – oo true – ue chew – ew threw – ew

Page 128 Read 1. (a) two (b) eight (c) skeleton (d) female, male

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

49


ANSWERS Read and think 1. (a) no (b) yes (c) no (d) yes 2. Teacher check

Page 133

Page 129

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Page 130

1. (a) web (b) legs (c) thorax (d) eggs (e) spider (f) baby (g) arachnid 2. Male – billy, rooster, ram, lion, tiger, stallion, bull Female – cow, hen, tigress, ewe, mare, nanny, lioness 3. abdomen, legs, skeleton, spinneret, thorax, web 4. male – female, big – small, hot – cold, wet – dry, old – young, fast – slow

Page 134

2. (a) with (b) (c) around (d) (e) up 3. (a) off (b) (c) out (d) (e) over (f) 4. Teacher check

by through

down outside after

Page 135 Teacher check Page 136 Teacher check

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Think Spiders – 8 legs, no antenna, no wings, 2 body parts, can spin webs Insects – 6 legs, has antenna, usually have wings, 3 body parts Both – can be useful, found in many places, different colours, usually small, can be harmful, many different types

1. (a) in (b) by (c) under (d) on (e) next to (f) between (g) in front of Teacher check picture.

Page 137 ©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Test 1. i Teacher •f orr ev ewcheckp ur posesonl y• 2. (a) What (b) Who

. te

1. Teacher check 2. (a) they, any, many (b) the, they, them (c) was, saw, the, one, any Page 132 3. (a) What (b) (c) Who (d) (e) What 4. (a) they (b) (c) some (d) (e) was (f) 5. Teacher check

50

Where When

When them some with by

(b) one (b) around (d) among

Page 138

m . u

w ww

Page 131

(c) 3. (a) (c) 4. (a) (c)

o c . che e r o t r s super 5. (a) under (b) next to (c) on (d) between Teacher check picture. 6. (a) on (b) up (c) inside (d) below

you done one

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book B

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

The English Workbook - Teachers Resource Books: Book B - Ages 7+  

The workbooks, designed to improve and develop students' literacy skills, consist of ten units of work, each focused on one of the following...

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