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Teachers resource book – Book A (6 years+)

Copyright Notice

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2012 Copyright© Diane Henderson and Rosemary Morris 2012 ISBN 978-1-921750-79-3 RIC–6355

Titles available in this series: Teachers resource book – Book A (6 years+) Teachers resource book – Book B (7 years+) Teachers resource book – Book C (8 years+) Teachers resource book – Book D (9 years+) Teachers resource book – Book E (10 years+) Teachers resource book – Book F (11 years+) Teachers resource book – Book G (12 years+)

Also available in this series:

Except as allowed under the Copyright Act 1968, any other use (including digital and online uses and the creation of overhead transparencies or posters) or any use by or for other people (including by or for other teachers, students or institutions) is prohibited. If you want a licence to do anything outside the scope of the BLM licence above, please contact the Publisher.

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This information is provided to clarify the limits of this licence and its interaction with the Copyright Act. For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase. Name of Purchaser:

Date of Purchase:

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The English workbook – Book A (6 years+) The English workbook – Book B (7 years+) The English workbook – Book C (8 years+) The English workbook – Book D (9 years+) The English workbook – Book E (10 years+) The English workbook – Book F (11 years+) The English workbook – Book G (12 years+)

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A number of pages in this book are worksheets. The publisher licenses the individual teacher who purchased this book to photocopy these pages to hand out to students in their own classes.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• School Order# (if applicable):

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Signature of Purchaser:

R.I.C. Publications® follows the guidelines for punctuation and grammar as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 2002, 6th edn. Note, however, that teachers should use their own guide if there is a conflict.

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Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


INTRODUCTION This teachers resource book provides information to support the implementation of The English workbook – Book A, designed to develop and improve students’ literacy skills, focusing on procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. The following sections are included within each format. • vocabulary • speaking and listening • proofreading and editing • language features • spelling • reading comprehension • student evaluation • writing activities

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Features of The English workbook – Teachers resource book • Descriptions of the five different writing formats • Photocopiable planning outlines for the five writing formats • Speaking and listening notes and photocopiable charts • Additional information about vocabulary, useful reference lists and spelling rules • Clear and concise explanations of the included language features • Photocopiable student editing and proofreading checklists specific to each writing format • Comprehensive integrated activity sheets provide cross-curricular extension to stimulate student interest • Class evaluation sheets to record information about student understanding and performance • Answers for student activities

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Introduction .......................................................................... 1 Writing format descriptions ..........................................2–3 Planning outlines.............................................................3–8 Editing and proofreading checklists .........................9–14 Class evaluation record sheet ..................................15–16 Speaking and listening ..............................................17–19 Speaking skills .......................................................... 17 Listening skills ........................................................... 17 Oral presentations .................................................... 17 Speaking chart .......................................................... 18 Listening chart .......................................................... 19 Vocabulary .......................................................................... 20 Compound words...................................................... 20 Homographs .............................................................. 20 Homophones ............................................................. 20 Synonyms................................................................... 20 Antonyms ................................................................... 20 Overused words........................................................ 20 Find a better word (good‚ nice‚ then) .................... 21 Find a better word (got‚ said‚ went)....................... 22 Spelling .........................................................................23–25 Syllables ..................................................................... 23

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Plurals...................................................................23–24 Adding suffixes (1-1-1 rule, dropping final ‘e’, adding ‘ly’) .......24–25 Language features .......................................................26–29 Parts of speech (verbs, adverbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions) ..............................26–27 Punctuation (capital letters, commas, apostrophes for possession, grammatical contractions, quotation marks, paragraphs) .................................................. 27 Sentence beginnings ........................................................ 28 Question words .................................................................. 29 Integrated activities ....................................................30–34 Graphic organisers......................................................35–40 Mind maps ................................................................. 35 Flow chart .................................................................. 36 Senses chart ............................................................. 37 Tree chart ................................................................... 38 Semantic web ........................................................... 39 Reading journal ......................................................... 40 Scope and sequence chart .............................................. 41 Answers ........................................................................42–49

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CONTENTS

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

1


WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

1. Procedure

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The main purpose of a procedure is to direct, inform or explain how something is done. It usually includes: • a goal – tells what is to be done • a list of requirements • steps – a list of instructions in a particular order • a test – to see if the task was completed successfully. A procedure uses: • command verbs • present tense • short, clear statements. A procedure may be written in the form of instructions for a task such as playing a game, constructing something, operating an appliance, using a reference book, dealing with a problem, or as a recipe or an experiment.

2. Recount

The purpose of a recount is to retell past events in time order. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the recount is about • a setting – who was involved and where and when the events happened • the events – what happened in chronological order • an ending or comments – how the events ended and what the writer thinks about it. A recount uses: • the past tense • paragraphs to separate significant events. A recount may be written in the form of a diary, a letter, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account, a biography or autobiography.

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3. Exposition (Persuasive text)

An exposition is written or spoken to persuade others to think or do something. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the exposition is about • an overview – a brief summary of what the writer thinks about the topic • reasons – the arguments to persuade people • a conclusion – a final comment or summing up. An exposition uses: • persuasive language • facts to support the arguments • a new paragraph for each new argument. An exposition may be written in the form of an essay, a letter, an advertisement, a review, a speech or an editorial.

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WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

4. Narrative

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The main purpose of a narrative is to describe a series of events and circumstances often involving fictitious characters. It usually includes: • a title – gets the attention of the reader and indicates what the story is about • an orientation – introduces the main characters, the setting or location, the time of the story and the initiating event • a complication – a problem which involves the main character(s) • a resolution – how the problem is solved. A narrative uses: • descriptive vocabulary • interesting characters • suitable paragraphing. A narrative may be written in the form of a story, a play, a fairytale, a myth, a legend, a science fiction work, a ballad or a poem.

5. Report

The main purpose of a report is to give facts clearly without unnecessary information or opinions. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the report is about • a classification – provides information about the focus of the report • a description – expands on the focus • a conclusion – a summary or comment. A report uses: • facts, not opinions • no unnecessary information • the third person • the timeless present tense. A report may be written in the form of a review, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account or a scientific report.

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The following pages (4–8) are photocopiable planning outlines for each of the five writing formats, designed for students to use when planning their writing. They provide a structure for writing and include elements unique to each format. The planning outlines can be used in conjunction with the ‘Editing and proofreading checklists’ (pages 9–13) to encourage students to review and correct their writing. Teachers can assess and then record their students’ understanding of the elements of each writing format on the ‘Class evaluation record’ on pages 15–16.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

3


Planning a procedure Name:

Date:

Title: Goal: (What you need to do)

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Needs:

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Steps: (In order)

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Test: (How you’ll know if your procedure works)

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Planning a recount Name:

Date:

Title:

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Orientation: Who? Where? When? Why?

Events:

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Ending:

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

5


Planning an exposition Name:

Date:

Title:

Arguments:

2.

3.

5.

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4.

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Conclusion:

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1.

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Introductory statement: (What I think)

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Planning a narrative Name:

Date:

Title: Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Where are they? S When did it happen?

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Who is the story about?

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Events: © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (What happened?) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Complication: (What was the problem?)

o c . Resolution: Ending: che e r o (How was the problem fixed?) (How did the t r s story end?) super

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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Planning a report Name:

Date:

Title:

Description:

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Classification: (What is it?)

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Conclusion: (What I think about it)

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EDITING AND PROOFREADING CHECKLISTS

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The primary purpose of writing and the use of language is communication—to get one’s message or ideas across to another person in an effective manner. It is important that the message is clear so that there are no misunderstandings. Ensuring that there are no barriers to effective communication, due to poor spelling and grammar or incorrect structure, is vital. Provided on the following pages is a series of checklists for each of the five writing formats: procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. Each of the writing formats has its own particular structure or elements which help the students communicate their ideas within the given format. The checklists allow students to ensure that these elements are included and that they have thoroughly checked and edited their work for any errors. The checklists, which list specific points, provide an opportunity for students and their peers to evaluate their writing and develop their writing and editing skills. Ideally, providing this opportunity for self-evaluation will allow students to develop a habit of always editing and proofing their work.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

9


Checking a procedure Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Did you say what you wanted to do or make? ..........

yes

no

Needs: Did you make a list of what was needed? ..................

yes

no

Steps:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

r o e t s Bo r Are the steps easye to follow? ...................................... p o u k Are they in the right order? ......................................... S Were any steps missed out?........................................

Test:

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Goal:

Did you say how it would look or work? ....................

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Words

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© R. I . CSpelling .Publ i cat i ons Did you check your spelling? .................................................... yes •f or r evi e w pur posesonl y • no

. te verbs? .................................................. oyes Did you use command c . che e r o r st super

no

Punctuation

10

Have you put a capital letter at the start of every sentence?....

yes

no

Did you remember full stops? ..................................................

yes

no

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Checking a recount Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r Did you tell when it happened? ................................................ e p o u k Did you tell where it happened? ............................................... S Events:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you tell who was there?......................................................

Did you tell what happened? ....................................................

yes

no

Were the events in the right order? ..........................................

yes

no

yes

no

Ending:

Did you tell how it ended? ........................................................

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons yes •f orr evi ew p u r p o s e s o n l y • Spelling

Did you say how you felt about it? ...........................................

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used capital letters for names? ................................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops? .........................................................

yes

no

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Words

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

. tinteresting words? ................................................ o Did you usee c . che e Did you use any ‘time’ words?.................................................. r o t r s super Punctuation

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

11


Checking an exposition Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Introductory statement:

r o e t s B r e oo Did you say what you thought about it? .................................. p u k Arguments: S

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you state what the topic was? ............................................

Did you explain your ideas clearly? .........................................

yes

no

Did you start with your strongest one? ....................................

yes

no

yes

no

Conclusion:

Did you say what you thought at the end? ..............................

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no

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

no

Punctuation

12

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops and question marks?.......................

yes

no

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Checking a narrative Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Orientation:

r o e t s Bo r Did you tell when it happened? ................................................ e p o u k Did you tell where it happened? ............................................... S Complication and events:

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

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Did you say who was in the story? ...........................................

Did you say what the problem was? ........................................

yes

no

Did you say what happened?....................................................

yes

no

yes

no

Resolution and ending:

Did you tell how the problem was fixed? ................................

yes © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y• Spelling

Did you tell what happened at the end? ..................................

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

no

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Have you used capital letters for names? ................................

yes

no

Have you used a capital letter for ‘I’? .......................................

yes

no

Have you used full stops? .........................................................

yes

no

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Words

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

. tinteresting words? ................................................ o Did you usee c . ch e Have you used good describing words?.................................. r er o t s super Punctuation

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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Checking a report Name:

Date:

Title:

Writing Classification:

r o e t s B r e oo Description: p u k Did you write interesting S things? .............................................

yes

no

yes

no

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Have you said what the report is about? .................................

Is your information true?........................................................... Conclusion:

Did you say what you thought about it? ..................................

yes

no

yes

no

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Words

yes

no

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Did you check your spelling? ....................................................

o c . Did you use interesting words? ................................................ yes ch e r er o st super

no

Punctuation

14

Does every sentence start with a capital letter? ......................

yes

no

Did you remember full stops? ..................................................

yes

no

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Class evaluation record

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Names

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Procedure Understands the format Uses clear concise language Sequences steps logically

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Self-edits Recount Understands the format

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Sequences events Uses past tense Self-edits Exposition Understands the format Presents persuasive arguments Supports arguments Self-edits

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Names

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Class evaluation record

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Narrative

Understands the format

Uses descriptive language

Imaginative ideas

Self-edits

Report

Understands the format

Accurate information

Self-edits

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SPEAKING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING SKILLS Students need to have a sense of audience and to learn how to engage and communicate effectively. The ‘Are you a good speaker?’ chart on page 18 can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It focuses attention on the preparation and presentation of information as well as oral communication skills. Opportunities are provided for students to organise and communicate their ideas to a partner, a small group or the class. Students should be encouraged to set individual speaking goals on which to focus and to evaluate their performance.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u LISTENING SKILLS S

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Providing opportunities for students to engage in active listening is essential, but some students may need to have explicit instruction to understand the requirements of effective listening. The ‘Are you a good listener?’ chart on page 19 can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It is suggested that teacher and students set a goal—e.g. sitting still—as a focus for a particular lesson and then evaluate how well this goal was achieved.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS

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Purpose 1. To inform the audience of the views, facts and news of the speaker. 2. To influence the audience to support the speaker’s perspective or cause. 3. To justify an action or proposed action. 4. To entertain a specific audience.

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An oral presentation is a talk or address delivered to an audience.

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Features 1. Ideas and facts must have a logical sequence. 2. Format may include: • introduction • description • conclusion 3. May include some visual presentation (objects and photographs). 4. Personal experience and humour may be used to maintain interest. 5. Short sentences may be used to enable members of the audience to remain focused and attentive.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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Are you a good speaker?

Good speakers …

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Organise: S • something to show Plan:

• interesting information

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Choose:

• their talk

Present:

• their ideas and tell who‚ when‚ where and © Rwhat‚ . I . C . Publ i cat i ons why

Look:

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Speak:

• • • •

at the audience good and stand tall interested confident

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Are you a good listener?

Good listeners:

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Look S at the speaker Sit still

Listen carefully

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about what the speaker is saying

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

19


VOCABULARY

An increased vocabulary develops the students’ ability to communicate their ideas, making their writing and speaking more descriptive and interesting to read or listen to.

COMPOUND WORDS ‘Compound’ comes from the Latin meaning ‘putting together’. Each part of a compound word must be a word that can stand alone. For example: toothbrush‚ mother-in-law Note: As language changes, many words that were previously hyphenated no longer need a hyphen. Students should be encouraged to consult a recent dictionary.

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HOMOGRAPHS

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Homo – same graph – write Homographs are words that are written in the same way, but have different meanings, origins and sometimes are pronounced differently. Homographs that sound the same include: sack, ruler, pupil, spring, squash, bear, saw, felt, train, fast, hold, park, club, duck, cape, chop, coach, grave, cricket, march, right, ring, table, watch, last, kind, cross, blind, iron

Homographs that are pronounced differently include:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons HOMOPHONES •–f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Homo – same phone sound row, subject, present, object, wind, wound, bow, tear, record, desert, close, number

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SYNONYMS

Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning.

ANTONYMS

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Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelt differently. For example: one/won‚ for/four‚ here/hear‚ write/right‚ sun/son‚ to/two/too

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Antonyms are words with the opposite meaning. Finding synonyms and antonyms helps students to develop a wider vocabulary and allows them to write more precisely and interestingly. Some antonyms are formed by adding a prefix; for example: un, dis, in, im, mis.

OVERUSED WORDS

Students should be encouraged to communicate more exact meaning by avoiding the overuse of some words; e.g. ‘asked’ and ‘said’. Words that can be used instead of ‘asked’ include: enquired, requested, queried, questioned, begged, quizzed, appealed, demanded Words that can be used instead of ‘said’ include: spoke, uttered, yelled, shouted, whispered, cried, sobbed, commented, replied, stated, talked, voiced, announced, remarked, repeated, breathed, declared, recited, protested 20

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Find a better word

good

nice

then

r o e t s Bo • before r • lovely e p ok u S • interesting • beautiful • after

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• well behaved

• excellent

• kind

• during

• fine

• enjoyable

• at last

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Find a better word

got

said

went

r o e t s Bo r • ran e p ok u • was given S • cried • walked • yelled

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• became

• won

• replied

• hurried

• received

• spoke

• travelled

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SPELLING

Because of the complexity of the English language, there are a number of exceptions to most of the spelling rules. After students have learned a rule, they should be encouraged to consolidate this learning by seeking exceptions to the rule.

SYLLABLES

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S swim/mer

con/test

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Breaking words into syllables is very useful for pronouncing and spelling words. A syllable has one vowel sound. The following is a list of rules to determine how words are divided into syllables. 1. When two consonants (same or different) come between two vowels, divide between the consonants.

2. When there is only one consonant between two vowels, divide before the consonant. fa/mous

mu/sic

3. When consonants make one speech sound, they are kept together. pro/phet

me/thod

dol/phin

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons me/tre sad/dle •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 5. Prefixes and suffixes are usually separated from the base word.

4. The letters ‘re’ and ‘le’ cannot stand alone at the end of a word and must take the preceding consonant.

sub/mit

dis/o/bey

6. Compound words divide between the small words.

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PLURALS

rain/coat

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la/dy-/in-/wait/ing

• Most nouns form their plural by just adding ‘s’.

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joy/ful

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• Words ending in ‘ch’, ‘sh’, ‘s’, ‘x’, and ‘z’ usually add ‘es’ to make the plural word easier to pronounce. churches, wishes, buses, boxes, quizzes exceptions include: stomachs, monarchs, matriarchs, patriarchs

Note: The ‘ch’ is pronounced like ‘ck’ in these words, so the ‘es’ is not needed for ease of pronunciation.

• Many words ending in ‘o’ also add ‘es’ in the plural form. tomatoes, potatoes, heroes, echoes But there are numerous exceptions, including words ending with ‘oo’ and some words associated with music. In many recent dictionaries, both endings are included. ‘oo’ words: bamboos, kangaroos, cockatoos, zoos, shampoos music: banjos, solos, duos, trios, pianos, sopranos, radios, altos, cellos, videos others: ratios, zeros, merinos, silos R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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SPELLING • Nouns ending in ‘f’ or ‘fe’ change the ‘f’ or ‘fe’ to ‘v’ and add ‘es’. knives, wolves, halves, selves Note: Both forms of some words are accepted: dwarves or dwarfs, wharves or wharfs, hooves or hoofs.

Exceptions include: words ending with ‘ff’: stuffs, puffs, skiffs, cliffs, staffs, sheriffs others: reefs, gulfs, chiefs, roofs, waifs

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• Nouns ending with a consonant and a ‘y’ change the ‘y’ to ‘i’ before adding ‘es’. babies, puppies, flies, spies, libraries

tooth – teeth oasis – oases person – people goose – geese parenthesis – parentheses criterion – criteria ox – oxen cherub – cherubim, cherubs

woman – women foot – feet die – dice cactus – cacti, cactuses radius – radii, radiuses fungus – fungi, funguses axis – axes crisis – crises emphasis – emphases louse – lice medium – media, mediums phenomenon – phenomena sphinx – sphinges, sphinxes child – children mouse – mice, mouses (computer)

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• Some plurals are made by changing some letters of the base noun or by adding an unusual suffix.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons fish, cod, salmon, trout, deer, sheep, reindeer, swine, elk, dozen, score, innings, gallows •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Some nouns have no singular form; many of them are thought of as ‘a pair of’.

• Some words may have the same singular and plural forms.

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trousers, bathers, spectacles, glasses, pants, tweezers, pliers, clippers, scissors, secateurs, bellows, tongs, measles, billiards

ADDING SUFFIXES

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A suffix can be described as a group of letters added to the end of a word. Suffixes changes the meaning of words. Examples of suffixes include:

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able, age, al, an, ance, ary, ate, en, ence, er, ery, ese, est, ful, fy, hood, ible, ic, ion, ish, ist, ive, less, ling, ly, ment, most, ness, or, ous, ship

• Suffixes are usually just added to the end of the word.

work, worked, workable, working, worker

• Sometimes the spelling of the base word changes. shut–shutting, happy–happily, shape–shaping

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SPELLING The one-one-one rule for adding suffixes beginning with a vowel requires understanding of: • consonants and vowels • short and long vowels • syllables.

one-one-one rule When adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to words of one syllable, with one short vowel sound followed by one consonant, double that consonant.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S shop–shopper

cut–cutting

refitting

babysitter

outrigger

dropping the final ‘e’

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Note: Words of more than one syllable with a prefix or which are compound words also double the final consonant.

Another rule for adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to a word, usually with a long vowel sound and ending with a silent ‘e’, is that the ‘e’ is dropped before adding the suffix. shape – shaping

close – closing

Note: An interesting exception is ‘likable’. Macquarie dictionary prefers ‘likeable’, but also acknowledges ‘likable’. A simple way for students to remember part of this rule is:

© R. I C Pwhen ub l i catot i ons ‘e’. goes. away ‘ing’ comes stay orr evi ew pur posesonl y• adding ‘ly’•f ‘ly’ is usually just added to words. love – lovely

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quick – quickly

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There are some exceptions: 1. Whole – wholly. The ‘e’ is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 2. True – truly, due – duly. There are already two vowels at the end of these words so one is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 3. Horrible – horribly, simple – simply. These are two examples of words ending in ‘le’ after a consonant. The ‘e’ is changed to ‘y’.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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LANGUAGE FEATURES PARTS OF SPEECH Understanding the different parts of speech will help students construct effective sentences.

Verbs Verbs are words used to show actions or states of being or having; e.g. eat, was, has. Command verbs are imperatives and are often used in procedures at the beginning of a sentence; e.g. ‘Roast the meat’. Verb tense: There are three basic tenses. However, because there are so many irregular verbs in English, these can be complex.

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the present walk walks see sees

the future will walk should walk will see should see

Adverbs

Note: The future and past tenses often use auxiliary or ‘helping’ verbs to form a compound verb; e.g. have written, can open, may visit, were asleep.

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the past regular walked has walked irregular saw has seen

Adverbs are words that can modify or enhance the meaning of verbs; e.g. He swam slowly, I sang yesterday. There are adverbs of time, place and manner. time; e.g. tomorrow place; e.g. outside manner; e.g. quickly

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Nouns

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Pronouns

Pronouns are words substituted for nouns; e.g. We asked them to help us.

Adjectives

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Nouns are words used to name people, places, things, feelings or ideas; e.g. boy, school, book, joy, courtesy. Proper nouns are used to name particular people, places or things. Proper nouns are written with capital letters; e.g. John, Singapore, February.

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Adjectives modify or enhance the meaning of nouns and, less commonly, pronouns; e.g. deserted playground, lucky me.

Prepositions

Prepositions are words that show the relationship between nouns and/or pronouns in the same sentence. Common prepositions include: during, for, between, in, up, on. He rode through the park. Sally slept until dawn. I would like one of those.

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LANGUAGE FEATURES Conjunctions Conjunctions are joining words. They can join different language units. one word with another one phrase with another one clause with another one sentence with another

PUNCTUATION

hot or cold on the land and in the air sitting on the beach while watching the birds There were dark clouds in the sky so I took my umbrella.

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Punctuation is used to clarify meaning and assist with reading and comprehension.

Capital letters

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Capital letters are needed for: • sentence beginnings; e.g. I like my teacher. She is kind to me. • proper nouns; e.g. people’s names (Bob Brown), names of places (Pacific Ocean), days of the week (Tuesday), months (May), countries (New Zealand), nationalities (French), languages (Russian), religious faiths (Christian), holidays and festivals (Passover). • titles; e.g. Red Cross, The sound of music, Note: R.I.C. Publications® employs minimal capitalisation for titles of books and other publications as recommended by the Style ‘Goldilocks and the three bears’. manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

Commas

Commas are used to separate items in a list or series; e.g. I like ice-cream, carrots, apples and chocolate.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Apostrophes are used to show that something belongs to someone or something. • f o rr e vbei e wp u r p orule se sito nl y The placement of the apostrophe can challenging but the simple is that is placed after• the owner or Apostrophes for possession

owners. (The ‘tail’ of the apostrophe ‘points’ to the owner[s].) the girls’ dresses (more than one girl) the babies’ shoes (more than one baby)

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Grammatical contractions

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the girl’s dresses (one girl) the baby’s shoes (one baby)

Grammatical contractions are words that have been made by joining and shortening two words. An apostrophe is used in place of the missing letters.

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Quotation marks

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he will – he’ll it has – it’s

Quotation marks (inverted commas) are used to enclose quoted speech or thoughts. Single or double quotation marks are acceptable but must be used consistently. ‘Please feed that noisy cat’, Mum shouted. ‘I fed him yesterday, it’s Ben’s turn’, Adam replied.

Note: R.I.C. Publications® punctuates speech as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

Quoted text must start on a new line, unless the same speaker is continuing.

Paragraphs Paragraphs separate text into meaningful sections to facilitate reading and understanding. Paragraphs start on a new line. A space is often left between paragraphs. R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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Sentence beginnings

• Once upon a time ... • Later that day ...

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• On my way home ...

• On the weekend ... • For my birthday ... • Walking along ...

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©R I . C.Publ i cat i ons • Yelling loudly ....

•f rr evi ew pur posesonl y• • While Io was ...

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• Looking around ...

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• Shivering with fright ... • •

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• Running towards ... • Hearing a loud noise ... • Slowly he ... 28

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Question words

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When? What? © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES These are a series of activities designed for each specific writing format as it appears in the student workbook. They will hopefully provide ideas as to how the formats can be used in relation to a variety of subjects other than English.

Procedure 1 – At the park Health 1. 2. 3.

The arts

List some activities you could do at a park. Circle 1. your favourite one. Discuss and list some important health and safety 2. rules when playing at a park; e.g. wearing a hat. Draw some healthy foods you could take to eat at a 3. park.

Draw your favourite piece of playground equipment in a park. Design a poster to encourage people to visit a local park. Compile a list of songs about playing or playground equipment; e.g. ‘My new playground’. Choose one to learn.

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1.

Design a new piece of playground equipment. Label each feature. You could include: – a slide – a seesaw – a cubby – monkey bars – a climbing frame. Draw a map of how to get to your local park from your house.

3.

4.

Design a suitable garden for a park. You could include: – a pond – flowers – trees – benches – stepping stones – paths. Design a playground for an animal. Think about their size and movements and things they would like to play with.

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Design and technology

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• Recount 1 –• The boat trip Mathematics

Health

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Design and technology

English 1. 2.

Write an acrostic poem on ‘boats’. Find as many stories and books about boats as you can. Read the most interesting one. Choose your favourite type of boat and make a list of words to describe it. Tell about: – what it’s made from – its size – its colour – how it moves – how fast it will go – its shape – its features – how it is made.

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Design a boat for yourself. You could include: – portholes – fishing rods – a cabin – seats – a pool – an engine – sails – an anchor – a rudder.

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2.

Talk about safety on boats. Make a list of what you would need to have on a boat to make it safe. Discuss safety near water. List as many water safety rules as you can.

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Using the library or internet, research forms of transport. Compile a list of the types of transport you found and sort them into land, sea and air transport. Tally them to see which form is used the most. Discuss the forms of transport you use. Keep a tally for a week to see how often you use each one.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Exposition 1 – Pets The arts 1.

Make a poster for a lost kitten or puppy. Don’t forget 1. to include: – a drawing/photo – its name – colour – size – age 2. – features – your contact details. List as many songs about animals as you can. Choose a favourite and learn it. Bring a pet to school and have everyone draw it.

3.

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Health 1. 2. 3.

Choose a pet you would like to own. Design a home for your pet. Include: – a food bowl – a water bowl – a bed – some toys. Design a play area for your pet. You may need: – some climbing things – some toys – things to jump over – somewhere to hide – something to chase – somewhere to swim – trees or shade.

Discuss the things you would need to do to care for a pet. Make a list. Visit your local vet and ask for some pamphlets on pet care. Talk about being safe around pets. Include: – washing your hands – not teasing pets – handling pets carefully.

Mathematics 1. 2.

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Design and technology

Survey your class to see which pets they have. Graph the results. Keep a record of how much it costs to feed a pet for a week. Compare with a friend who has a different pet. Measure and weigh your pet and compare the results with a friend.

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Narrative 1 – I’ve lost my baby English Design and technology

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The arts 1.

2.

Design a place to keep a baby chick safe. Remember it must be warm, protected from other animals and from the weather. Design a farm you would like to live on. Include: – a farmhouse – barns – sheds – paddocks – equipment – your favourite animals. Use crushed eggshells to make a picture. Make a chicken mask. Dramatise ‘I’ve lost my baby’. Add more animals if you wish. Research to find some songs about farms and farm animals. Learn one; e.g. ‘Old MacDonald’. Find a book about farms and design a new cover for it. Make a collage using animal pictures from magazines or newspapers. Design your own background.

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Compile a list of animals and their babies. 1. Write your own ‘lost animal’ story. List as many farm animals as you can. Make 2. up a poem about your favourite one. Use the list to make up a word search for a friend to solve. Choose two of the farm animals and write a ‘What am I?’ riddle.

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Design a poster for a lost chick. Include: – colour – size – name – features – where lost – your details. Decorate hard boiled eggs using crayons (wax resist), paints or food dye.

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Report 1 – Apples Health and physical education

Science

1.

1.

2.

The arts 1. 2. 3.

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Design a poster to advertise your favourite fruit. Make an apple template then use it to design a pattern. Make a collage using pictures or drawings of different fruits.

English

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Write a story pretending you are an apple. Write an acrostic poem about your favourite fruit. Choose different fruits and compile a list of interesting adjectives to describe them.

3. 4.

3.

1.

Use the title ‘Beautiful butterfly’ and see how

3.

Choose an insect and make up a ‘What am I?’ riddle. ‘Butterfly’ is a compound word. Make a list of compound words to do with colour; e.g. ‘blueberry, rosebud’. Pretend you are an insect and write a story about yourself. Mime insects and see if your classmates can guess what you are. Use the insects from your word sleuth and put them into alphabetical order. Make a word snake using ten insects; e.g.

4.

Butterflies are ‘symmetrical’. Find out what that means. Collect pictures of other things that are symmetrical. Count the insects you see in a day. Graph the results. Use a bar graph. Ask your class their favourite insects. Tally and graph the results using a pie graph.

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smaller words yous can find in it; e.g. © R. I . C.Pubmany l i c at i on ‘butter, but, fly’. 2. r Compile list ofs insects use some •f orr evi ew pu poas e oand nl y •of them to make a word sleuth.

Research, plan and draw the life cycle of a butterfly. Research, plan and draw the life cycles of other insects. Find out what butterflies and caterpillars eat. Butterflies fly, caterpillars crawl. Write a list of other ways insects move. List as many insects as you can for each movement.

Mathematics 1.

4.

5.

Procedure 2 – Beautiful butterfly Science 1. 2.

3.

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Visit a local greengrocer and see how may types of apples are being sold. Compile a list. Add any other types of apples you know. Research to compare these apples using colour, size, weight, crispness and taste. Using a variety of apples, conduct experiments to see which go brown first, and then see what happens if the apple is dipped in lemon juice. Apples grow on trees. Compile a list of other fruits that grow on trees. Research how other fruits grow and compile lists of each. Try growing some fruits.

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Find a dessert recipe using apples. Make it and see if you like it. Make a list of other desserts using apples. Compile a list of other things made using apples; e.g. juice.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Recount 2 – A day at the beach Science 1. 2. 3.

The arts

Collect seashells then sort them into different categories such as colour, size, shape and type. Research and list beach flora. Compare and contrast to garden plants. Research and list beach fauna. What features do animals need to live on a seashore?

1. 2. 3. 4.

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Make a list of games suitable for playing at the beach. Compile a list of water safety rules. Discuss keeping healthy at the beach. Include sun protection, enough liquids, care with animals and plants, broken glass, etc. Think about and discuss the facilities needed at the beach. Include: – toilets – changing rooms – rubbish bins – shelters – picnic facilities.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

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Health and physical education 1. 2. 3.

Use some beach sand to create a collage. Dye some beach sand and make a sand dome. Design some safety signs for the beach. Design an invitation for a beach party. Don’t forget to include: – date – place – time – what to bring – what to wear. Design a ‘funky’ outfit to wear to the beach. Collect some beach pictures from magazines and make a collage. Design an interesting hat to wear to the beach. Design a beach shirt. Make it colourful.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The arts • f o r r e v i e w p ur posesonl y• Compile a list of wild and tame animals. 1. Choose a pet and mime it. See if your classmates can

Exposition 2 – The best pets Society and environment

2.

4.

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Discuss the tame animals that would be suitable for a pet. 2. Use your list of wild animals, show on a world map or a globe where they would be located. Find out what type of habitats each of these animals need. Compare and contrast these habitats.

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Design and technology 1.

2. 3. 4.

guess it. Design a poster to advertise a pet. Include: – colour – type – size – age – shape – features. Bring a pet to school and let classmates draw it. Collect pictures of pets and make a collage. Take a photo of your pet or one you would like. Make a photo frame for it and decorate it. Choose a favourite wild animal and draw it in its habitat.

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Design a suitable toy for your pet. Does it move? Does it make a noise? What is it made from? Design an imaginary animal. Include parts of other animals. Design a cover for your story about your pet. Plan and design a zoo enclosure for a wild animal. Include food, shelter, space and facilities.

3. 4. 5. 6.

English 1. 2. 3.

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Write a story about your pet. Compile a list of adjectives to describe pets. Try to think of some for every letter of the alphabet. Find stories about animals and read some of them.

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Narrative 2 – Is it fair? Science

The arts

1.

1.

3.

4. 5.

7. 8.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Look at the emu and the kangaroo on the Australian coat of arms. Design a coat of arms using animals or birds from another country. Find some songs about birds. Learn one of them. Draw your favourite bird. Act out the narrative of Edward the emu. Mime animals and see if your classmates can guess what you are.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S English 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Write your own story about Edmund the emu. List words about emus then make up a word search. Try to think of an animal or bird for every letter of the alphabet. Write a poem about emus. Write a review about ‘Is it fair?’ to encourage others to read it.

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Emus are covered in feathers. List as many other birds as you can. Other creatures may be covered in fur, hair, skin or scales. Make a list of animals covered in each. Emu eggs are large. Research to find the size and colour of other birds’ eggs. Compare and contrast the eggs. Research to find out how long each of the eggs take to hatch. Emus can run, but not fly. Compile a list of animal movements and name two animals for each movement. Emus are Australian birds. Make a list of other Australian birds and animals. Look at the structure of feathers and find out how they work. Collect feathers and categorise them by size, colour, shape, type etc.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Science Elephants have good memories. Make a w1.p Research too finds the size an elephant’s • f o rr e vupi e ur p e sofo nl yfootprint. • memory game using pictures of animals. Compare and contrast with other wild animals.

Report 2 – Elephants The arts

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5.

6. 7. 8.

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Find some pictures or photos of animals and use them to make a collage. Make an elephant mask using a paper plate. Make an elephant puppet. You may like to use a paper bag, a sock or just cardboard. Find some poems about elephant. Choose your favourite and recite it to the class. Use drawings as well. Research to find songs about elephants. Mime animal movements and see if your classmates can guess what you are. Make a poster to advertise your local zoo or animal park.

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5.

Make a list of the uses of an elephant’s trunk. Elephants in the past were hunted for their ivory. Research to compile a list of the uses of ivory. Research to find how elephants have been used as work animals over the years. Find out what machines have now replaced them. Research to find out how much an elephant eats in a day. Compare and contrast to other wild animals.

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English 1. 2. 3.

Make up a play about animals. Write a story about your favourite wild animal. Write an acrostic poem about elephants.

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GRAPHIC ORGANISERS

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Graphic organisers are visual frameworks that are used to represent ideas and to organise them in a way that promotes learning and facilitates understanding. They are particularly useful for planning the content, sequence and organisation of a writing task. Graphic organisers allow students to: • make connections and understand how things are related • develop their more complex thinking skills; e.g. analysing, categorising and evaluating • use visual representations to assist memory and facilitate recall • apply multiple intelligences simultaneously. Graphic organisers include: • mind maps • flow charts (page 36) • senses charts (page 37) • tree charts (page 38) • semantic webs (page 39).

MIND MAPS

Mind maps can be used for note taking and as visual prompts for oral presentations. They usually use keywords, colour, drawings and symbols linked with arrows and branches. They are intended to be understood only by their creators. Space should be left so further ideas can be added.

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Flow chart

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Senses chart Subject:

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Looks

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Sounds

Feels

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Smells R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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Tree chart

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Semantic web

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Reading journal Comment

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Title

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R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


Boats

Apples

The beach

Elephants, favourite animals

–am, –un words, plurals, blends

triple blend, ‘ch’, ‘sh’, ‘wh’, homophones

vowels, two vowels, magic ‘e’

Exposition 2

Read yes/no Read joining sentences Read sentences Read missing words

Read yes/no Read missing words Read yes/no Read sentences Read yes/no Read sequencing

Read and think sequencing Read and think about elephants

Read and think sentences Read and think sequencing Read and think fruits Read and think yes/no, sentences Read and think sequencing Read and think drawing pets

nouns (people, places, things)

nouns, proper nouns

Report 2

prepositions (place, time)

Narrative 2 adjectives (comparing)

Exposition 2 punctuation – ?, !, commas

Recount 2

Procedure 2 verbs, tense

Report 1

prepositions (place, time)

Narrative 1 adjectives

Exposition 1 capital letters, full stops, joining words

Recount 1

Think labelling Think draw and explain

Think beach food Think animals

Think drawing pets Think farm animals Think favourite fruit Think insects

Think park activities Think zoo animals

Activities

word search, jumbled words, ‘What am I?’

Exposition 1 jumbled pet, matching, ‘What am I?’

Recount 1

Procedure 1 opposites, more than one

Genre

Teac he r

Read and think draw Read and think sequencing

Activities

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Procedure 1 verbs, command verbs

Report 2

Narrative 2

Exposition 2

Recount 2

Procedure 2

Report 1

Narrative 1

Exposition 1

Recount 1

Procedure 1

m . u

final sounds, plurals – ’y’ – ‘i’, ‘es’ no change, always plurals ‘y;’ in ‘fly’ and ‘puppy’, plurals – ‘es’, ‘y’ to ‘i’ to Narrative 2 add ‘es’ triple blends, plurals – ‘s’, ‘es’, ‘y’ to ‘i’, ‘f’, ‘fe’ to Report 2 ‘ves’, interesting, ‘an’ or ‘a’

Recount 2

Procedure 2 short vowels, syllables

Report 1

Narrative 1 double consonants, adding ‘y’

Exposition 1 –ck, final blends

Recount 1

Procedure 1 beginning and final sounds

Report 2

Narrative 2 Birds

Exposition 2 Cats

Recount 2

Procedure 2 Butterflies and insects

Report 1

Narrative 1 Farms and farm animals

Exposition 1 Pets

Recount 1

Procedure 1 Visiting parks

o c . che e r o t r s super Language features

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Speaking and listening

Spelling

Genre

Vocabulary

Activities

compound words, jumbled fruits, ‘What am I?’

compound words, jumbled transport, food

animal babies, alphabetical order, animal noises

Trip to see animals

A fruit

A beach trip

Report 2

An animal

Narrative 2 A bird

Exposition 2 Pet request

Recount 2

Procedure 2 To make a bee

Report 1

Narrative 1 An animal looking for its home

Exposition 1 All children must learn to swim

Recount 1

Procedure 1 At the beach, read and draw

Report 2

Narrative 2 jumbled words; animals, babies and coverings

Exposition 2 making words; animals, sound and movements

Recount 2

Procedure 2 compound words, wordsnake, word search

Report 1

Narrative 1 animals and sounds, babies, word search

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Reading

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Genre

SCOPE AND SEQUENCE CHART

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

41


ANSWERS Procedure 1 At the park: pages 1–13 Page 2 1.–2. Teacher check Page 3

Page 7

Teac he r 3. no

4. The following letters should be circled: man ‘n’, book ‘k’, road ‘d’, tap ‘p’, frog ‘g’. 5. Teacher check 6. (a) Stop (b) Walk (c) Call (d) Swim

4. no

Read and think 1. (a)–(b) Answers may vary 2. (a)–(b) Answers may vary 3. (a)–(b) Answers may vary

4. The following letters should be circled: rabbit ‘r’, panda ‘p’, fish ‘f’, web ‘w’, hat ‘h’, dog ‘d’, cat ‘c’, lion ‘l’, monkey ‘m’, king ‘k’.

Page 8

5. The following letters should be circled: frog ‘g’, dress ‘s’, tub ‘b’, boat ‘t’, bell ‘l’, fan ‘n’, train ‘n’, book ‘k’, hand ‘d’, cup ‘p’, bus ‘s’, net ‘t’, fox ‘x’, elf ‘f’, web ‘b’.

Page 9

Recount 1 The boat trip: pages 14–25 Page 15

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Page 4

2. yes

Page 13

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. At the park 2. The procedure tells you how to finish the picture 3. Coloured pencils or felt-tipped pens 4. (a) 5 (b) Draw, Draw, Draw, Draw, Colour 5. Answers may vary

Read 1. no

3. (a) The following pictures should be coloured: bed, box and ball. (b) ‘b’ should be circled (c) Teacher check

1. Teacher check Page 16 1. 2. 3. 4.

The boat trip on the river Mum, Dad and Sam Answers may include: Went on a boat trip, had fun on the boat, got off at the jetty, walked to the zoo, saw lots of animals, went home on a bus. 5. Teacher check

like © R. I . C.Pudrives bl i cat i ons plays Think • f o r r e v i e w p u r posesonl y• Take 1.–3. Teacher check

w ww

1. boy–girl, up–down, hot–cold, day–night, fast–slow 2. trees, birds, ball, flowers, lake, garden 3. (a) tree, bee (b) lake, snake (c) fish, dish (d) call, ball (e) play, hay

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Page 6 1. (a) The following pictures should be coloured: snake, sun, star and snail. (b) ‘s’ should be circled (c) Teacher check 2. (a) The following pictures should be coloured: tree and tap. (b) ‘t’ should be circled (c) Teacher check 42

Listen

Page 10 1. Teacher check Page 11 Teacher check

Page 17 Read 1. zoo 2. boat 3. animals 4. elephants 5. crocodiles 6. bus Think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check

m . u

Page 5

1. Teacher check 2. (a) walk (b) (c) played (d) (e) ride (f) 3. (a) Give (b) (c) Put (d)

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 12

Test 1. (a) The following pictures should be coloured: mouse, mug and man. (b) ‘m’ should be circled. (c) Teacher check 2. (a) The following pictures should be coloured: lamp, lion and lake. (b) ‘l’ should be circled (c) Teacher check 3. The following letters should be circled: box ‘b’, tree ‘t’, dog ‘d’, crab ‘c’, rabbit ‘r’.

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

Page 18

Read and think 1. sitting on the boat 2. getting off the boat 3. walking to the zoo 4. looking at the elephants 5. going home on the bus

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS Page 19

2. Answers may include (a) pram, tree, bin, crocodile, squirrel (b) zoo, pond, shop, garden (c) baby, boy, girl, man, woman

1.

Page 23

Page 20

Page 24

Teacher check

Page 25 Test 1. (a) (c) (e) 2. (a) (c) 3. (a) (c) 4. (a) (c) (e)

1. (a)–(b) Teacher check 2. (a) hat (b) ran (c) bed (d) men (e) sit (f) bin (g) hot (h) cold (i) bus (j) cup 3. (a) bins (b) cups (c) hats (d) beds

cat (b) net (d) bad or bed (f) rod or rid (b) pot or pit (d) rug (b) sun (d) pram (b) stop (d) flag (f)

jet man or men sad sit bin mug bus drip frog clap

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Teacher check

fun (b) cold trip (d) bus boat (f) home elephant Teacher check

Teac he r

2. (a) (c) (e) 3. (a) (b)

(c) yes (d) no (e) yes (f) no Read and think 1. they are too big and cost a lot to feed 2. they wouldn’t have to cut the lawn 3. they cost too much too feed 4. Answers may include: You need to give them food and water. You need to be kind and gentle and play with them.

Page 30

Think 1.–4. Answers will vary. Page 31

1. (a) horse (b) goat (c) cat (d) fish 2. sheep–grass, cat–milk, bird–seeds, dog–meat, mice–cheese 3. (a) fish (b) dog

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 21 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 4. (a) drip–drop, Exposition 1

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Page 32

Page 27 Teacher check Page 28 1. Pets 2. He/she wants everyone to have a pet 3. Answers may include: Having a pet is good for children. Learning how to look after them is good. They have to give them food and water. Pets teach children to be kind and gentle. Pets are good friends. 4. All children should have a pet.

1. sack, neck, lick, rock, duck 2. (a) truck (b) brick (c) sock (d) stack (e) neck (f) luck (g) back (h) block (i) sick (j) peck 3. band–sand, jump–lump, milk–silk, mend–send, lamp–camp, post–ghost, best–nest, lift–gift

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 22 1.

Pets: pages 26–37

m . u

w ww

pram–press, clip–clap, trip–trap, black–bled, slip–slop, flag–flop, frog–fresh, grab–grip, stamp–stop (b) pram, press, slip, slop 5. Answers may include (a) stamp, swamp, scamp (b) trap (c) frog (d) drop (e) pram (f) black (g) clip, chip (h) grab 6. (a) glad (b) brat (c) plan (d) trap

People

Places

Things

nurse

hospital

bed

teacher

school

chalk

swimmer

beach

surfboard

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

Page 29 Read 1. (a) no

Page 33 4. (a) (c) (e) (g)

vest bent test rest

(b) (d) (f) (h)

vent best tent rent

(b) yes The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

43


ANSWERS must stamp desk help

(b) gift (d) sent (f) wind

Page 40

Page 34

Page 35 Teacher check Page 36

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Page 37

w ww

Test 1. back, neck, stick, clock, truck 2. (a) track (b) black (c) suck (d) peck 3. stamp–ramp, lend–spend, band–stand, sift–swift, test–rest 4. (a) nest (b) tent 5. (a) lift (b) gust 6. (c) Rabbits are cute. 7. (a) and, but (b) and, but

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Narrative 1 I’ve lost my baby: pages 38–49

Teacher check 44

4. dress–mess, cuff–stuff, fizz–whizz, add–odd, fill–will, free–bee 5. (a) my (b) (c) by (d) (e) try (f) (g) fly (h) (i) fry 6. Teacher check

Read 1. sad 2. looked, looked 3. sheep, cow, duck, goat 4. home 5. shirt Think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check

sky shy cry dry

Page 46 ©R . I . C . P u b l i c a t i ons 1. a spotty dog, a big book, a Page 42 white duck, shining star, a tall Read andw think p •f orr ev i e u r p o s e s o y• tree, an longl worm 1. 1. Mother Hen looks sad.

Teacher check

Page 39

Page 41

Page 45

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Teac he r

1. (a) M (b) S (c) A (d) K (e) L (f) R (g) T 2. (a) I went to the park. 3. All sentences should have a full stop the end. 4. Black and white, smart and bright, Soft and strong, little but long, Cute and funny, likes jam and honey, Can run and walk, but doesn’t talk. 5. (a) and (b) and (c) and, but

1. I’ve lost my baby 2. (a) on a farm (b) Mother Hen and her chick (c) a sheep, a cow, a duck, a goat and Farmer Bob 3. (a) A chick was missing (b) She looked and looked and asked for help. 4. The chick was in Farmer Bob’s shirt. 5. Teacher check

(b) boss, mess, dress, cross, miss, kiss 2. (a) buzz (b) fizz (c) jazz (d) whizz 3. (a) huff, puff (b) office (c) off (d) stiff (e) sniff

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Mother Hen asks the sheep. Mother Hen asks the cow. Mother Hen asked the duck. Mother Hen asks the goat. Mother Hen sees Farmer Bob.

2. (a)–(b) a big, blue bird; a little, brown rabbit; a shiny, red apple; a long, yellow ribbon; a sharp, green pencil; a pretty, pink flower

Page 47

m . u

5. (a) (c) (e) (g)

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 43 1 (a) (b) (d) 2. (a) (c) (e) 3.

Teacher check

chick–cheep cow–moo (c) goat–maa (e) sheep (b) cow (d) goat (f)

h g o d d

o o o f s

r s g p h

s e c g e

e d l o e

p u p a p

duck–quack sheep–baa hen duck horse

k c u t t

x k c o w

c h i c k

f h e n x

Page 44 1. (a) doll, gull, fill, call, mill, ball

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

Page 48

Teacher check

Page 49

Test 1. (a) doll (b) toss or toll (c) bell (d) ball or bass (e) boss (f) cross 2. (a) puff (b) sniff (c) off 3. Teacher check 4. (a) shy (b) by (c) cry (d) spy 5. a jumping frog, a blue ball, a big rock

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ANSWERS 6. a tall, green tree; a hot, sunny day; a small, lost chick Report 1 Apples: pages 50–61 Page 51

Page 57

1. Teacher check Page 52

Teac he r

Page 65

Page 58

1. Teacher check 2. (a) in–out (b) up–down (c) on–off (d) under–over (e) below–above 3. Answer will vary.

Page 59 Teacher check

Read 1. Get the scissors. 2. Hold it between your fingers. 3. Fold the butterfly. 4. Copy the butterfly. Read and think 1. (a) yes (b) yes (c) no (d) yes 2. (a) fly (b) pretty (c) butterflies (d) spiders

ew i ev Pr

4. no

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Read and think 1. (a)–(d) Teacher check

1. (a) strawberry (b) pineapple (c) (d) rockmelon (e) 2. (a) pear (b) (c) apple (d) (e) orange 3. (a)–(b) apple

Test 1. (a) spring (b) sprinkle (c) spray (d) spread 2. (a) chat (b) chips (c) choke (d) chin 3. shower, shave, ship, dish, mash, push 4. Answers will vary 5. (a) up–down (b) over–under (c) near–far (d) on–off (e) in–out 6. (a) after (b) at (c) on (d) off

Page 67 1. Teacher check 2. (a) colour, cut, butterfly, fold, around, fly, make, fingers (b) 8 3. a l o n g r e s f p

m . u

3. yes

Think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check

Page 55

4. Answers will vary 5. (a) one (b) made (c) been (d) flower (e) for (f) there

Page 60 © R. I . C .Publ i cat i oPage ns Teacher check 66 Think Page 61 p •f orr evi ew ur poseso nl y• 1.–4. Teacher check

Read 1. no 2. yes 5. yes

Page 54

3. Scissors, coloured pencils or felt-tipped pens 4. (a) 6 (b) 1. Copy 2. Colour 3. Fold 4. Cut 5. Hold 6. Make 5. Answers will vary

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. Apples 2. Apples are a fruit. 3. (a) They are round with a stalk on top. They can be red, green or yellow. (b) They grow on trees. They usually grow in orchards. (c) They are used for eating and drinking. You can make apple pie, apple juice, apple sauce and apple cider. 4. (a) popular, good (b) apple, doctor

Page 53

(e) church (f) chin 3. (a) shark, shell, wish, fish, shop, shed, shut, splash, crash (b) splash, church

o c . che e r o t r s super

watermelon blackberry plum banana

Procedure 2 Beautiful butterfly: pages 62–73 Page 63

Page 56 1. sprint, spray, spread, spring, sprang, sprain 2. (a) chain (b) chick (c) child (d) chop R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

1. Teacher check Page 64

e

i

u h

f

b u

t

t

t

c

o

r w s

b

u

o

l

d

l

e

e

r

l

f

l

y

n

o u

r

i

s

f

o

l

t w

l

Page 68

1. (a) Teacher check (b) hat ‘a’, pot ‘o’, bed ‘e’, bun ‘u’, bin ‘i’ (c) Teacher check 2. mug, cat, ran/run, bus, fun, sun, bat, tap 3. (a) jet, dog, ten, net, cat, bed (b) jet, ten, net, bed

1. Beautiful butterfly 2. To make a beautiful butterfly The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

45


ANSWERS Page 69 pin/nip rod zip sad rat bun 1 1 2 2

(b) (d) (f) (b) (d) (f) (b) (d) (f) (h)

cot hot fin run pet bed 2 2 3 3

1. Teacher check Page 76

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 1. 2. 3. 4.

1. (a) made, coloured, folded, flew, hang, look, like, will draw, will make (b) Yesterday: made, coloured, folded, flew Today: hang, look, like Tomorrow: (will) draw, (will) make 2. Teacher check Page 71 Teacher check Page 72

A day at the beach at the beach on the train Answers will include: They splashed about. They sailed a boat. They made sand castles. They ate their lunch and had a drink. They had a race. They had a rest. They found seaweed, seashells and a nest. They packed their bags and headed off to the train. 5. Teacher check

Page 77

Think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check

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Test 1. (a) play + time (b) butter + fly (c) cow + boy 2. (a) 2 (b) 2 (c) 3 (d) 2 (e) 1 (f) 1 3. (a) man (b) rug (c) rat (d) bug 4. peg, leg, nest 5. (a) dot (b) sit (c) win (d) dog 6. (a) ate, peeled, drank, have, sit, (will) go (b) ate, peeled, drank, have, sit, (will) go

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Page 78 Read and think 1. 1. sailing our boat 2. eating our lunch 3. racing along the beach 4. finding seaweed 5. catching the train home 6. falling asleep on Mum’s knee

Page 81 6. (a) (b) 7. (a) (c) (e) 8. (a) (c) (e)

Teacher check hop, fin, pet, cube, mat rode (b) tape cute (d) bite Pete (f) made same (b) made tale (d) hope came (f) cave

1. (a) beach, home (b) Dad, boy (c) bait, hook, fish 2. (a) fish (b) beach (c) home (d) hook 3. (a)–(b) Teacher check 4. (a)–(b) Teacher check

o c . che e r o t r s super Page 79

1. (a) seaweed (b) seagull (c) seashell (d) seawater 2. (a) bus (b) bike (c) boat (d) train (e) car (f) plane 3. Answers will vary. Page 80 1. Teacher check

46

5. (a) (c) (e) (g)

© RRead . I . C.P(b)unobl i cat i ons 1. (a) yes (c)e yes (d) yes •f orr evi w p u r pose sonl y• Page 82 (e) no (f) no

Teacher check Page 73

bag (b) beg big (d) bog bug 2 (b) 2 (c) 2 2 (e) 2 (f) 1 2 (h) 2 Teacher check (i) wait (ii) read (iii) boat (iv) tried (v) glue read (b) peas bait (d) boat toe (f) sheep teach (h) tissue

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Teac he r

Page 70

Page 75

2. (a) (c) (e) 3. (a) (d) (g) 4. (a) (b)

m . u

4. (a) (c) (e) 5. (a) (c) (e) 6. (a) (c) (e) (g)

Recount 2 A day at the beach pages 74–85

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

Page 83

Teacher check

Page 84

Teacher check

Page 85 Test 1. (a) 2 (b) 2 (c) 2 (d) 2 (e) 1 (f) 1 2. (a)–(f) Teacher check 3. (a) feed (b) read (c) rains (d) boat (e) toe (f) tissue 4. (a) bite (b) cute R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS 5. (a)–(b) Teacher check 6. Teacher check Exposition 2 The best pets: pages 86–97 Page 87 Teacher check Page 88

Teacher check Page 96 Teacher check Page 97

Page 92

1. best, rest, pest, chest, test, nest 2. (a) jump (b) pump (c) stump (d) dump (e) lump 3. bold, fold, gold, hold, sold, told 4. (a) rabbits (b) benches (c) boxes (d) horses (e) buzzes (f) dresses

Test 1. pest, nest, west, test 2. (a) pump (b) jump (c) lump (d) dump 3. bold, cold, fold, sold 4. (a) dogs (b) bunches (c) goats (d) misses 5. ponies, daisies, puppies 6. (a) fish (b) deer 7. trousers, pyjamas, scissors

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Page 95

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. The best pets 2. The writer thinks that cats are the best pets. 3. (a) bark, noise (b) friendly, knee (c) hold, cuddly (d) run, clean (e) small, feed (f) dig, run 4. Cats, clean, friendly

Narrative 2 Is it fair?: pages 98–109 Page 99

Page 93 P Teacher © R. I . C. ubl i cat i on scheck 5. stories, puppies, countries, Page 100 aunties, cubbies, rubies •f orr evi e w p u r p o s e s o n y• 1. Is it l fair? 6. (a) fish (b) sheep

w ww

Read 1. (a) Dogs bark and make a lot of noise. (b) Cats like to sit on your knee. (c) You can’t hold a fish. (d) Mice squeak and run around. (e) Horses cost a lot to feed. (f) Rabbits dig up the garden. Read and think 1. (a) horse (b) fish (c) dog (d) mouse (e) rabbit (f) cat

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Page 90 Think 1.–4. Teacher check

Page 94 1. (a)–(f)

A question mark is needed at the end of each one. Bill walks home. Will you come to see me? The girl lost her bag. Where have you been? Who is next to you? I like ice-cream. Oh, no! I missed the bus. Help! I’ve lost my mum. Surprise! Here is your present. Ouch! I cut my hand. Run! The mean dog is coming.

2. (a) Edmund (b) in the nest 3. Edmund couldn’t fly. 4. 1. Edmund came out of the egg. 2. He made a cheeping noise. 3. He cracked his egg. 4. His mother fed him. 5. He grew feathers. 6. He tried to flap his wings. 7. He tried to run away. 8. He is happy. 5. Edmund found he could run fast. 6. Teacher check

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 91 1. (a) rabbit (c) kitten (e) jaguar

(c) reindeer 7. Teacher check

m . u

Page 89

2. cat–meow, duck–quack, snake–hiss, dog–woof, bird–cheep, mouse–squeak 3. emu–run, bird–fly, fish–swim, frog–jump, rabbit–hop, horse–gallop

(b) turtle (d) monkey

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2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 3. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

Page 101 Read 1. (a) egg (b) cheeping (c) beak (d) food (e) two, claws Think Teacher check

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

47


ANSWERS Page 102

Page 106 1.

b

a

b

y

p q

t

t m

s

r

y

l m a

s

y

r

e

h b o g

a

a

o p

b

e

a

u

t

i

f

u

l

d

a

t

r

v

l

e

n

x

c

h

e

e

p

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Page 113 Read 1. (a) largest (b) grey (c) trunk (d) bamboo, leaves (e) herds Read and think 1. twigs, bamboo and leaves should be circled 2. mother elephant – cow baby elephant – calf father elephant – bull

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 2. (a) sharp (b) beautiful (c) young (d) baby (e) fast 3. Teacher check 4. (a) taller, tallest (b) longer, longest

Page 107

Page 103

Teacher check

1. (a) beak (b) claws (c) egg (d) wings (e) nest (f) feathers 2. (a) sheep – lamb (b) horse – foal (c) cow – calf (d) cat – kitten (e) dog – puppy (f) hen – chick 3. Answers include: (a) bird (b) fish (c) teacher check (d) teacher check (e) sheep (f) snake

Page 108 Teacher check Page 109

Page 114

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Teac he r

Read and think 1. He came out of an egg. 2. He sits with the other chicks in the nest. 3. He has a sharp beak. 4. His mother puts food in his mouth. 5. He has two legs with claws. 6. He grew long feathers. 7. He flaps his wings and tries to fly. 8. The wind rushes past him. 9. Emus can run and run.

4. (a) Elephants are gentle giants. (b) They should be looked after and protected.

3. ‘breathe, smell, pick up, eat, drink, spray’’ should be ticked Think 1. (a)–(b) Teacher check

© RTest . I . C.P(b)uflb l i cat i o115 ns Page 1. (a) sky y 1. (a) cat – kitten (c) cry •f orr ev i e w p u r p o s e s onl y• (b) horse – foal 2. (a) bunny (b) cherry

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1. (a) sky (b) spy (c) try (d) cry (e) dry (f) fry 2. (a) puppy (b) fairy (c) daisy (d) baby (e) teddy (f) bunny 3. s: flowers, trees, boys, girls, ponds, birds, nests es: bushes, benches, boxes, glasses, dishes

(c) dog – puppy (e) elephant – calf (e) hen – chick (f) tiger – cub (g) deer – fawn 2. bear, fox, giraffe, horse, lion, monkey 3. Answers may include (a) snake (b) cat (c) lion/tiger (d) dog (e) cow (f) mouse

o c . che e r o t r s super

Pages 105 4. babies, jelly, city, puppies, pony, cherries, lady, family, fairies 5. (a) flies (b) teddies (c) daisies (d) bunnies (e) ponies (f) puppies 48

wishes (b) buses witches (d) boxes ponies (b) fairies witches (d) lady young (b) beautiful sharp bigger, biggest smaller, smallest

m . u

w ww

Page 104

3. (a) (c) 4. (a) (c) 5. (a) (c) 6. (a) (b)

Report 2 Elephants: pages 110–122 Page 111

Teacher check Page 112 1. Elephants 2. Elephants are large land mammals. 3. (a) Teacher check (b) African and Indian (c) Elephants can swim (d) Elephants can’t jump.

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

Page 116 1. (a) (b) (c) (d) 2. (a) (c) 3. (a) (c) 4. (a) (c)

spray, spring, sprint splash, splinter, split strip, string, strong splash, spray, strong horses (b) dogs elephants wishes (b) lunches foxes flies (b) babies puppies

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS 5. (a) halves (c) wives (e) wolves

(b) shelves (d) knives (f) calves

Page 117 tooth – teeth man – men person – people foot – feet woman – women child – children a dog, a lion, an elephants, an ant, a snake, a horse, a bear, an emu (b) an elephant, an ant, an emu

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Page 118

1. Teacher check 2. (a) near (b) with (c) about (d) at

Page 119

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Teac he r

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Test 1. (a) spray (b) spring 2. (a) splash (b) splinter 3. (a) string (b) strike 4. (a) dogs (b) tigers (c) lunches (d) foxes 5. (a) babies (b) puppies (c) teddies 6. (a) elves (b) wolves (c) calves (d) knives 7. tooth – teeth, foot – feet, man – men

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an ant (b) an apple a banana in (b) with near (d) at

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book A

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The English Workbook - Teachers Resource Books: Book A - Ages 6+