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RIC-6304 3.3/561/1616


Teachers resource book – Book D (9 years+)

Copyright Notice

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2007 Copyright© Diane Henderson and Rosemary Morris 2007 ISBN 978-1-74126-561-3 RIC–6304

Titles available in this series: Teachers resource book – Book A (6 years+) Teachers resource book – Book B (7 years+) Teachers resource book – Book C (8 years+) Teachers resource book – Book D (9 years+) Teachers resource book – Book E (10 years+) Teachers resource book – Book F (11 years+) Teachers resource book – Book G (12 years+)

Also available in this series:

Except as allowed under the Copyright Act 1968, any other use (including digital and online uses and the creation of overhead transparencies or posters) or any use by or for other people (including by or for other teachers, students or institutions) is prohibited. If you want a licence to do anything outside the scope of the BLM licence above, please contact the Publisher.

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This information is provided to clarify the limits of this licence and its interaction with the Copyright Act. For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase. Name of Purchaser:

Date of Purchase:

Supplier:

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The English workbook – Book A (6 years+) The English workbook – Book B (7 years+) The English workbook – Book C (8 years+) The English workbook – Book D (9 years+) The English workbook – Book E (10 years+) The English workbook – Book F (11 years+) The English workbook – Book G (12 years+)

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A number of pages in this book are worksheets. The publisher licenses the individual teacher who purchased this book to photocopy these pages to hand out to students in their own classes.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• School Order# (if applicable):

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Signature of Purchaser:

R.I.C. Publications® follows the guidelines for punctuation and grammar as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 2002, 6th edn. Note, however, that teachers should use their own guide if there is a conflict.

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Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

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INTRODUCTION This teachers resource book provides information to support the implementation of The English workbook – Book D, designed to develop and improve students’ literacy skills, focusing on procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. The following sections are included within each format. • spelling • writing activities • speaking and listening • student evaluation • vocabulary • language features • proofreading and editing • reading comprehension

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Features of The English workbook – Teachers resource book • Descriptions of the five different writing formats • Photocopiable planning outlines for the five writing formats • Speaking and listening notes and photocopiable charts • Additional information about vocabulary, useful reference lists and spelling rules • Clear and concise explanations of the included language features • Photocopiable student editing and proofreading checklists specific to each writing format • Comprehensive integrated activity sheets provide cross-curricular extension to stimulate student interest • Analytical notes on activities such as advertisements and cartoons • Class evaluation sheets to record information about student understanding and performance • Answers for student activities

CONTENTS

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Long vowel sounds............................................................ 27 Language features .................................................................27–33 Parts of speech (verbs, adverbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions) .......................................27–29 Punctuation (capital letters, commas, apostrophes for possession, grammatical contractions, quotation marks, paragraphs) ..................................................................29–30 Collective nouns ..........................................................31–32 Animal nouns...................................................................... 33 Integrated activities ..............................................................34–38 Graphic organisers................................................................39–45 Mind maps .......................................................................... 39 Flow chart ........................................................................... 40 Problem-solving chart ...................................................... 41 Senses chart ...................................................................... 42 Tree chart ............................................................................ 43 Semantic web .................................................................... 44 Reading journal .................................................................. 45 Additional information .........................................................46–47 Cartoons .............................................................................. 46 Advertisements .................................................................. 46 Journal/Diary writing ........................................................ 47 Plays .................................................................................... 47

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Introduction .................................................................................... 1 Writing format descriptions ....................................................2–3 Planning outlines.......................................................................3–8 Editing and proofreading checklists ...................................9–14 Class evaluation record sheet ............................................15–16 Speaking and listening ........................................................17–21 Speaking skills ................................................................... 17 Listening skills .................................................................... 17 Speeches ............................................................................ 17 Debating ........................................................................18–19 Speaking chart ................................................................... 20 Listening chart ................................................................... 21 Vocabulary ..............................................................................22–24 Compound words............................................................... 22 Homographs ....................................................................... 22 Homophones ...................................................................... 22 Synonyms............................................................................ 22 Antonyms ............................................................................ 23 Masculine and feminine nouns ....................................... 23 Overused words................................................................. 23 Acrostics ............................................................................. 23 Contractions ....................................................................... 24 Spelling ...................................................................................24–27 Syllables .............................................................................. 24 Plurals.................................................................................. 25 Adding suffixes (1-1-1 rule, dropping final ‘e’, adding ‘ly’) ...................... 26

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Scope and sequence chart ...................................................48 Answers ..................................................................................49–64 The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

1. Procedure

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The main purpose of a procedure is to direct, inform or explain how something is done. It usually includes: • a goal – to tell what is to be done • a list of requirements • steps – a list of instructions in a particular order • a test – to see if the task was completed successfully. A procedure uses: • command verbs • present tense • short, clear statements. A procedure may be written in the form of instructions for a task such as playing a game, constructing something, operating an appliance, using a reference book, dealing with a problem, or as a recipe or an experiment.

2. Recount

The purpose of a recount is to retell past events in time order. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the recount is about • a setting – who was involved and where and when the events happened • the events – what happened in chronological order • an ending or comments – how the events ended and what the writer thinks about it. A recount uses: • the past tense • paragraphs to separate significant events. A recount may be written in the form of a diary, a letter, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account, a biography or autobiography.

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3. Exposition

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An exposition is written or spoken to persuade others to think or do something. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the exposition is about • an overview – a brief summary of what the writer thinks about the topic • reasons – the arguments to persuade people • a conclusion – a final comment or summing up. An exposition uses: • persuasive language • facts to support the arguments • a new paragraph for each new argument. An exposition may be written in the form of an essay, a letter, an advertisement, a review, a speech or an editorial.

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WRITING FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

4. Narrative

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The main purpose of a narrative is to describe a series of events and circumstances often involving fictitious characters. It usually includes: • a title – gets the attention of the reader and indicates what the story is about • an orientation – introduces the main characters, the setting or location, the time of the story and the initiating event • a complication – a problem which involves the main character(s) • a resolution – how the problem is solved. A narrative uses: • descriptive vocabulary • interesting characters • suitable paragraphing. A narrative may be written in the form of a story, a play, a fairytale, a myth, a legend, a science fiction work, a ballad or a poem.

5. Report

The main purpose of a report is to give facts clearly without unnecessary information or opinions. It usually includes: • a title – tells what the report is about • a classification – provides information about the focus of the report • a description – expands on the focus • a conclusion – a summary or comment. A report uses: • facts, not opinions • no unnecessary information • the third person • the timeless present tense. A report may be written in the form of a review, a newspaper or magazine article, an eyewitness account or a scientific report.

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The following pages (4–8) are photocopiable planning outlines for each of the five writing formats, designed for students to use when planning their writing. They provide a structure for writing and include elements unique to each format. The planning outlines can be used in conjunction with the ‘Editing and proofreading checklists’ (pages 10–14) to encourage students to review and correct their writing. Teachers can assess and then record their students’ understanding of the elements of each writing format on the ‘Class evaluation record’ on pages 15–16.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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Planning a procedure Name:

Date:

Title: Goal (What you need to do):

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Requirements (Things you’ll need):

2.

3.

4.

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1.

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Steps:

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7.

8.

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5.

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Test (How you’ll know if your procedure was successful):

4

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Planning a recount Name:

Date:

Title: Setting: Who?

Where?

Why?

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When?

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Events: 1.

2.

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5.

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3.

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Concluding statement/comment:

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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Planning an exposition Name:

Date:

Title:

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Introductory statement (What you believe):

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2.

3.

5.

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4.

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1.

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Arguments (Thoughts and ideas which support your belief):

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Conclusion (Link your ideas to form a final comment which summarises your position):

6

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Planning a narrative Name:

Date:

Title: Orientation: Characters (appearance, personality, likely actions):

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Time:

Initiating event: What event starts the action?

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Setting/Location:

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Complication: What problems do the characters have?

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What caused the problems?

Resolution (How are the problems solved?):

Conclusion (What happened in the end?):

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Planning a report Name:

Date:

Title: Classification (gives information about the focus of the report):

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Description (special features):

3.

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2.

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1.

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6.

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4.

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Conclusion (summing up):

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EDITING AND PROOFREADING CHECKLISTS

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The primary purpose of writing and the use of language is communication—to get one’s message or ideas across to another person in an effective manner. It is important that the message is clear so that there are no misunderstandings. Ensuring that there are no barriers to effective communication, due to poor spelling and grammar or incorrect structure, is vital. Provided on the following pages is a series of checklists for each of the five writing formats: procedures, recounts, expositions, narratives and reports. Each of the writing formats has its own particular structure or elements which help the students communicate their ideas within the given format. The checklists allow students to ensure that these elements are included and that they have thoroughly checked and edited their work for any errors. The checklists, which list specific points, provide an opportunity for students and their peers to evaluate their writing and develop their writing and editing skills. Ideally, providing this opportunity for self-evaluation will allow students to develop a habit of always editing and proofing their work.

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Editing and proofreading a procedure Name:

Date:

Title of procedure: Editing and proofreading are very important parts of writing. Use the checklist below to edit and proofread your work. Checklist

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1. Does your procedure make sense to you? ........................................................................... Yes No 2. Did you include a goal? ............................................................................................................ Yes No 3. Did you list the things you needed? ....................................................................................... Yes No

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4. Have you included all the steps in the correct order? ........................................................ Yes No

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5. Did you add a test to check that your procedure works? .................................................. Yes No 6. Spelling: (a)

Have you corrected any spelling errors? .................................................................... Yes No

(b)

Did you check that your works look right? .................................................................. Yes No

(c)

Did you use a dictionary? ............................................................................................... Yes No

(d)

Did you ask someone to help you with spelling? ....................................................... Yes No

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 7. Did you use command verbs? ................................................................................................. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Yes No

8. Are your statements short and clear? ................................................................................... Yes No 9. Did each statement make sense when you read it on its own? ........................................ Yes No

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10. Do your statements all start with a capital letter and end with a full stop? .................... Yes No 11. Ask a partner to read your procedure. .................................................................................. Yes No (a)

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Did he/she find it easy to understand? ........................................................................ Yes No

I think my procedure is short my procedure is clear

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my procedure would work

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Editing and proofreading a recount Name:

Date:

Title of recount: Editing and proofreading are very important parts of writing. Use the checklist below to edit and proofread your work. Checklist Title:

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Does your title reflect the topic? ............................................................................................ Yes No Does it generate interest? ....................................................................................................... Yes No

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Setting: Does your recount include:

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• specific characters? ........................................................................................................... Yes No • location?................................................................................................................................ Yes No • time of the events? .............................................................................................................. Yes No

• the reason for the events? ................................................................................................. Yes No Events: Were the events sequenced correctly? ................................................................................ Yes No

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Did you conclude with av statement or comment? ............................................................... • f o r r e i e w p u r posesonl y• Spelling:

Were all relevant events included? ....................................................................................... Yes No Concluding statement: Yes No

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Have you corrected any spelling errors? .............................................................................. Yes No Punctuation:

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Have you checked your punctuation? ................................................................................... Yes No

Is each event recorded in a separate paragraph? .............................................................. Yes No Language features:

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Have you used the past tense? ............................................................................................... Yes No

Is the vocabulary you used interesting and varied? ........................................................... Yes No Peer editor: Did you use a peer editor? ....................................................................................................... Yes No Did she/he make any constructive comments? ................................................................... Yes No I think my recount is interesting my spelling and punctuation are the presentation of my work is R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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Editing and proofreading an exposition Name:

Date:

Title of exposition: Editing and proofreading are very important parts of writing. Use the checklist below to edit and proofread your work. Checklist Do you understand the purpose of an exposition? 1. Does your exposition:

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(a) clearly state a problem in the introduction? ............................................................. Yes No (b) provide background information?............................................................................... Yes No

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(c) list facts to support your arguments? (diagrams, photos, facts and figures)...... Yes No (d) sequence arguments from strongest to weakest? .................................................. Yes No (e) include a final paragraph which reinforces and summarises the main points? Yes No

2. Have you used persuasive language? ............................................................................. Yes No

Spelling

3. Have you corrected any spelling errors? ........................................................................ Yes No

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 4. Have you checked your punctuation? ............................................................................. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 5. Have you used a separate paragraph for each argument? .........................................

Punctuation

Yes No Yes No

Peer edit 6. Ask a partner to read your exposition

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(a) Did he/she understand your point of view? .............................................................. Yes No (b) Did it make sense? ........................................................................................................ Yes No

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(c) Were you able to persuade your partner to agree with your point of view? ...... Yes No

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I think my exposition is persuasive

my spelling and punctuation are the presentation of my work is

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Editing and proofreading a narrative Name:

Date:

Title of narrative: Editing and proofreading are very important parts of writing. Use the checklist below to edit and proofread your work. Checklist Title:

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Does your title indicate what the story is about? ................................................................ Yes No Does it get the attention of the reader? ................................................................................ Yes No Orientation:

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Does the beginning draw the reader into the characters’ world? ................................... Yes No

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Are the characters believable? .............................................................................................. Yes No Do their actions fit their personalities? ................................................................................. Yes No

Is the setting realistic? ............................................................................................................. Yes No Initiating event: Is the problem known at the beginning of the story? .......................................................... Yes No Complication:

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Is the problem believable? ...................................................................................................... Yes No Resolution: Yes No

Have the problems been solved? ........................................................................................... Yes No Conclusion:

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Is the ending satisfying to the reader? .................................................................................. Yes No Punctuation and spelling: Check the following: Spelling – use a dictionary or ask someone. Punctuation – including capital letters, full stops, question marks, commas and direct speech. Paragraphs for new ideas. Vocabulary:

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Have you used some interesting adjectives? ....................................................................... Yes No Have you used any compound words? ................................................................................. Yes No Have you used more interesting verbs instead of ‘said’? .................................................. Yes No I think my narrative is interesting my spelling and punctuation are the presentation of my work is

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Editing and proofreading a report Name:

Date:

Title of report: Editing and proofreading are very important parts of writing. Use the checklist below to edit and proofread your work. Checklist

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1. Does your report include a classification? ........................................................................... Yes No 2. Does it include an accurate and detailed description of the topic? ................................ Yes No 3. Have you ended with a conclusion? ...................................................................................... Yes No

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4. Have you written facts not opinions? .................................................................................... Yes No

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5. Have you used action verbs? .................................................................................................. Yes No 6. Have you corrected any spelling errors? .............................................................................. Yes No 7. Have you used capital letters and full stops correctly? ..................................................... Yes No 8. Did your peer editor: (a)

understand your report? ................................................................................................ Yes No

(b)

believe your facts to be true? ........................................................................................ Yes No

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my report gives facts

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the presentation of my work is

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I think my report is interesting

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Class evaluation record

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Procedure Understands the format Uses clear concise language Sequences steps logically

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Self-edits Recount Understands the format

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Sequences events Uses past tense Self-edits Exposition Understands the format Presents persuasive arguments Supports arguments Self-edits

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Class evaluation record

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Narrative Understands the format Uses descriptive language Appropriate paragraphing Imaginative ideas Self-edits Report Understands the format Uses factual language Accurate information Self-edits

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SPEAKING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING SKILLS Students need to have a sense of audience and to learn how to engage and communicate effectively. The chart, ‘How effective are you as a speaker?’ on page 20, can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It focuses attention on the preparation and presentation of information as well as oral communication skills. Opportunities are provided for students to organise and communicate their ideas to a partner, a small group or the class. Students should be encouraged to set individual speaking goals on which to focus and to evaluate their performance.

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Providing opportunities for students to engage in active listening is essential, but some students may need to have explicit instruction to understand the requirements of effective listening. The ‘How do you listen?‘ chart on page 21 can be photocopied and enlarged for classroom use. It is suggested that teacher and students decide on a particular goal as a focus for a lesson and then evaluate how well this goal was achieved.

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SPEECHES

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Purpose 1. To inform the audience of the views, facts and news of the speaker. 2. To influence the audience to support the speaker’s perspective or cause. 3. To justify an action or proposed action. 4. To entertain a specific audience.

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A speech is a talk or address delivered to an audience.

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Features 1. Ideas and facts must have a logical sequence. 2. Format includes: • introduction • statement of case • argument or explanation of position • conclusion 3. May include some visual presentation (video, slides, photographs, diagrams). 4. Personal experience and humour may be used to maintain interest and to emphasise point of view. 5. May include some informal language or idioms. 6. Short sentences may be used to enable members of the audience to remain focused and attentive.

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SPEAKING AND LISTENING DEBATING A debate is a formal organised argument on a particular matter or topic, between two opposing teams. Purpose 1. To win by presenting a convincing argument and by out-scoring the opposing team.

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Features 1. A debate is made up of: • an affirmative team of 3 members who argue for the topic • a negative team of 3 members who argue against the topic • a chair • a timekeeper • an adjudicator. 2. A debate is about a topic, also known as the moot. (A moot is a claim that something is true.) 3. Team members work together to prepare their argument by researching the topic. 4. Use palm cards to summarise discussion points. 5. Speakers must consider audience intelligence and experience. 6. Humour may be used. 7. Each team member has a different task.

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Format A classroom plan could be as follows.

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M A 2, E r E T ake V I e AT , sp r 1 M e IR er 3 eak F F k A ea sp sp

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Chairperson The chair

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1. 2. 3. 4.

CHAIR

AUDIENCE

sp NE ea G ke AT I sp r 1, VE ea sp TE ke ea AM r 3 ke r2 ,

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TIMEKEEPER

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States the topic. Introduces each speaker for both teams. Deals firmly with interjections or comments from the audience. Announces the winner at the conclusion of the debate after consulting with the adjudicator.

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SPEAKING AND LISTENING Timekeeper • The timekeeper allocates each speaker a set time to speak. • The timekeeper rings three sets of bells. 1. A single bell – warns the speaker the time is almost up. 2. A double bell – the speaker’s time is up. 3. A continuous bell – the time is up and the adjudicator will disregard any further argument.

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Speakers Each speaker has a different role: Affirmative 1 • defines the subject of the debate • outlines the argument • allocates responsibility to each member Negative 1 • must accept affirmative definition or show why it is unacceptable and amend it Affirmative 2 • restates affirmative case • deals with each argument presented by Negative 1 • may add new aspects to the affirmative argument Negative 2 • attacks the arguments put forward by the two affirmative speakers • develops his or her argument Affirmative 3 • persuades audience that Negative team’s argument is worthless • ends on a positive note that affirms the topic Negative 3 • role is similar to that of Affirmative 3 • stresses negative aspect

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Judges the performance of both teams based on: Matter: • subject knowledge • definition of topic • the outline and explanation of the argument • examples that support the argument Manner: the way in which the speech is presented. • language • gestures • stance • voice quality • verbal skills Method: how the matter is planned • introduction • technique • strategy

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How effective are you as a speaker? Effective speakers … Select:

• interesting information • relevant facts

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• time efficiently • equipment if required

• their facts and opinions ©•Rconfi . I . Cdently .Publ i cat i ons •e themselves well •f orr v i ew pur posesonl y•

Engage:

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• with the topic • audience interest

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Maintain: • eye contact • posture Speak:

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Present:

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • information logically Organise:

• clearly • at an appropriate volume and pace • in a lively, enthusiastic manner

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How well do you listen?

Effective listeners:

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Focus

Avoid

unnecessary movements

Listen

carefully

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Show

courtesy

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Think

of appropriate questions

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VOCABULARY

To enrich the communication skills of students, it is important that they understand all of the concepts of English vocabulary. An increased vocabulary develops the students’ ability to communicate their ideas, making their writing and speaking more descriptive and interesting to read or listen to.

COMPOUND WORDS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

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‘Compound’ comes from the Latin meaning ‘putting together’. Each part of a compound word must be a word that can stand alone. For example: toothbrush mother-in-law Note: As language changes, many words that were previously hyphenated no longer need a hyphen. Students should be encouraged to consult a recent dictionary.

HOMOGRAPHS

Homo – same graph – write Homographs are words that are written in the same way, but have different meanings, origins and sometimes are pronounced differently. Homographs that sound the same include: sack, ruler, pupil, spring, squash, stole, swallow, bear, saw, felt, train, fast, hold, park, club, court, duck, cape, chop, coach, grave, cricket, march, prune, right, ring, table, wake, dear, watch, last, kind, cross, blind, bored, down, iron

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f opresent, rr e vi ew pbow, ur precord, os esclose, on l y• row,• subject, object, wind, wound, tear, desert, number

Homographs that are pronounced differently include:

w ww

Homo – same phone – sound Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled differently. paws, pause, pores load, lode horse, hoarse to, two, too main, mane prey, pray court, caught hole, whole foul, fowl fare, fair idle, idol vane, vain, vein steel, steal right, write

scent, sent, cent I’ll, aisle, isle so, sew, sow they’re, their, there pain, pane lead, led knew, new bored, board threw, through ate, eight key, quay weather, whether, wether break, brake

. te

male, mail alter, altar bare, bear weak, week road, rode peace, piece no, know, meat, meet queue, cue stationery, stationary waist, waste where, wear, ware hale, hail

m . u

HOMOPHONES

berry, bury choose, chews hare, hair sauce, source sale, sail course, coarse serial, cereal sea, see blew, blue practice, practise throne, thrown stairs, stares plain, plane

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SYNONYMS Synonyms are words with the same or similar meaning. 22

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VOCABULARY ANTONYMS Antonyms are words with the opposite meaning. Finding synonyms and antonyms helps students to develop a wider vocabulary and allows them to write more precisely and interestingly. Some antonyms are formed by adding a prefix; for example: un, dis, in, im, mis.

MASCULINE AND FEMININE NOUNS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Gender neutral nouns are more commonly used today, particularly for occupations, but students need to be aware of some of the gender specific terms. For example:

Teac he r

OVERUSED WORDS

man – woman husband – wife lord – lady hero – heroine

father – mother prince – princess sir – dame widower – widow

ew i ev Pr

uncle – aunt boy – girl duke – duchess marquess – marquise

Students should be encouraged to communicate more exact meaning by avoiding the overuse of some words; e.g. ‘ask’, ‘said’, ‘nice’, ‘got’ and ‘then’. Words that can be used instead of ‘asked’ include:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Words that can be used instead of ‘said’ include: • f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• spoke, uttered, yelled, shouted, whispered, cried, sobbed, commented, replied, stated, enquired, requested, queried, questioned, begged, quizzed, appealed, demanded, beseeched, required, implored

Words that can be used instead of ‘nice’ include:

w ww

m . u

talked, voiced, announced, remarked, repeated, breathed, declared, recited, expressed, protested

agreeable, exquisite, favourite, attractive, delightful, colourful, fine, mild, neat, rare, wise, exact, fussy, right, interesting, dainty, decent, proper, friendly, careful, correct, entertaining, fitting, precise, refined, welcome, accurate, becoming, kind, delicate, pretty, pleasant, pleasing, precious, suitable, beautiful, delicious, sweet, cute, gratifying, wonderful

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Words that can be used instead of ‘got’ include:

received, caught, attracted, obtained, earned, had, became, achieved, bought, purchased, grew, was, was given, found, possessed, collected, acquired, took, procured, inherited, fetched, retrieved, comprehended, understood Words that can be used instead of ‘then’ include: after, following, eventually, finally, later, also, so, when, again, besides, further, therefore, in addition, consequently, while, afterwards, subsequently, on arrival, later on, during

ACROSTICS An acrostic is a series of lines or verses in which the first letters form a word or phrase. Completing acrostics improves students’ vocabulary and spelling and allows them to concisely describe a concept by their choice of appropriate words and phrases. R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

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VOCABULARY CONTRACTIONS Contractions are more common in speech and dialogue. Contractions are used to make communication quicker and easier. Students need to be aware of the purpose and conventions of contracting words and understand that the apostrophe indicates that letters have been omitted.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Contractions are often: • pronouns plus auxiliary verbs (e.g. am, is, are was, were, has, have, had, will, shall, would, should) Note: Proper nouns and auxiliary verbs can also be contracted; e.g. January is the hottest month, January’s the hottest month. • auxiliary verbs plus not • other words often contracted include: who, where, there, that, how, why, let, must, might, ought, need, dare

SPELLING

Because of the complexity of the English language, there are a number of exceptions to most of the spelling rules. After students have learned a rule, they should be encouraged to consolidate this learning by seeking exceptions to the rule.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

SYLLABLES

. te

swim/mer

con/test

m . u

w ww

Breaking words into syllables is very useful for pronouncing and spelling words. A syllable has one vowel sound. The following is a list of rules to determine how words are divided into syllables. 1. When two consonants (same or different) come between two vowels, divide between the consonants.

o c . che e r o t r s super

2. When there is only one consonant between two vowels, divide before the consonant. fa/mous

mu/seum

3. When consonants make one speech sound, they are kept together. pro/phet

me/thod

dol/phin

4. The letters ‘re’ and ‘le’ cannot stand alone at the end of a word and must take the preceding consonant. me/tre

sad/dle

5. Prefixes and suffixes are usually separated from the base word. joy/ful

sub/mit

dis/o/bey

6. Compound words divide between the small words. rain/coat 24

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SPELLING PLURALS • Most nouns form their plural by just adding ‘s’. socks, shoes, shirts • Words ending in ‘ch’, ‘sh’, ‘s’, ‘x’, and ‘z’ usually add ‘es’ to make the plural word easier to pronounce. churches, wishes, buses, boxes, quizzes exception include: stomachs, monarchs, matriarchs, patriarchs

Note: The ‘ch’ is pronounced like ‘ck’ in these words, so the ‘es’ is not needed for ease of pronunciation.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Many words ending in ‘o’ also add ‘es’ in the plural form.

tomatoes, potatoes, heroes, echoes

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

But there are numerous exceptions, including words ending with ‘oo’ and some words associated with music. In many recent dictionaries, both endings are included. ‘oo’ words: bamboos, kangaroos, cockatoos, zoos, shampoos

music: banjos, solos, duos, trios, pianos, sopranos, radios, altos, cellos, videos others: ratios, zeros, merinos, silos

• Nouns ending in ‘f’ or ‘fe’ change the ‘f’ or ‘fe’ to ‘v’ and add ‘es’.

© RExceptions . I . C. Publ i cat i ons include: words ending with ‘ff’: stuffs, puffs, skiffs, cliffs, staffs, sheriffs • f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• knives, wolves, halves, selves

Note: Both forms of some words are accepted: dwarves or dwarfs, wharves or wharfs, hooves or hoofs.

others: reefs, gulfs, chiefs, roofs, waifs

babies, puppies, flies, spies, libraries

w ww

m . u

• Nouns ending with a consonant and a ‘y’ change the ‘y’ to ‘i’ before adding ‘es’.

• Some plurals are made by changing some letters of the base noun or by adding an unusual suffix.

. te

tooth – teeth oasis – oases person – people goose – geese parenthesis – parentheses criterion – criteria ox – oxen cherub – cherubim, cherubs

woman – women foot – feet die – dice cactus – cacti, cactuses radius – radii, radiuses fungus – fungi, funguses axis – axes crisis – crises emphasis – emphases louse – lice medium – media, mediums phenomenon – phenomena sphinx – sphinges, sphinxes child – children mouse – mice, mouses (computer)

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Some words may have the same singular and plural forms. fish, cod, salmon, trout, deer, sheep, reindeer, swine, elk, dozen, score, innings, gallows • Some nouns have no singular form; many of them are thought of as ‘a pair of’. trousers, bathers, spectacles, glasses, pants, tweezers, pliers, clippers, scissors, secateurs, bellows, tongs, measles, billiards

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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SPELLING ADDING SUFFIXES A suffix can be described as a group of letters added to the end of a word. Suffixes changes the meaning of words. Examples of suffixes include: able, age, al, an, ance, ary, ate, en, ence, er, ery, ese, est, ful, fy, hood, ible, ic, ion, ish, ist, ive, less, ling, ly, ment, most, ness, or, ous, ship • Suffixes are usually just added to the end of the word.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S work, worked, workable, working, worker

• Sometimes the spelling of the base word changes.

The one-one-one rule for adding suffixes beginning with a vowel requires understanding of: • consonants and vowels • short and long vowels • syllables.

one-one-one rule

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

shut–shutting, happy–happily, shape–shaping

When adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to words of one syllable, with one short vowel sound followed by one consonant, double that consonant.

shop–shopper cut–cutting © R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Note: Words of more than one syllable with a prefix or which are compound words also double the final consonant. •f orr ev ew pur posesonl y• refii tting babysitter outrigger

dropping the ‘e’

. te

shape – shaping

m . u

w ww

Another rule for adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to a word, usually with a long vowel sound and ending with a silent ‘e’, is that the ‘e’ is dropped before adding the suffix. close – closing

Note: An interesting exception is ‘likable’. Macquarie dictionary prefers ‘likeable’, but also acknowledges ‘likable’. A simple way for students to remember part of this rule is:

adding ‘ly’ ‘Ly’ is usually just added to words.

o c . che e r o t r s super ‘e’ goes away when ‘ing’ comes to stay

quick – quickly

love – lovely

There are some exceptions: 1. Whole – wholly. The ‘e’ is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 2. True – truly, due – duly. There are already two vowels at the end of these words so one is dropped before adding ‘ly’. 3. Horrible – horribly, simple – simply. These are two examples of words ending in ‘le’ after a consonant. The ‘e’ is changed to ‘y’.

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SPELLING LONG VOWEL SOUNDS Students need to be aware of some of the different ways the common long vowel sounds are represented in English. Compiling a class list is recommended. These include: – a, a–e, ai, ay, eigh, ei – e, ee, ea, y, ey, e–e – i, ie, igh, y, i–e, uy, ei, eigh – o, oa, ow, o–e, oe, ough – u, u–e, ue, iew, ew, ui

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S LANGUAGE FEATURES

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

a e i o u

PARTS OF SPEECH

Understanding the different parts of speech will help students construct effective sentences.

Verbs

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• regular

w ww

the past

the present

the future

walked

walk

will walk

has walked

walks

should walk

see

will see

sees

should see

irregular saw

Adverbs

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has seen

m . u

Verbs are words used to show actions or states of being or having; e.g. eat, was, has. Command verbs are imperatives and are often used in procedures at the beginning of a sentence; e.g. ‘Roast the meat’. Verb tense: There are three basic tenses. However, because there are so many irregular verbs in English, these can be complex.

Note: The future and past tenses often use auxiliary or ‘helping’ verbs to form a compound verb; e.g. have written, can open, may visit, were asleep.

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Adverbs are words that can modify or enhance the meaning of verbs; e.g. He swam slowly, I sang yesterday. There are adverbs of time, place and manner. time; e.g. tomorrow place; e.g. outside manner; e.g. quickly

Nouns Nouns are words used to name people, places, things, feelings or ideas; e.g. boy, school, book, joy, courtesy. Proper nouns are used to name particular people, places or things. Proper nouns are written with capital letters; e.g. John, Singapore, February. Collective nouns are words used to name groups of people, animals or things; e.g. a team of footballers. An extensive list of common and less familiar collective nouns used to describe many of these groups is on page 31–32. Note: Some groups have more than one collective noun and some collective nouns are used for a number of different groups. R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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LANGUAGE FEATURES Pronouns Pronouns are words substituted for nouns; e.g. We asked them to help us. Students should be able to use personal pronouns in the: First person (used when talking about ourselves; e.g. I, we, me, us) Second person (used when talking to someone; e.g. you) Third person (used when talking about someone; e.g. he, she, it, they, him, her, their)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S He gave the book to me.

(subject) (verb)

(object)

He is the subject of the verb. Me is the object of the verb.

Students often find difficulty with sentences with a pronoun and a proper noun together.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

I or me These pronouns can cause difficulty. ‘I’ is used for the subject of a verb. ‘Me’ is used for the object of a verb.

For example: • He gave the book to Mary and me/I. A simple way to work out which pronoun to use is to omit the proper noun. He gave the book to me. He gave the book to I. ‘He gave the book to me’ is usually identified by students as sounding ‘better’ and is correct because ‘me’ is the object of ‘gave’.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Mary and I/me went to the movies.

w ww

m . u

I went to the movies. Me went to the movies. With the proper noun omitted, students can usually identify that ‘I’ (the subject) is correct and sounds ‘better’.

An added complication occurs when the pronoun at the end of the sentence refers to a verb that is understood but not written or spoken. For example:

. te

Adjectives

o c . che e r o t r s super Tom can run faster than I. (can) He is taller than I. (am) She rides her bike faster than I. (do)

Adjectives modify or enhance the meaning of nouns and, less commonly, pronouns; e.g. deserted playground, lucky me.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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LANGUAGE FEATURES Prepositions Prepositions are words that show the relationship between nouns and/or pronouns in the same sentence. Common prepositions include: during, for, between, in, up, on. He rode through the park. Sally slept until dawn. I would like one of those.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Prepositions of time: after, in, about, before, during, while, between, for, since, until, from, on, till, at, around place: beside, against, outside, inside, beyond, along, through, over, under, above, below, between, near, towards, behind, within, around, by across, beneath, down, up, on, in, upon, to, into, from

Conjunctions are joining words. They can join different language units. one word with another one phrase with another one clause with another one sentence with another

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Teac he r

Conjunctions

hot or cold on the land and in the air sitting on the beach while watching the birds There were dark clouds in the sky so I took my umbrella.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Capital letters PUNCTUATION

Punctuation is used to clarify meaning and assist with reading and comprehension.

Commas

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m . u

w ww

Capital letters are needed for: • sentence beginnings; e.g. I like my teacher. She is kind to me. • proper nouns; e.g. people’s names (Bob Brown), names of places (Pacific Ocean), days of the week (Tuesday), months (May), countries (New Zealand), nationalities (French), languages (Russian), religious faiths (Christian), holidays and festivals (Passover). • titles; e.g. Red Cross, The sound of music, Note: R.I.C. Publications® employs minimal capitalisation for titles ‘Goldilocks and the three bears’. of books and other publications as recommended by the Style

o c . che e r o t r s super

manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

Students need to understand the purpose of commas in text and particularly how commas can change meaning. I enjoy watching horses, eating hay and galloping around a paddock. I enjoy watching horses eating hay and galloping around a paddock.

Commas can be used: • to mark a pause in text. Sometimes these may be a matter of personal choice. The trend seems to be to use commas less frequently. • to separate a series of names (nouns), descriptions (adjectives) and actions (verbs—including adverbs) • to separate direct speech from the rest of the sentence • at the beginning and end of a letter • to separate parts of a sentence including the name of the person being addressed, additional information and so the reader will not connect words that do not belong together.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

29


LANGUAGE FEATURES Apostrophes for possession Apostrophes are used to show that something belongs to someone or something. The placement of the apostrophe can be challenging but the simple rule is that it is placed after the owner or owners. (The ‘tail’ of the apostrophe ‘points’ to the owner(s).) the girl’s dresses (one girl) the baby’s shoes (one baby)

the girls’ dresses (more than one girl) the babies’ shoes (more than one baby)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Grammatical contractions

Grammatical contractions are words that have been made by joining and shortening two words. An apostrophe is used in place of the missing letters. he will – he’ll it has – it’s

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Teac he r

should not – shouldn’t I had – I’d

Quotation marks

Quotation marks (inverted commas) are used to enclose quoted speech or thoughts. Single or double quotation marks are acceptable but must be used consistently. ‘Please feed that noisy cat’, Mum shouted. ‘I fed him yesterday, it’s Ben’s turn’, Adam replied.

Note: R.I.C. Publications® punctuates speech as recommended by the Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, 2002.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Quoted text must start on a new line unless the same speaker is continuing.

‘Look out, Ben! There’s a train coming’, Brad yelled. ‘I can see it‘, Ben replied. ‘Well get off the track’, yelled Brad. ‘You’ll need to hurry.’

Paragraphs

. te

30

m . u

w ww

Paragraphs separate text into meaningful sections to facilitate reading and understanding. Paragraphs start on a new line. A space is often left between paragraphs. The first sentence of a paragraph should indicate and introduce the content of the paragraph. Students are able to make use of this writing convention when ‘skimming’ text to quickly gain an understanding of the content.

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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LANGUAGE FEATURES COLLECTIVE NOUNS Birds

A herd of buffalo A caravan of camels A train of camels A clowder of cats A clutter of cats A herd of cattle A mob of cattle A coalition of cheetahs A litter of cubs A herd of deer A parcel of deer A pack of dogs A flock of dolphins A pod of dolphins A school of dolphins A herd of donkeys A drove of donkeys A herd of elephants A parade of elephants A skulk of foxes A leash of foxes A tower of giraffes A group of giraffes A trip of goats A flock of goats A tribe of goats A band of gorillas A bloat of hippopotamuses A herd of hippopotamuses A pod of hippopotamuses A stable of horses A stud of horses A team of horses A mob of kangaroos A litter of kittens A leap of leopards A pride of lions A nest of mice A troop of monkeys A herd of moose A family of otters

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

A flock of birds A flight of birds A brood of chickens A clutch of chickens A flight of cormorants A murder of crows A head of curlews A dole of doves A flight of doves A flush of ducks A flock of ducks A team of ducks A skein of ducks A convocation of eagles A cast of falcons A charm of finches A trembling of finches A stand of flamingos A gaggle of geese A flock of geese A skein of geese A colony of gulls A kettle of hawks A mews of hawks A brood of hens A charm of hummingbirds A colony of ibises A band of jays A congregation of magpies A flock of magpies A littering of magpies A sord of mallards A flush of mallards A pride of ostriches A parliament of owls A company of parrots A pandemonium of parrots A muster of peacocks A pod of pelicans A colony of penguins

A flight of pigeons A flock of pigeons A run of poultry A bevy of quail An unkindness of ravens A conspiracy of ravens A parliament of rooks A squabble of seagulls A host of sparrows A quarrel of sparrows A chattering of starlings A cloud of starlings A congregation of starlings A mustering of storks A flight of storks A flight of swallows A gulp of swallows A herd of swans A bevy of swans A bank of swans A team of swans A flock of turkeys A raft of turkeys A pitying of turtledoves A wake of vultures A bunch of waterfowl A descent of woodpeckers A herd of wrens A flock of wrens

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Mammals

A cluster of antelope A herd of antelope A tribe of antelope A troop of apes A congress of baboons A colony of badgers A cloud of bats A colony of bats A family of beavers A gang of buffalo

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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LANGUAGE FEATURES COLLECTIVE NOUNS

Teac he r

Fish A host of angelfish A fleet of bass A school of butterfly fish A swarm of eels A glide of flying fish A shoal of mackerel A flotilla of swordfish A hover of trout A float of tuna A shoal of minnows A pack of perch A shoal of pilchards A bind of salmon A leap of salmon A family of sardines A herd of seahorses A shiver of sharks A school of sharks A pod of whiting

A troupe of performers A crew of sailors A squad of soldiers An army of soldiers A company of soldiers A platoon of soldiers A class of students A flock of tourists A congregation of worshippers

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Others

ew i ev Pr

A team of oxen A drove of pigs A herd of pigs A string of ponies A school of porpoises A pod of porpoises A colony of rabbits A colony of seals A rookery of seals A herd of seals A flock of sheep A mob of sheep A parcel of sheep A dray of squirrels An ambush of tigers A huddle of walruses A mob of wallaby A sneak of weasels A gang of weasels A school of whales A run of whales A pod of whales A pack of wolves A herd of yaks A cohort of zebras A herd of zebras

A wing of aircraft A quiver of arrows A belt of asteroids A bunch of bananas A hand of bananas A library of books A batch of bread A fleet of cars A pack of cards A deck of cards A network of computers A clutch of eggs A bed of flowers A bouquet of flowers A patch of flowers A ring of keys A range of mountains An anthology of poems A fleet of ships A flotilla of ships A pair of shoes A choir of singers A galaxy of stars A constellation of stars A stand of trees A grove of trees A clump of trees

w ww

Insects

. te

A colony of ants A flight of butterflies An army of caterpillars An intrusion of cockroaches A swarm of flies A colony of wasps A cloud of grasshoppers A swarm of grasshoppers A flock of lice A plague of locusts A swarm of mosquitos A colony of termites A cloud of gnats

32

People A troupe of acrobats A cast of actors A company of actors A chorus of angels A troupe of artists A bevy of beauties A board of directors A staff of employees A panel of experts A gang of hoodlums An audience of listeners A den of thieves A coven of witches A faculty of academics A band of men A cortege of mourners An orchestra of musicians A crowd of onlookers A crowd of people

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


LANGUAGE FEATURES ANIMAL NOUNS Animal

Male

Female

Baby

bear

boar

sow

bee

drone

queen, worker larva

bird

cock

camel

bull

Group of animals

cub

sleuth, sloth

Family ursine

hive, swarm (in flight), bike, drift, grist

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S hatchling, chick

dissimulation (small birds only), fleet, flight, flock, parcel, pod, volery

cow

calf

flock

cameline

queen

kitten

clutter, clowder, litter (young born to one female), kindle (kittens)

feline

cow

calf

drift, drove, herd, mob

bovine

rooster

hen

chick, pullet (young flock, brood (of hens), clutch (of chicks), hen), cockerel (young peep (of chicks) rooster)

deer

buck, stag

doe

fawn

herd, mob

dog

dog

bitch

pup

litter (pups from one mother), pack (wild), canine kennel

duck

drake

duck

duckling

badelynge, brace, bunch, flock, paddling, raft, team

cat

bull

Teac he r

cattle

tomcat

chicken

fox

giraffe goat

ew i ev Pr

hen

cervine

cub, skulk, leash ©vixenR. I . Ckit,. Ppupubl i c at i ons bull doe calf herd, corps, tower, group • orr enanny vi ew pur po s es nl y• buck,f billy doe, kid, billy herd, tribe, trip o reynard

vulpine hircine

goose

gosling

flock, gaggle, skein (only while in flight), wedge (flying in a V formation)

guinea pig

boar

sow

pup

group

buck

doe

pup

horde

horse

stallion, stud

mare, dam

foal, colt (male), filly (female)

stable, harras, herd, team (working horses), string or field (racehorses)

kangaroo

buck, boomer, jack

doe, flyer, jill, roo

joey

troop, herd, mob

lioness

cub

pride

o c . che e r o t r s super

feline

sow

piglet, shoat, farrow

drove, herd, litter (of pups), sounder

porcine

doe

kitten, bunny, kit

colony, drove, leash, nest, trace, warren

lapine

cow

pup

herd, pod, rookery, harem

ovine

hamster

. te

lion

lion

pig

boar

rabbit

buck

seal

bull

m . u

gander

w ww

goose

sheep

buck, ram

ewe, dam

lamb, lambkin, cosset drift, drove, flock, herd, mob, trip

swan

cob

pen

cygnet, flapper

bevy, game, herd, team, wedge (flying in a V formation)

tiger

tiger

tigress

cub, whelp

ambush, streak

whale

bull

cow

calf

gam, grind, herd, pod, school

wolf

dog

bitch

pup, whelp

pack, rout

zebra

stallion

mare

colt, foal

herd, zeal

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equine

feline lupine

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES These are a series of activities designed for each specific writing format as they appear in the student workbook. They will hopefully provide ideas as to how the formats can be used in relation to a variety of subjects apart from English.

Procedure 1 Health

Design and technology

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English

Research the history of pizza. • Where and when was it first made? • Which countries now make and sell pizza? • How and where are pizzas sold? • Why are pizzas popular? • How has the creation of pizzas affected our lives? • What types of ingredients are used? Why?

Recount 1

Vegetable survey Survey class members to find out: • what vegetables are eaten? • how often? • what are the most popular? Record your results on a graph Design a poster advertising the importance of eating vegetables each day. Your poster must be bright and appealing and convey the message clearly and concisely.

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Design and make a giant pizza. 1. Design and make a pizza that will feed 20 people. The pizza must be: • low fat, low sugar • nutritious • satisfying • economical (not too expensive). 2. How will you cook the pizza? Write a recipe giving all the ingredients and method.

Choose an author who writes cookbooks. Research and write a report about the author. • When did he/she start writing? • Does he/she only write cookbooks? • Where does he/she live? • Why does he/she like to cook? • Does he/she have a favourite type of cooking? • Where does he/she get the recipes?

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Journal writing Journals record a writer’s thoughts, events, reactions and experiences. Journals are written for others to read and can be about holidays and travel experiences. Create a travel journal of a six-day holiday to Singapore. You may need to use travel brochures, the Internet, newspapers and the library to research suitable tourist venues, shopping and travel in Singapore to support your journal. 34

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Exchange rates Spices The currency in Australia and Singapore is based Using the library and Internet, research the spices on the decimal system and is known as ‘dollars and that can typically be found in Singapore. cents’. Even though they have the same name, they Present your information on a large sheet of card are different in value. Using the newspaper, the or in a folder. You should include illustrations and Internet or telephone, find the exchange rate for samples where possible. Describe each spice, where the following amounts. it is grown and how it is cultivated and harvested. $ Aus $ Singapore $ Aus $ Singapore $50.00 $1.00 $5.00 $100.00 $10.00 $1000.00

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Design and technology

Fashion design Singapore is a hot and humid country. It is important to wear suitable clothes. Design an outfit for a 10-year-old boy or girl who may be visiting Singapore for the first time. Include information on the following: • design of garment • accessories • suitable fabric • footwear Explain your choices. R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Exposition 1 Health

Hats, hats, hats 1. Hats have many purposes and are made from many different materials. Using the library resources, create a list of all the different types of hats that are worn and by whom; e.g. soldier, firefighter, straw, canvas. 2. Hats have been worn for many centuries. Using the library and Internet resources, research the history of hats. Answer the following questions: • Why were hats invented? • What was the original purpose of hats? • Who wore the early hats? • What materials were hats made from? • How have hats changed over the centuries? • Are hats still popular?

1.

Research, using library resources and the Internet, to find out about skin cancer. Include: • types • how detected • how prevented • incidence in past and present Contact your local Cancer Council to compile a list of items available for sun protection. Include: • sunglasses • hats • sunscreen • swimming cover-ups Design a poster showing one way to prevent skin cancer. Conduct a debate on ‘Everyone should have a skin cancer check each year’. (See teachers notes on debates.)

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3. 4.

Design and technology

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Crazy hat party Design and make an unusual hat you would wear to a crazy hat party. Your hat must be: • colourful • comfortable • eye-catching • different from any other hat you might wear It must also have interesting decorations.

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Society and environment

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Use the library or Internet to find out about caravans: • where they originated. • who lives in them • different types Research several popular holiday destinations to find: • types of accommodation available • approximate cost of each type • caravan parks and their facilities.

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Research the rules for playing cricket (number of players, positions on field etc.). Find out the rules for another team sport. Research individual sports. Find out the rules for an individual sport. List other games suitable to play at the beach. Find out about Test series cricket. • Where and when is it played? • What countries are involved? • Where and when did it begin?

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Collect beach shells and make a collage, picture frame, necklace or animals. Find some pictures of beaches from magazines, travel brochures or postcards and use them to make a collage. Collect pictures of famous sportspeople and make a photo gallery. Design an invitation asking a friend to join you on a beach holiday. Include the place, time, date and things to take.

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Design and technology 1.

2.

Design an interior for a caravan, including: • beds (number and type) • table/chairs • cupboards • washing/toilet facilities. Design your own game suitable for the beach: • list the rules • list any equipment needed • include the number of players

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Report 1 Society and environment

Science

1.

1.

2.

Compare and contrast dolphins and porpoises. Include: • types • sizes • features • food • where found Using a map of the world, show where each type of porpoise or dolphin is located. Draw a detailed sketch of a dolphin and label all the important parts. Research to find out the feeding habits of one particular dolphin. Include: • what it eats • how often • how much • how its food is caught

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The arts

Design and technology

1.

1.

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5.

Design an enclosure for dolphins kept in captivity. Remember to include lots of space, feeding areas, display spaces and areas for people to view them. Plan a dolphin show. Research to learn what tricks they can be taught and include these in your program.

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Society and environment 1.

2.

Create a map of an island where treasure has been 1. Write an advertisement for your school, local park or hidden. Give instructions and clues which will help shopping centre. locate this treasure. Include: Make a map of your city/town suitable for tourists. • location • name Show the main highlights which you think would be • size • features of greatest interest to visitors. • facilities Include: • restrooms • refreshments 2. Keep a diary of the places you visit in your local area • accommodation • exit points for a week. Record your reasons for visiting each and how long you spent there.

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2.

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Design a poster encouraging people to protect dolphins. Make up an acrostic poem about dolphins. Design an underwater scene for a backdrop for a puppet play. Make a dolphin puppet and use it with the backdrop to make up a short talk on protecting dolphins. Draw a template of a dolphin and use it to make artwork using patterns.

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Research, using the Internet or library, to find out about different types of dolphins. Choose one to research fully. Include: • name • length • weight • appearance • what it eats • where it is found • its predators • who named it • any special features. Research to find out information about dolphins in captivity. Include: • places they are allowed to be kept • why they are kept • what tricks they can be taught • any breeding programs • comparison between life expectancy in captivity and the wild.

The arts

Use an atlas to work out the distances between the 1. Make a poster to advertise a popular tourist following cities. attraction in your area. Sydney – Melbourne, Jakarta, Darwin, Auckland, 2. Draw/Paint your favourite place to visit in your local Tokyo, Brisbane area. Darwin – Sydney, Melbourne, Jakarta, Auckland, 3. Make a postcard to send to a friend showing your Tokyo, Brisbane local area. Graph the results. Which city is nearest Sydney? Darwin? Which city is furthest from Sydney? Darwin? The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES Recount 2 Society and environment

English

Weather patterns 1. Extremes in weather temperatures can affect people in number of ways. Using library and Internet resources, find ways that people are affected by very hot and very cold climates. How do people cope with these conditions? Present your 2. work on a large poster-sized sheet. Use drawings, photographs and cuttings to support your work.

Write an acrostic poem for these words and characters: The beach Luke Dad Construct a debate on ‘There should be more parking available at beaches’. (See teachers notes on debates.)

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Beach umbrella 1. Design a beach umbrella which will provide protection from the sun. The umbrella must: • protect a family of two adults and three children • be lightweight • be safe, that is, not easily blown away in the wind • be compact when not in use, fold up to fit in the boot of a car • be attractive. Illustrate your umbrella and explain each feature. 2. Make a model of your umbrella.

Play • Rewrite the recount The beach in the form of a play. You may embellish (exaggerate) the story to make it more interesting and humorous. • Produce the play and perform it for your class. • Remember that plays, like other stories, are structured this way: Orientation: setting the scene and introducing the characters. Complications: events where things go wrong and have to be resolved. Resolution: the complications are cleared up and the story is finished. (See teachers notes for additional help.)

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The arts

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Compile a list of facilities you consider necessary 1. at your local park/lake. Research your local park/lake to find out: • what facilities are provided • how long they’ve been in use • latest improvements • how often they’re used • who uses them 2. • who is responsible for the maintenance. Find out about pollution problems in your local area 3. and what is being done to prevent them. Include noise, traffic, water and litter pollution.

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Mathematics 1.

2.

Design some signs for your local park/lake. Include: • parking signs • signs to protect local fauna • signs to protect local flora • litter signs Try to make them clear, but not detract from the local environment. Design a poster/video clip or short skit to advertise Clean Up Australia Day. Make up a travel brochure promoting your local area. Include special features, tourist spots and scenic spots. Use photos or drawings and descriptive language.

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Research to find out the approximate costs 1. involved in maintaining your local park/lake. Include things like painting, bins, signs, plastic bags for dog owners, lighting, cleaning, gardening. Hint: You may need to contact your local council. 2. Survey your class/school group to see how often they use the local park/lake and which facilities they use.

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Conduct a survey of your local park/lake to find out what facilities are provided for exercise. Include ovals, playground equipment, playing fields, walk paths, bike paths, training equipment and any other features. Design a ‘keep fit’ program for your age group using local facilities. The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES

Narrative 2 Drama

Art and craft

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Mushroom prints Puppet plays Make patterns using potato carving, sponge Use the puppets to: shapes and cardboard cutouts. • re-enact the story Crowns • dramatise the story with a different ending Design, make and decorate a crown for a prince, • dramatise a new story using the same characters princess, king or queen using different materials; • retell the story from each character’s point of for example, paper, cardboard, fabric, cellophane, view. beads, pasta, paint Puppets Make a puppet for each character in the story using, for example, papier mâché, socks, felt, paper plates.

Society and environment

Science

Caves Research, using the library or the Internet, to find information about caves. Include: • how they are formed • locations • stories about caves • different types • famous caves • caving • safety considerations • uses • cave paintings • local caves • people who study caves • cave dwellers • formations found in caves

Mushrooms Research, using the library or Internet, to find information about: • Characteristics of mushrooms – size – colour – shape – edible/poisonous – mushrooms/toadstools • Cultivation – climate – soils – distribution • Uses – recipes – medicines

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Report 2

2.

Find out about local skateboard parks. Include 1. Design and label your own skateboard. List any information about where they are located, when special features it has. they were built, who uses them, how often they are 2. Create your own skateboard park. used, what they look like and what facilities they Include: have. • ramps • tracks Research to find out about the sport of surfing. • hills Include information about when it began, • landscaping surfboards past and present, well know surf• other special features such as a lake or jump. beaches, famous surfers, local surf carnivals, safety while surfing, surfing expressions; e.g. hang ten.

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2. 3. 4.

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Society and environment

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1. Experiment with a variety of wheels of different sizes. Estimate the cost of skateboarding as a sport. Compare the distances covered in 20 rotations. Include the cost of the skateboard, a helmet, knee 2. Find out about the material ‘urethane’. Include and elbow pads, wrist guards, lessons. information about when it was invented, what it is Choose another sport and compare the costs used for, how strong it is. involved. 3. Compare the sizes of wheels of different vehicles. Graph the results to find which sport is cheaper. Research to find out how size and speed are related. Choose several sports that require equipment with wheels—e.g. cycling, inline skating, go karts—and research to find the maximum speeds reached in each sport. The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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GRAPHIC ORGANISERS

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Graphic organisers are visual frameworks that are used to represent ideas and to organise them in a way that promotes learning and facilitates understanding. They are particularly useful for planning the content, sequence and organisation of a writing task. Graphic organisers allow students to: • make connections and understand how things are related • develop their more complex thinking skills; e.g. analysing, categorising and evaluating • use visual representations to assist memory and facilitate recall • apply multiple intelligences simultaneously. Graphic organisers include: • mind maps • flow charts (page 40) • problem-solving charts (page 41) • senses charts (page 42) • tree charts (page 43) • semantic webs (page 44)

MIND MAPS

Mind maps can be used for note taking and as visual prompts for oral presentations. They usually use keywords, colour, drawings and symbols linked with arrows and branches. They are intended to be understood only by their creators. Space should be left so further ideas can be added.

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Flow chart

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Problem-solving chart

Problem

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Possibilities

Positives

Negatives

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Goal

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Solution

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Why

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Senses chart Subject:

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Looks

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Sounds

Feels

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Smells

42

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Tree chart

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Semantic web

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Reading journal Category

Rating

Comment

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Title

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Which titles caught your interest? What did you notice about the length of these titles? How much information was given in the title? Write your comments.

H = High interest

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M = Moderate interest

L = Low interest

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CARTOONS Cartoons use a picture or a series of pictures to communicate a story or message. Cartoons are often found in newspapers and comment on current political events, politicians and prominent people; for example, Michael Jackson’s nose. Usually the cartoonist aims to make his audience laugh. There are four types of cartoons. 1. A comic strip Generally found in newspapers, they can vary from two to several panels. Often the comic strip will be a complete story; however, it can be written as a serial and continued in the next issue of the newspaper. Examples of a comic strip include Garfield, Snake, Wizard of Id.

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2. A single cartoon Also found in newspapers, the single cartoon has only one picture. Even though they are funny, often a serious message is portrayed. 3. A comic book This is a collection of cartoons in one book or magazine. The cartoons may be presented as one long story or a series of short stories. Some well-known examples include Calvin and Hobbs, Mad Magazine, The Phantom and Archie. 4. TV and film cartoons Cartoons may be used as a series or a complete work to create a feature-length film. The detail in the drawing and the story line is more complex and may require thousands of pictures to create movement. Voice-overs, music and sound effects are also required. Some well-known animated cartoons include Beauty and the beast and The Simpsons.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Conventions of cartoons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Cartoons use the following conventions.

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• Thought bubble • Unusual facial features • Larger than life situations • Description of actions • Exaggerated characteristics or action • Speech balloon containing exclamation, caption or dialogue. • Cartoonist’s signature

An aural (radio) or visual message in the form of billboards, fliers, circulars, notice, pamphlets or posters promoting a product, cause, event or person.

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Purpose • To tantalise, persuade and invite purchase of a service or product. • To disseminate information. • To encourage loyalty to a cause, person or product. Features • Uses concise language • May include sponsorship • Uses abbreviated language and abbreviations • Uses graphics, colour, font, size • Emphasises price, quality and reliability • Designed for a specific audience or to create a new audience 46

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

• To endorse a product over that of a competitor. • To correct actual or perceived misinformation.

• May create sense of emergency (limited availability, sale, special offer) • Includes contact information • Radio and television may include jingle or song • Excellence often claimed rather than proven or backed by research • Asterisk often refers to fine print outlining conditions, limitations or warnings R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION JOURNAL/DIARY WRITING A journal (or a diary) is a record of a person’s thoughts, feelings and experiences. Journals may be written as a summary of the day’s activities and encounters. Journals are often kept by writers, artists, politicians, travellers, students and businesspeople.

• May be written for an audience; e.g. teachers, superiors, siblings, other family members.

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• Uses vocabulary which expresses personal feelings

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Purpose • To provide a non-threatening medium for exploring, recording and evaluating ideas. • To record personal thoughts and feelings. Features • Each entry is dated • Detailed and descriptive entries • Can be written in first person (I, me etc.) • Can include cartoons, photographs, poems, conversations

Journal writing to reflect on a unit of work Students write a passage to express their thoughts, feelings, ideas and opinions about a unit of work they have completed. They are directed to ask themselves these questions and to give reasons for their responses: • • • •

What did I learn in this unit? What did I enjoy or not enjoy? Do I need to improve my writing? Has this work helped?

• Am I aware of the format required for this type of work? • Do I need any help with this format?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

PLAYS

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Purpose • To present a visual and aural experience for the audience. • To entertain or provoke thought and emotion. • To provide a forum for the players to express their actions.

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A play is a dramatic work written in dialogue and usually presented by more than one player to an audience.

• To share knowledge of other cultures and places. • To question the way we live.

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Features • Characters are listed at the beginning, usually in order of appearance. • Character listings may include a brief description of age, appearance, role in story or relationship to others. • Longer scenes are divided into acts, which include scenes. • Setting is given in italics at the beginning of the text.

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• Stage directions are given in italics within square brackets. • Lines and numbers may be used as a reference and are found on the left side of the page. • Characters’ names are written in bold type. • Structure of the play includes orientation, complication and resolution.

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Genre

Activities

Genre

Activities

Procedure 1 Using a dictionary, Word search, Jumbled words

Recount 1

Recount 1

Classifying adjectives, Design and describe a hat, Facts and opinions

Words in words, Dictionary meanings, Jumbled words

Procedure 1 For information, For understanding, Application – Making lists

For information, For understanding, Application – Cooking and selecting healthy food

Procedure 2

Report 1

For information, For understanding, Application – Missing person poster

Recount 2

Word worms, Change a letter, Word categories, Crossword

Words for phrases, Homographs, Antonyms and forming with ‘un/dis/im’

Vowels and consonants, Long vowel graphemes

Short vowels to long vowels (spelling rule), Double consonants (spelling rule) Exposition 2 Long ‘e’ graphemes, Long ‘a’ graphemes

Adding ‘ly’ to words ending in ‘y’, Rhyming words, Find a Narrative 2 word – letter squares Long ‘o’ graphemes, Long ‘i’ graphemes, Long ‘u’ graphemes, Report 2 Plurals – s/es/y/ves/o + s or es + other interesting plurals

Procedure 1

Nouns, Proper nouns, Recognising nouns, Conjunctions, Joining sentences

Command verbs; Tense – present/past/future; Irregular verbs

Activities

Recount 1

Punctuation – sentences, question marks; Writing questions; Apostrophes for ownership

Genre

Exposition 1

Prepositions – choosing correct, time or place, opposites (changing meaning)

Narrative 1 Adjectives – choosing, replacing; Punctuation – commas

Report 1

Narrative 2

Exposition 2

Prepositions – sentences, identifying

Nouns/adjectives – people/places/things/like/dislike; Punctuation – paragraphs, direct speech

Punctuation – statements, questions, capital letter; Proper nouns

Verbs – doing/being/having, Adverbs – time/place/manner

Report 2

Writing short, clear statements; Procedure – Making pikelets recipe

Procedure 2

Procedure 1

Concluding statements, Recount – student choice

Collective nouns; Pronouns; Personal pronouns – placement, ‘me’ or ‘I’

Recount 1

Preparing an exposition – ‘Sunburn’, Persuasive argument, Exposition – student choice

Recount 2

Exposition 1

Analysing a narrative, Sequencing narrative – student choice

Facts and opinions, Report – Animals

Narrative 1

Report 1

Directions to reach library, Procedure – ‘How I get to school’

Interesting vocabulary, Recount – student choice

Procedure 2

Recount 2

Getting the message across; Signs – positive, negative; Exposition – student choice

Report 2

Report descriptions, Self-report; Report – Doctor/Nurse/Teacher, Report – Occupations; ‘Facts, not opinions’

Narrative 2 Writing resolutions, Narrative – student choice

Exposition 2

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Suffixes – adding ‘ly’, ‘ly’ to consonant and ‘le’, 1-1-1 rule

Plurals (‘s’ or ‘es’, ves/y to i), ‘f’ graphemes

Narrative 1 Homophones – their/there/they’re

Exposition 1 Long ‘e’, graphemes, Question words

Recount 1

Phrase meanings, Dictionary meaning, Narrative 2 Masculine/feminine/neutral nouns – people and animals Sports equipment/venue/people, Report 2 Acrostic poem – favourite sport, Overused words: nice, Choosing better words Suffixes (s, ed, er, ing, est); Adding ‘ing’, ‘er’, ‘ed’ to ‘e’ Procedure 1 words (spelling rule); Short vowels; Consonants; Syllables

Exposition 2 Matching words, Synonyms, Antonyms

Recount 2

Procedure 2 Homophones – selecting meanings, correct

Report 1

Narrative 1 Acrostic poems (holiday/caravan), Contractions

Exposition 1

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Exposition 1 Planning speeches, Facts and opinions – Wearing hats

Holidays

Procedure 1 Practising instructions, Evaluating instructions

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Similarities and differences between humans and dolphins

Narrative 1 Brainstorm rules, Good sports Report 1

Beach activities and equipment

Recount 1

For information, For understanding, Application – School rules

Vocabulary Spelling

Procedure 2 Following directions Recount 2 Exposition 2 Parks – Persuasive arguments Narrative 2 Fairytale morals

Exposition 1

For information, For understanding, Application – Caravan park activities

Describing physical activities

Narrative 1

For information, For understanding, Application – Poster for a dolphin show

Narrative 2

Writing

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Report 1

For information, For understanding, Application – Procedure 2 Mapping journeys, School travel graph For information, For understanding, Recount 2 Application – ‘Painful young children’ and disability parking For information, For understanding, Application – Predicting outcomes Exposition 2

Report 2

For information, For understanding, Application – Draw and label the features for a safe skateboarder

Language features

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SCOPE AND SEQUENCE CHART


ANSWERS Procedure 1 Mini pizza: pages 1–19 Page 2 Teacher check

Page 3

1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

combine – combines, combined, combining spread – spreads, spreader, spreading add – adds, added, adding cook – cooks, cooker, cooked, cooking brown – browns, browner, browned, browning, brownest mix – mixes, mixer, mixed, mixing clean – cleans, cleaner, cleaned, cleaning, cleanest enjoy – enjoys, enjoyed, enjoying pinch – pinches, pincher, pinched, pinching cut – cuts, cutter, cutting brush – brushes, brushed, brushing

(f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k)

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1. Goal Teacher check Requirements Teacher check Steps (a) Cut the rolls in halves. (b) Preheat the oven. (c) Mix herbs, sugar and paste. (d) Dice the capsicum. (e) Bake for 12 minutes. Test The pizza tastes and looks good. Answers may vary.

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2. (a) grating (b) dicing (c) (d) combining (e) tasting (f) (g) serving (h) deciding (i) (j) preparing (k) taking (l) 3. (a) dice – diced (b) bake – baker, baked (c) taste – taster, tasted (d) serve – server, served (e) combine – combined (f) decide – decider, decided (g) half – halved (h) grate – grater, grated (i) save – saving, saved 4. Teacher check

halving baking pasting saving

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Applying your knowledge Teacher check

Page 6 1. Teacher check 2. c a p s i c u m u p c m e l t

3. (a) (c) (e) (f) (g)

g u d o j p b

r r e z k a r

a e f z l s e

t e g a m t a

e i d r i e d

c h e e s e o

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b a s i l n o e

a s u g a r p n

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Page 4

spoon (b) cup glass (d) knife fork the extra letters are zpzia. The word is pizza. Teacher check

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Teacher check

Page 10

1. Make a cake, Butter the bread, Cook a pizza, Slice the tomatoes, Wash the dishes, Eat the sandwich 2. (a) Stir the sauce. (b) Cook the cake. (c) Turn the meat. (d) Toss the salad. (e) Wash the dishes. (f) Chop the carrots. (g) Drain the rice. (h) Roll the pastry. (i) Add the flour. (j) Boil the eggs. 3. (a) Grate (b) Cut (c) Dice (d) Bake (e) Serve (Eat) (f) Add (g) Eat (Serve)

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ANSWERS Page 11 1. (a) (d) 2. (a) (d) (g) (j)

future past drained added grated served

(b) (e) (b) (e) (h) (k)

past present mixed melted halved baked

Page 12

present future washed brushed combined tasted

pizza (2) tomato (3) long (1) mozzarella (4) Cook the pasta. Wash the dishes. present present

(b) (d) (f) (h) (b) (d) (b) (d)

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3. (a) took (b) write (d) buys (e) ran (g) took (h) see 4. Teacher check

(c) came (f) thinks

Recount 1 Letter from Singapore: pages 20–40 Page 21

Teacher check

Page 14

1. Answers may vary, but may include: (a) Set/Preheat oven to 180 ºC. (b) Cut rolls in halves lengthways. (c) Stir eggs, milk and sugar. (d) Mix flours, add herbs. (e) Place mixture in pan. (f) Cook cake 45 minutes at 180 ºC.

sugar (2) capsicum (3) pineapple (3) basil (2) Stir the sauce. Boil the water. past future

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(c) (f) (c) (f) (i) (l)

7. (a) (c) (e) (g) 8. (a) (c) 9. (a) (c)

Title A holiday in Singapore Setting Who – Melissa, To whom – Jessica Who – Melissa, Kylie and Bec Why – for a holiday When – Sunday afternoon Events 1. The trip was smooth. 2. They watched the movie Insomnia. 3. They noticed the smell. 4. They went for a walk. 5. They saw the busy streets and shops. Ending/Comment She thinks Singapore is very interesting.

Page 16 Teacher check

Page 17

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Page 18 – Evaluation

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1. Teacher check 2. Text: A procedure has a goal, a list of requirements, steps and a test at the end. Language: A procedure uses clear, concise statements. 3. Teacher check

Page 19 – Evaluation

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4. A suffix is added to the end of a word. 5. (a) eating (b) tasting (c) baking (d) grating (e) cooking (f) tossing (g) dicing (h) draining 6. crack dice ham drain cup break add hot

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Reading for information 1. True 2. False 4. False 5. True Reading for understanding 1–3. Teacher check

3. True 6. True

Page 24 4–5. Teacher check Applying your knowledge 1. the in-flight movie 2. sights 3. sounds 4. shop fronts 5. lights 1–3. Teacher check R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS Page 25

Page 29

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1. (a) Teacher check (b) b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, z 2. (a) a, e, i, o, u (b)–(c) Teacher check

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smoke go noticed movie we Kylie fairly light blind true chew

road hope window real be street free bite tie cute use

(c) show (f) most

1. (a) (d) 1. (a) (b)

no (b) yes (c) no yes (e) yes (f) no I looked for my passport, but I couldn’t find it. Leave the room key at reception when you are leaving the hotel. (c) Melissa had to buy new sunglasses because she lost her old ones. (d) Take an umbrella with you if it looks like rain. (e) Please wait for me until I have finished writing this postcard.

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(i) busy (l) evening (c) sky (c) new

(b) Finish unpacking your clothes. You may go for a walk. (c) You must put a stamp on the postcard. I can post it for you. 3. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) then/and (b) then/and (c) while (d) and/before/then

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(b) (e) (h) (b) (e) (h) (k) (b) (e) (b) (e)

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (c) mystery Page 31 •f orr evi e w p u r po sesonl y• (f) keen 2. (a) Bec wasn’t feeling well. She went to bed.

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3. (a) (d) (g) 4. (a) (d) (g) (j) 5. (a) (d) 6. (a) (d)

2. (a) Melissa, Kylie and Bec went to Singapore. (b) The three girls went shopping on Tuesday. (c) It was very busy at Changi Airport in January. (d) Bec told Melissa that her favourite shop was Chans in Orchard Road. (e) The girls went to visit Sentosa Island and Arab Street. (f) Melissa returned to Australia and showed Jessica her photos of Singapore.

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1. Answers may include: (a) Singapore – sing, sin, in, a, gap, pore, or, ore (b) window – wind, win, in, do (c) everything – eve, ever, every, very, thin, thing, in (d) captivate – cap, apt, ate, at, vat (e) afternoon – after, tern, noon, no, on (f) studying – stud, study, dying 2. Teacher check 3. (a) movie (b) smell (c) shops (d) unpack

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1. (a) People – Julia, Claire, people, girls Places – countries, Buckingham Palace, London, Eiffel Tower, Paris Things – way, things, buildings, fun, holidays (b) (i) They were running to school. (ii) My mother is waiting for me. (iii) Will you please close the door. (iv) Where did you leave your new bike? (v) Why didn’t she take her raincoat? (vi) We all wanted to visit Antarctica. (c) Julia, Claire, Buckingham Palace, London, Eiffel Tower, Paris

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4. (a) Before you go to bed, turn off the light. (b) When you wash your hair, please don’t use my shampoo. (c) While she is having a rest, try not to make a noise. 5. (a) His mother had a rest while the baby was asleep. (b) The team all went out for dinner after the important football match. (c) You can not watch television until you tidy up your room.

Page 34 Teacher check

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ANSWERS Page 35

Exposition 1 Hats: pages 40–58

Teacher check

Page 41

Page 36

Teacher check. Answers may vary

Teacher check

Page 42

Page 37 – Evaluation

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© (c)Rspice . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 43 •f orr e v i e w p ur posesonl y• mad (S) stay (L) Reading for information

insomnia (b) source captivate (e) cafe Teacher check they (L) leg (S) fin (s) key (L) under (S) few (L) elf (S) ant (S)

neigh (L) fairly (L) fit (S)

cot (S) flow (L) coat (L)

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6. (a) people, places, things (b) cat ( ) Singapore ( ) skip ( or ) fly ( or ) Jack ( ) jump ( or ) aeroplane ( ) Mary ( ) insect ( ) street ( ) play ( or ) eat ( ) Sydney ( ) bowl ( or ) March ( ) 7. (a) Ana, Chin, Melissa, Bec, Changi Airport, Melissa, Chin, Raffles Plaza, Raffles Hotel, Wednesday, Ana, Patrick 8. (a) Conjunctions are joining words. (b) (i) and (ii) or (iii) because (iv) until 9. Teacher check

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(a) false (b) true (d) false (e) true Reading for understanding Teacher check

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(c) true

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4. (a) (d) 5. (a) (b)

Title Students having to wear hats for sun protection. Overview Wear their hats when they go outside. Reasons 1. Because some children are not wearing hats in the playground. 2. To protect students from sun damage. 3. It can cause skin cancer. 4. To offer maximum protection for a student’s face and neck. 5. In the middle of the day. 6. To protect your skin for the rest of your life. Conclusion To wear their hats at school, on the weekends and during the summer holidays

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1. Teacher check 2. (a) A recount is a retelling of past events in time order (or similar). (b) A recount has: a title, a setting, events, and a concluding statement (or comment). 3. (a) The title tells what the recount is about. (b) The setting discusses who, when, where and why the events happen. (c) The events tell what happened and are in order. (d) The concluding statement tells the ending and what the writer thinks about it (or similar).

Applying your knowledge Teacher check

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The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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1. (a) size – large, small colour – green, white material – fur, straw use – school, surf (b) Teacher check (c) Teacher check 2. (a) opinion (b) Teacher check

Page 46 1. we 2. (a) e ea ee

speak been only money – we, me, remember, responsible, even – speak – been, see, seen, weekend

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ANSWERS y

(b) (c) (d) (e)

– only, simply, very, scary, specially, many ey – money Teacher check yes Because ey in ‘they’ makes an a sound and not an e sound. (i) Murray (ii) primary

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Teacher check

Page 55 Teacher check

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1. (a) Teacher check (b) Lack of punctuation (c) It was hot. The sun was burning my skin and my mouth felt very dry. I just had to have a drink of cool water but I had forgotten my water bottle. What could I do? Luckily my sister had hers. She was very generous and said that we could share hers. Isn’t she kind! (d) Teacher check 2. What could I do?

1. Teacher check 2. An exposition is something written or spoken to persuade others to think or do something. An exposition can be in the form of a speech an essay or a letter. An exposition has: a title, an overview, arguments (reasons), a conclusion. 3. (a) The title tells what the exposition is about. (b) The overview tells what the writer or speaker wants to happen. (c) The reasons are the arguments which persuade the audience. (d) The conclusion is the final comment and summing up.

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3. wh 4. (a) What (b) Why (d) Where/How (e) How (g) Who 5. Teacher check

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Page 57 © R. I . C.Pub l i c at i ons 4. Facts: boots, leather, brown, size 6, lace up Opinions: heavy, big, soft, comfortable, ugly •f orr evi ew pur po se n l y• 5. (a) factso (b) opinion (c) opinion

3. Teacher check

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4. Teacher check

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5. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 6. (a) (c) (e) (f)

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(d) fact (e) fact (f) opinion 6. (a) happy report donkey family she key leaf meal sheep street (b) The word windy should be underlined.

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the teachers’ carpark the child’s desk the principal’s office the gardener’s shed footballers’ jumpers The rubbish bin’s lid my father’s car (b) the doctors’ surgery the cat’s tail (d) the men’s shirts the books’ illustrations the cake’s icing (g) the ladies’ cars

Page 52 1. Teacher check

Page 53 2. Teacher check R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

7. (a) wh (b)–(c) Teacher check 8. (a) question mark (b) question mark (c) question mark (d) question mark (e) full stop (f) question mark (g) full stop

Narrative 1 Beach cricket: pages 59–75 Page 60 1. Teacher check 2. Teacher check

Page 61 Title Beach cricket The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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ANSWERS Page 67 1–2. Teacher check 3. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) small, short, tiny (b) small, tiny, minute (c) boring, dull (d) calm, peaceful (e) ugly, dull, rotten (f) noisy

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Reading for information 1. False 2. False 4. True 5. False Reading for understanding 1–4. Teacher check

3. True

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4. Teacher check

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1. I searched for my bag in my room, in the car and in the family room. 2. (a) I broke my arm when I fell out of the tree, climbing up to get the ball. (b) She ran to catch the bus, tripping over the rock. (c) He rang the doorbell when he arrived at my house, looking for his lost bird. (d) Take care walking home from your school, crossing the main road and don’t talk to strangers. (e) I like carrots, eating fruit and most green vegetables.

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Orientation Who – Alex Who – Hannah; other children; Dad, Mum and 4 adults What – playing beach cricket Where – on the beach When – in summer holidays Complication – Dad wouldn’t accept that Hannah bowled him out. – Alex then had a turn at bowling and also got him out. Resolution Dad wouldn’t let Alex play.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 63 •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y• Applying your knowledge Page 71 Teacher check

1. Teacher check

Page 64

Page 65 4. (a) (c) 5. (a) (c) (e)

Page 72 Teacher check let’s (b) howzat doesn’t (e) I’d can’t (h) we’ll

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1–2. 3. (a) (d) (g)

their There, their their There, there There

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(b) (d) (b) (d)

2. (a) 3, (b) 1, (c) 5, (d) 4, (e) 6, (f) 2 (c) don’t (f) that’s

Teacher check

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There, their there there their

Page 66 1. (a) I hope that they’re not going to be late. (b) They’re working hard. (c) I wonder why they’re looking at me. (d) They’re beautiful. 2. (a) I don’t know where they’re going to school. (b) Why don’t you ask their teacher? (c) She is over there, near the library. 3. Teacher check 54

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Page 75 – Evaluation

1. Teacher check 2. (a) A narrative has four parts, which are a title, an orientation, a complication, a resolution and a conclusion. (b) The orientation tells who, what, where and when. (c) The resolution tells how the problem is solved. 3. (a) did not (b) would not (c) I had/I would (d) we are (e) she will (f) what is

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ANSWERS 4. (a) They lost their ball at the beach. (b) I think it’s over there. (c) They’re going to look for it. 5. Teacher check 6. (a) I like dogs, riding horses and watching television. (b) The boy sat on the seat, waiting for his father. (c) Trying to climb the tree, she fell and broke her arm.

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Across: 2. milk 4. blowhole 6. skeleton 10. kilogram 11. tail 13. flipper 14. calves

Page 78

1. Title Dolphins Classification Dolphins are toothed-whales and cetaceans (a group of mammals) Description – Dolphins range from 1.2 metres to 7 metres in length and from 30 kg to 4 tonnes in weight. Most are grey or black. – They breathe through a blowhole on the top of their heads while they are on the surface. – Dolphins swim using their flippers to steer and turn. Conclusion Pollution, fishing nets and decreasing fish supplies threaten dolphins.

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Down: 1. pollution 3. low 4. biggest 5. pod 6. species 7. mammal 8. dolphin 9. orca 12. metre 14. fish 15. dark

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1–3.

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Report 1 Dolphins: pages 76–93 Page 77

3. eye: look, blink, watch, wink, stare ear: hear, listen, sound, thunder, ring mouth: talk, chew, smile, bite, yell hand: feel, grab, touch, clap, throw nose: sneeze, smell, sniff, perfume, aroma

1. (a) flippers (b) boxes © R. I . C.Publ i c a t i o n s (c) matches (d) jaws groups (f) glasses •f orr evi ew pur po(g)(e)se s o n l y brushes (h) • animals

3. (a) (c) (e) 4. (a)

(b) (d) (f) (h)

supplies lollies fairies cities

halves (b) selves wolves (d) shelves wives (f) thieves The elves rode the calves through the leaves as they ran for their lives away from the hungry wolves. (b)–(c) Teacher check

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Reading for information 1. true 2. false 4. false 5. false Reading for understanding 1–4. Teacher check

3. true 6. false

Page 80 Applying your knowledge Teacher check

Page 81 1. (a) shark (c) pollution 2. Teacher check

Page 84

ladies families puppies ferries

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2. (a) (c) (e) (g)

(b) flippers

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Page 85 5. (a) The family watched the dolphins frolic in the pool. (b) They laughed when the dolphins’ calf splashed water into Dad’s cup of coffee. (c) After the show they had enough money to buy their favourite muffins to take home for their friends Sophie and Phillip. 6. Teacher check The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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ANSWERS Page 86 1. Jade went to the park with Kelly. They got off the bus and walked along the path beside the lake. They jumped over the stepping stones then walked under the bridge near the trees. After crawling through the tunnel they sat on the grass among the flowers and watched the birds flying above their heads.

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(c) to

(c) place (f) place

6. (a) under (b) (d) near (e) (g) on 7. (a) time (b) (d) place (e) (g) place 8. Teacher check

down at

(c) against (f) along

time time

(c) time (f) manner

Procedures 2 Getting to school: pages 94–114 Page 95

Page 88

Teacher check

5. Teacher check 6. (a) Put the dishes in the dishwasher. (b) Is your house near the school? (c) My sister sat down beside the swimming pool. (d) The horse came from New Zealand. (e) I enjoy ice-skating with my friends. 7. Teacher check

(c) caravans (f) desks

Page 93 – Evaluation

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with with place time

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(b) leaves (e) halves (h) lives

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2. (a) of (b) (d) from (e) 3. (a) time (b) (d) place (e) (g) time 4. Teacher check

5. (a) knives (d) doctors (g) spoons

Page 96 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Yes, to explain to Mrs Gill how to get to school. No, because Mrs Gill is not making anything. yes, yes Teacher check step 1. along Davies Road step 2. turn right at T-junction step 3. along to next T-junction step 4. turn left step 5. pass Watkins and Edna Road step 6. go through roundabout step 7. cross Riley Road step 8. turn right into Colin Street 6. She would find the school.

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Teacher check

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(c) fact

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1. Teacher check 2. (a) Reports give facts clearly without unnecessary information or opinions. (b) A report has a title, classification, description and conclusion. (c) A report should give facts, not opinions. 3. (a) wishes (b) boats (c) crabs (d) teachers (e) bosses (f) churches 4 (a) babies (b) bunnies (c) shirts (d) daisies (e) copies (f) colours 56

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Reading for information 1. false 2. true 4. false 5. true Reading for understanding 1–3. Teacher check

3. true

Page 98 Applying your knowledge Teacher check

Page 99 1. (a) buoy – a maker which floats on water (b) weather – the state of the atmosphere— hot, cold, wet, dry (c) weak – liable to break or fall down R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS (d) threw – tossed or flung in the air (e) plane – a tool for smoothing wood (f) gorilla – the largest kind of ape 2. new, boy, rode, whether, would, meet, some, new, would, not, be, gate, by, heard, you, boy, here

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rode (b) meat (c) knew four, fore (e) to, too (f) reed passed (h) write (i) ewe, yew sea (k) witch (l) threw dew, morning (b) reign, wear, mourning checks, border (d) sent, boarder, eight to, meet, course (f) new, coarse which, our, week (h) witch, see, weight plane, four (j) rode, their, plain

Page 105 1. (a) (c) (e) 2. (a) (c) (e)

yesterday lazily early close everywhere out

Page 106 3. Teacher check 4. (a) today

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gladly (b) slowly (e) badly (h) savagely (k) rapidly (n) simply (b) idly (e) comfortably sensibly (j)

rudely (c) proudly quickly (f) surely seriously (i) bravely swiftly (l) lightly cowardly terribly (c) visibly nobly (f) feebly (h) noticeably possibly

Page 107 (c) early (e) now 5. Teacher check

(b) (d) (f) (b) (d) (f)

loudly inside upstairs here inside behind

(b) yesterday

(d) often (f) later

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 108 •f orr evi ew pur po seso nl y• 6. (a) quickly (b) easily (c) proudly

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chop

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skip

yes

rest

yes

grind

yes

stick

yes

yes

no

map

yes

yes

yes

swim

yes

yes

yes

4. (a) belt

boat

(b) 4 (d) 5

yes yes yes

(d) strongly (e) warmly 7. (a) loudly (b) slowly (d) safely (e) neatly 8. Teacher check

yes

no

no

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

no

no

no

Teacher check

(f) carefully (c) badly (f) quickly

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1. Doing: explain, drive, turn, go, see, continue, cross, follow Being: is, be Having: has, have 2. Teacher check

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3. (a) (d) (g) (j) 4. (a) (c) (e) (g) (i)

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Teacher check

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Teacher check

Page 112 – Evaluation 1. Teacher check 2. Text: A procedure explains how to do (or make) something. Language: The statements in a procedure must be short, clear and precise. 3. (a) Maps are included to make the steps clearer and easier to understand. (b) Order is important because you need to do some things before others. The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

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ANSWERS 4. (a) different (b) two/too, new, for/fore, which, right, see

Page 113 – Evaluation (b) Teacher check idly (c) sensibly feebly (f) possibly shutting (c) banning stopping (f) slapping quitting thinner (c) farmer batter (f) painter finder (i) holder jumper (l) wiper

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(b) (e) (b) (e) (h) (b) (e) (h) (k)

Page 118 Reading for information 1. false 2. true 3. false 4. false 5. true Reading for understanding 1–3. Teacher check Applying your knowledge 1. (a) Dad may have received a parking fine.

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9. (a) Teacher check (b) doing verbs – walked, crossed, turning, turned, realised, reached, knocked, drove being verbs – was having verbs – had (c) doing 10. (a) Teacher check (b) time – after, suddenly place – left, right manner – carefully, hopelessly, loudly, happily

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5. (a) end 6. (a) horribly (d) visibly 7. (a) hitting (d) letting (g) chopping 8. (a) shaker (d) rider (g) slipper (j) swimmer

5. Dad got into the water. Ending 6. They thought it was great and worth the effort.

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(b) Teacher check 2–3. Teacher check Teacher check. Answers may include: 1. (a) grabbed, collected (b) escape, flee, avoid (c) Finally, Eventually

2. l Teacher check. Answers © R. I . C.Pub i ca t i o nsmay include: (a) a grassy area to play in; to stop a vehicle at a stationary point •f orr evi ew pur p o s e s onl y• (b) an event at which people dance; a rounded

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1. Teacher check

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(e) 3. (a) (d) (e) (g) (h) (i)

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Teacher check. Answers may include Title The recount is about a family going to the beach. Setting Where – the beach Who – Mum, Dad, Luke, the writer When – A hot sticky day Why – for a swim because it was hot Events 1. They required petrol. 2. They couldn’t find a place to park. 3. Dad went to look for a park on his own. 4. They picked up their boards and raced into the water. 58

(d)

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Recount 2 The beach: pages 115–131

object that is used in sport to move one’s hand to say hello or goodbye; a crest on water made by wind a popular game played with a bat and a ball; a small insect that hops a dot; a particular place cold (b) go (c) night happy/contented/calm sister (f) left/departed up displeased/unhappy/sad out (of) (j) empty/vacate

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

Page 121 4. (a) (c) (e) (g) 1. (a) (d) 2. (a) (d)

discontinued imperfect disagreed not cube (b) rode (e) cap (b) cod (e)

(b) unwanted (d) impatiently (f) uninviting ride shine pin pan

(c) (f) (c) (f)

cane hate us fin

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ANSWERS Page 122 3. (a) (c) (e) (g) (i) (k) (m)

2, milking 2, asking 1, rotting 2, costing 2, wishing 1, chopping 2, tossing

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(b) (d) (f) (h) (j) (l) (n)

1, stepping 2, filling 1, skipping 1, shutting 1, batting 2, dusting 2, minding

Page 130 – Evaluation 4. Teacher check (a) fill-up (b) told (c) Finally, 5. (a) Homographs have the same spelling but more than one meaning. (b) Teacher check 6. (a) after (b) front (c) low (d) dull (e) over (f) child (g) good (h) small 7. Teacher check

Page 124

4. A gaggle is a flock of geese; a skein is a flock in flight. 1. (a) he/she (b) he (c) it (d) they (e) her

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1. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) soldiers (b) cattle (c) birds (d) fish (e) flowers (f) footballers 2. (a) crows (b) owls (c) geese Teacher check 3. (a) herd (b) flock (c) troop (d) swarm (e) pride

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3. (a) who, where and when (b) what, order (c) the ending and what the speaker thinks about it.

Page 131 – Evaluation

8. (a) running (b) sitting (c) singing (d) hitting (e) hopping (f) jumping (g) skipping (h) stopping 9. Teacher check. Answers may vary: (a) cattle (b) birds (c) bees (d) grapes (e) geese 10. My best friend, John, lives near the beach. I think that he and his family are so lucky. All they need to do is grab their gear and carry it across the road. When I stay with them, we go swimming every day. 11. (a) I (b) me (c) I (d) me (e) me (f) I

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2. (a) He gave the puppy to Dad and me. (b) Jane and I are learning to speak Italian. (c) The coach chose Tony, Shane and me to play in the school cricket team. (d) My sister, Mum and I went to see the school play. (e) Nana bought Jaime and me an ice-cream. 3. (a) me (b) I (c) I (d) I (e) me

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Exposition 2 Save Lake Wilson: pages 132–146

o c . che e r o t r s super

Teacher check

Page 128 Teacher check

Page 129 – Evaluation 1. Teacher check 2. Text: A recount is a retelling of past events in the order that they occurred. Structure: A recount has: title, setting, events R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

Page 133

Teacher check

Page 134

Teacher check. Answers may include: Title The exposition is about saving Lake Wilson. Overview They want the manager to make Lake Wilson pleasant and safe. Reasons 1. They went to Lake Wilson on Clean Up Australia Day. 2. They want more people to be able to enjoy the park.

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59


ANSWERS 3. more rubbish bins, plastic bags for dog owners, regular cleaning of toilets 4. improved lighting, gas barbecues, shady trees 5. repainting of signs, less rubbish, more trees Conclusion As soon as possible.

Page 135

1. (a) Why did the children go to the lake? (b) Do you know why they needed more rubbish bins? (c) I think that the lake could be a really beautiful place. (d) Please pick up your rubbish before you leave. (e) When would be a good time to plant some more trees? 2. I don’t really like picnics. What do you think about them? There are often too many flies. I hate flies. Another problem is that there is nowhere comfortable to sit. Do you enjoy balancing a plate on your knee while sitting on a rug? It’s not my idea of fun.

3. true

Page 136

Applying your knowledge 1–4. Teacher check 1. (a) assistance (b) located (c) concerned (d) restore (e) propose

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Reading for information 1. false 2. false 4. false 5. true Reading for understanding 1–4. Teacher check

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Page 139

Page 140

1. People – Ben Smith, Dr Harris, Mrs Tan, Mickey Mouse, Sleeping Beauty Places – Point Walter, Monash University, Melbourne, Mount Wellington, Lake Clifton Days – Wednesday Months – January Books and films – Sleeping Beauty, Finding Nemo Products – Fanta™, Cherry Ripe™ Special occasions – Easter 2. (a) My favourite book is Black Beauty, but I lost it last Tuesday. (b) Last Christmas, my family went to Coral Bay for a holiday. (c) Our house is in Green Street, close to the Melbourne Cricket Ground. (d) I love listening to music, especially Kylie Minogue, who is the singer I enjoy most.

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3. (a) irregular (b) adequate (c) seldom (d) insufficient 1. Answers may include: (a) e – facilities, restore, recent, reviewed, we, being, misbehave, believe, repainting ee – weekend, seeking, meeting, trees ea – dear, cleaning, clean ey – money y – lovely, very, carrying, shady, community, facility, especially, fully, sincerely, regularly

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. (a) regular (b) facilities (c) inadequate (d) r provided •f or evi ew pur posesonl y• (e) ensure

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believe, facilities weekend, seeking, meeting, trees tray (b) rain (c) game snake (e) education (f) pain hay (h) dictation ay (b) a Answers will vary

Page 141

1. Teacher check 2. Answers may include: – Park in marked bays/Park here – Please use barbecues – Children under 14 are welcome/can play here

Page 142 Teacher check

Page 143 Teacher check

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R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au


ANSWERS Page 144 – Evaluation

Page 148 Teacher check. Answers may include: Title It’s a story about a princess and a prince. It may be a fairytale. Orientation Who – The main characters are Princess Sophie, Prince Alex. Who – The minor characters are the king, Prince Nicholas, Troll and the wealthy king with five children. Where – In Princess Sophie’s father’s kingdom When – Once upon a time. What – The country had fallen on hard times Complication The king was sick, the crops had failed and he needed money to feed his people. Resolution Prince Alex found mushrooms which cured the king.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Page 145 – Evaluation 6. enjoy, park, path, peaceful, safe, walk 7. (a) Why don’t we go to the park more often? (b) My favourite park is quite close to where we live. It only takes 10 minutes to walk there. (c) I can’t understand why people drop rubbish and spoil such a beautiful place. They are so selfish. (d) Jess, what would you like for your birthday next Monday? You can have money, if you like. (e) Did you enjoy reading Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson? He is my favourite author. (f) We enjoyed our holiday in Brisbane. It was June, but the weather was very pleasant. On Thursday, I went to Chatfield Shopping Centre, in York Street, with Sophie and Claire. We bought some presents for our friend, Brittanie. I decided to buy her a book, but I couldn’t decide if she would like or . 8. (a) Teacher check (b) Thursday, Chatfield Shopping Centre, York Street, Sophie, Clare, Brittanie. Students should add two book titles.

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1. Teacher check 2. (a) The purpose of an exposition is to persuade by presenting one side of an argument. (b) An exposition has: a title, an overview, reasons, conclusion. 3. (a) The title tells what the exposition is about. (b) The introductory statement/overview. (c) It tries to persuade people. (d) Make a final comment or summing up. 4. Synonyms are words with the same or a similar meeting. 5. (a) concerned (b) located (c) suggested (d) regular (e) assistance (f) facilities

© R. I . C.Publ i c at i o ns Reading for information (a) true (b) true (c) false •f orr evi ew pur po(d)se so n l y• false (e) false

Reading for understanding (a) He had fallen on hard times. (b) He had good ideas and his plan was successful. (c) Mushrooms grow best in that environment. (d) They were in the water and possibly had moss growing on them. (e) He wanted the troll to wake up.

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Narrative 2 Princess Sophie and the prince: pages 146–166 Page 147 Teacher check R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

Page 150

Applying your knowledge 1–2. Teacher check

Page 151

1. Answers may include: (a) Life had become difficult because the crops had failed, he was poor and his health was bad. (b) He didn’t want his sister there. He wanted her to die. (c) He would be allowed to marry her. She would agree to marry him. 2. Teacher check

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ANSWERS Page 152 3. (a) (d) (g) (j) 4. (a) (d) (g)

Page 159 MF M MF M queen sister boy

(b) (e) (h) (k) (b) (e) (h)

MF MF F MF father empress wife

mare nanny sow furiously frailly easily ordinarily busily

(b) (e) (h) (b) (e) (h) (k) (n)

doe (c) hen cow (f) lioness peahen kindly (c) happily jealously (f) richly quietly (i) grumpily powerfully (l) commonly silently

Page 153

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MF MF MF MF child grandmother teacher check

1. (a) yes (b) no 2. (a) Teacher check (b) Sentence 1: full stop Sentence 2: comma

(c) yes

Page 160

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3. (a) ‘I don’t like being woken up’, grumbled the troll. (b) The poor king groaned, ’I feel too sick to get out of bed today’. (c) The troll yelled, ‘How dare you make so much noise!’ (d) ‘Please marry me Princess Sophie’, begged Prince Alex.

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5. (a) (d) (g) 1. (a) (d) (g) (j) (m)

(c) (f) (i) (l) (c) (f) (i)

Page 162 Teacher check

Page 163

Page 154

Teacher check

2. Teacher check 3. Teacher check 4. (a) servants (b) slippery (c) furious (d) kingdom (e) handsome (f) disguised

Page 164 © R. I . C.Pu bl i ca t i ons Teacher check Page 165 – Evaluation •f orr evi ew p ur po sesonl y•

Page 156

kind, young, beautiful rich, powerful frail, ill poor, hungry wealthy, lonely Teacher check

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1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) 2. (a)

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(b) Teacher check

Page 157 3. (a) (c) (e) (g) (j)

1. Teacher check 2. (a) title (c) complication (e) conclusion 3. (a) wife (b) (d) princess (e) (g) queen 4. (a) softly (b) (d) silently (e) (g) happily (h)

(b) orientation (d) resolution

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lioness (c) mare daughter (f) cow

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7 (b) yes Princess (d) kingdom Prince Nicholas (f) the neighbouring king 3 (h) 3 (i) 1 To introduce a new idea and make the story easier to understand. 4. Teacher check

lazily busily quietly

(c) rudely (f) noisily

Page 166 – Evaluation

5. Teacher check 6. (a) To introduce a new idea. (b) Leave a space and start a new line. 7. (a) ‘Look, I think that boat is sinking’, yelled the man. (b) The girl whispered, ‘Steady there boy, steady’.

Page 158 5. Teacher check

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ANSWERS Report 2 Skateboarding: pages 167–183 Page 168 Teacher check

Page 169

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Teacher check. Answers may include: Title Skateboarding, Teacher check Classification A board with wheels for riders to stand on. Description (a) roller-skating and surfing (b) The boards had hard clay wheels, were hard to turn and dangerous (c) They were softer, gripped the road, rolled over cracks so riders could do tricks (d) All around the world (e) helmets, wrist guards, knee and elbow pads, glove and high-top sneakers Conclusion Many boards have been sold and special facilities have been built for skateboarders.

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(d) exciting, interesting, thrilling, lively (e) attractive, beautiful, colourful, interesting (f) attractive, comfortable, cosy, homely (g) big, awful, unbelievable (h) good, successful, great 4. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) fine, sunny, great (b) entered, caught, jumped on (c) fun, exciting, interesting, wonderful (d) yelled, roared, called, cried (e) pondered, wondered, thought, asked (f) scored, kicked, bagged, shot (g) found, bought, made (h) finally, eventually, thankfully (i) clever, smart, cunning, virtuoso (j) breathtaking, exhilarating, important (k) fun, exciting, enjoyable

Page 174

1. (a) toe open coat potatoes throat soap though bony echo throne hoe chose throw own (b) 6 (c) ow – blow, throw, own o_e – slope, throne, chose oa – coat, throat, soap o – open, bony, echo ough – though, dough, although oe – toe, potatoes, hoe 2. (a) tired, child, cried, night (b) drive, ice-cream (c) tried, height (d) type, quite (e) shy, smiled, I, ride, bike (f) slide 3. Teacher check

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Reading for information 1. true 2. false 3. true 4. true 5. false Reading for understanding 1. (a) very flexible (b) wider trucks (c) larger wheels (d) urethane wheels 2. It was a combination of roller-skating and surfing. 3. They were hard to turn and moved very fast because of their clay wheels. 4. Answers will vary

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slope blow dough although

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Applying your knowledge Teacher check

Page 175 Page 172 1–2.

Teacher check

Page 173 3. Teacher check. Answers may include: (a) kind, friendly, gentle, considerate, sweet (b) good-looking, smart, attractive (c) tasty, pleasant, yummy, delicious R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

4. (a) (d) (g) (j) 5. (a) (d) (g) (j)

ew ue u_e ui foxes purses atlases babies

(b) u (e) u (h) ew

(c) u_e (f) ue (i) iew

(b) dishes (e) calves (h) crosses

(c) parks (f) lives (i) lunches

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ANSWERS 6. (a) foxes, dishes, atlases, crosses, lunches (b) babies (c) parks (d) calves, lives

Page 176 Teacher check

Page 177

Page 178

3. Teacher check 4. (a) The teacher growled at the noisy children in the library. (b) Several people were waiting for the train on Saturday. (c) The horse jumped over the gate and galloped towards the road. (d) Last weekend we watched the dolphins diving under and over the waves. (e) During the holidays we camped by the river at Alexander Bridge.

Page 185 – Evaluation

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time (b) place (c) time place (e) time with (b) on, over, under when, before/for (d) before, after, during towards, over (f) before, after over, through

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1. (a) (d) 2. (a) (c) (e) (g)

7. i_e – bite, nine igh – sight, flight ie – cried i – find ei – neither uy – buy, guy eigh – height y – shy, tyre 8. (a) That new boy is a nuisance because he likes to argue and won’t do yard duty. (b) ew, ui, ue, u 9. (a) foxes (b) babies (c) tomatoes (d) halves (e) pianos (f) dishes (g) lunches (h) teeth (i) bathers (j) knives

10–11. Teacher check 12. (a) Put your bag in your room before you watch television. (b) I like to walk to school in summer. (c) When did your class travel to the zoo on the bus? (d) After dinner, I would like to have a swim in the pool. (e) He fell into the water.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Teacher check

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Teacher check

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Page 183 – Evaluation 1. Teacher check 2. (a) opinions 3–5. Teacher check

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(b) information

Page 184 – Evaluation 6. (a) (d) (g) (j)

64

goat o’clock choke rope

(b) grow (e) though (h) tomato

(c) hoe (f) show (i) float

The English workbook – Teachers resource book – Book D

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

The English Workbook - Teachers Resource Books: Book D - Ages 9+  

The workbooks, designed to improve and develop students' literacy skills, consist of ten units of work, each focused on one of the following...

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