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RIC-6093 2.9/943


Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

A number of pages in this book are worksheets. The publisher licenses the individual teacher who purchased this book to photocopy these pages to hand out to students in their own classes.

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2013 Copyright© Linda Marshall 2013 ISBN 978-1-921750-90-8 RIC–6093

Titles in this series: Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 1) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 2) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 3) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 4) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 5) Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 6)

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All material identified by is material subject to copyright under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) and is owned by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority 2013. For all Australian Curriculum material except elaborations: This is an extract from the Australian Curriculum. Elaborations: This may be a modified extract from the Australian Curriculum and may include the work of other authors. Disclaimer: ACARA neither endorses nor verifies the accuracy of the information provided and accepts no responsibility for incomplete or inaccurate information. In particular, ACARA does not endorse or verify that: • The content descriptions are solely for a particular year and subject; • All the content descriptions for that year and subject have been used; and • The author’s material aligns with the Australian Curriculum content descriptions for the relevant year and subject. You can find the unaltered and most up to date version of this material at http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/ This material is reproduced with the permission of ACARA.

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AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS RESOURCE BOOK: MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY (FOUNDATION) Foreword

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Contents

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation) is one in a series of seven teacher resource books that support teaching and learning activities in Australian Curriculum Mathematics. The books focus on the measurement and geometry content strands of the national maths curriculum. The resource books include theoretical background information, resource sheets, hands-on activities and assessment activities, along with links to other curriculum areas.

Format of this book....................................................................... iv – v Using units of measurement...........................................................2–29 • UUM – 1

• Shape – 1

Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language (ACMMG006) Teacher information ..................................................................................2–3 Hands-on activities ....................................................................................... 4 Links to other curriculum areas ..................................................................... 5 Resource sheets .......................................................................................6–13 Assessment ...........................................................................................14–16 Checklist ...................................................................................................... 17

• UUM – 2

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Teacher information .................................................................................... 18 Hands-on activities ..................................................................................... 19 Links to other curriculum areas ................................................................... 20 Resource sheets .....................................................................................21–23 Assessment ................................................................................................. 24 Checklist ...................................................................................................... 25

• UUM – 3

– – – – – –

Teacher information ....................................................................................30 Hands-on activities .....................................................................................31 Links to other curriculum areas ...................................................................32 Resource sheets ....................................................................................33–41 Assessment .................................................................................................42 Checklist ......................................................................................................43

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Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time (ACMMG007) – – – – – –

Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment (ACMMG009)

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Location and transformation ....................................................... 44–53 • L&T – 1

Describe position and movement (ACMMG010) – – – – – –

Teacher information ....................................................................................44 Hands-on activities ..............................................................................45–46 Links to other curriculum areas ...................................................................47 Resource sheets ....................................................................................48–50 Assessment ..........................................................................................51–52 Checklist ......................................................................................................53

Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions (ACMMG008) – – – –

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Shape ........................................................................................ 30–43

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Teacher information .................................................................................... 26 Hands-on activities ..................................................................................... 27 Links to other curriculum areas ................................................................... 28 Checklist ...................................................................................................... 29

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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FORMAT OF THIS BOOK This teacher resource book includes supporting materials for teaching and learning in all sections of the Measurement and Geometry content strand of Australian Curriculum Mathematics. It includes activities relating to all sub-strands: Using units of measurement, Shape, and Location and transformation. All content descriptions have been included, as well as teaching points based on the curriculum’s elaborations. Links to the proficiency strands have also been included. Each section supports a specific content description and follows a consistent format, containing the following information over several pages: • teacher information with related terms, student vocabulary, what the content description means, teaching points and problems to watch for • hands-on activities • links to other curriculum areas

• resource sheets • assessment sheets.

• a checklist

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The length of each content description section varies.

Teacher information includes background information relating to the content description, as well as related terms, and desirable student vocabulary and other useful details which may assist the teacher.

Related terms includes vocabulary associated with the content description. Many of these relate to the glossary in the back of the official Australian Curriculum Mathematics document; additional related terms may also have been added.

What this means provides a general explanation of the content description.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i on s Teaching points provides a list of the main teaching • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • points relating to the content Student vocabulary includes words which

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The proficiency strand(s) (Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving or Reasoning) relevant to each content description are shown in bold.

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description.

What to look for suggests any difficulties and misconceptions the students might encounter or develop.

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the teacher would use—and expect the students to learn, understand and use—during mathematics lessons.

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Hands-on activities includes descriptions or instructions for games or activities relating to the content descriptions or elaborations. Some of the hands-on activities are supported by resource sheets. Where applicable, these will be stated for easy reference.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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FORMAT OF THIS BOOK Links to other curriculum areas includes activities in other curriculum areas which support the content description. These are English, Information and Communication Technology, Health and Physical Education, Science, The Arts, Languages, and Civics and Citizenship. This section may list many links or only a few. It may also provide links to relevant interactive websites appropriate for the age group.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Resource sheets are provided to support teaching and learning activities for each content description. The resource sheets could be cards for games, charts, additional worksheets for class use or other materials which the teacher might find useful to use or display in the classroom. For each resource sheet, the content description to which it relates is given.

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Cross-curricular links reinforce the knowledge that mathematics can be found within, and relate to, many other aspects of student learning and everyday life.

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Assessment pages are included. These support activities in the Hands-on activities or resource sheets.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language (ACMMG006)

TEACHER INFORMATION

RELATED TERMS Length

What this means

• the measure of a path or object in one dimension from end to end. Mass

Teaching points

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• the amount of matter, commonly measured in grams, kilograms, and for heavier objects, tonnes. These units are not expected to be used at this year level. Note: The term ‘weight’ is commonly used when, mathematically, the correct term is ‘mass’. Weight is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object and is used to measure mass. In the classroom setting, the distinction is slight, and the terms can be used interchangeably.

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• Students compare the length of two objects directly by placing one against another and seeing which is longer. • They compare them indirectly when they measure the length of each object with other objects such as counters or pebbles and count to see which one has more. • Students may heft (hold a different object in each hand) to decide which is the heavier of two objects. • Students pour from one container to another to determine which container holds more.

• the amount a container can hold, usually related to liquids or pouring. Note: This is different to volume, which is how much space the object itself takes up.

• With students of this age, the objects to be compared according to their lengths, masses or capacities need to be quite different so that the students can decide without too much difficulty which is longer, heavier or holds more. • If students are using multiples of a unit to compare the lengths of two other objects, e.g. counters, they need to line them up without gaps or overlaps and start from the same place. • Estimation should be encouraged before students undertake any measurement. Estimations can then be revised after some measuring has taken place.

Direct comparison

What to look for

• Using only two items; in length, holding one against the other to see which is longer or shorter; in mass, hefting the objects to decide which is heavier or lighter; in capacity, pouring liquid from one container to another to decide which holds more or less.

• When comparing lengths directly, the students need to have the end of one object level with the end of the other. • When using another object to compare length, students need to lay them out in a straight line (not zigzagged), with no gaps or overlaps.

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• Still only making decisions about two items, but using a third component. For example, in length, using counters to determine the lengths of two pencils, and using the number of counters to decide which pencil is longer or shorter; in mass, using a pan balance and balancing one object against a group of counters, then balancing the second object against counters, and using the number of counters to determine which is heavier or lighter; in capacity, using one measure (e.g. a scoop) and counting how many it takes to fill each of the two containers, then comparing the number of scoops to decide which holds more or less.

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• The objects need to be large enough so that the students can count the number needed.

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language (ACMMG006)

RELATED TERMS Hefting

• Holding an object in each hand and trying to decide which is heavier. It often helps students decide if they then swap hands and re-do the comparison.

• Hefting is quite a difficult skill. Children may need practice at this. It helps to suggest that they swap the items in each hand and see if they still agree which of the two objects is heavier. • You cannot usually determine which is the heavier of two objects just by looking at them; e.g. a golf ball is heavier than a balloon, but visually not as large. • When pouring water or sand from one container to another, once one is full, some students have difficulty then deciding what this means, or which one holds more. Seeing a full container and one with some left in it, can lead some students to believe that the full one must hold more, even though it has been filled from the first container with some left over.

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Note: When we compare two objects, we use the terms long, longer, heavy, heavier, holds more, holds less. When there are more than two objects, this is called seriation or ordering, and we then use the terms shortest, longest, lightest, heaviest and holds the least, holds the most. Ordering is not expected at Foundation level, only the comparison of two objects.

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TEACHER INFORMATION (CONTINUED)

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Student vocabulary tall taller than long longer than the same length as short shorter than holds more than hold less than holds the same as

Proficiency strand(s): Understanding Fluency Problem solving Reasoning

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES Estimate before measuring in all these activities.

Length

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Mass

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• Have pairs of real objects where one of the pair is large and the other small. This may be two books, two dolls, two pencils, two blocks etc. Ask the students which is the larger or smaller of each pair. Then discuss how they could find out which is the larger. • Direct measure: Use the pictures on page 6. Discuss which of the two crocodiles is long and which is longer; or which of the snakes is small and which is smaller. Children may make their decision based on the visual image. However, when the objects are not lined up from the same starting point, they may need to cut them out and overlay them, making sure that they are starting at the same point. • Have the student select six different objects to measure. For each one, students choose a unit such as counters or paper clips to measure it directly. They estimate first and then check by measuring. Use the table on page 8 to record findings. • Indirect measure: Use the pictures of butterflies and ladybugs on page 7, but ask the students to line up counters, blocks, beans, or some other non-standard unit along each of the pairs. Based on the number of units used, they then decide which of the pair is longer or shorter. They will need to use units that, when lined up on the pictures, give a number that is within the their counting range. Discuss the lining up of their units, with no gaps or overlaps, and not zigzagged. • Ask students to use playdough and roll out a ‘snake’ that is as long as their foot. Can they now make it longer than their foot?

• Have pairs of real objects where one of the pair is heavy and the other light. This may be two books, two dolls, two pencils, two blocks etc. Ask the students which is the heavier or lighter of each pair. Note: The student needs to handle the objects to determine which is the heavier; they cannot usually determine which is heavier just by looking at them. • The use of pan balances will help students to determine the heavier of a pair of objects. Discussion will need to take place to help students decide whether the pan that goes down contains the heavier or lighter object. Students can record their results by drawing pictures of the objects in the pan balance on paper or by using page 9. • The use of hefting is another way to compare the masses of two objects. Teachers can help the children to decide which is lighter or heavier by having them place the two articles in their cupped hands and then simulating pan balances. A good suggestion is to change the hand and see if they still agree on which object is heavier. Again, recording their results can be by drawing them or using page 10. • Try to include examples where the heavier object is smaller than the larger one, e.g. a golf ball and a balloon; a large hollow plastic cube and a small wooden one; or a large, light paper book and a small, heavier cardboard one. • Have pairs of objects for students to compare using balance pans. The students record their results by drawing or by using the table on page 11.

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Capacity

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• Have free play with the water trolley or sand tray and different sized containers so that students can pour from one to another. Also have funnels available to make pouring from one container to another easier and more enjoyable. Ask questions such as: Which of these two containers holds more? Which one holds less? Some students may be confused by the visual image of the smaller container being full once some of the contents of the larger one have been poured in, with the larger one still having some left in it. • Discuss the ideas of ‘full’, ‘half full’ and ‘empty’. • Students use rice or small pasta and pour into one container to fill it. Students then pour the contents into a second container and see whether it fills it completely, if there is any left over in the first container, or if there is still room in the second container even after all the contents have been transferred. Discuss what it means when the second container overflows, or when it is not full after pouring from the first to the second container. What does it mean? Which container holds more?

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED) Capacity (continued)

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• Alternatively, ask the student to fill the smaller container and then pour it into the larger one. This is visually less confusing, as the smaller container is now empty and the larger one has some water or sand in it, but some room left. • If both containers are quite large, e.g. a bucket and an ice-cream carton, students may use a smaller container and count how many of them are needed to fill each of the pair. Make sure the results are within the students’ counting range. • The students record the results of their comparisons by drawing the two containers and writing the words ‘holds more’ under the container with the largest capacity and ‘holds less’ under the one with the smaller capacity; or by using page 12. This page contains pictures of ‘containers’ that cannot be measured by students, such as a bath and a swimming pool. In these instances, students decide on which of the two ‘containers’ would hold more from their own knowledge. This could be used as a stimulus for discussion about holding more or less.

English

• Students draw pictures of their comparisons and write the appropriate words about their findings. They use words such as long, longer; heavy, heavier; holds more, holds less. • Read Watch out! Big Bro’s coming by J Alborough. Discuss how Big Bro is so much bigger than his brother. Ask questions such as: Who is bigger? Who is smaller? What about the other animals? • Read Shrinking mouse by Pat Hutchins. • Read Big and small by J Pipe.

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Health and Physical Education

• Students can take small steps and long steps; or small jumps and long jumps. Make the smallest step or jump you can; now make the longest step or jump you can. • In pairs, who can make the longer jump? Is your jump longer or shorter than your partner’s jump? How do you know? Discuss the need to start from the same point to be able to make a suitable comparison.

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• Students draw two snakes; one long and one longer. • Use playdough or plasticine to create long and longer snakes, or other long and longer articles. • Students each roll a snake shape from playdough or plasticine and try to find objects in the room that are longer than, shorter than, or about the same length as their snake.

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• Students compare items collected from the outside environment, e.g. two leaves or flowers for length, two gumnuts or rocks for mass.

Languages

• Students learn the words for long, longer, short, shorter, heavy, heavier, holds more and holds less in another language.

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Write long • or f longer under crocodile. orr e vi eeach wp ur posesonl y•

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Write small or smaller under each snake. 6

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Length


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement— UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET

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Write long or© longer under each butterfl y.on R. I . C.P ubl i cat i s

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

Length

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Write short or shorter under each ladybug. Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET Length

• Choose 6 objects • Draw them • Estimate how long they are • Check by measuring with chosen units such as counters, blocks etc. Actual measure

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

Estimate

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Object


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET

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Draw one object on each side. © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Write heavy or heavier under each side.

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

Which one is heavier?

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Draw one object on each side. Write heavy or heavier under each side. Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET

R. I . C. Publ i cat i ons Draw two objects.© Circle the heavier one.

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Draw yourself holding two objects. Circle the heavier one. 10

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Which one is heavier?


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET Which one is heavier?

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

Put each pair of objects onto balance pans. Circle the one that is heavier.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET Holds more or holds less

Write holds more or holds less.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

RESOURCE SHEET Choose the right words

Draw arrows to match words to the pictures.

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Assessment 1

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

NAME:

DATE:

blocks

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Use blocks to find out which road is longer. orr e vi eeach wp ur posesonl y• Write long • or f longer under road.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Length Use blocks to find out which ant is shorter. Write short or shorter under each ant.


Assessment 2

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

NAME:

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Heavy/heavier? Tick the one that is heavier. Use a pan balance to help.

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Assessment 3

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

NAME:

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Choose two different containers. Draw pictures to show which holds more and which holds less.

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

holds less R.I.C. Publications®

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION : Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language

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Hold more/Holds less Pour water or sand into two containers. Draw pictures to show which holds more and which holds less.


Checklist

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 1

Compares the capacities of two objects using the language of holds more/holds less

Compares the masses of two objects using the language of heavy/ heavier

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STUDENT NAME

Compares the lengths of two objects using the language of long/ longer; short/ shorter

Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language (ACMMG006)

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Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

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Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time (ACMMG007)

TEACHER INFORMATION

RELATED TERMS Compare

What this means

• Making a judgement about two events, in this case the length of time taken for two events, and deciding which takes/ took a longer or shorter time. Order

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Duration

• The length of time an event takes.

Teaching points

• In the early years of schooling, informal use of language should be encouraged. The teacher could set up a daily calendar routine where students help fill in the day of the week, the date and the month. Informal questions could be asked about days of the week, such as: Is today Monday? What day was it yesterday? What day will it be tomorrow? • It is generally a good idea to start thinking about sequencing using events that centre on the student’s life. To start with, the comparisons need to be quite obvious, such as what you do when you first get to school and what you do just before you go home.

What to look for

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• Making a judgement about three or more events, in this case the length of time taken for three or more events; and placing the events in order from the shortest to the longest time taken.

Teac he r

• Students know the names and order of the days of the week, and can tell you what day it is today, yesterday and tomorrow. • Linking specific days to familiar events. • Students sequence everyday events in the correct time order.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Students who do not know the correct order of the days of the week. • Students who can not tell you the order in which common events occur, e.g. that they have dinner before they go to bed.

Student vocabulary

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Sunday

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Monday Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday Friday

Saturday today yesterday

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tomorrow earlier later morning afternoon night bedtime

18

Proficiency strand(s): Understanding Fluency Problem solving Reasoning

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES Days of the week • Each day, as part of the daily routine, the teacher talks about what day of the week it is and asks the name of the day before and the name of the day after. The labels on page 21 may be useful. • The teacher can mention significant times as the occasion arises, e.g. We always do art on Tuesday afternoons. • Link specific days to familiar events. Ask questions such as: – What do we do on Tuesday mornings? – On what day do we have physical education? – What day comes after Wednesday? – What day will it be tomorrow? • Link specific days to familiar events on a larger scale, e.g. Good Friday, Easter Sunday and many public holidays such as the Queen’s birthday (always a Monday long weekend). Note the day of the week on which most other annual events fall varies, e.g. Christmas Day, Anzac Day, Australia Day.

Teac he r

Sequencing events

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• Ask students to draw something they do during the day and something they do at night. • Give students a selection of magazines and ask them to find pictures of things that happen during the day and things that happen at night. Make a poster by gluing the pictures onto paper with the heading ‘Day time’ and ‘Night time’. • Have students make their own poster where they draw what they do in the first thing in the morning, at lunch time, after school and at night time. Or provide pictures of events that may occur at those times and the students cut them out and glue them in the correct order. Page 22 may be used. • From magazines, students find pictures that show people of different ages, e.g. a baby, child, parent, grandparent. • Read well-known stories that have a clear sequence, e.g. Goldilocks and the three bears. Re-read the story, stopping part way through, and ask the students what happens next. • Have pictures of some of the main events that happen in a story and ask the students to put them in the order that they occur in the story. Page 24 gives the main events from Little Red Riding Hood. • What happens first? What happens next? On page 23, students have a picture such as a child cleaning their teeth. They then draw what might have happened before and what might happen after the event. At the bottom, the students can draw their own centre picture, with the teacher’s guidance, and then draw the before and after events.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

19


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

LINKS TO OTHER CURRICULUM AREAS English • Read The very hungry caterpillar by Eric Carle, emphasising the days of the week on which the caterpillar eats each of the items in the story. Ask questions about what day it will be next, and what was the day before. • Read Mr Wolf’s week by C Hawkins. • Read Groompa’s kindergarten by M Nishiuchi. As well as comparative sizing, notions of sequence are developed through the pages of this book. • Read the nursery rhyme Monday’s child.

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Information and Communication Technology

Teac he r

The Arts

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• Use an interactive whiteboard to show the days of the week. Scramble the order of the days and have pairs of students put them into the correct order. • Ask children to bring in photos of themselves as babies, toddlers and now. Scan them onto the interactive whiteboard. The students put them in the correct chronological order. • Use three or four illustrations from well-known stories and place the events in order from what happened first to what happened last.

• Make a one-week class diary by choosing selected children to draw pictures of one thing he or she did each day. Label each of the days of the week.

Languages

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Learn the days of the week in a different language.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

RESOURCE SHEET

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Tuesday

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Teac he r

Monday

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. te

Friday

m . u

Thursday

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time

Wednesday

o c . che e r o t r s super

Saturday Sunday Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

21


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© R. I . C.Publ i c at i on s morning lunch time

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after school 22

m . u

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

night time

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

RESOURCE SHEET


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

RESOURCE SHEET

What happens first? What happens next?

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• What happens first? What happens next?

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Me

after

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before

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time

after

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before

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

23


Assessment 1

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

NAME:

DATE:

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Little Red Riding Hood Cut out the pictures. Glue them onto paper in the correct order.


Checklist

Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 2

Can sequence simple events

Knows the days of the week

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

STUDENT NAME

Knows the name of the day before and the day after

Compare and order the duration of events using the everyday language of time (ACMMG007)

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

25


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 3

Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions (ACMMG008)

TEACHER INFORMATION

RELATED TERMS • Names of all the days of the week • Names of the particular two days of the weekend

What this means • This description is very similar to the previous one (UUM – 2) except that it is concerned with making connections between the days of the week and students’ everyday familiar routines.

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• In the early years of schooling, informal use of language should be encouraged. The teacher could set up a daily calendar routine where students help fill in the day of the week, the date and the month. Informally questions could be asked about days of the week, such as: Who has something special they do after school on Mondays? What day was it yesterday? What did you do yesterday? What will you be doing this coming weekend? • Discuss what may be different on weekends to weekdays, other than not going to school. For example, they may get out of bed later, have different meal times, watch more TV, visit friends and relatives, go shopping, go on picnics, wear different clothes etc.

What to look for

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Teac he r

Teaching points

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Sunday Monday Tuesday

Wednesday

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Student vocabulary

• Students who do not know the correct order of the days of the week. • Students who cannot distinguish between weekdays and weekends.

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Thursday Friday Saturday

Proficiency strand(s): weekend today yesterday tomorrow

26

Understanding Fluency Problem solving Reasoning

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 3

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES • Discuss the types of things that students do after school on different days of the week, e.g. Kim has dance lessons after school on Mondays. • Discuss the types of things that students do on weekends, e.g. Mary goes to swimming classes on Saturdays. • Note that some events occur each week, e.g. sports practice after school every Tuesday, and other events are unusual, e.g. visiting the zoo on a particular Sunday. • Make a week’s calendar of the regular events that students do outside of school on the different days of the week. Students could draw pictures of these activities and glue them on to a class poster. • Make a poster of what happened on each day of the previous weekend. Students draw pictures of their activities and glue them on to the class poster. Monday Joe goes to after-school care

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Teac he r

Jean gets picked up from school by her granny

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Kim has dance practice

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Tuesday

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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What I/we did last Sunday

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What I/we did last Saturday

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

27


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 3

LINKS TO OTHER CURRICULUM AREAS English • Recite the days of the week. • Discuss weekend and after school activities.

Information and Communication Technology • Use an interactive whiteboard to show the days of the week. Have pictures of events that happen outside of school. Students connect the pictures to the days of the week, using the information displayed in a class poster of these events.

Languages

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• Learn the days of the week in a different language.

Civics and Citizenship

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Teac he r

• Discuss the various clubs and organisations that students and/or their families belong to, and what days of the week they occur.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM – 3

Connects days of the week to family activities

Can recognise that some activities are only done on weekends

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

STUDENT NAME

Knows the difference between weekdays and weekend

Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions (ACMMG008)

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

29


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1 Sub-strand: Using units of measurement—UUM –2

Assessment 1

Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment (ACMMG009)

TEACHER INFORMATION

RELATED TERMS What this means

• Place shapes and objects in groups according to particular criteria. For example, shapes may be sorted according to whether they have straight sides or curves, objects may be sorted according to whether or not they can be rolled.

• Whenever the curriculum mentions ‘shapes’, it is referring to twodimensions. When it mentions ‘objects’, it is referring to threedimensions. • Become familiar with particular shapes and objects: squares, triangles, rectangles, spheres and cubes. • Classification involves deciding which things belong in a group and which do not.

Describe

Teaching points

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• Students define the characteristics of the groups into which the shapes or objects have been sorted. Two-dimensional shape

• A planar shape that has length and width, but no depth. Familiar two-dimensional shapes would include circles, squares, triangles and rectangles.

• Classification is an important skill that is used frequently in everyday life: e.g. the Dewey decimal catalogue system in libraries, the description of cars on licence papers, the classification of movies. • Students need to be given the opportunity to classify and to describe their classification processes. Giving the students the opportunity to decide on how to sort items is important, rather than the teacher telling the students how to sort them. • Students need to be able to know and use the correct names for shapes and objects. Note: A square turned on one of its corners is not a ‘diamond’; it is still a square. There is no mathematical term ‘diamond’; if it is not a square, then it is a rhombus (shown right).

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Teac he r

Sort

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • An object that has length, width and •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• depth. Familiar three-dimensional objects would include spheres and cubes.

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Student vocabulary square circle triangle

What to look for • Students using the correct names for shapes and objects. • Students are able to describe the reasons for their classifications. • Students are able to identify particular shapes and objects in the environment, e.g. triangles in building structures, six-sided dice as cubes.

m . u

Three-dimensional object

o c . che e r o t r s super

rectangle sphere cube belongs with goes together because

30

Proficiency strand(s): Understanding Fluency Problem solving Reasoning

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES Two-dimensional shapes

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Cut and laminate the triangles on page 33. Students sort the triangles according to criteria of their choice. Discuss their choice of categories. • Cut and laminate the squares on page 34, the circles on page 35 and the rectangles on page 36. Mix each set up separately, and students sort the shapes in any way they wish. Ask the students to sort the shapes a different way; for example, the students may sort them according to size or some other classification. Note: They may make more than two groups of shapes. Discuss their choice of categories. Later, students could have all the shapes from pages 33 to 36 mixed up, and sort as with the previous examples. • Students identify and name the shapes in a set of Attribute blocks. The shapes in most sets are: circles, rectangles, triangles, squares and hexagons. Although the hexagon is not mentioned as one of the two-dimensional shapes to be described, most students could learn its name and recognise what makes it different to the other shapes in the set. Most sets of Attribute blocks contain 60 pieces. It may be preferable to use only some of the blocks for the following activities. If you only want each group of students to have 20 blocks, an easy way to break the sets up is according to colours, i.e. one blue set, one red and the other yellow.

• Using Attribute blocks, ask students to sort the shapes into different groups. Again, the sets of blocks could be less than the full 60. Options include dividing the sets according to colour, thickness (thick or thin) or size (big or small). Note: Have the students decide how many groups they put them into, and what attributes they use to categorise them. They can be sorted by colour, size and thickness as well as by shape. Students may find other criteria by which to sort the shapes; e.g. those with straight edges and those with curves. Ask the students to sort the shapes a different way. Get them to describe what is special about each set. Have the students look at other groups’ sets of shapes and see if they can decide what is special about each of their sets. • Teacher holds up one of the shapes and students see if they can think of anything in the room that is the same shape. The students could be taken outside and asked if they can find anything that is the same as the shape the teacher hold up. • Students match images of squares, rectangles, triangles and circles to their names using a stimulus picture, such as the one on page 37. • Play card games such as ‘Happy families’ and ‘Animal families’, where reasons for belonging are important.

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Three-dimensional objects

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Have sets of different-sized spheres and cubes and ask the students to sort them into groups. • Ask students to describe what the differences are between the two sets of objects. If students have sorted the objects using different criteria, e.g. big and small, they still need to be able to describe what their decisions were based on. They can then be asked to sort the objects in a different way, and again asked to describe the reason for their choice. • Have students think about where they might have seen spheres or cubes in the classroom, and outside of the classroom.

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Both two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects

• Cut and laminate the Concentration (matching) cards on page 38. Note: It is preferable to make each set of cards on paper or card of several different colours. Lay the 12 cards out facedown in front of a small group or pair of students. They take turns to turn over two cards at a time and try to find a matching pair. If they find a matching pair, they take and keep those two cards. The student with the most pairs at the end of play is the winner. • Using three or four sets of the cards above per pair or group of students, play Snap, where a student wins if they say ‘Snap’ first when two of the same shape or object is turned over (including when one card is a picture, e.g. of a cube, and the other is the word for it). • Play Shape bingo using the boards on page 39, preferably laminated. The teacher also needs one set of cards from page 38, perhaps enlarged. The teacher shuffles the cards and holds one up. If a student has exactly the same shape or object on their board, they cover it with a counter; i.e. if a picture of a cube is held up and the student has the word ‘cube’, it may not be covered, only the picture. The first student to cover their board is the winner. • Cut and laminate the pictures of cubes and spheres on page 40. Add them to the shapes on pages 33–36. Students sort the pictures, deciding on their own classification criteria. Discuss their choice of categories. • Discuss the shapes in the stimulus page (page 41) showing shapes in the environment. Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

31


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

LINKS TO OTHER CURRICULUM AREAS English • Read Harry and the dinosaur have a very busy day by I Whybrow and A Reynolds. This book looks at five different shapes and could lead to discussion about different shapes in the classroom, the playground and the environment.

Information and Communication Technology • Have pictures of each of the shapes and objects, and labels for each on the interactive whiteboard. Students match the two sets.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Health and Physical Education

• Any ball game offers the opportunity to remind students that the mathematical name for these objects is spheres.

The Arts

Languages

• Learn the names of the shapes and objects in another language.

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Teac he r

• Students make a pattern or picture collage of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects.

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

Triangles

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

33


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Squares


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET

Teac he r

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

Circles

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

35


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Rectangles


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET Recognising shapes

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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triangle

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

Draw a line from each shape in the picture to its name.

o c . che e r o t r s super

square

rectangle

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

circle www.ricpublications.com.au

37


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET Concentration

triangle

sphere

cube

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

square rectangle r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

circle


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET Shape bingo

Shape bingo board 1

Shape bingo board 2

square r o e t s B r e oo p u k S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

cube

circle

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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rectangle

Shape bingo board 4

square

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Shape bingo board 3

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

triangle

o c . che e r o t r s super

sphere

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

cube

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

39


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Spheres

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Cubes


Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

RESOURCE SHEET Shapes in our environment

Teac he r

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

What shapes can you see in these pictures?

o c . che e r o t r s super

fruit

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

41


Assessment 1

Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

NAME:

DATE:

Shape Draw a line to match the pictures to their correct names.

circle

rectangle © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons w ww

triangle . te

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•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s s r u e p sphere

cube 42

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S square


Checklist

Sub-strand: Shape—Shape–1

Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment (ACMMG009)

cubes

spheres

triangles

rectangles

squares

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

STUDENT NAME

circles

Can recognise and name …

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

43


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

Describe position and movement (ACMMG010)

RELATED TERMS

TEACHER INFORMATION

Position

What this means

• Concerned with where things are relative to something else; e.g. compared to where the students are, or compared to where another object is located. Movement

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• In this sense, answering the questions ‘which way’ and ‘how far’.

Teaching points

• The focus is on the everyday language of location and direction such as ‘between’, ‘near’, ‘next to’, ‘towards’ and ‘forwards’. • Students follow and give simple directions to guide a friend around an obstacle path. In order to describe the position of an object or person, students need to recognise spatial relationships and put them into words.

What to look for

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Teac he r

• Students understand and follow simple directions. • The movement of an object or person is described in simple terms.

• Students’ use of appropriate directional language. • Students able to follow simple directions.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Student vocabulary between

m . u

near

w ww

next to

forwards

backwards towards

away from left right up down in

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

on under beside above

Proficiency strand(s):

below

Understanding Fluency Problem solving Reasoning

in front of behind

44

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

HANDS–ON ACTIVITIES • Teacher reads Rosie’s walk by Pat Hutchins, then creates their own Rosie’s walk using labels such as those of page 48; e.g. place the word ‘under’ at the side of a desk to indicate that the students have to go under the desk, ‘around’ on an easel, so students go around that object etc. • Take the class outside and make a ‘Rosie’s walk’ outside using playground equipment. Again, the use of labels will help students to associate the words with the movement or direction. • Under and over: paper weaving. Each student will need a piece of A4 coloured light card, a piece of A4 coloured paper, a pair of scissors, glue and a ruler. Alternatively, teachers or aides may complete steps 1 to 5 allowing the students to complete the weaving only. Students fold the piece of card in half.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

2.

Use the ruler to draw a line across the top of the card on the non-folded edge.

3.

Draw in vertical lines from the fold to the horizontal line drawn in Step 2. It doesn’t matter if the lines are not straight. Carefully cut along the lines, making sure the cuts don’t go beyond the horizontal line.

4.

Open the card up.

5.

Cut the piece of coloured paper into strips about 3–4 cm wide (the teacher or aide may do this beforehand).

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

6.

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Teac he r

1.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Take one of the strips, and thread it over and under the cuts in the first piece of card. Then push it gently to the top of the card. Glue the edges of the strip to the side of the A4 card.

7.

Do the same with the other strips of paper, starting from the opposite of the previous strip. So if the previous strip was ‘over then under’, the next one will be ‘under then over’.

8.

When completed, a border or frame can be made in a contrasting colour.

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

45


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

HANDS–ON ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED)

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Teac he r

• Students work in pairs, one with eyes closed. One student describes to their partner how to get from one place to another; e.g. from the classroom door to their desk. • In pairs, one student takes the part of a robot, and the other guides them around the room or around the playground. • Using the picture on page 49 (enlarged), students take turns describing routes that the teacher points to; e.g. teacher shows where a person might be next to the monkey cage, and asks how they would get to the bird enclosure. Encourage the use of the words ‘left’ and ‘right’, as well as other directional language. • In a circle, sing the song ‘Hokey pokey’ and students dance according to the directions; e.g. you put your right hand in, you put your right hand out, you put your right hand in and you shake it all about. • Find the treasure: The teacher, or a student, hides an object somewhere in the classroom while one student is not looking. This student then has to follow directions to locate the object with help from the rest of the class who have seen where the treasure has been hidden. • Play games where students have to follow directions. For example, on the oval, students are told to walk forward 3 steps, walk backwards 2 steps, jump high and low, creep forward on tiptoes, turn right around, change places with the person next to them, walk below the monkey bars, stand in the middle of the basketball court etc. • The teacher makes and laminates signs (similar to those on page 48) and holds them up to direct the students as to which direction to tiptoe, skip, jump etc. • Using blocks and other equipment, students build a road network in a sandpit area. They then describe how a toy car or teddy could get from the middle to the outside of their area. • Play simple track board games such as ‘Snakes and ladders’ where students have to move their counter in a particular direction.

w ww

. te

46

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

LINKS TO OTHER CURRICULUM AREAS English • Read Rosie’s walk by Pat Hutchins. This book uses the language of location such as ‘under’, ‘past’ and ‘through’, to describe the route Rosie the hen walked through the farmyard. There are very few words in the book, and every second page has no words at all, but wonderfully humorous pictures of a fox trying to catch Rosie and constantly getting into trouble. • Recite and show movement of language using nursery rhymes that have language of movement like ‘up’ and ‘down’: – Hickory dickory dock – Jack and Jill – Incy wincy spider – Ring a ring o’ roses

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Information and Communication Technology

Teac he r

Health and Physical Education

ew i ev Pr

• Scan a picture of a zoo such as the one on page 49, or other simple pictorial map of choice, onto interactive whiteboard. Students describe how to get from one place to another; e.g. from the monkeys to the elephants. • An animated version of Rosie’s walk is available on <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rylMYZEwwI&list=PL28CAD1C 78C3F40F6&index=3&feature=plpp_video>

• Using beanbags or similar, students throw them high, low, near, far, under, over, inside, outside etc.

The Arts

• See Under and over: paper weaving on page 45. • Sing and dance ‘The grand old duke of York’. Sing with the students doing the actions.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

There are many variations on the movements that can accompany this song.

. te

m . u

w ww

The grand old duke of York (students march in time) He had ten thousand men (students march in time) He marched them up to the top of the hill (students march in time stretched up tall) And he marched them down again. (students march in time crouching low) And when they were up they were up (students gradually get taller again) And when they were down they were down (students gradually crouch low) And when they were only half way up (students gradually come up to half way) They were neither up nor down. (on ‘up’ students jump up, on ‘down’ they crouch down)

o c . che e r o t r s super

Languages • Learn some of the positional words in another language; e.g. left and right.

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

47


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

RESOURCE SHEET Directional signs

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Describe position and movement

m . u

Teac he r w ww 48

ew i ev Pr

behind r o e t s Bo r e p ok between u S in front of © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons under •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• next to . te o c over . che e r o t r s super left right


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

RESOURCE SHEET

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Describe position and movement

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

49


Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

RESOURCE SHEET Shape maze

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw lines to find where each shape belongs.

50

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Describe position and movement

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•


Assessment 1

Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

NAME:

DATE:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Where are they – 1? Draw a line from each word to show where a child is.

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Describe position and movement

w ww

. te

under

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

next to

on

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

middle R.I.C. Publications®

over

www.ricpublications.com.au

51


Assessment 2

Sub-strand: Location and transformation—L&T–1

NAME:

DATE:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Where are they – 2?

o c . c e r 1. Where is the train? h er o t s s r u e p 2. What is on the bed? 3. What is next to the easel? 4. Where are the teddies? 5. What is under the toy box? 6. What is on top of the bookcase? 52

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Year 1)

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au

CONTENT DESCRIPTION: Describe position and movement

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•


Checklist

Sub-strand: Location Shape—Shape –1 and transformation—L&T–1

Describe position and movement (ACMMG010)

right

left

next to

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

STUDENT NAME

under

over

Understands and uses in context the words …

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Australian Curriculum Mathematics resource book: Measurement and Geometry (Foundation)

R.I.C. Publications®

www.ricpublications.com.au

53


Australian Curriculum Mathematics - Measurement and Geometry: Foundation - Ages 5-6  

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