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Lower secondary

VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT

A CONCEPT BY DAVID KOUTSOUKIS RIC-2777 6.8/721


VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Lower secondary) Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2006 Copyright© David Koutsoukis 2006 ISBN 1 74126 377 8 RIC–2777

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VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 4–6) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 6–8) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 8–10) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 10–12)

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Foreword Values education in schools is crucial for developing future citizens of good character. The Values education toolkit, featuring the Six kinds of best concept, is a series of five books expressly designed to assist the teaching of values education in primary and lower secondary schools. The varied activities in this book extend across all major learning areas and will have relevance for a wide range of student learning styles and intelligences. Titles in this series are:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Contents

Teachers notes.....................................................iv – ix Curriculum links ........................................................ x Certificates.........................................................xi – xvi Checklists ...................................................... xvii – xix Be kind to yourself .................................... 1–24

Overview ..................................................................2–3 Teacher information...............................................4–5 Be proud of your uniqueness...................................... 6 Develop a sense of identity.......................................... 7 Know your strengths and weaknesses ........................ 8 Exercise regularly ....................................................... 9 Eat well...................................................................... 10 Sleep well .................................................................. 11 Take time to relax ..................................................... 12 Minimise risks........................................................... 13 Keep learning and growing ...................................... 14 Strive for success ....................................................... 15 Love, and value the love of, others ........................... 16 Develop a circle of good friends ............................... 17 Stand up for yourself ................................................ 18 Make good choices.................................................... 19 Forgive yourself if you make mistakes ..................... 20 Be positive ................................................................. 21 Be useful.................................................................... 22 Have some fun .......................................................... 23 Be proud of the things you say and do ..................... 24

Seek a fair go for all ................................................. 39 Manage and resolve conflict..................................... 40 Cooperate and be a team player ............................... 41 Support and include others ...................................... 42 Value family life ........................................................ 43 Treat others the way they need to be treated ............ 44 Be kind to the environment .................45–59

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• Values education toolkit — Ages 4–6 • Values education toolkit — Ages 6–8 • Values education toolkit — Ages 8–10 • Values education toolkit — Ages 11+ • Values education toolkit — Lower secondary

Be the achieving kind .............................77–95 Overview ..............................................................78–79 Teacher information...........................................80–81 Have a go! ................................................................. 82 Try lots of different things ........................................ 83 Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing........ 84 Do things to the best of your ability ......................... 85 Pursue quality and personal excellence .................. 86 Use your talents......................................................... 87 Develop a sense of purpose ....................................... 88 Manage your time effectively ................................... 89 Manage your time wisely .......................................... 90 Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them......................................................... 91 Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals.............................................................. 92 Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation ..................................................... 93 Develop good communication skills ........................ 94 Seek good role models .............................................. 95 Chatterbox ..............................................96

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Overview ..............................................................46–47 Teacher information...........................................48–49 Clean up after yourself ............................................. 50 Keep the land, water and waterways clean............... 51 Recycle and don’t waste............................................ 52 Save water ................................................................. 53 Conserve energy ........................................................ 54 Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species ............................................... 55 Use environmentally-friendly products.................... 56 Consider environmentally-friendly products ........... 57 Consider using resources that can be replaced ........ 58 Value our cultural heritage ...................................... 59 Chatterbox template ................................60

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Be kind to others......................................25–44

Overview ..............................................................26–27 Teacher information...........................................28–29 Value relationships ................................................... 30 Respect the rights of others ...................................... 31 Be polite and use good manners .............................. 32 Praise people who do things well ............................. 33 Develop good people skills ........................................ 34 Work at building and maintaining relationships ... 35 Be tolerant and understanding of difference ........... 36 Respect other points of view ..................................... 37 Don’t bully or put others down ................................ 38

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Be the community kind ....................... 97–114

Be the learning kind ...............................61–76

Overview ..............................................................62–63 Teacher information...........................................64–65 Be positive about learning ........................................ 66 Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you ................................................. 67 Recognise the value of knowledge ........................... 68 Have an enquiring mind—be curious .................... 69 Determine how you learn best (learning styles)...... 70 Have an open mind .................................................. 71 Be a critical thinker .................................................. 72 Have a global perspective ......................................... 73 Seek learning opportunities everywhere .................. 74 Learn from your mistakes ........................................ 75 Keep learning ............................................................ 76

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Overview ..............................................................98–99 Teacher information.......................................100–101 Behave responsibly ................................................. 102 Respect authority .................................................... 103 Follow rules............................................................. 104 Be honest and seek truth ........................................ 105 Show integrity ......................................................... 106 Be useful.................................................................. 107 Get involved in the community.............................. 108 Strive for justice and a ‘fair go for all’ ................... 109 Share and care for those in need............................ 110 Support reconciliation ............................................ 111 Contribute to research ............................................ 112 Support freedom ..................................................... 113 Strive for peace........................................................ 114 ‘And I love life’ ..................................... 115 References ............................................116

Values education toolkit


Teachers notes What are values?

Values education encourages students to become ‘nice human beings’.

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Values are ideals that guide our behaviour and decisions, and help us distinguish between what is right or wrong. They outline Values within school curriculums what is important to us in terms of our conduct, our interaction with others and how we might live our lives in a meaningful way. Generally speaking, there are nine agreed values to be incorporated Values give us a guiding framework by which to lead our lives. into school curriculums. People who engage in antisocial behaviour often lack a values These are: framework. Care and compassion Doing your best Why teach values? ‘Fair go’ Freedom Developing good values gives us a structure to guide our conscience Honesty and trustworthiness and helps us make good choices. If we have strong values and are Integrity put in challenging situations, we are more likely to make good Respect decisions according to those values. Developing strong values Responsibility also helps address our spiritual needs and self-esteem by giving Understanding, tolerance and inclusion. us a personal sense of identity and direction. In addition, it helps develop a sense of responsibility for the consequences of our own The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept incorporates all these values. behaviour and how our actions might affect ourselves, others and the environment. The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept Teaching values in schools is a proactive approach towards The ‘Six kinds of best’ is a model that outlines six core values for managing student behaviour. It gives students effective strategies becoming a person of good character and for leading a happy and to help them lead happy and successful lives. successful life. It frames the core values in a way that students, Values can be incorporated into a whole-school approach and can teachers and parents can remember and apply in everyday situations. It provides ‘anchor points’ upon which we can reflect include: when faced with decision-making situations and helps us make good choices. It may be considered a ‘recipe for life’. • encouraging staff to model good values,

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• including values in the school vision and mission statements,

The ‘Six kinds of best’ are: Be KIND to yourself ................................. (Respect yourself) Be KIND to others ...................................... (Respect others) Be KIND to the environment ............ (Value the environment) Be the learning KIND ................................ (Seek knowledge) Be the achieving KIND ...................... (Achieve your potential) Be the community KIND ........ (Contribute positively to society)

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• creating a school motto, slogan or ethos based on specific values • displaying values posters,

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• including values in school rules and policies,

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• including values in structured classroom guidelines such as class rules,

• introducing ongoing daily or weekly values programs, • integrating the teaching of values into all curriculum learning areas, • collating and using resources for specific values education lessons, • inviting guest speakers to the school, • including values-based activities in pastoral care programs and • teaching values incidentally during class or recess times.

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept uses a play on the word ‘kind’ to make it memorable and repeatable. It also reinforces the word ‘kind’. It provides a mechanism to continually reinforce good values and teach them in context. This book is divided into six sections (as above) to indicate the six core values. Each section has a number of pointers which illustrate and support the six values. The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept provides a framework and a language for teaching and reinforcing values at school and in the home. It aims to make students familiar with the six core values and internalise them by using the ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation. (Refer to page ix, the cover pages of each section and page 115.)

These six fingers represent the ‘Six kinds of best’. Get your students to make the sign. Tell them if they apply these principles throughout their life, they will be ‘A-OK’.

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For example: • When a student makes a negative comment about himself/herself, the teacher may say, ‘Sasha! You’re not being kind to yourself! Are you?’

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Teachers and parents are encouraged to highlight incorrect behaviours and reinforce correct behaviours by using the language of the ‘Six kinds of best’.

• When one student bullies another, the teacher may say, ‘John! You’re not being kind to others! Are you?’ • When a student drops some rubbish, the teacher may comment about the child not being ‘kind to the environment’. • When the class does well in a test, the teacher may comment that they are really ‘the learning kind’.

© R. . Ca. Pu l i cawell, t i o ns •I When student doesb an assignment the teacher may say that the student is ‘the achieving kind’. •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• • When a group of students help to clean up, the teacher may state that they are ‘the

Make the ‘Six kinds of best’ your personal quest

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community kind’.

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Using the Values toolkit book The activities in this book may be:

– incorporated into a continuing weekly program – used incidentally as required in the classroom – incorporated into an existing personal development or values program – used in conjunction with special values events such as a values ‘supercharger’ day or values ‘week’ where a guest speaker works with the students.

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Teachers notes The format of the book

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The book is divided into six sections. The six sections are: • Be kind to yourself • Be kind to others Title page • Be kind to the environment The first page of each section is a title page • Be the learning kind designed to introduce the section. • Be the achieving kind • Be the community kind • A pictorial representation of the affirmation(s) is/are also supplied.

Overview A two-page overview of additional activities has been provided for each of the six sections. The activities cover a variety of learning areas and learning styles. Teachers may use the activities to further develop each section with the class or as extension work for more able students.

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Teachers notes pages The student pages are supported by two pages of teachers notes, which comprise: – an introduction to the section, – a compilation of discussion points for each student page, and – answers (where required). Each double teacher’s page also includes an example of a graphic organiser, which teachers may find beneficial for recording summaries of students’ discussions or for students to record their thoughts. Graphic organisers provide a visual representation of information. They employ four intelligences at the same time—verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial and naturalist. (Different organisers use aspects of the naturalist intelligence, including categorising, classifying, identifying etc.)

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Teachers notes Student pages Each section is divided into a number of key pointers. The bullet points are utilised as individual student pages. The activities on the student pages are intended to be mostly open-ended, ‘fun’ tasks focusing on the eight multiple intelligences.

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The final two pages in the book include: a pictorial representation of the ‘I love life’ affirmation, a bibliography of references and suggested readings to further teacher knowledge, and appropriate websites.

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Each student page includes: – the title of the relevant section and the bullet points being covered – title of the student page.

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‘By applying the ‘Six kinds of best’ principles, students and adults will lead a happy, successful and fulfilling life and make them feel like saying ‘I love life!’’

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Additional information Discussion and student reflection about their own personal experiences form an important part of values education. For this reason, discussion points form a major portion of the teacher information section of teachers notes for each section.

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David Koutsoukis is the creator of the ‘Six kinds of best’ concept. He is an educator with over 20 years’ experience who has a passion for encouraging people to develop good values and become persons of good character. He is also the author of the Behaviour management toolkit, the R.I.C. Behaviour management and Values poster sets, and the Daily dose of fun series of books. David is now a full-time presenter and consultant who works with educators, helping them build positive school cultures. He conducts professional development programs for teachers throughout Australia, New Zealand and South-East Asia on how to effectively deliver the Six kinds of best program. David also does a motivational program for students entitled Make the six kinds of best your personal quest. For more information about presentations and resources for schools by David Koutsoukis, visit www. schoolmasters.com.au or email admin@schoolmasters.com.au

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í˘˛

Be KIND to others

Respect others

Be KIND to yourself

Respect yourself

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Be KIND to the environment Seek knowledge

Be the learning KIND

1. Clean up after yourself 1. Be positive about learning 2. Keep the land, air and 2. Seek knowledge about waterways clean yourself 3. Recycle and don’t waste 3. Recognise the values of 4. Save water others 5. Conserve energy 4. Have an enquiring mind – 6. Care for natural habitats, be curious wildlife and endangered 5. Determine how you learn species best (learning styles) 7. Use environmentally friendly 6. Have an open mind products 7. Be a critical thinker 8. Consider environmentally 8. Have a global perspective friendly energy sources 9. Seek learning opportunities 9. Consider using resources 10. Learn from your mistakes that can be replaced 11. Keep learning (sustainable development) 10. Value our cultural heritage

key Pointers

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1. Value relationships 2. Respect the rights of others 3. Be polite and use good manners 4. Praise people who do things well 5. Develop good people skills 6. Build and maintain relationships 7. Be tolerant and understanding of others 8. Respect other points of view 9. Don’t bully or put others down 10. Seek a ‘fair go’ for all 11. Manage and resolve conflict 12. Cooperate and be a team player 13. Support and include others 14. Value family life 15. Treat others the way they need to be treated

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1. Be proud of your uniqueness 2. Develop a sense of identity (know what is important to you) 3. Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses 4. Exercise 5. Eat well 6. Sleep well 7. Take time to relax 8. Minimise risk 9. Keep learning and growing 10. Strive for success (and get some ego food) 11. Love, and value the love of, others 12. Develop a circle of quality friends 13. Stand up for yourself (be confident but humble) 14. Make good choices 15. Forgive yourself if you make mistakes 16. Be positive 17. Be useful (and you will feel good about yourself) 18. Have some fun 19. Be proud of the things you say and do

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1. Have a go! 2. Try lots of different things 3. Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing 4. Do things to the best of your ability 5. Pursue quality and personal excellence 6. Use your talents 7. Develop a sense of purpose 8. Manage your time 9. Manage your money wisely 10. Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. Show persistence and selfdiscipline to achieve your goals 12. Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation 13. Develop good communication skills 14. Seek good role models

1. Behave responsibly 2. Respect authority 3. Follow rules 4. Be honest and seek the truth 5. Show integrity – develop a sense of what’s morally right, and act that way 6. Be useful 7. Get involved in the community 8. Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. Share and care 10. Support reconciliation 11. Contribute to research 12. Support freedom 13. Strive for peace

Contribute positively to society

Be the community KIND

Be the achieving KIND Achieve your potential

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Six core values

Values Framework

The Six Kinds of Best

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation is a series of actions which reinforces the six core values in a memorable and fun way. Reciting the affirmation engages visual, auditory and kinaesthetic learners.

I am one of a kind.

I am kind to myself.

(Right index finger in the air in front of body.)

(Clenched fist over heart.)

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(From clenched fist over heart, swing right arm clockwise and point outwards.)

(Touch left index finger with right index finger– Auslan sign language for ‘E’.)

I am the learning kind.

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(Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height–like a book. Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand and swing your hand up to touch the top of your head—putting the information from the book into your head.)

I am the achieving kind.

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(Point upwards—aim for the stars.)

And I

And I am the community kind.

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(Point to yourself and touch your chest.)

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(Form an ‘A’ shape in front of your body with your fingers—like a house.)

Love

Life!

(Hug yourself.)

(Hands and arms outstretched above your head.)

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Curriculum links

The activities in the book predominantly support student learning in the following key learning areas and topics/strands for each State: NSW

Vic.

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education

SA

Qld

Health and physical education

Health and physical education

• Personal and social • Knowledge and development understanding • Self-management skills • Health of individuals and communities • Interpersonal skills

• Promoting the health of individuals and communities • Enhancing personal development

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Human Society and its Environment

Studies of Society and Environment

Society and environment

Society and environment

• Patterns of place and location • Relationships with places • Resource systems • Roles, rights and responsibilities • Significant events and people • Time and change • Identities • Cultural diversity

• Family and neighbourhood (Level 1) • Community and participation (Level 2) • Australia’s people and places (Level 3) • History (Level 4) • Geography (Level 4)

• Investigation, communication and participation • Place and space • Culture • Time, continuity and change • Resources • Active citizenship

• Time, continuity and change • Place, space and environment • Societies and cultures • Social systems

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• Health of individuals and population • Growth and development • Self and relationships • Interpersonal relationships • Personal health choices • Safe living • Values and attitudes • Skills: – Communicating – Decision-making – Interacting – Problem-solving

WA

Studies of Society and Environment

• Time, continuity and change • Place and space • Culture and identity • Systems, resources and power

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Science and Technology Science • Built environments • Physical phenomena • Products and services

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Science

Science

Science

• Earth and beyond • Biological science: – Living together: past, • Energy and change present and future • Life and living • Earth and space sciences: – The changing earth • Physical science: – Energy and its uses

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• Earth and space • Energy systems • Life systems

• Earth and beyond • Energy and change • Life and living

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Make ‘the Six Kinds of Best’ your personal quest!

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Teacher – student self-reflection checklist Name Go through the list, tick the appropriate boxes and see how you rate. You will notice a profile that will indicate which of your values are strongly developed, and which areas you need to improve. í˘ą Be kind to yourself

Strongly agree

Agree

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Strongly disagree

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1. I am proud of my uniqueness 2. I have a strong sense of identity 3. I know my strengths and work on my weaknesses 4. I exercise regularly 5. I eat well 6. I sleep well 7. I take time to relax 8. I minimise risks 9. I like learning 10. I strive for success 11. I love, and value the love of, others 12. I have a circle of quality friends 13. I stand up for myself 14. I make good choices 15. I forgive myself if I make mistakes 16. I am positive 17. I am useful 18. I have fun 19. I am proud of the things I say and do

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Disagree

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Strongly agree

1. I value relationships 2. I respect the rights of others 3. I am polite and use good manners 4. I praise people who do things well 5. I work at building and maintaining relationships 6. I am tolerant and understanding of difference 7. I respect other points of view 8. I don’t bully or put others down 9. I seek a fair go for all 10. I try to manage and resolve conflict 11. I cooperate with others 12. I support and include others 13. I value family life 14. I treat others the way they need to be treated

Agree

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Disagree

Strongly disagree

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name í˘ł Be kind to the environment

Strongly agree

Agree

Strongly disagree

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í˘´ Be the learning kind

Strongly agree

1. I am positive about learning 2. I seek knowledge about myself, others and the world around me 3. I recognise the value of knowledge 4. I have an enquiring mind—I am curious 5. I know how I learn best 6. I have an open mind 7. I am a critical thinker 8. I have a global perspective 9. I seek learning opportunities everywhere 10. I learn from my mistakes 11. I am a lifelong learner

Agree

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1. I clean up after myself 2. I don’t pollute the land, air or waterways 3. I recycle and don’t waste 4. I don’t waste water 5. I conserve energy 6. I care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species 7. I use environmentally friendly products 8. I use environmentally friendly energy sources 9. I use resources that can be replaced 10. I value our cultural heritage

Disagree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name í˘ľ Be the achieving kind

Strongly agree

Agree

Strongly disagree

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1. I have a go! 2. I try lots of different things 3. I know what I am good at and enjoy doing 4. I do things to the best of my ability 5. I pursue quality and personal excellence 6. I use my talents 7. I have a sense of purpose 8. I manage my time effectively 9. I manage my money wisely 10. I set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. I am persistent and self-disciplined at achieving my goals 12. I look at different ways of doing things 13. I have good communication skills 14. I have good role models that I look up to

Disagree

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1. I behave responsibly 2. I respect authority 3. I follow rules 4. I am honest and seek the truth 5. I show integrity—I know what is morally and ethically right, and I act that way 6. I am useful 7. I get involved in the community 8. I strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. I share with and care for those in need 10. I support reconciliation 11. I contribute to or support research 12. I support freedom 13. I strive for peace

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I am a one of a kind

Right index finger in the air in front of body.

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1. Be kind to yourself

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Be kind to yourself – overview • Find out how each of the body’s digestive organs functions and how it is affected by diet.

BE PROUD OF YOUR UNIQUENESS • Have the class write anonymous comments about what makes each student in the class unique. The students can read the comments relating to them and then add their own to write a short speech that explains what makes them special. • Hold a school competition (similar to the Archibald Prize) where students have to complete a self-portrait. Encourage the use of media other than paint. • Write a ‘This is your life’ book for yourself. Include all aspects of your life with photographs and other memorabilia you have collected.

SLEEP WELL • Research to find out the scientific reasons for why we sleep and how much sleep people of different ages should ideally get each night. • Take a digital photo of yourself and upload it onto a computer with a design program such as ‘Photoshop’. Copy the photo and distort it to show what you look like when you are sleep-deprived. Print the two photos (distorted and original) side by side. • Research to discover how sleep deprivation has been used to coerce prisoners of war to give away secrets or confess to crimes which they did not commit.

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DEVELOP A SENSE OF IDENTITY

TAKE TIME TO RELAX

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• View magazine advertisements or television commercials that use the idea that teenagers like to dress, act or sound like their peers. Comment on the images and explain why developing your own identity might be better than always ‘following the crowd’. • What incorporates your identity? Discuss in a group and use your findings to create a poster that displays some of the facets of your own identity. Display the posters. • Write a report on who you are. Make positive statements about what you do and the things you like and dislike.

• Invite teachers of yoga, meditation and tai chi to visit the class and teach some relaxing poses, postures or exercises. The students can compare how each type of relaxation made them feel. • Keep a record for one week of how you spend your time. How many hours per week do you simply relax? List ways you can increase this time. • Make a collection of six pieces of recorded music which help you to relax. Share your collection with the class. Is there a relationship between the type of music chosen and the personality of the individual?

KNOW YOUR STRENGTHS AND WORK ON YOUR WEAKNESSES

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• In small groups, discuss a range of ‘risk’ scenarios involving physical, mental and other risks. Decide on a solution to each scenario. • Students confidentially write a brief account of a situation when they felt they were at risk. (Examples could include: being at a party with alcohol or being in a car when the driver was speeding.) The teacher chooses some of the situations to share with the class and asks for suggestions of ways the student could have avoided the situation or safely removed themselves from it. • Find out the meaning of risk assessment. With your parents, go through your home and immediate local area to assess the risks. What can you do to manage these risks?

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• Answer a questionnaire that asks you to rate your capability at different skills; e.g. social or sporting. After the questionnaire has been completed, choose some of your weakest areas and write how you could improve upon them. • Keep a personal diary for one term and record when you recognise your strengths and weaknesses. At the end of the term, devise an action plan for the following term to work on improving your weaknesses. • Ask people who know you well, from different areas of your life to give you two examples of strengths and weaknesses they have identified in you. With their help, consider ways to use your strengths in each area and to overcome your weaknesses. EXERCISE REGULARLY

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• Research to find out how much exercise experts recommend for someone of your age. Use the information to compile a weekly exercise program you think you would enjoy. • Research to find out the benefits of regular exercise. • Research for details of training in your favourite sport. Consider how you might incorporate some of the activities into your life to improve your performance.

KEEP LEARNING AND GROWING

• In small groups, create a picture book, aimed at young children, that teaches them an important life lesson; e.g. the importance of friends. • During your own time, watch a documentary on television of your choice and present a brief oral report to the class, explaining what you learnt from it. • Browse through an atlas and find somewhere in the world that you would like to visit. From a travel agent, find out how you would have to travel to get there. To make the most of your visit, what would you need to research before you went on your trip? Share your virtual trip with the class.

EAT WELL • Survey a group of students in different age groups to find out their most popular types of junk food. Write a list of nutritional statistics for each food (e.g. sugar, salt and fat content). Compare these to statistics for a healthier, fun alternative to each food. • Find out the behaviours of people with the conditions anorexia and bulimia. Choose one and list how it is detrimental to one’s health—physically and mentally.

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Be kind to yourself – overview • Use beading or other materials to make a special bracelet that you can wear to remind yourself that it is OK to make mistakes (but try to learn from them). • Research on the Internet for quotes about making mistakes. Choose your favourite quotes to place on an inspirational poster.

STRIVE FOR SUCCESS • Use the Internet to find some inspirational quotes on the subject of success or failure. Use one as the topic for a debate or as a springboard for creative writing. • Ask class members to write what they believe are the characteristics of a successful person. Collate the information and write a class definition of success. • Interview three successful people from different areas of your life. Ask them for their secrets to success.

BE POSITIVE • What star sign are you? Write positive star sign predictions for yourself for the weeks to come. Keep them close by and see which parts come true. • In pairs, role-play scenarios in which one character demonstrates positive behaviour which affects the other character. • Look on the internet to read a precis of the children’s novel, Pollyanna by Eleanor H Porter. What aspects of Pollyanna’s character do you think you have?

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LOVE, AND VALUE THE LOVE OF, OTHERS

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• In small groups, discuss the statement ‘Love makes the world go round’. • Present a series of short role-plays that demonstrate different types of love. • Research on the Internet to find quotes on the meaning of love. Make an illustrated booklet using quotes that have significance for you.

BE USEFUL

• Write a list of ten things you can do to be useful at home (such as washing the car, taking the dog for a walk etc.) Date and cross off each as you do it. • Make a list of ways in which you could use your talents and abilities to make a difference in your community. • Take on a job at home for which you have sole responsibility.

DEVELOP A CIRCLE OF QUALITY FRIENDS

• Recall a time when a good friend helped you. Use the incident as the basis for a short story or poem. • Write a poem about why is it important to choose ‘quality’ friends. Change the poem into a song and perform it to children in younger classes. • Hold a group discussion about quality versus ‘fair-weather’ friends.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• HAVE SOME FUN

• Plan a birthday party for a young child. Include food, music and entertainment in your plan. • Given a budget, plan a ‘fun fundraising’ day at your school. Decide on activities and entertainment you think the whole community would enjoy. • Plan an after-school activity with a group of friends. Share responsibility for providing refreshments and equipment required.

STAND UP FOR YOURSELF

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• Learn some of the techniques for dealing with bullies and use the information to write short, scripted plays that show characters successfully dealing with bullying in different ways. • Find out the difference between demonstrating a passive, aggressive or assertive manner with others. Which way do you think has the most positive results? • Learn about positive body language and use it!

BE PROUD OF THE THINGS YOU SAY AND DO • Write a recount describing something you have done that made you feel proud of yourself. Share your recount with the class. • On a time line, write what you think was your proudest moment in your primary school years, the most recent proud moment you had and the proudest moment you predict will happen in your future. • Design a certificate for yourself describing something you have said or done that made you feel proud.

MAKE GOOD CHOICES

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• Choose a scene from a television drama where a character makes a choice you think is poor. Rewrite the scene with the character making a better choice. • As a teenager, list some of the important choices you will have to make in the next few years. Choose one and share with a partner how you feel about making it. • Devise a ‘Good choices’ board game for use by Year 7 students. Include rewards for making good choices and penalties for making bad choices.. FORGIVE YOURSELF IF YOU MAKE MISTAKES • Recall a time when you said or did something you later regretted. Write what you learned from making the mistake and suggest ways you can ‘let go’ of the incident and move on.

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Values education toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Often, students are told to be nice to other people, but how often are they told to be kind to themselves? All people, at times, feel bad about themselves or put themselves ‘down’. In fact, we are often harsher critics of ourselves than others are. It is really important to encourage students to think positively about themselves as much as possible to develop high self-esteem — to ‘be kind to yourself.’

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Discussion points

Page 6 – Be proud of your uniqueness

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• What factors make people unique? • What makes you a unique person? • What makes you proud of yourself?

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Page 7 – Develop a sense of identity

• What do you think makes up a person’s identity? • How could you develop a sense of identity?

Page 8 – Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses

Page 14 – Keep learning and growing

• What do you regard as your strengths and weaknesses? • Discuss a time when you worked to improve a weakness. • Discuss a time when you used one or more of your strengths to achieve something great.

• Discuss the ways in which learning can make us grow. • Discuss how we can learn from the experiences of others. • Discuss the ages and stages of learning of young children.

Page 9 – Exercise regularly

• What are the some of the benefits of regular exercise? • How much exercise is recommended for someone in your age group? Do you follow this recommendation? • Do you enjoy exercising? Why? Why not?

• Discuss and give personal examples from the wordsearch list. • Discuss the quote, ‘Success is a journey, not a destination’. (Ben Sweetland) • Discuss the quote, ‘Success doesn’t come to you ... you go to it’. (Marva Collins)

Page 10 – Eat well

Page 16 – Love, and value the love of, others

• What responsibilities do you think food manufacturers should have in regards to food packaging and advertising? • What makes junk food so appealing? • How would you describe your diet?

• Who are the people to whom we show love? Discuss. • Why is their love for us important? Discuss. • Discuss the consequences of feeling unloved.

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Page 17 – Develop a circle of good quality friends

• Why do we sleep? • How much sleep should you get per night? • When do you find it difficult to get to sleep?

• Discuss the qualities of a lasting friendship. • How important for your future are the friendships you develop now? Discuss. • How do good friends differ from ‘fair-weather’ friends? Discuss.

Page 12 – Take time to relax

Page 18 – Stand up for yourself

Page 11 – Sleep well

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• Discuss how much the influence of your peers affects your actions. • Discuss why some people are more able than others to show confidence in their ability. • Consider how you might alter your behaviour to develop more confidence.

• Discuss the many ways we choose to relax. • Discuss the possible consequences of not taking time to relax. • Discuss why different methods of relaxation may suit some people but not others.

Page 13 – Minimise risks Page 19 – Make good choices

• Is risk-taking always dangerous? Discuss the notion of ‘high risk, great reward’. • What type of risks do students encounter? Discuss their consequences. • How does an individual’s risks affect others? Discuss.

Values education toolkit

• Discuss a time when you made a poor choice. What were the consequences? What did you learn? • Discuss a time when you made a good choice. Did other people also feel it was a good choice? How did it make you feel?

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Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes Page 20 – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes

Graphic organiser examples

• Should we forgive ourselves for making a terrible mistake? Why/ Why not? • How can you forgive yourself and ‘let go’ of the past? • Is it important to be forgiven by others for mistakes you have made?

Yourself Cartoon and picture strip Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3 Picture 4 Picture 5

Page 21 – Be positive

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• What makes a positive person? • What advantages might positive people have? • Can the way you think affect your life? How?

Page 22 – Be useful

• Do you consider yourself to be a useful person? Why/Why not? • What are some useful things you could do or already do in your community? • How are you useful at school or at home? Do you enjoy the useful tasks you do?

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Page 23 – Have some fun • ‘All work and no play makes Jill a dull girl’. Discuss. • What kinds of things do you do for fun? • What are some free or inexpensive fun things to do in your community?

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Agreement scales

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Evaluation scales

Page 24 – Be proud of the things you say and do

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• Do you think of pride as a positive or negative emotion? • Is it important for other people to be proud of you? • What have you been most proud of in your life so far?

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stamina endurance persistence determination

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Joke/Riddle What am I? I have no lungs but I need air. I grow even though I am not alive. I have no mouth and I’m destroyed by water.

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Be kind to yourself – Be proud of your uniqueness

movie me! • Write anything else you think the actor needs to know to portray you well.

Imagine a movie is going to be made of your life so far. 1. The director of the movie asks you to suggest the actor you think would be the best choice to play you. Give reasons for your choice. Actor: Reasons:

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3. The director now asks you to provide information for the wardrobe and hair departments. Describe a typical casual outfit you might wear.

2. • What should the actor’s voice be like?

• How should the actor walk or generally move?

Describe a typical formal outfit you might wear.

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The director likes your suggestion and casts this actor as your character. He asks you to answer the list of questions below to provide information for the actor to read before filming begins.

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• How do you show:

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Describe how you usually wear your hair.

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• What habits of yours should he/she show during the movie?

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4. Show your page to someone in the class who knows you well. Does he/she think the character in the movie will be an accurate portrayal of you?

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a sense of identity

My identity card d Many countries around the world require their citizens to carry identityy cards. These cards contain information such as the cardholder’s name,, date of birth, fingerprints, address and physical characteristics.

REPUBL IC OF KO NGO BO NGO NAME: Na thaneal Nchim bay D.O.B. 20 September 19 97 I.D. 208 4512 77 91

But is this all that makes up a person’s identity? Design a ‘sense of identity’ card that reveals to people your true identity.

Address: 44 2 Lamassa Ro ad Greentown 99 10 West Provinc e, Kongo Bo ngo

1. To give you some ideas, write notes under the headings below.

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• What causes or issues are important to you (e.g. ‘saving the environment’)?

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• List words to d describe b your family. f l

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• Name someone you admire and describe why.

• What motto/mottoes do you believe in or try to live by (e.g. ‘Practise random acts of kindness’)?

• List anything else you feel is an important part of your identity; e.g. your religion, your hobbies.

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• List words that describe the best aspects of your personality.

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2. Use the ideas from the introduction and Question 1 to create your ‘sense of identity’ card in the space below. Use colours, images and fonts you feel are most appropriate to your own unique identity. You should draft your card on scrap paper first.

Front of card

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Be kind to yourself – Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses

Intelligences In the 1980s, psychologist Dr Howard Gardner developed a theory called ‘multiple intelligences’. This identified eight different types of human intelligence. Gardner believes that each person has one or two dominant intelligences, although it is possible to strengthen all eight. 1. To discover your dominant intelligence(s), tick the statements below that are true for you. VL VL VL VL LM LM LM LM N N N N VS VS VS VS

I love playing sport. ...............................................................❏ BK I am skilled at dancing or acting. ............................................❏ BK I find it hard to sit still at my desk...........................................❏ BK I prefer to ‘do’ rather than watch. ...........................................❏ BK I play a musical instrument. ...................................................❏ MR I enjoy listening to music. ......................................................❏ MR I like to sing..........................................................................❏ MR I often tap my feet or fingers. .................................................❏ MR I prefer to work in groups or teams..........................................❏ IR I have a wide circle of friends. ................................................❏ IR I am a natural leader. ............................................................❏ IR I like meeting new people. .....................................................❏ IR I have one or two close friends. ...............................................❏ IA I usually enjoy spending time alone. .......................................❏ IA I have strong opinions and beliefs. ..........................................❏ IA I regularly set personal goals. .................................................❏ IA

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I like to read in my spare time. ...............................................❏ I enjoy creative writing. ..........................................................❏ English is my favourite subject. ...............................................❏ I like word puzzles and games. ...............................................❏ Maths is my favourite subject..................................................❏ I enjoy science experiments. ...................................................❏ I enjoy discovering how things work. .......................................❏ I am an organised person.......................................................❏ I love animals. ......................................................................❏ I prefer to be outdoors............................................................❏ Environmental issues interest me. ...........................................❏ I enjoy gardening. .................................................................❏ Art is my favourite subject. .....................................................❏ I easily picture ideas in my head. ............................................❏ I enjoy making or building things. ..........................................❏ I can read maps easily. ..........................................................❏

© RPeople . I . Cwho .P ubl i cat i ons learn best through activities involving … VL = Verbal-Linguistic reading, writingp and speaking •f orr ev i ew u r posesonl y•

2. (a) Use the key below to highlight which intelligences you scored the most ticks in. Intelligence

logical thought, numbers and patterns

N = Naturalist

patterns in nature, animals, plants, the environment

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images, colours and shapes, visualising ideas

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sport, drama or other ‘hands-on’ activities

MR = Musical-Rhythmic

music, rhythm or sound

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team or group work

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analysing own thoughts and feelings, working on your own

(b) Which two areas in which you scored the least ticks would you most like to work on? (c) Suggest a realistic goal you could set to help you improve in each of these areas.

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Be kind to yourself – Exercise regularly

Exercise leaflet Create an information leaflet using a folded sheet of A4 paper that encourages people of a particular age group to exercise regularly. You will need to think carefully about the presentation of your leaflet to make sure it is appealing to your target age group. Use the steps below to help you plan your leaflet.

3. (a) Decide on the mood of your leaflet.

1. Which age group will you target? 7–9-year-olds teenagers other

serious

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(b) List images and colours you could use that would capture this mood.

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2. Use the Internet or other resources to research information to include in your leaflet; for example, the benefits of regular exercise, recommended daily exercise for someone in your target age group. List any important facts you discover.

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4. Use some or all of your answers from Questions 1 to 3 to show the intended layout of your leaflet design in the space below. Remember to show fold lines.

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Be kind to yourself – Eat well

Healthy food claims Australian laws require food manufacturers to accurately represent what their products contain. Therefore, you will find nutritional information panels on most packaged food at the supermarket. These panels usually list the seven main ingredients of a food. Some manufacturers also make claims like ‘reduced fat’ or ‘low salt’. This can help you choose healthy food. However, you also need to be wary of such information – for example:

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• The contents of foods are shown ‘per serving’ and ‘per 100 g’. It is better to look at the ‘100 g’ column to compare two products because the serving size may differ. • ‘91% fat free’ means a food is 9% fat! • ‘Light’ or ‘lite’ can mean a food has a light colour or taste. • A food with less than 5 g of sugars, 3 g of fat and 120 mg of sodium (salt) per 100 g is reasonably healthy. • Sugar, salt and fat can be called other names. For example, sugar can be listed as sucrose or dextrose; fat as lard or shortening and salt as sodium or soy sauce.

1. (a) Choose two similar packaged food products (e.g. two brands of vanilla ice-cream) – one of which claims to be healthy in some way; e.g. ‘reduced salt’. Compare the two products and the information contained on each of the nutritional panels to find out if the ‘healthier’ option is worth buying. You can use a dictionary and the information at the top of this page to help you. Product names:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

List any claims made by the ‘healthy’ product:

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Comparison of the two foods:

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2. Compare the two sets of facts you have gathered above. Would you buy the ‘healthier’ product? yes/no Give reasons for your answer.

3. Discuss your findings and your opinions of nutritional panels with the class. Values education toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Sleep well

Sleepy internet challenge With a partner, use the Internet to find out the answers to the questions below about sleep. 5. Write one scientific theory for why we dream.

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6. List three tips to help someone who finds it difficult to get to sleep at night.

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1. Write three reasons why people need to sleep.

2. Write how much sleep experts recommend these age groups get per night:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons teenagers •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• adults 7. Why do some people sleepwalk? infants

children

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3. What does REM sleep mean?

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8. Write the name of a sleep disorder. List three facts about it.

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Be kind to yourself – Time to relax

The ultimate guide to relaxation Relaxation is essential for our personal wellbeing. We all need to allow ourselves time to leave behind the stress of daily routine and focus on maintaining the balance in our lives. Relaxation clears the mind and improves our ability to perform well. Plan four chapters of a best-selling lifestyle book, The ultimate guide to relaxation.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2o •f orr evi ew pChapter ur p sesonl y•

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Chapter 1

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1. Choose four different ways to relax and explain how each activity can help the body recharge.

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Chapter 3

Chapter 4

2. (a) On a separate sheet of paper, collate all the suggestions from your group (b) Conduct a survey in the class to determine the most frequently used method of relaxation. (c) Present your results graphically on a separate sheet of paper. 3. In pairs, role-play a television interview with the author of The ultimate guide to relaxation. Values education toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Minimise risk

Risky Richard in jeopardy again! A series of books about cartoon character Risky Richard has just been published. Each book in the series is about an adventure Risky Richard has because of the risks he takes. Each story is about a different type of risk. 1. For each book write: (a) an idea for the main story line, (b) a title for the story. risk

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S storyline

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2. Design a poster promoting the series.

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Be kind to yourself – Keep learning and growing

How does your garden grow? All our life experiences teach us something new or reinforce something we already know. The subject matter of these lessons can range from the straightforward—e.g. how to bake a cake—to the unclear— e.g. how to deal with a sensitive situation. 1. (a) Choose three people; one younger, one older and one the same age as you. (b) Ask each one to: (i) describe a personal learning situation he/she has encountered within the past three months, (ii) explain the lesson learned.

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2. Record your results in the table.

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write an idea to describe the different ways in which learning can make us grow; e.g. We become more tolerant. 4. Enlarge your flower and decorate it.

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5. Exhibit the flowers of all the class in a colourful display.

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Be kind to yourself – Strive for success

The secret of success To be successful, one needs to be prepared to work hard even when the going gets tough, and to keep going when giving up seems a better alternative. There are many character traits a person must possess to be successful. Eight character trait words are hidden in the word search. The words are listed in code. A

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1. (a) Complete the word search. [i] (20,5,14,1,3,9,20, 25) [ii] (19,20,1,13,9,14,1)

[iii] (4, 9,12,9,7,5,14,3,5) [iv] (5,14,4,21,18,1,14,3,5) [v] (4,5,4,9,3,1,20,9,15,14)

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(b) Decipher the coded words.

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A P Hu I l Ec T t No I s T R C O © R. I . C. b i a i n E T S A B E N J A E M • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • [vii] (16,5,18,19,5,22,5,18,1,14,3,5) Y N N D I S R A E L T [vi] (16,5,18,19,9,19,20,5,14,3,5)

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[viii] (4,5,20,5,18,13,9,14,1,20,9,15,14)

The unused letters of the word search, read from left to right and top to bottom, spell out a quote by a 19th century British prime minister, his name and the general term used to describe his occupation.

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2. (a) Write the quote, the name and the term.

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3. On a separate sheet of paper, using the above code: (a) encode the quote, name and occupation, (b) add the numbers for each letter to reach a total, (c) circle the correct answer. 1000

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Values education toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Love, and value the love of, others

The importance of love For most people, the need to be loved is as important as the need for food, clothing and shelter. The need to love and be loved is an important characteristic of human nature. 1. (a) Discuss each of the quotes below. (b) Interpret each quote using your own words.

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You can give without loving, but you cannot love without giving.

Only where the heart is can the treasure be found. James Barrie

It is sad not to be loved, but it is much sadder not to be able to love. Miguel De Unamuno

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Love is not only something you feel. It is something you do.

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If you would be loved, love and be lovable.

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Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead.

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2. Write a personal quote about the importance of loving and valuing the love of others.

3. Create an artistic design for your quote on A4 paper. Values education toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a circle of good quality friends

memories Imagine it is ten years from now and you have been invited back to school for a reunion party. While you are considering whether to attend, you start thinking about the friends you had in school. 1. (a) Make a list of the qualities your friends had that you appreciated the most. (b) Give examples of times when you particularly valued these qualities. example

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2. What qualities and examples will your friends be remembering about you? quality

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Be kind to yourself – Stand up for yourself

Talent show The school drama department is organising a talent show for each year group. You would love to audition to take part in the show as you believe you have a particular talent, but you are afraid of the reaction from your peers. 1. Describe each of the following scenarios and how it might conclude.

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(a) You secretly put your name forward and attend the audition without telling anyone.

(b) You ask your friends’ opinion before putting your name forward and then attend the audition secretly.

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(c) You confidently put your name forward and invite your friends to watch your audition.

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2. Which of these scenarios best describes how you would tackle the situation? Explain why.

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Be kind to yourself – Make good choices

Dramatic choice Choose a scene from a television drama (e.g. a soapie) where a character makes a poor choice. The choice should either be one which causes other people to suffer or think badly of the character or one which causes the character to feel badly about himself/herself. Describe the main details of the scene by completing the information below. 1. Name of television drama

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2. Name of character

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3. Description of character (include his/her main personality traits)

4. List any other main characters in the scene. Name

Age

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6. Why did the character make this choice?

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7. What other options were open to him/her?

8. What effect did/will this character’s choice have?

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Be kind to yourself – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes

Can I ever forgive myself? Sometimes when we make a mistake, especially one that hurts other people, it can be difficult to forgive ourselves because we feel so guilty. But forgiving yourself does not mean you should not feel responsible for what you did. It means you realise that you should have acted differently and that you have learned something from what happened. And remember— everyone makes mistakes sometimes. 1. Visualise a mistake you have made in the past that has affected other people in a negative way. Write:

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• whether it was something you said or did that you now regret

• why you acted that way at the time

• your feelings about what happened

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• what you have learned from making the mistake.

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2. An important part of forgiving yourself is ‘letting go’. This means that you accept responsibility for your mistake but you stop dwelling on it. (a) Suggest some things someone could do to ‘let go’ after making a mistake.

(b) Circle the suggestions that would work best for you in the situation you described in Question 1. Now try to put them into action! Values education toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Be positive

Positive affirmations 1. Read the information below. Many people find that using positive affirmations is a powerful way to lead a more productive and enjoyable life. An affirmation is a statement that you repeat to yourself. The best affirmations are simple, use positive, strong words and focus on what you wish to achieve; for example: ‘I want to pass my music exam’, or ‘I am an interesting person’.

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By guiding your thoughts in a particular direction, affirmations can help you: • stay motivated to achieve goals • change your attitude

• overcome a negative state of mind.

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• be said every morning and night and during the day as often as you can remember • be written down and kept in prominent places to remind you

• be said with a feeling of achievement—as though you have already achieved your goal.

2. (a) Do you think positive affirmations might work for you? yes/no Explain why/why not.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (b) Try using positive affirmations for four weeks. Think of two goals or attitude changes you would like • f or r evi ethewinformation pur potos es ormation nl y to see happen for yourself. Use above write an affi for• each one below. •

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(b) Write your affirmations on pieces of card or paper and put them in places you are most likely to see first thing in the morning, throughout the day and before you go to bed. 3. After four weeks of saying your affirmations, write:

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(a) how well you think you followed the instructions at the top of the page

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(b) your opinions on positive affirmations now. For example, did they make you feel any different? Did anything change? Would you continue to use positive affirmations in the future? Why/Why not?

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Be kind to yourself – Be useful

Useful questionnaire Complete the questionnaire. Compare your answers with other students in your class. 1. List examples of ways in which you help others in each of the following areas. Home/Family

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2. Which of these do you consider to be the more important? Why?

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School/Work

3. List some ways you could use your talents and abilities to make a difference in your community. Highlight any that you already do.

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5. Tick the statement which best describes you. • I like to help others most of the time. ..............................................

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• I like to help others some of the time. ............................................. • I don’t like helping others; I just do what I have to do...................... Expand your answer.

6. How does being useful usually make you feel?

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Be kind to yourself – Have some fun

Fun day out To keep a healthy mind, it is important to have fun sometimes. Plan a fun day out for you and a friend. You have a budget of $40. Try to include a range of activities. Be creative!

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1. Begin by brainstorming some fun, low-cost activities you both enjoy.

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2. Fit some or all of your activities in the timetable below. Remember the budget! Activity

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Be kind to yourself – Be proud of the things you say and do

Pride Imagine you buy a journal. The first page you open invites you to express your feelings about pride and what it means to you. Complete the journal page. List words and/or draw symbols you associate with the word ‘pride’.

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List words and/or draw symbols you associate with the word ‘ashamed’.

Describe your proudest moment and how it felt.

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Describe your least proud moment and how it felt.

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‘Pride comes before a fall.’ Write your opinion of this saying.

Is it important to you that other people are proud of you? Explain why or why not.

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Be kind to others – overview VALUE RELATIONSHIPS • Create a collage using pictures and words from magazines and newspapers that represents how you feel about the most important people in your life. • Design and make a card to thank the people whose relationship you value. Inside the card, list some of the reasons why each person’s relationship is important to you. • Make a collection of popular songs that describe how you feel about people who are important to you.

WORK AT BUILDING AND MAINTAINING RELATIONSHIPS • In small groups, discuss how factors like gender, age and culture can affect relationships. • Consider a relationship you have that requires some attention and write an action plan explaining how you might repair or strengthen this relationship. • Draw a diagram to illustrate the different relationships you have in your life. Use the colour code, green, orange, red to display whether the relationships are good, need a little attention, or need drastic measures.

• Research to write a report about a famous person who worked to restore the rights of minority groups; e.g. Martin Luther King Jr. • What are our human rights? In a small group, brainstorm some basic human rights that all people deserve. List ways these rights can be respected. • Research to compile a report on the world’s street children, whose rights are neither recognised nor respected. BE POLITE AND USE GOOD MANNERS

• Conduct a survey on manners; e.g. ask people of different age groups to rate how important they think good manners are. Graph your results. • Role-play a humorous scenario between a customer and a shop assistant where the customer is not using his/her manners. What are the consequences? • Watch episodes of Fawlty Towers on video or DVD to learn how NOT to treat people.

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RESPECT THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS

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• Take part in speech and drama activities which allow you to practise behaving in different scenarios.

BE TOLERANT AND UNDERSTANDING OF DIFFERENCE

• Read about the famous ‘blue-eyed’ experiment conducted by teacher Jane Elliott in the 1960s. Try a version of it in your classroom. • Write and perform a short play demonstrating how a person can be affected emotionally when others are intolerant of him/her. • Make a list of ways in which you are different from others in your class. Share your list with the class. Are you really as different as you thought?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• RESPECT OTHER POINTS OF VIEW

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• In groups, devise a rap about respecting others, to perform to a younger class. • List sentences you might say to someone who is arguing his or her point of view to you and which is different from your own. For example: ‘I do see your point, however, I still feel that …’. • Make up a list of sayings with the same meaning as ‘There’s more than one path through the woods’.

PRAISE PEOPLE WHO DO THINGS WELL

DON’T BULLY OR PUT OTHERS DOWN

• Devise a system in which the students in your class can support and praise others for achievement without being patronising or insincere. • Design and construct a class (or year group) trophy that is awarded each week to a student who has shone above others. Present the trophy at an assembly. • For an end-of-term presentation, design certificates, acknowledging good performances by all individuals.

• Identify some of the stereotypes of people who bully (perhaps drawing and labelling a picture) then compare to the class’s real experiences of people who have bullied them. • Create and perform an anti-bullying television commercial that helps people who bully to see the effects of their behaviour. • Write a poem with the title ‘Don’t bully or put people down’.

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DEVELOP GOOD PEOPLE SKILLS

• Rate how well you feel you relate to people of different ages; e.g. young children, elderly people. Identify the age group you rated the worst. Write possible reasons why and then devise a plan to improve your communication skills with this group. • Teenagers are often ‘stereotyped’ as having poor social skills. Roleplay ‘worst case’ scenarios between teenagers and adults. Defy the stereotype by role-playing how you would have spoken and acted in the same situation.

Values education toolkit

SEEK A FAIR GO FOR ALL

• Discuss the meaning of ‘empathy’ in small groups. Individual students can then create a mask or work on another art project that expresses the concept of empathy to them. • Hold a mini-debate on the topic: ‘People who complete the same tasks at work should be paid the same wage, regardless of age’. • Research different cultural societies where a fair go for all is not an option.

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Be kind to others – overview VALUE FAMILY LIFE

• In small groups, devise a television commercial, aimed at a particular target audience, that shows viewers the best way to deal with conflict. • Research the role and qualities of a mediator (a person who mediates between two conflicting parties) and practise being a mediator in the classroom and playground. • View an episode of Parliament question time. Discuss the way in which politicians from different parties speak to one another.

• Survey to find out the different types of families students are part of and what they like most about their family. Use the results to create an information brochure on families. • Write a recount about a special day you had with your family. A recount includes: an orientation (who, when, where and why), events (in order) and a conclusion. • Write a story about someone having difficulties at home who dreams about all the good things home should offer.

COOPERATE AND BE A TEAM PLAYER

TREAT OTHERS THE WAY THEY NEED TO BE TREATED

• Participate in teambuilding exercises, including simulation games. • Think of the most recent group project you completed and list the complications that occurred. For each item on the list, suggest a positive way the group could have resolved the problem. • In groups, work together to complete a cross-curricular task. Evaluate each team’s completed task and its performance as a team.

• Find newspaper articles that contain examples of people not being treated the way they need to be. Comment on the actions of everyone involved in the article. • Grandparents are special people for many reasons. Make a list of nice things you can do for your grandparents to show them you value and appreciate their love. • Make a list of special people in your life. Dedicate a month to each. During that month, focus your attention on that person and do all you can to make his/her life the best it can be.

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SUPPORT AND INCLUDE OTHERS

• Describe a campaign that promotes acts of kindness to people who are being left out at your school. Include details of what resources would be needed, how the campaign should be structured etc. • Choose someone in your life who would benefit from your support (for example, a younger sibling needing help with his/her homework). Write yourself a short-term goal to offer that person your support. Give yourself a deadline. • Write a song about the importance of supporting one another.

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Be kind to others – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Being kind to others is an essential element in the development of good people skills. These skills are important in forming and maintaining the many different relationships which are an integral part of living in society. Students need to understand the nature and importance of relationships and how to form and support them. Comprehending and considering the needs of others and knowing how to interact with them in a positive way are the keys to good relationships.

Discussion points

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Page 30 – Value relationships

• What are the most important relationships in your life? • What makes a good relationship? • How can you show people that you value their relationships with you?

Page 31 – Respect the rights of others

• What is meant by ‘human rights’? • What do you think are the most important basic human rights? • What student rights are protected by your school rules? Do you think any other rules should be written? If so, describe them.

Page 32 – Be polite and use good manners • How highly do you value good manners? Why? • Sometimes older people complain that younger people these days don’t have any manners. Respond (politely!) to this opinion. • What impolite behaviour do you most dislike?

Page 38 – Don’t bully or put others down • Why is the plight of the victim so sad? Discuss. • Would the bullies consider themselves such? Discuss. • How serious could the psychological damage to the victim be? Discuss.

Page 39 – Seek a fair go for all

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• What social and academic advantages are there in belonging to a book group? Discuss. • What would be the optimum size for the membership of a book club? Explain.

• ‘Whoever said life was fair?’ Discuss the meaning of this phrase and how we deal with it. • Is it possible that some things really are fair but we just can’t see it? Discuss. • ‘You can please some of the people some of the time but you can’t please all the people all of the time.’ Can this expression be related to being fair? Discuss.

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Page 33 – Praise people who do things well

• What is meant by conflict resolution? • What types of serious conflicts have you been involved in? Were you able to resolve them? • Are there any types of conflicts you should not try to solve on your own?

Page 34 – Develop good people skills

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• How does our current disposition affect how we respond to people? Discuss. • Discuss why it is acceptable for our positive feelings to affect how we treat others, but not our negative feelings. • How will our people skills affect the impressions we make on people? Discuss.

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Page 41 – Cooperate and be a team player

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• Why do some people feel awkward when given praise? Discuss. • Why is it necessary to give praise? Discuss. • How does the person showing appreciation feel? Discuss.

• What makes a good team player? • Do you feel you are a good team player? How could you improve your skills?

Page 42 – Support and include others

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Page 35 – Work at building and maintaining relationships

• Is it necessary to work at a relationship if the ‘other person’ isn’t? Discuss. • How can failing to work at relationships affect our future happiness? Discuss. • Who benefits from our maintenance efforts? Discuss.

Page 36 – Be tolerant and understanding of difference

• In what sorts of situations might people be left out? • Is it sometimes difficult to support and include people? Why? • Have you ever been left out? What emotions did this make you feel?

Page 43 – Value family life

• How can a family support you? • What makes a family? • What do you appreciate about your family?

Page 44 – Treat others the way they need to be treated

• What are the advantages of differences in our society? Discuss. • Why are some people afraid of these differences? Discuss. • How does intolerance of difference affect the peace of our society?

• ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.’ Discuss. • What does it mean to show empathy towards someone? • Can you think of a time when you empathised with someone you knew?

Page 37 – Respect other points of view • What opportunities are there in a book club for respecting other points of view? Discuss.

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Be kind to others – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

Item 1

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Item 3 Contrast

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Be kind to others – Value relationships

TV RELATIONSHIPS Imagine a commercial television station is looking for ideas for new information programs. It asks people to submit proposals using the form below. You and a partner decide to submit a proposal for a program about relationships. Read the form and then discuss possibilities for each heading before completing the form.

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INFORMATION PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM

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Suggested name(s) for program:

Suggested time slot for program: Mood of show:

upbeat

serious

other

Main location(s) for show:

Type(s) of relationships to be covered in program (tick one or more):

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Target audience:

sibling other © R . I . C . P u b l i cat i ons Presenter(s) of program (you may choose current celebrities or describe the type of person you would like to present the show): •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• friendships

parent-child

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Briefly describe three segments that could be included in the first episode of program (e.g. a street poll that asks ‘What makes a good relationship?’):

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Why do you think this program will appeal to your target audience?

What do you hope your target audience will learn from the program?

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Be kind to others – Respect the rights of others

Human rights The international global community has decided on basic human rights. These are outlined in the International Declaration of Human Rights. This document is set up to ensure countries and their people support the basic rights and freedom of all people. It contains rights concerning issues such as privacy, private property, equality, freedom, education, religion and dignity.

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1. Unfortunately, in many countries, not all of these rights are upheld. In small groups, explain why this might be.

2 Write a list of rights you feel should be upheld for the teachers and students at your school; e.g. ‘Teachers have the right to teach without being interrupted’. In the right-hand column, list any problems that may interfere with the stated right. Right

Problem(s)

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3. Choose a person who has fought for human rights (e.g. Nelson Mandela, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mahatma Gandhi or Martin Luther King Jr) and research to prepare a list of interesting facts about his/her achievements. Present them to the class.

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Be kind to others – Be polite and use good manners

Most offensive, least offensive ‌ How important do you think politeness and good manners are? Do you find some people’s bad manners more offensive than others? 1. Find a group of three or four people to work with. Read each of these situations below. í˘“ Receiving a gift without saying thank you í˘” Burping after a meal without apologising í˘• Showing off about how rich your parents are

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í˘– Pushing your way into a lift before the people inside the lift walk out í˘— Clicking your fingers at a waiter in a restaurant í˘˜ Staring at someone with a disability

í˘š Responding to a question with ‘yeah’ instead of ‘yes, please’ 2. Discuss each situation in your group and rank the situations from ‘most offensive’ to ‘least offensive’. Begin with the situation you think describes the ‘most offensive’ behaviour.

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í˘™ Letting a friend pay for you every time you go out somewhere

3. For the worst and best rankings, write a reason for your group’s choice. Most offensive behaviour:

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Least offensive behaviour:

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4. Write two other situations involving impolite behaviour or bad manners you would find more offensive than the examples given in Question 1. •

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5. Compare your answers to Questions 2, 3 and 4 with those of other groups. Be prepared to defend your decisions!

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Be kind to others – Praise people who do things well

Just rewards Some people feel uncomfortable when they receive praise so it is important to show appreciation in a way that acknowledges effort but does not leave the recipient feeling embarrassed. 1. Write an appropriate way to praise each person. Your parents have organised a fantastic celebration for your birthday.

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Your shy friend has helped you through a difficult time.

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Your gregarious captain has helped your team achieve top honours this season.

Your young sibling has learned not to mess things in your room. Your parents have redecorated your house.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Your austere grandfather has Your doting grandmother has taught you how to propagate plants.

taught you how to play chess.

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Your genial music teacher has guided you towards a distinction in your exam.

2. Who is worthy of your praise and how can you demonstrate your appreciation? recipient

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Be kind to others – Develop good people skills

Always show your sunny side! What exactly are good people skills? Maybe the question can be answered by looking at what good people skills are not! 1. (a) In pairs, plan a brief scenario which concludes with a customer (who has just received a speeding fine from the traffic police) leaving a shop, complaining about the sales assistant (who earlier that morning, had an argument with her employer.)

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Include how the customer approached the sales assistant and how the sales assistant responded. Record the dialogue.

(b) Present your scene to the rest of the group. (c) Discuss the situation from both points of view.

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(e) How did the events earlier in the day affect each person’s temperament?

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(d) What bad people skills were displayed by each character?

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2. Rewrite and present the scenario with both people displaying good people skills.

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Be kind to others – Work at building and maintaining relationships

Communication is the key It is possible to have relationships with people all over the world. The distance between us is no longer a barrier as, with modern technology, we can easily maintain a relationship irrespective of distance. 1. Where in the world are the people with whom you wish to maintain a relationship? same state

interstate

overseas

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2. (a) What methods of communication do you use for each person? (b) How frequently do you contact each (daily, weekly, monthly, yearly)? person

method of communication

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4. What are the advantages of maintaining relationships?

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Be kind to others – Be tolerant and understanding of difference

Festival fever Intolerance is often brought about by a lack of understanding and a fear of the unknown. If something is different and you know nothing about it, think of it as an opportunity for learning, to find out more about the world and its many cultures. Don’t hide in ignorance. You have the power to be more open-minded and tolerant, so use it!

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Sarah and Alison received an invitation from Suli, a mutual friend, to attend the Hindu arts festival of Sarasvati Puja, being celebrated in her local community.

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Sarah was delighted to have been invited and immediately set about researching the festival so she would be able to appreciate and fully participate in the big celebration. Suli described the food and explained how it would be served. Sarah was keen to try everything! With the help of Suli’s mum, Sarah’s mum made her a special yellow outfit so she would be like everyone else, wearing yellow as a symbol of the warmth of spring. Alison’s response to the invitation was very different. She knew nothing about the Hindu faith and did not really want to accept the invitation. She did not even want to talk to Sarah about it. Sarah’s enthusiasm annoyed her.

‘It’s only a stupid street party. I don’t know why you’re getting so excited’, complained Alison. ‘It’ll just be a load of greyhaired oldies making fools of themselves, doing stuff I don’t know about and serving strange food that burns the back of your throat and makes your breath stink! I wish I didn’t have to go.’

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1. What lessons in tolerance could be learned by Alison?

2. (a) How could Alison overcome her problems?

(b) Who could help her?

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3. Write a positive conclusion to the narrative.

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Be kind to others – Respect other points of view

Book club A contemporary popular pastime is attending a book club. Once a month, a book is chosen for club members to read before the next meeting, when the book is discussed. The choice of books can come either from a given list, from a library or bookshop, or from individual club members. The discussion points for each book can follow a standard format or be tailored to meet the needs of each book. Members take turns hosting the club, providing refreshments and a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere.

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1. What do you think are the advantages of being a member of a book club?

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2. If you were responsible for compiling a book list for a year, how would you decide which books to choose?

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3. If you were responsible for designing the outlines for each month’s discussions, where would you get your ideas from?

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4. Organise a book club with a group of friends.

(The school librarian and teachers of English will be able to assist you as required.)

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Time

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Outline for discussing books

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Be kind to others – Don’t bully or put others down

Cry of despair Being bullied or put down can have a crushing effect on a person’s life. The more insidious the bullying, the more difficult it is for an objective observer to notice the problem. Meanwhile, the victim may be sinking deeper and deeper into an abyss of despair. 1. Read the diary entry of a student suffering from constant verbal abuse. Walking into the school grounds, the feeling over whelms me. Every day the same. Sickness, misery, fear. Nowhere to turn, no-one to confide in, lost and alone in an atmosphere of ridicule.

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On its own, each taunt or jibe would be easy to counter. But the constant flow, never letting up, wears me down just as the stormy seas carve the cliff face.

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At the beginning, there was only one person. I thought I’d be smart and ignore her attempts to put me down. Wrong move! It was taken as a weakness. She moved up a gear and others joined in, just for a laugh.

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Like the ever present bird song on a summer afternoon, the air is full of their t wittering. I’ve forgotten how to smile, my head is always bowed. At recess, I hide in the library, giving them more ammunition. ‘Her only friends are books. What a sad case!’ But the books are no solace. I can’t concentrate, I can’t study.

My grades have dropped off the scale, giving them more ammunition. ‘She’s so dull. Can’t she succeed at anything?’ The teachers think I’m lazy. I’ve ‘gone off the rails’.

Can’t they see! Don’t they notice? My parents think I’m rude and sullen. Can’t they see! Don’t they notice? What can I tell them?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •who f o r r e i ew pur posesonl y• Is there anyone can help me?v Someone? Anyone? These girls don’t really do anything. I have no scars or bruises. How can I describe what they do? My will has gone. I hate my life. Aren’t teenage years meant to be fun? Please.

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(a) Describe the roles of everyone mentioned, including the author.

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2. Discuss the narrative.

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(b) What positive steps could be taken to relieve the student’s despair?

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Be kind to others – Seek a ‘fair go’ for all

‘Let’s be fair’ Imagine your school has decided to run a ‘Let’s be fair’ week. The organisers are enlisting the help of each year group to find out what the students think is ‘fair’ and ‘unfair’ about the school system. This way, they hope to make the week appropriate for all students. 1. In groups, discuss and record all the things you believe to be fair and unfair about your school life. unfair

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2. Discuss the unfair issues raised and suggest ideas for addressing each. unfair issue

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3. Discuss and record suggestions to offer the organisers of the ‘Let’s be fair’ week.

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Be kind to others – Manage and resolve conflict

Conf lict resolution Conflict resolution is a process that directs the responsibility for solving a conflict to the people involved. The conflicting parties express their points of view and interests and work together to find a solution they both find agreeable. The steps used in conflict resolution are: í˘ą Stop and cool off. í˘˛ Define the problem (Use sentences beginning with ‘I’ such as ‘I felt angry when ‌’ to tell the other person what happened and how you felt.)

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í˘ł Brainstorm solutions.

í˘´ Choose a fair solution—you may need to compromise. í˘ś Agree to the plan.

1. Write why each of these steps might be important in helping to solve a conflict. cooling off

brainstorming solutions

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í˘ľ Make a plan. Decide how you will put it into action.

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Resolving conflicts successfully doesn’t happen by accident! It requires practice of communication and problem-solving skills.

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2. Why do you think you would need to be a good communicator and problem-solver to resolve conflicts successfully?

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3. In a small group, work through each of the conflict resolution steps to solve the conflict below. Write your answers on a separate sheet of paper and then report to the class. Craig has just moved into the house next to Aaron’s. Craig plays in a band and practises the drums every morning before he goes to work. Aaron is a nurse. He works late shifts four days a week and needs to sleep during the day. He finds it impossible as the room Craig practises in faces his bedroom. After a few weeks of this, Aaron storms over to Craig’s house and demands that he stops playing. Craig refuses and slams the door in Aaron’s face. • What could Craig and Aaron do to cool off? • What is the problem and how does each person feel? Write these as ‘I’ statements. • Brainstorm three possible solutions to the problem. Choose the best one. • Write a plan of action based on your solution.

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Be kind to others – Cooperate and be a team player

Team-building activities Try these activities. After each, comment on how well you worked and your role in the team. Who, Where, When, What, Why

Survival

Group of 6

Group of 5

Create a drama scene based on one of the following situations:

Your team is taking part in a reality television show. You have to survive on a remote island for three months. The island has poisonous snakes and wild pigs. There is also a freshwater stream and plenty of fish and coconut palms.

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• Frantically looking for … • The announcement

The host of the show tells you that you can only take six items among you from the list below:

• fishing rod • matches • snake anti-venene • 5 small bottles • cooking pot • sharp knife • sunscreen • tarpaulin • rope • bandages • soap • spear • 3 months’ supply of rice • chocolate bars As a team, decide what you will take and why. You have a 20-minute time limit.

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Decide: – Who you are – Where you are – When it is – What you are doing – Why you are doing this

Each of you should have at least three lines to say. You have a 10-minute time limit to rehearse and present your scene.

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Knot a problem

Objects

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Group of 6

Stand in a circle with your team. Each person needs to reach across the circle and grab hold of two other hands. The hands each person grabs must belong to two different people.

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Without letting go, the team must untangle the knot to make a circle. You may find that some team members will be facing outwards or that two circles are formed.

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Be kind to others – Support and include others

Supportive situations Imagine that four of your friends tell you the following stories. Suggest how you could show support for each person.

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‘Jayden, Sam and I were out shopping when Jayden showed us he had stolen a magazine. He dared Sam to steal something. Sam then stole a pair of shorts from a surf shop. Jayden dared me to have a go. I told him they were idiots and I wouldn’t do it. They won’t speak to me now and I’m worried they’ve started spreading rumours about me being gutless. I’m going to have to steal something too or I’ll be on my own at school.’

‘I’m the only one in our group of friends who doesn’t have a boyfriend or girlfriend. Sasha told me it is because I am overweight. I’ve noticed that the group has stopped asking me to occasions where you all go out as couples. I’m quite happy to be single because I haven’t met anyone I want to go out with yet. But I’m beginning to feel really left out.’

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ‘Mum won’t let me buy my food from the

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school canteen, so I have to take my lunch to school every day. The food is traditional to our culture. I really like it, but you’ve probably noticed that it has a strong smell. Other people laugh at me and refuse to sit near me. A few are also joking that I stink and they hold their noses and pretend to choke whenever they are near me.’

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‘I’ve been feeling really upset since my grandfather died last month, but Mum has been in a terrible state. She often sits at home and just cries. I have to look after my younger brothers as well as doing my homework and chores. My schoolwork’s started to suffer, my skin is breaking out and my friends all reckon I’m snapping at them.’

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Be kind to others – Value family life

Family life info-mercial Find a group of four to five people to work with. Imagine you are employed as a creative team for an advertising company. A client asks you to devise a 30-second television information commercial for the upcoming ‘Year of the family’ celebration. The client wants: • the commercial to encourage people to spend time with their families • no voices to be heard • music to be part of the commercial

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1. Begin by brainstorming ideas for the commercial.

music

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2. On a separate sheet of paper, plan a storyboard for your commercial. A storyboard shows ‘freezeframe’ shots that make up your commercial. Each shot should represent five seconds of your commercial. Under each shot, write a description of what is happening.

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3. Create the final draft of your storyboard in the space below.

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Be kind to others – Treat others the way they need to be treated

Empathy Showing empathy for others and treating them well is a skill we should all learn. 1. Read each of these scenarios below. 2. For each scenario: (a) write how you think George or Charlotte might be feeling (b) comment on the behaviour of the other characters in the scenario

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(c) explain how you could demonstrate empathy for George or Charlotte.

(a)

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You are at a pool party. Almost everyone is swimming, playing cricket or dancing. But one of the guests, Charlotte, is in a wheelchair and can’t join in the physical activities. She sits on the sidelines, smiling, and seems to be enjoying watching. Most of the guests are ignoring her. A few seem to forget she is there and keep crashing into her wheelchair as they rush past. Eventually, the mother of the girl holding the party asks Charlotte to help her out in the kitchen. Charlotte accepts.

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George is a new student at your school. His clothes are out of fashion and look old and worn. He keeps to himself and even sits with his younger brothers at lunchtime. He is late to school every morning but the teachers don’t seem to get angry. They even ignore the fact that George often falls asleep during lessons. But some of the students in your class laugh when it happens and sometimes throw things at him.

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Be kind to the environment – overview CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF • Invite a guest speaker to talk to the students about Clean Up Australia Day. The students can prepare for the visit by writing interview questions to ask the speaker. • Create a list of reasons why it is important to thoroughly clean and put away equipment after practical lessons in subjects such as science, home economics and woodwork. • Write a story about a series of calamities that occurred because someone did not clean up after him/herself.

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KEEP THE LAND, AIR AND WATERWAYS CLEAN

RECYCLE AND DON’T WASTE

• Talk to older people in the community to find out what they did at your age to recycle and avoid waste, particularly during wartime. Compare to how you recycle and avoid waste now. • Use estimations and calculations to determine how many pieces of A4 paper are used in your school in one day, one week and one year. Explain how you came to your final number. • Design and construct a puppet stage using large boxes and other packaging materials. Make some puppets from recyclable materials. Write and present a puppet show for young children.

CARE FOR NATURAL HABITATS, WILDLIFE AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

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• Conduct an experiment to find out the effect water pollution has on plants. • In a group, discuss how you think our waterways become polluted. Make of list of some possible consequences of this pollution. • Research to find specific health problems believed to be caused by pollution. Choose one problem and its apparent cause to investigate further.

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• Find out the meaning of the ‘stars’ on white goods such as washing machines, fridges and dishwashers. Compare a top loader and front loader washing machine. Why is one more energy efficient than the other? • Make a list of simple measures you could take at home to reduce your family’s energy consumption.

• Draw diagrams which illustrate the effect of deforestation on the climate. • Find out what wildlife corridors are. What purpose do they serve? Are there any in your local area? Are they working? • Plan a research study on the endangered species of the world. Use a world map to locate the natural habitats of each species. USE ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS

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• Calculate the daily cost of water consumption in your home. Encourage your family to save water for one month and then compare the results. • Design a set of posters that clearly send the message of simple ways to save water in the home. Display the posters around the school. • Make a list of how you use water each day in your home. Imagine you no longer had running water and had to collect water from a local pump. How would your family have to change its use of water?

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CONSIDER ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY ENERGY SOURCES

• Investigate the pros and cons of wind farms. • Design a house that promotes sustainable living. Draw the house on A3 paper and add notes that explain its features. Consider the positioning of the house (with the sun), materials used for construction etc. • Research the fuel alternatives currently under investigation in the motor industry.

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CONSERVE ENERGY • Investigate common appliances at home and school, looking at what form of energy each needs to operate, what each is used for and how necessary you feel it is.

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SAVE WATER

• Research to create posters that convince supermarket customers not to use plastic bags. The posters should include statistics and helpful hints. Ask a local supermarket to display the posters. • Research a company that promotes its products as friendly to the environment such as ‘The Bodyshop’. Choose a sample of products and create an information poster that explains how the products have been manufactured to affect the environment the least. • Imagine you are a salesperson for a brand of household cleaning ware that uses only water to clean. Prepare a presentation to give to your prospective buyers.

CONSIDER USING RESOURCES THAT CAN BE REPLACED (SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT)

• Design alternative packaging for supermarket products currently wrapped in plastic. The new packaging must be attractive, functional and practical. • Hold a debate on the topic: ‘It is impossible to have development and sustain resources at the same time’. • Draw a diagram to describe how a compost bin works. Explain which foods can be included and which cannot.

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Be kind to the environment – overview VALUE OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE

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• Have class members share objects associated with their cultural heritage, explaining the objects’ significance. • Choose a creative way such as a poem, art piece or model to represent part of the Australian Aboriginal culture, such as cuisine, music, beliefs or celebrations. • Use material pieces to make national flags of all the nations represented in your class. Some students will need to go back a few generations to decide where their ancestors came from. All students work together to make one larger flag of Australia. Display flags at a special assembly. Explain that although we come from different lands, we are all Australian.

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Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION The environment can be defined as the world that exists around us. This is not just the physical conditions of a place, but also all those conditions and influences that affect it. Human behaviour is responsible for many detrimental changes to the environment and students need to be aware of how they should care for the environment so what they do has a lessened impact on it.

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Page 56 – Use environmentally-friendly products

Discussion points

Page 50 – Clean up after yourself

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• Everyone should be responsible for cleaning up after himself/herself. Discuss. • Discuss some of the problems that are caused by littering. • What penalties do you think should be applied to people who litter?

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• What are some ways you might identify an ‘environmentallyfriendly’ product on the supermarket shelves? • How are some cleaning products friendly to the environment when others are not? • Have you been to a shop that does not offer plastic shopping bags? What were the alternatives?

Page 57 – Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources

Page 51 – Keep the land, air and waterways clear • What are some of the worst pollution threats we face today? • Which type of pollution do you feel is the most serious—land, air or water? • Which organisations are associated with trying to lower pollution levels?

• What are fossil fuels and how are they extracted/manufactured? • List at least six renewable energy sources. Which do you think is the ‘energy source’ of the future? • If we know that fossil fuels are non-renewable, why haven’t we switched to renewable energy sources? Discuss.

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Page 53 – Save water

• How are native plants better suited to the Australian climate? • Why are introduced species so popular in Australian gardens? • What other gardening management techniques can help to reduce water consumption?

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Page 54 – Conserve energy

• What does it mean to be sustainable? • If trees are renewable, why are people against the logging of forests? • Do most people you know recycle? Does your family? Why/Why not?

Page 59 – Value our cultural heritage • Discuss the different waves of emigration to Australia, including when they occurred. • What are some ways you can show that you value this country’s Australian Aboriginal heritage and culture? • What significant landmarks and heritage sites can be found in your local area?

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• Why is plastic packaging so popular for food products? • What would be an alternative, biodegradable food packaging? Explain. • How could families realistically reduce the amount of food bought in plastic containers?

Page 58 – Consider using resources that can be replaced (sustainable development)

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• Which domestic appliances consume the greatest amounts of energy? • Do you think power restrictions are the answer to the energy crisis? Explain. • Research for information to support or refute the claims that nonrenewable resources will be totally depleted by the middle of the 21st century.

Page 55 – Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species • What are some reasons wildlife might become endangered? • How are some zoos helping to increase the numbers of threatened and endangered species? • What can you do to care for natural habitats in your local area?

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Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples What am I? I live in the sea and on land but can neither swim nor walk. I travel by foot but have no legs. I’m always close to home.

Word Web – Environment

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Be kind to the environment – Clean up after yourself

Clean campaign As a class, plan a campaign that works towards making your school litter-free. Follow the steps below. 1. (a) Over the course of a school day, observe to find out which areas accumulate the most litter at your school. (b) Hold a class discussion to find out which three areas everyone agrees are the worst. Write them below.

• vote on the three pieces of promotional material and one or two of the slogans you like the best out of all those suggested by the groups

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• decide on an effective class plan for making the promotional material and presenting the campaign to the school.

4. When your materials are ready, try out your campaign for one or two weeks. Write what effects, if any, you think it had on the litter problem. Add your comments and feelings about the campaign itself. Effect of campaign:

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3. Come back together as a class and:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. In a small group: •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (a) Describe three pieces of promotional material

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you could make that you feel would best point out the litter problem to the students at your school and encourage them to pick up litter; for example: a poster, stickers.

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(b) Suggest some possible catchy slogans for the campaign.

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Be kind to the environment – Keep the land, water and waterways clean

Anti-pollution tourist map Imagine you live in an environmentally friendly town. You and the town’s other residents pride yourselves on keeping the land, air and waterways as pollution free as possible. The number of visitors to your town has recently begun to increase dramatically and you would like tourists to help you keep the town clean. The town council decide that the best way to do this is to create a tourist map of the town that contains environmentally-friendly tips and reminders for tourists to read. The council begins the map, but asks you to finish it.

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On the partially completed town map below:

• draw and label other features or buildings of your imaginary tourist town

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• use resource materials such as the Internet to help you write an appropriate anti-pollution tip or reminder next to each feature or building; e.g. next to the hire car company, you might write a tip on which type of car has the best fuel economy. Use friendly, easy-to-read language.

convertibles four wheel drives

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Bob’s Hire Cars

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Be kind to the environment – Recycle and don’t waste

Weekly plastics tally Plastic tubs, bags and bottles from food packaging are a large part of weekly household rubbish. We have become so used to the convenience of plastic ware that we probably don’t even realise how much we throw out each week.

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1. (a) Design a tally chart for all the plastic packaged foods consumed in one week in your house. Include columns for daily and weekly totals.

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(b) Make a copy of the chart on separate paper and ask family members to record with a tally mark each time they throw out a plastic container for each food item. 2. On separate paper, graphically represent your home’s results. Display your graphs at home to remind everyone how much you contribute to the plastic landfill mountain!

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3. Think of ways some of these containers could be reused at home; e.g. margarine tubs for propagating plants (remember to make drainage holes in the bottom), small yoghurt tubs for mixing paints for younger siblings.

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Be kind to the environment – Save water

A native garden Although many homes use bore water for their gardens, much of our domestic water is used in reticulation systems and for hand watering plants. Gardens are important for the aesthetic appeal of a neighbourhood and for residents to enjoy. However, it is possible to create a beautiful garden using native plants which thrive in drier conditions. 1. Research to find suitable native plants for each area of a garden.

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plants which thrive in shady areas

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trees for shade and privacy

flowering plants to hide fences

shrubs for borders

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. Imagine you are building a house on a new block. Your garden is just sand.

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(b) Devise a legend to show which plants have been used.

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(a) Sketch a rough design for your garden, using native plants exclusively around your house.

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3. Plan your garden in detail using cm2 paper. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be kind to the environment – Conserve energy

Halt power restrictions! The local power provider is considering the introduction of restrictions in all residential areas unless the overall power consumption is reduced. They are holding a ‘Design a poster competition’, the subject of which is ways to reduce energy consumption. The poster must include suggestions for summer and winter. The winning poster will be used in the company’s energy conservation advertising campaign.

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2. Sketch a rough design for your poster, using your ideas from Question 1.

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1. Make a list of ways in which power in the home can be reduced.

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Be kind to the environment – Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species

Zoos in the 21st century In the past, animals in zoos lived in enclosures that resembled jails, with concrete walls and bars. They spent their days being stared at like objects in a museum. Fortunately, zoos and wildlife parks have changed dramatically since then, with the focus now being on the animal’s needs. 1. Below are some of the zoos and wildlife parks in Australia. Use a search engine such as google (www.google.com) to find the websites of these zoos and read about them. Tick the zoos you read about, plus any that you have visited yourself.

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South Australia Adelaide Zoo

Western Australia

Tasmania

Perth Zoo

Trowunna Wildlife Park

Northern Territory Alice Springs Desert Park

Victoria

Territory Wildlife Park

New South Wales

Queensland

Melbourne Zoo

The Australian Reptile Park

Healesville Sanctuary

Taronga Zoo

Victoria’s Open Range Zoo

Western Plains Zoo

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Monarto Zoological Park

Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary

2. While you are viewing different websites, make notes under the headings below, explaining how the focus of zoos and wildlife sanctuaries has changed.

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Animal enclosures

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Conservation and education

Other interesting facts

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Be kind to the environment – Use environmentally-friendly products

‘Environmentally friendly’ product review As consumers, we are constantly making choices about which products to buy and to use. Today there are many products which advertise using the slogan ‘environmentally friendly’. 1. Compare a well-known brand of toilet tissue with toilet tissue that states it is friendly to the environment. Record your comparisons below.

Toilet tissue – product review Product 1

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Well-known brand:

Environmentally friendly brand:

Cost:

Cost:

Scent:

Texture: soft

Packaging: Scent:

rough Texture:

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Packaging:

soft

Colour of paper:

Colour of paper:

Thickness of sheets:

Thickness of sheets:

rough

• Explain how, by purchasing product 2, the consumer is being a friend to the environment.

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• In your own words, compare the two products, including which you would purchase and why.

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2. Choose two more products that have the same function (e.g. shampoo: function – used to wash hair) from the areas below or your own choice. One must advertise that it is ‘environmentally friendly’ in some way. • appliances • cosmetics • body care • foodstuffs • shopping bags • cleaning products • paper • electricity/energy On the back of this sheet, review both products and write a paragraph comparing them. Include which one you would purchase and why. Values education toolkit

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Be kind to the environment – Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources

Renewable energy resources Hydroelectric energy

Wind energy

Dams are constructed that produce artificial lakes behind them. The water rushing down from this lake is used to turn generators.

Windmills have been used for centuries to pump water. Today, huge windmills in wind farms are used to turn electrical generators.

The rocks deep underground are very hot. This heat can be used to heat homes or run electrical generators.

Tidal energy

An estuary is dammed to create an artificial lake that is filled by incoming tides and emptied by outgoing tides. The energy contained in the water flowing in and out can be used to turn electrical generators.

Solar energy

Solar panels absorb heat energy from the sun, which can be used to heat water. Solar cells use sunlight to produce small amounts of electricity.

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Alternate energy source

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Geothermal energy

1. Read about each of the alternate energy sources and choose one to find out more about.

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(b) the advantages and disadvantages of using the energy source.

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disadvantages

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4. On the back of this sheet, write a paragraph explaining whether you believe this alternate energy source will replace fossil fuels (electricity/gas/oil) and become the energy source of the future. Give reasons for your opinion. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be kind to the environment – Consider using sources that can be replaced

Sustainability report 1. Prepare for a class debate on the statement: ‘It is impossible to have development and sustain resources at the same time.’ (a) Research for information and evidence to support each side of the motion. Write bullet point notes. Record the resources (books and websites) you used to research the topic below. evidence against

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evidence for

(b) List your arguments for and against. arguments for

arguments against

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2. Hold the debate.

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3. (a) Were you for or against the statement?

For

Against

(b) Were you happy with the outcome?

Yes

No

Explain why:

References list:

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Be kind to the environment – Value our cultural heritage

Travellers to a new land

D

uring the last Ice Age, a lot of water from the ocean was being used to form large polar ice-caps. With less water in the oceans, the level of the sea was lower than it is today. At this time, the world’s continents were shaped differently. It is believed that Australia was once joined to Papa New Guinea, and, until about 12 000 years ago, Tasmania was part of Australia’s mainland.

The Aboriginal people moved in bands, stopping for long periods in different places to fish, hunt and gather other foods. Some may not have wished to travel to Australia but may have been caught in their watercraft by strong winds or monsoons and drifted towards the great land.

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Due to the sea being lower, people were able to walk across natural land bridges from one continent to another.

The first Aboriginal people would have reached Arnhem Land (Northern Territory), the Kimberley region (northern Western Australia) and Cape York Peninsula (Northern Queensland) and settled by the coast. When the population grew, small groups may have chosen to travel inland.

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Prehistorians believe Australia’s first indigenous population travelled here from South-East Asia during this ice age about 40 000 years ago. The sea level was probably about 130 metres lower than it is today, leaving more of Indonesia’s islands visible as land. Aboriginal people ‘islandhopped’, walking from as far as India until they were forced to take rafts or canoes to travel the last leg of their journey to the north-west part of

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Australia. These watercraft were possibly made of bamboo as it is a water-resistant, light material, in good supply in Asia.

About 10 000 years ago, the temperature began to increase a little, causing the southern and northern ice sheets to melt. The sea level rose, making Australia an island.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 1. Use an atlas too locate thee places where first Aboriginal landed andl settled. •f rr vi e wthep u r popeople ses on y •Record them on the map of northern Australia.

Unlike many other cultures, there are no written records of Aboriginal history. Instead, history has been passed on through storytelling, songs and dance. Some history can be determined by archaeological finds.

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Northern Australia

250

500

750 km

1:25 000 000

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• Arnhem Land • the Kimberley region • Cape York Peninsula 2. Draw an arrow to show the direction to Papua New Guinea.

Gulf of Carpentaria

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3. With a partner, discuss some of the obstacles that Aboriginal people may have faced during their migration to Australia. List at least three obstacles they may have encountered. • • • 4. Choose one part of Aboriginal culture, such as food, music, beliefs or celebrations, to research and report on. Choose a creative way to display your findings, such as a piece of artwork, a poem, a poster or model. (Be culturally sensitive!) R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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chatterbox TEMPLATE A chatterbox is a fun method to reinforce concepts as well as engage learners who utilise the visual/spatial, verbal/linguistic, logical/ mathematical and bodily/kinaesthetic intelligences while encouraging the interpersonal intelligence.

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Instructions í˘ą Begin with a square piece of paper or light card.

í˘ą

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Use the pattern given to encourage students to make individual chatterboxes relating to specific areas of the Values toolkit. A specific example is given on page 96.

í˘˛ Fold each corner in so that they meet in the centre of the square. í˘ł Turn over and repeat the procedure, folding corners in to meet at the centre. This will create four triangular flaps.

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í˘´ Number each half of the triangular ‘flaps’ (eight in all). Any numbers can be used.Number also each of the four square flaps on the underside of the construction.

í˘ś Place thumbs and forefingers under the square flaps. Move them in a ‘forward/sideways’ motion. The chatterbox will open in two ways, revealing the four ‘triangular’ numbers each time.

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7 8

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3 4

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í˘ľ Fold the chatterbox in half, so that the numbered squares are on the outside.

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Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height— like a book

I am

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4. Be the learning r o e t s Bo r e p ok kind u S

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Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand

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Swing your hand up to your head—putting the information from the book into your head.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – overview DETERMINE HOW YOU LEARN BEST (LEARNING STYLES)

BE POSITIVE ABOUT LEARNING • Compose a letter or an email to your favourite teacher of the past or present, explaining how he/she inspired you to enjoy and appreciate learning. • Imagine it is ten years in the future. You have been asked to return to school to present a talk to the students, explaining how the learning experiences you had in secondary school helped you to follow, and become successful in, your chosen career path. • If you feel your learning has purpose, you will feel positive about it! Write a list of the things you want to achieve in your life. Include education, career, travel etc. What do you need to do and learn to achieve these things?

• Complete a project in small groups that involves using a range of learning styles (e.g. creating a magazine). When the project is complete, detail those tasks you felt you were best at and those where you felt you learned from others. • Over one term, prepare for tests in one subject area (such as society and environment) in a number of different ways: for example, reading information only, using palm cards to learn facts, writing notes, being quizzed by a friend/family member. Which method helped you to remember and recall the facts the best? • In a group, discuss the methods each of you use to learn, taking into account environment as a factor. Try out different methods for different types of learning.

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SEEK KNOWLEDGE ABOUT YOURSELF, OTHERS AND THE WORLD AROUND YOU

• Read various myths and legends. Write a contemporary version of one of them that teaches the same knowledge or lesson to a modern audience. • Survey the students in your school to determine the countries where they and their families originate. Organise a lunch where food from each culture is prepared and tasted. • From the Internet, obtain a list of all the countries of the world. Cut the list into strips, fold and place in a tin. Pick one, unseen, from the tin. Research to find information about that country. Present as a short project following a set layout. Over time, an excellent resource will be created.

HAVE AN OPEN MIND

• Read creative descriptions of imaginary crime scenes and, in small groups, discuss what might have taken place, looking beyond the obvious. • During one week’s television viewing, keep a list of ‘stereotypical’characters in programs. Choose a number of characters to use as examples for an oral report discussing how television promotes stereotypes. • Take part in an activity that you would not normally consider. Immerse yourself in it for the allotted time. Give an objective appraisal, explaining how you felt.

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RECOGNISE THE VALUE OF KNOWLEDGE

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• Analyse scenes from novels or plays in which a character uses knowledge rather than strength to make the best of a situation. • Write and perform an interview between a student and a successful academic/inventor of the past, such as Einstein, Galileo, Da Vinci, Shakespeare, Madame Curie etc. • Would inventions be possible without knowledge? Why was the invention of the steam engine one of the most important innovations of the Industrial Revolution?

BE A CRITICAL THINKER

• Write a critical review of a play or movie. • After an event such as a sports carnival or excursion, critically consider how it could be improved for the following year. • Watch a television program that you not normally watch. Give a critical appraisal.

HAVE AN ENQUIRING MIND – BE CURIOUS

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• Watch a television documentary or information program and choose a topic from the program you would like to know more about. Research your topic with a partner and share your information with the class. • Write five questions you don’t know the answer to. Use the library and Internet to find the answers. Combine your questions with three other people’s to create a 20-question quiz and test your classmates and teacher. • Find out how domestic appliances work.

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HAVE A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

• Read articles from different world newspapers (some can be found online) that describe the same event. Compare the articles and think about why any differences in the articles might have occurred; e.g. cultural differences. • Research how people from other countries have been affected by a natural disaster (such as Hurricane Katrina or the Boxing Day tsunami). • Research for world statistics on population density, types of housing, education, health etc. to compare the range of world living standards.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – overview SEEK LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES EVERYWHERE

KEEP LEARNING

• Plan a school camp for younger children in which they participate in activities that provide a range of learning opportunities. • Choose a family member or friend who has a special interest or talent and spend time with that person learning about his/her talent. • Take a walk in a local park or bushland and take photographs of the different trees. Research to find their common and botanical names and how they reproduce and grow.

• Keep a learning journal for one week or one term. • Use the Internet to find out more about the belief that playing board games, reading, card games and other brain-focused activities can help prevent the onset of dementia, including Alzheimer’s Disease in the elderly. • Begin a long-term, personal project on a subject that interests you greatly. Spend a little time each week adding to your knowledge and understanding of the subject. Develop a web chart that brings in other related subjects. This could become a lifetime interest!

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LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES

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• Create a cartoon strip to show how your level of self-esteem might have affected a poor decision you made. • Write a narrative about a character who made a tremendous mistake that affected people he/she cared about. Ensure the final paragraph includes how the character learnt from the mistake. • ‘Mistakes are precious life lessons that can only be learned the hard way.’ Hold a debate on this statement.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Learning enables us to grow as individuals. Learning new things keeps our mind active and makes us more interesting human beings. It is important that children understand the benefits of learning and realise that knowledge gives us more choices and opportunities in our lives. Children and adults should continue to be curious and seek learning opportunities everywhere. As teachers, we can help children to recognise mistakes as important lessons rather than failures. We can provide learning opportunities in a range of intelligences to enable children to discover the types of learners they are, and we can work towards installing a lifelong love of learning in all our students.

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Discussion points

Page 73 – Have a global perspective

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• What are the benefits of learning? • Is learning just about facts and figures? • Is there a time when learning is no longer necessary?

Page 67 – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you

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• Why is important to know about events taking place outside of where you live? • Why might some events or countries get poor international news coverage? • How could you find out more about people living in other countries?

Page 66 – Be positive about learning

Page 74 – Seek learning opportunities everywhere

• Why is it important to learn about places other than our immediate environment? • Why do people originating from the same country often live in the same areas? • What are some of the advantages of a multicultural society?

• What are some of the most powerful or memorable learning opportunities you have experienced? • Who have you learned your most important lesson from? • ‘Our most important lessons are learned at school’. Discuss.

Page 75 – Learn from your mistakes

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y• Page 76 – Keep learning Page 69 – Have an enquiring mind – be curious Page 68 – Recognise the value of knowledge

• What are clouds? • How are rainbows formed? • Why is studying weather patterns an important science?

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Page 70 – Determine how you learn best • How do you prefer to take in information? • Describe the ‘perfect’, most interesting lesson for you. • What might be some reasons that everyone has different learning strengths?

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Page 71 – Have an open mind

• What are some important sources of learning? • Why should we keep learning throughout our lives? • What could you learn through teaching someone else?

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• What might be some positive results from making mistakes? • What have you learned from making a mistake? • Is it better to try something new and make a mistake or avoid it altogether? Why?

• Discuss incidents when immediate first aid has saved a life. • Discuss preventative measures to avoid each condition. • Discuss the value of having at least basic knowledge of first aid.

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• What does it mean to have an open mind? Is this always a good quality to have? • How could you develop an open mind? • Is it okay to challenge someone who is being close minded? If so, how could you do this politely?

Page 72 – Be a critical thinker • What does it mean to think ‘critically’? Why does it often have a negative connotation? • How could you develop your ability to think critically? • In what sorts of situations would it be vital to be able to think critically?

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

Answers

Step chart Step 5 Step 4 Step 3

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On a visit to the dentist, a young boy was disappointed to hear he had to have a cavity filled. But he soon cheered up when the dentist asked, ‘Now son, what kind of filling would you like for that tooth?’ ‘Honeycomb and maple syrup, please,’ answered the boy happily.

Step 2

Step 1

Title

Venn diagram

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Page 69: Cirrus – highest of all clouds Cumulus – summertime clouds Stratus clouds – thick, grey clouds Cirrostratus – high, thin clouds Cirrocumulus – delicate clouds forming ‘mackerel’ or ‘buttermilk’ sky Altostratus – blue-grey clouds Altocumulus – oval-shaped, fluffy clouds Nimbostratus – continuous, thick rain clouds Stratocumulus – long, dark, heavy, grey clouds Cumulonimbus – towering thunderstorm clouds

AB

A

B

ABC AC

BC

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Be the learning kind – Be positive about learning

Celebrity inspiration Imagine you are a famous person who has been asked by the school principal to give a motivational talk to a class of young teenagers. Your audience has lost interest in all forms of learning and is only content when playing computer games, watching videos and DVDs and generally just ‘hanging out’. It’s a difficult task, but you feel you can get through to them as you remember going through a similar phase yourself. 1. Complete the action plan below. This will provide the framework for your talk.

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Introduce yourself and briefly describe your current status.

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Recall some memories of your early teenage years.

Describe the motivating force behind your success.

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Explain the steps you have been through to reach your current status.

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Give examples of how new learning experiences have enriched your life.

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Describe any failures or rejections and how you dealt with them.

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Explain why you believe being positive about learning is essential for future success and happiness.

2. (a) Give your talk to your audience. (b) How did they respond? inspired

very interested

vaguely interested

unaffected

(c) If you were a member of the audience, how would you have responded?

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Be the learning kind – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you

Our multicultural society As a relatively young country, Australia has been populated by many waves of migrants from all over the world. This has led to a multicultural society in which the traditions of many nations have become part of the overall tapestry which makes up Australian culture. 1. (a) Research to find four businesses in your area which illustrate the multicultural nature of our society. business

country

colour on map

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(b) On the world map, colour Australia and the four countries, listed above.

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2. Research to find three important facts about each country.

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Be the learning kind – Recognise the value of knowledge

First aid Immediate attention by members of the public, to the victims of some medical conditions, has saved many lives. Do you know enough to be able to help out in an emergency? 1. Research to find information on recognised emergency procedures for each situation. bee sting

choking

poisonous snakebite

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box jellyfish sting

2. (a) Find the contact details for each organisation in your local area.

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(b) Write details of first aid courses they provide which you could attend.

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name and address

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courses offered

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Australian Red Cross

St John Ambulance Australia

Royal Life Saving Society Australia

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Be the learning kind – Have an enquiring mind

Looking at clouds Have you ever looked up at the sky and wondered what all the different cloud types mean? Have you ever made predictions about the weather based on the appearance of the clouds? Do you remember as a child seeing different shapes in the clouds? Have you ever researched to find out about the different cloud types? Cloud formation tells us a lot about what we can expect from the weather. A classification system has been developed by meteorologists, derived from some basic cloud characteristics, such as altitude, colour, density and appearance. Three primary and seven secondary cloud types have been recognised.

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1. Type cloud formations into a search engine such as google for information to match these cloud types with their descriptions.

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cirrus

high, thin clouds

oval-shaped, fluffy clouds

stratus

long, dark, heavy, grey clouds

cirrostratus

highest of all clouds

cirrocumulus

thick, grey clouds

altostratus

towering thunderstorm clouds

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cumulus

delicate clouds © R. I . C.Publ i ca t i on sforming ‘mackerel’ or ‘buttermilk’ sky • f orr evi ew pur poses onl y• nimbostratus continuous, thick rain clouds altocumulus

summertime clouds

cumulonimbus

blue-grey clouds

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2. Use your information from the internet to write more detailed descriptions of the three primary cloud types.

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3. (a) Use a range of materials and art techniques to make a large display of the ten cloud types. (b) Use your display to explain cloud formations to younger students. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be the learning kind – Determining how you learn best

What type of learner are you? Some educational experts say there are three major types of learning styles—and each of us has a preference for one of these styles. 1. Read the description of each style below.

4. Think carefully about the type of learner you identified yourself as. How could you approach and complete the assignment using the strengths of your learning style? Write detailed notes in the space below.

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Visual learners learn best by watching or seeing Do you: • interpret pictures, maps or diagrams easily? • prefer to watch a presentation to gain information than listen to someone speak? • prefer to talk to people face to face rather than over the phone? • feel you are good at reading people’s body language and facial expressions? • have a vivid imagination? Auditory learners learn best by listening Do you: • understand spoken instructions easily? • prefer to listen to the radio news rather than read a newspaper? • usually enjoy debates and discussions? • feel you are easily distracted by noises or music? • prefer to present a speech rather than write an essay?

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Kinaesthetic/Tactile learners learn best by touching or doing Do you: • understand ideas best when you are actually trying them out? • often use gestures when you talk? • enjoy talking to people while you are doing an activity or task? • often find it difficult to sit still at your desk? • enjoy making things with your hands?

2. Which type of learner sounds the most like you?

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3. Imagine your teacher gives you the following assignment. Research to find out the life story of one of your ancestors. You can use any information sources you like and may present the information you find in any way you choose—but make sure it is creative and interesting!

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Be the learning kind – Have an open mind

‘Top 10’ miracle Imagine you are a freelance writer. You hear about an Internet e-zine called ‘Top 10’ and decide to submit an article. Your idea is to write about the ‘top 10’ practical activities teenagers could do to develop an open mind; for example, listening to a different style of music, swapping emails with someone from another country and so on. 1. Research/Brainstorming

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Use resources such as the Internet and/or your own ideas for the body of your article. Write your 10 favourite ideas in note form below. Remember not to copy anyone else’s writing or ideas directly—you must use your own wording and creativity.

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2. Planning

Plan an interesting introduction and conclusion to your article. Your introduction should catch the reader’s attention and make him/her want to read on. For example, you might begin with a question or a quote. Your conclusion should encourage the reader to try out the suggested activities or offer any final tips or advice.

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4. Covering letter

conclusion ideas

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Write a brief email to the editor of the e-zine to submit with your article. The email should briefly explain why you think your article would appeal to teenagers.

5. Presenting Type your completed article on a separate sheet of paper, presenting it in the way you would like your readers to see it on a computer screen. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be the learning kind – Be a critical thinker

CD review Find a group of four or five people to work with for this activity. You will need a CD player and four CD singles. The singles should represent a mix of musical styles and could be modern or old.

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1. Listen to each CD single and write critical comments about it in the space below. You might include comments about the music, the singer(s) or the song lyrics. Remember, being critical means considering both positive and negative aspects of something.

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2. Compare your comments to the rest of the group’s. Decide which CD was the group’s least favourite and which was the most favourite. Report back to the class. Values education toolkit

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Be the learning kind – Have a global perspective

Global news segment Sometimes, dramatic events happening in other parts of the world get little news coverage on your local television news. Find a small group of people to work with to create a three to five-minute television news segment about an event that has taken place in another country. 1. With your group, look through newspapers from other countries or read articles from them on the Internet. Choose an article or a series of articles you think details important news but which you all know little about. List the main details of the story below. Location(s):

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Key people involved:

What happened?:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. Use the information you wrote to create your news segment. The structure of the segment should be as follows: • A newsreader introduces the story and then ‘throws’ to an on-the-spot reporter.

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• The newsreader asks the reporter a few questions about his/her location.

• The reporter introduces and interviews witnesses or key figures from the story and then ‘throws’ back to the studio.

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Decide who is playing which role, then practise your television news segment. You may want to add costumes and props.

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3. Present your segment to the class. Afterwards, answer any questions the class has about your segment. 4. When all the groups have performed, write about your favourite news segment (besides your own!) and what you learned from it.

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Be the learning kind – Seek learning opportunities everywhere

My most important lesson Find a group of three people to work with to complete this activity. Prepare and conduct a survey in which people belonging to three different age groups are asked the same questions: ‘Who did you learn your most important lesson from? What was it?’. 1. Choose three different age groups you could like to have answer these questions; for example, teenagers, people over 50 and so on. Write the three groups you choose below. • • •

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2. Find 10 people you know from each age group to participate in your survey. Divide the work evenly among the three of you. Write what your part will be.

3. Conduct your survey. When you have finished, summarise the information you received from the people you surveyed below.

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4. Discuss the information all three of you collected. Decide on the best way to present your results; for example, as a graph or a table. Note the details you decide upon below.

5. Present your results to the class in the form you chose. Compare your findings to those of other groups. Values education toolkit

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Be the learning kind – Learn from your mistakes

My mistake ‘We must not say every mistake is a foolish one.’ Cicero, orator and politician (106 BC–43 BC)

‘I have learned throughout my life as a composer chiefly through my mistakes and pursuits of false assumptions, not by my exposure to founts of wisdom and knowledge.’

‘Be not ashamed of mistakes and thus make them crimes.’ Confucius, philosopher (551 BC –479 BC)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Igor Stravinsky, composer (1882–1971)

(b) Do you agree with the quote? yes

no

Expand your answer.

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1. (a) Choose one of the quotes above about making mistakes. Write what you think the quote means in your own words.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. Use the • quote you chose and your answers to u Question 1 ass the inspiration for a free verse poem f or r e v i e wp r po e son l y • about a mistake you have made. Plan the content of your poem in the spaces below.

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Type of mistake I made

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My feelings about the mistake I made

What I learned from the mistake

3. Draft your poem on a sheet of scrap paper, then write a final copy on a fresh sheet of paper or card. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be the learning kind – Keep learning

Sources of learning It is important for people to keep learning throughout their lives. Learning not only keeps our brains active and healthy, it also adds interest and meaning to our lives. We can learn information, attitudes and values through a variety of sources. 1. Write a specific example of something important or memorable you have learned through each source of learning below. Some of the categories will require careful thought! Another person

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Media (i.e. books, television etc.)

Teaching someone else

Working on a personal weakness

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2. Add another source of learning not included in Question 1 and write an example of what you learned from it. Learning source Example

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3. Which one of your examples do you think was the most powerful learning experience for you? Explain why.

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5.erBe the r o e t s Bo p ok u achieving S kind

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – overview HAVE A GO!

PURSUE QUALITY AND PERSONAL EXCELLENCE

• Use travel brochures to design an adventure holiday filled with activities you would like to try. Compare your ideas with a partner’s. Would you try all the activities he/she listed? Why/Why not? • Hold a discussion about what it means when people say they were ‘outside their comfort zone’. When have you felt like this? How did you feel afterwards? • Try your hand at growing vegetables. Research all the necessary information for preparation, planting and caring. Keep a diary. Enjoy your successes. If you have failures, find the cause.

• ‘If something is worth doing, it is worth doing well.’ Discuss. • Write a future ‘fact file’ about yourself that has been published in a magazine. What have you achieved to appear in the magazine? Write a ten-step plan for yourself to help you reach this goal. • Choose an area of your life which could be improved. Concentrate your efforts to pursue quality and personal excellence in this area. What strategies did you find useful?

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TRY LOTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS

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• Challenge the students to identify a talent they have from a list of possibilities and use that talent to help the community in some way within a given time. • Five minutes has been allocated to you at the school’s talent show. How will you dazzle the audience with your talents? Prepare, rehearse and present your piece to the class. • How can your talents be used at school and at home?

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• Create a class noticeboard where students can post information about activities they are involved in for other students to read. • Find out about games played in different countries. Gather or make the materials required to play the games and organise a day where students can play them. • Learn traditional dances from different countries. Help to organise a dance evening from a particular country. Wear traditional costume, eat traditional food and dance to traditional music. Repeat for other countries.

USE YOUR TALENTS

DEVELOP A SENSE OF PURPOSE

• Write goals for your future life (e.g. for your career) and write the steps you could take to achieve them. • Whom do you admire? What type of person do you hope to become (e.g. kind, hard working, successful, charitable, fit.)? Cut out pieces of different people from magazines and glue them onto a sheet to create a whole person. Write notes next to each piece, explaining why you have chosen that person and what trait he/she has that inspires you. • Choose a country you would like to visit where the people speak a language you don’t know. Take steps to learn the language so you will gain more from your visit when you get there.

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DISCOVER WHAT YOU’RE GOOD AT AND ENJOY DOING

• Think about a particular task that you always seem to run out of time to do well; e.g. homework. Schedule a regular time to do this task for one week and stick to it. Did it work for you? • Estimate how much leisure time you have in one week. Use a table to calculate the actual amount of leisure time you have. Were you surprised? How could you use some of this time more productively? • Draw a pie chart to determine how your time is spent each week. Do you need to improve your time management?

DO THINGS TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY

MANAGE YOUR MONEY WISELY

• Hold a careers afternoon where guest speakers from different employment fields speak to students about the hard work it took them to get to where they are and the importance of trying your best to achieve success. • In which subject area do you feel you work to the best of your ability? Think about what you are like when you are doing this—concentrating, not letting others distract you, enthusiastic, disciplined. Think of ways you can transfer these work habits across to other subject areas. • Set yourself a goal to give 100% in everything you do for one day. How did you feel at the end of the day? Could you do the same tomorrow?

• Set up a simulation game where pairs of students pretend they have left school and are sharing a house together. Give them a budget to live on each week and ask them to detail how they would spend it. At the end of a month, the students can report on how well they think they managed their budget. • In a group, research to find out the interest rate charged on banks’ credit cards and shop cards (such as Myer, Target etc.) Find out how the interest is calculated (simple or compound interest) and the penalties for people who do not pay off their cards each month. Present your findings as an oral report. • Ask your parents for a realistic figure for food shopping expenses for your family for one week. Using supermarket catalogues and recent

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MANAGE YOUR TIME EFFECTIVELY

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• Over a fortnight, have students set up and run lunchtime clubs that promote activities they are good at. Membership should be open to anyone in the class. Encourage the students to try out some of the different clubs. • Make a list of ten things you would like to try by the end of the year. Display the list and cross the items off as each is attempted. • Make a list of activities for each category: physical, relaxing, mentally stimulating. Have a go at each activity and give it a score out of ten depending on how much you enjoyed it. Find time each week to do the activities you enjoyed.

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – overview food receipts, write a realistic weekly shopping list for your family. Did you stay within budget? SET WORTHWHILE GOALS AND MAKE PLANS TO ACHIEVE THEM

SEEK GOOD ROLE MODELS

• Recall a time when you set a goal but didn’t achieve it. Explain what happened and what you would do differently next time. • Write, rehearse and perform a short play about a character who set goals and made sacrifices to achieve his/her dreams. Perform your play to children in younger classes. • Draw three time lines: for one year, five years, ten years. Along each line, mark what you hope to achieve. The one-year line will be the most detailed, the ten the least. Your goals need to be achievable. Write notes on how you plan to achieve each goal. Display your time lines in your room and refer to them regularly to help you keep on track.

• Research past Australian of the Year winners. The students can decide on their ‘Top 5’ most deserving recipients and explain why. • Write a newspaper article about a teenager who chose the wrong person as a role model. What were the consequences? • Select a person you know who is a good role model. Explain the qualities this person has.

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SHOW PERSISTENCE AND SELF-DISCIPLINE TO ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS

• What does it mean to have ‘self-discipline’? List people who you feel show great self-discipline. How do you motivate yourself to be disciplined and complete a task you do not enjoy? • Have each student write an example of a time when he/she or someone he/she knows achieved a goal through self-discipline. Post the stories on a display board in the classroom for the students to read. Ask them to identify which stories they found the most inspirational. • Choose a specific skill you want to master. Record how you work towards achieving this goal. Note the conditions when things go well and when they go badly. Describe how you deal with the bad times.

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• Make a list of occupations where good communication skills are essential. For each, explain why these skills are necessary.

LOOK AT DIFFERENT WAYS OF DOING THINGS – CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION

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• In small groups, have the students design a new type of chair using a design brief. They may use resources to help them; e.g. the Internet, furniture catalogues. • Write a poem or play that promotes ‘Thinking outside the square’. • Each person in a group individually writes ideas for the same task; e.g. a community fundraising event. Students share ideas and activate the plan.

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DEVELOP GOOD COMMUNICATION SKILLS

• Devise a group drama piece with the title ‘Communication’. The drama can be based on spoken, verbal or non-verbal communication. • With a partner, role-play the following scenarios, being aware of the communication cues you are using (such as tone of voice, body language etc.) – telling a friend some bad news – trying to determine from a sibling why he/she had detention – asking for an extension from a teacher – explaining to a parent why you want to stop playing a sport, playing an instrument or learning a language.

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Be the achieving kind – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION To discover what it is we are good at and enjoy doing, it is necessary to try out a range of different experiences and activities— especially when we are children. Students need to understand that they will have to take risks and overcome feelings such as fear to achieve something worthwhile in life. Other qualities or skills, such as persistence and time management, are also important, and are worth exploring and learning about. Discussion points

Page 82 – Have a go!

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• Describe a positive experience where you had a go at something new. • What feelings do you get when you think about trying something new? • What would you try if you knew you couldn’t fail?

Page 83 – Try lots of different things • Why is it important to try out lots of different things? • Do you think adults should try different things as much as children? Discuss. • How could you motivate someone else to try something new?

Page 84 – Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing

Page 90 – Manage your money wisely

• Until you have a ‘proper’ job and responsibilities, why bother managing money? Discuss. • Should you have to earn any money given to you at home? Discuss. • What are the benefits of learning early how to manage your money? Discuss.

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• What are the negative effects of an unbalanced (in any way) lifestyle? Discuss. • Would it be easier to balance a lifestyle now and maintain it for always, or wait until you are older and balance it when you feel you have more control over your life? Discuss.

Page 91 – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them

• If we devise steps to reach goals, we can achieve great things. Discuss. • ‘Live only for today!’ Is this a good motto to live by? Discuss. • During secondary school years, what are the most valuable goals you could set? Discuss.

• What do you enjoy doing? • Why is it important to feel passionate about our work or hobbies? • How could you discover your passions?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page –p Show self-discipline to •f orr evi ew p u92r opersistence sesando nl y• achieve your goals

• How do you feel when you know you have done your very best? • Why is it important to try your best, even when you think you may not be able to do something? • ‘Always do your best. What you plant now, you will harvest later.’ (Og Mandino) Discuss.

Page 86 – Pursue quality and personal excellence

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• What does it mean to ‘pursue quality’? • What might you have to sacrifice to achieve your best? • Discuss how it feels to achieve an excellent result in something you value.

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Page 87 – Use your talents

• Discuss people you know who have demonstrated persistence or self-discipline to achieve something. • What is frustration? How can people overcome it? • How can you motivate yourself to persist with something difficult?

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Page 85 – Do things to the best of your ability

Page 93 – Look at different ways of doing things

• What does it mean to ‘think outside the square’? • How important do you think it is to be able to think creatively? • How could you work on your ability to think creatively?

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• Are talents like singing, painting and dancing more valuable than talents such as caring, diligence and friendliness? Discuss. • For any given situation, a number of talents may be required. Does this mean all talents have equal value? Discuss. • Discuss the saying, ‘hiding your light under a bushel’.

Page 88 – Develop a sense of purpose

• Discuss how waking up to a busy day feels different from waking up to an empty day. • How does thinking about others, rather than focusing inwards, affect your feelings of purpose? • What things give the greatest sense of purpose? Discuss.

Page 94 – Develop good communication skills

• What kinds of things can we communicate non-verbally? • What are the elements of good communication? • Why is it important to be able to communicate well?

Page 95 – Seek good role models

• What types of attributes do your personal good role models display? • Do people make a conscious effort to be a good role model? Discuss. • ‘Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.’ Discuss.

Page 89 – Manage your time effectively • What are the positive effects of a balanced lifestyle? Discuss.

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

What am I? I run but can’t walk. I have a mouth but cannot speak. I have a bed but do not lie down.

Chains Event 1

Event 2

Event 4

Achieving

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Fourth

Fifth

Tenth

Ninth

Eighth

Seventh

Sixth

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Answer A river.

Event 3

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Be the achieving kind – Have a go!

Variety performance Prepare a variety show involving the whole class to present to a group of younger children. Everyone in the class needs to prepare an act to perform in the show. Your act must involve a partner or small group. Try to create an act which includes a skill you have never tried before—have a go! Some ideas for acts are: • a magic trick • a musical performance • a novelty act (e.g. juggling)

• a stand-up comedy routine • a play excerpt • a clown act

• a dance • a mime • a demonstration

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NB: Whatever act you choose, be mindful of safety.

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4. After your performance has taken place, answer the questions below.

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1. Discuss ideas for your act with your partner or group. When you have decided on an idea everyone likes, describe it in the space below.

• Comment on your performance on the day.

• What did you learn through preparing and performing your act?

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2. List any costumes, props or other materials you will need for your act.

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• If you could prepare another act, what would you like to try? Why?

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3. Rehearse your act over a few weeks. Note two problems you encounter during your rehearsals and how you solve them. Problem 1

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Be the achieving kind – Try lots of different things

Recreation centre activities Imagine a new recreation centre is about to be built in your local area. The general public are asked to submit suggestions for activities they would like to see offered at the centre by filling in a form. 1. Complete the form below.

Wigglesworth Recreation Centre Community feedback form

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Please suggest one activity you would like to try for each category. Explain why you think you would like to try it; e.g. health benefits.

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• Board/Card games

• Exercise/Relaxation (yoga classes, sports coaching, dance classes etc.)

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• Art and craft

• Music/Drama

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2. For two of your suggestions, create an eye-catching display advertisement for each that could be included in the centre’s brochure. Think carefully about how your advertisement might entice reluctant readers to try the activities. Plan your advertisements on a sheet of scrap paper first.

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3. Read the advertisements another class member has created. If you were going to try one of his/her activities, which would you be most likely to choose? Why?

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Be the achieving kind – Discover what you are good at

What’s your passion? Being passionate about the things you do in life makes you feel good about yourself. Most people need help to discover what their passions are. If you lucky enough to have found your passion(s), complete this activity anyway. You may discover a new passion! 1. Answer the questions below. (a) What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?

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(b) When you were six years old, what did you want to be when you grew up? (c) List five things you dream of for your future life. • • • •

(d) List three things you would like to accomplish before you die. •

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2. Close your eyes and imagine your bedroom at home. What possessions are most important to you? What things do you keep?

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3. (a) List ideas that have formed in your mind about what your passion(s) might be from answering Questions 1 and 2.

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(b) What could you do tomorrow to begin exploring one of these ideas?

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Be the achieving kind – Do things to the best of your ability

Inspirational poster ‘Always do your best. What you plant now, you will harvest later.’ Og Mandino Quotations such as the one above are often found on inspirational posters. Using the steps below, design a poster that contains this quotation.

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1. (a) Brainstorm to list the images this quotation brings to your mind.

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(b) List some mediums you could use to show images on your poster; e.g. digital photography, collage.

2. (a) Brainstorm to list the lettering styles you feel would best suit the poster; e.g. calligraphy, block letters.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons handwrite the quotation? (b) Would you prefer to: • •f orr e v i ew pur posesonl y• • type the quotation?

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3. On a sheet of scrap paper, plan a small version of your poster. When you are happy with your design, sketch it in the space below. Add labels to explain how the images and quotation will be presented; e.g. ‘photograph’ and then list any materials you will need. List

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Be the achieving kind – Pursue quality and personal excellence

Excellent accounts 1. Read the following accounts about achieving personal excellence.

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hen I was a kid, football was just for fun. I trained once a week and played in matches on the weekends. When I decided to become serious about football, however, things changed. Training now takes hours a week and I also work on my fitness in my own time. I often have to give up going out with my friends or spending time with my family. Some matches I play well in, and others I don’t, but, with the help of my coach, I am always working to improve my skills. This can sometimes mean a lot of repetition! When I get bored, I focus on what I want to achieve—playing for an AFL team one day.

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started playing the violin when I was in secondary school. It wasn’t a very cool instrument to play, but once I started I loved it so much that I was willing to overlook the teasing I received. As I got more serious about a career in music, I practised for at least an hour a day. On the days I didn’t feel like practising, I would listen to a violin CD and remind myself of what I wanted to achieve. Then I would make myself play. I would start with an easy piece of music first to boost my confidence. I sometimes had to give up going out with friends because of lessons or exams. But it has been worth it. Now I am a member of a famous symphony orchestra, and tour the world.

2. Use the ideas from the accounts,as well as your own, to answer these questions. (a) What are some difficulties people may have to overcome to achieve excellence?

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(c) Do you think you should ever accept that you can not achieve the level of quality you may want to in something? Explain.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (b) Imagine you are the violinist. Write the first few lines of a diary entry after you find out you have been accepted aso a member of the famous orchestra. •f rr e v i e wsymphony pur p osesonl y•

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(d) Write a brief account of a time when you tried hard and achieved an excellent result in something.

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Be the achieving kind – Use your talents

Volunteer task force The school has received a letter from a local activity centre, asking for volunteers to help with a weekend camp for Year 5 students. The weekend promises to be a lot of fun and everyone in the class wants to help. However, only six people are needed, so each person who wants to go has to: • write a summary of the skills and talents he/she has which he/she believes will be useful during the weekend, • offer ideas for the weekend’s evening activities.

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1. Write your summary, remembering that skills and talents cover a wide range of experiences, from playing the guitar and cooking sausages to organising activities and communicating well with others.

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personality description

leadership qualities

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practical skills

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2. List your activity suggestions for two evenings.

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Be the achieving kind – Develop a sense of purpose

Why am I here? It is important that when we wake each morning, we feel we have a reason for getting out of bed. Even if we don’t like what we have to do, having a purpose stimulates the brain and puts us into gear, ready for the day ahead. To give value to our daily activities, we should consider who benefits from the things we do. 1. (a) Make a list of all the different things you do during a normal weekend. (b) Next to each, write who benefits from your activities. Don’t forget yourself!

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(c) Describe how each person benefits.

beneficiary(ies)

how person/people benefit

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2. (a) Are you surprised by the number of people who are positively affected by your actions? yes (b) Do you feel motivated to develop a greater sense of purpose?

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3. What new activities could you do, or which old ones could you expand upon, to increase your sense of purpose?

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4. Describe how having a sense of purpose makes you feel.

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your time effectively

24/7 How well do you think you manage your time? Perhaps you spend too long in front of the TV or computer. Maybe you’re always so busy you feel like you never get a chance to relax. We all fall somewhere between these two extremes. The ideal would be somewhere in the middle, indicating a balanced lifestyle. 1. Complete the table, indicating how long you spend doing each activity in an average week. Activity sleeping eating at school

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

Sat.

Sun.

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Total for week

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physical activity helping others relaxing

watching TV/using computer

2. Compare your totals with others in your group. 3. (a) How well do you think you balance your time now?

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(b) In the ‘Change to ...’ column, write the total hours you think you should be spending doing each activity. (c) Which areas of your life need amending?

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your money wisely

Budget control A special event in your social calendar is happening in six weeks’ time. All your friends are talking about it, planning, preparing and deciding on all the things that need to be bought. Your parents have agreed to allow you to attend, but they will only pay for your entry ticket, everything else is up to you! 1. Complete the budget statement.

Event:

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cost per item:

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Total money required:

How much money do you have now?

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2. It is very difficult to save all your money for a specific purpose. How much will you allow yourself to spend on other things during the six weeks? yes no 3. Do you think you will reach your target? 4. What will be the hardest part of controlling your budget?

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Be the achieving kind – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them

The banner of success Throughout our lives, we often find ourselves working towards goals. Sometimes this happens subconsciously, but at other times we need to make a determined effort to reach a particular goal. Planning the steps along the way is an essential part of the achievement process. Reaching the final goal can be daunting and, without support and motivation, all too easy to abandon. It is essential that the chosen goal is realistic and achievable (though not necessarily easy!) and the steps along the way small enough to provide motivation but large enough to show progress. 1. Choose a goal you wish to achieve in some area of your life.

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2. List the steps you will need to take to achieve it.

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3. (a) Make sufficient copies of a triangular flag template to record your successful arrival at each step along the way to achieving your final goal.

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(b) On each flag, record this information: • step number • step description • time taken to reach step • degree of difficulty • problems overcome to achieve step • motivation level • supporters 4. When you reach your final goal, string all the flags together to make your banner of success.

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Be the achieving kind – Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals

Being persistent Being persistent means you show the commitment, patience and endurance to keep trying, even if you initially fail. One of the most difficult things about persisting with something is overcoming frustration. People show persistence in many ways. You may give up watching television to study, save money to buy something special or overcome a disability to achieve something difficult.

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1. Write words you associate with persistence.

2. Describe how you have, or someone you know has, shown persistence.

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One person who has shown amazing persistence is the famous physicist Stephen Hawking. Hawking is afflicted with Lou Gehrig’s disease, a progressive disease which affects muscle control. He uses a wheelchair and speaks through a voice synthesiser. This has not stopped Hawking from achieving. He has written bestselling books, is a professor of mathematics, regularly holds lectures, has appeared on television and in movies and has won the Albert Einstein Award (the most prestigious award for theoretical physics). He is best known for his discovery that black holes emit radiation. This has made it possible for people to conduct detailed studies of black holes.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 3. Give your opinion of Stephen Hawking’s persistence.

4. Research one of the following famous people or one of your own choices. Write a report on his/ her persistence in the space below.

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Helen Keller (author), Itzhak Perlman (musician), Albert Einstein (scientist), Martin Luther King Jr (human rights activist), Lance Armstrong (professional bike rider), Charles Perkins (Aboriginal activist), Kay Cottee (sailor), J K Rowling (children’s author), Susan B Anthony (women’s rights activist), Robert de Castella (marathon runner)

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Be the achieving kind – Look at different ways of doing things

Script interpretation Find a partner to work with to complete this activity. Decide who will be A and who will be B. 1. Read the short script below. A Aren’t you ready yet? B Almost … There! What do you think? A Not bad.

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A You haven’t changed your mind, have you?

A Good. Then let’s get going before it’s too late.

2. Decide on two possible situations in which this script might be placed. The situations should be very different from each other. Be creative! Write your two ideas below.

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3. Discuss the two different versions of the script you described, deciding:

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• what each character will do at different points during the script; and • how he/she will say each line, considering aspects like pausing and tone of voice.

Aren’t you ready yet?

S c r ipt 2

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Aren’t you ready yet?

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Almost … There! What do you think?

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Almost … There! What do you think?

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Not bad.

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Not bad.

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Do you really think it will be okay?

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Do you really think it will be okay?

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Yes, I do. Why?

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Yes, I do. Why?

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I just …

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I just …

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You haven’t changed your mind, have you?

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You haven’t changed your mind, have you?

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No.

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No.

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Good. Then let’s get going before it’s too late.

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Good. Then let’s get going before it’s too late.

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4. Rehearse your two versions of the script. Try to memorise your lines if possible. When you are ready, present your plays to the class. 5. As an extra challenge, try adding extra lines to one version of your script. R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be the achieving kind – Develop good communication skills

Non-verbal communication Find a group of four or five people to complete this activity. When we hear the word ‘communication’, many people think of speaking or talking. But we also communicate a lot of ideas and information through our actions, body language and facial expression. Try exploring this idea through the following activity. 1. In your group, prepare a short drama in which you do not speak at all. Your drama must take place in one of the following settings: • an airport • a doctor’s surgery • a shop • backstage at a theatre

5. Perform your non-verbal drama for the class. Afterwards, answer the following questions.

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2. Choose a setting and then discuss ideas for your characters and a basic storyline. Your drama must have a clear beginning, middle and end.

(a) What was the most challenging thing about preparing a non-verbal drama?

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expression.

Characters

Beginning

(b) What did most groups struggle to communicate without speaking?

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(c) Comment on how well you feel you communicated all the ideas or emotions in your drama.

End

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3. Rehearse your play. Use words when you first rehearse, then practise without, thinking carefully about how you could communicate the same ideas without speaking.

4. When you think you are ready, have a person from another group watch your non-verbal drama. Ask him/her to tell you if any part of your drama was unclear. If so, you may need to modify your gestures, body language or facial Values education toolkit

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Be the achieving kind – Seek good role models

Recognising your good role models Role models from all walks of life motivate us in many different ways. One doesn’t have to be famous to be a good role model. The positive influences from families, friends and neighbours can be just as powerful. 1. Write your definition of a good role model.

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2. (a) For each area of your life, list your good role models.

role models

characteristics of role models

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(b) What characteristics do they have which make them a good role models for you?

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3. How well do you strive to emulate the positive characteristics of your role models?

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Chatterbox

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Use the chatterbox to reinforce concepts from this book.

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Instructions: 1. Cut out the square.

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2. Place the square with the written side down and fold as directed on page 60. 3. To use with a partner: • Ask your partner to select an affirmation and ‘open and close’ according to the number of words or syllables. • Ask your partner to select a number and ‘open and close’ the chatterbox the given number of times. • Ask your partner to choose a number and open to reveal a nice comment about the person! Values education toolkit

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6. rBe the r o e t s Bo e p ok u community S kind

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community kind with your fingers—like a house.

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Be the community kind – overview BE USEFUL

• Create word puzzles using words you associate with the word ‘responsible’. • Divide a page in two and list examples of responsible and irresponsible behaviour in the following places: – on a school camp/excursion – shopping centre – movie theatre – watching a football match • Watch a popular television program in which people display responsible and irresponsible behaviour. Follow the story lines and discuss why the characters act as they do.

• Have the students suggest simple community projects they could set up and carry out; e.g. cleaning up litter from a local park (after gaining the appropriate permission). Afterwards, the students could comment on how helping out made them feel. • Mime ways you can be useful at home, at school and in the community. Your partner must try to guess your mime. Swap roles. • Discuss the value of everyone playing a useful role in the community. Draw a cartoon illustrating how useful you are at home and in the community now. After your motivating discussion, draw another cartoon showing how useful you will be from now on.

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RESPECT AUTHORITY

• List the main authority figures in your life and write how much respect you have for each. Give reasons for your answers. • Imagine you have just started your first part-time job. List ways you can demonstrate that you respect your boss and your place of work. • Write a rap about respecting authority.

GET INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY

• Study maps of your local community to create and publish leaflets which highlight the ‘Top 10’ best things to do for children, teenagers and families. • Find out ways people your age can become involved in the community. Present your findings at an assembly and encourage others to join in. • Use the community newspaper, and other sources to look for local events coming up in your area. Design a poster or series of posters to advertise the events and encourage people to attend.

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BEHAVE RESPONSIBLY

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• In small groups, role-play scenarios in which characters are in conflict with home or school rules. • Write a narrative about a school with an extraordinary principal who doesn’t believe in rules. • Play a game of cricket without following the rules. How long did it last? Was it enjoyable? Explain why rules are essential for the smooth running of such a game. BE HONEST AND SEEK TRUTH

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• Debate the topic ‘Honesty is the best policy’. • Watch the film Liar, liar and debate whether it is essential to always speak the truth. • Write a story about a young child who kept telling lies. Describe the trouble it brought and how he/she mended his/her ways.

SHARE WITH AND CARE FOR THOSE IN NEED

• Make a list of organisations in your community that help people in need. Detail what they do to help. Publish the information in directory form. • Research to find a group in your community in need of funds for something worthwhile. Organise a fundraising event at school or a local event to raise money for this group. • Find out from the local hospitals, what you can do to help support children in hospital; e.g. collecting toys, reading material.

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SHOW INTEGRITY – DEVELOP A SENSE OF WHAT’S MORALLY AND ETHICALLY RIGHT, AND ACT THAT WAY

• Write a set of modern fables which have morals you think are important and that teenagers could relate to. • Some people say that you show your integrity most of all when no-one is watching. Role-play situations that represent this (for example, seeing a $50 note fall from a man’s wallet just as he hops into a car). • Design an either/or questionnaire, asking people to choose which they believe is the correct way to respond to a situation. Each presents an example of integrity being shown and not shown.

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• Hold mock court trials based on issues from local newspapers. Fair trials should be the aim. • Create and design a cartoon strip where the main character fights for justice. • From recent news stories, describe situations where people are being treated unfairly. How would you like to see these problems resolved?

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FOLLOW RULES

STRIVE FOR JUSTICE AND A ‘FAIR GO’ FOR ALL

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Be the community kind – overview SUPPORT RECONCILIATION

STRIVE FOR PEACE

• In small groups, discuss the idea of holding a ‘National Sorry Day’. Do you think it is a good idea? What else could be done to promote reconciliation? • Choose a country and investigate the history of reconciliation between its citizens. – Australia – Canada – New Zealand – South Africa • Research to find out about the roles of national and international bodies involved in reconciliation.

• Research to find information about the Nobel Peace Prize. What criteria do you think nominees should have to meet? • Look at a map of the middle east and locate the Gaza Strip. Which countries surround it? Use the Internet, newspaper articles and television documentaries to determine why this strip of land is the cause of so much conflict. • Design a logo for World Peace Day, which occurs each year on 21 September.

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CONTRIBUTE TO RESEARCH

• Design a new website for an organisation that supports a cause you believe in; e.g. preventing cruelty to animals. • Research the life and achievements of the Western Australian doctor, Fiona Woods. Use the information to write an informative report. • Compile a list of national annual fundraising days for medical research and environmental protection associated. Make a calendar highlighting these days and promote and support fundraising activities. SUPPORT FREEDOM

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• Research the life of Nelson Mandela and write what you think freedom meant to him. • In a group, divide a sheet of paper in two and write the headings ‘What we know’ and ‘What we want to know’. Discuss asylum seekers in Australia and record your group’s ideas on the sheet. Report your ideas back to the class and devise a way to answer some of the questions in the second column. • Research the life of William Wilberforce (1759–1833), who spent most of his political career striving for the abolition of slavery.

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be the Community kind – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION The community refers to any group of people, ranging from close family and friends in the local neighbourhood, to the population of all countries around the world. By being the community kind, we are playing our part to strive for a peaceful, harmonious life for all. This requires compromise and understanding from individuals and a willingness to follow order for the good of the community.

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Page 109 – Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all

Discussion points

Page 102 – Behave responsibly

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Page 103 – Respect authority • Discuss the need for authority in a community. • Discuss examples of people in authority abusing their positions. Research for recent, appropriate news stories. • When do people feel the need to demonstrate authority?

Page 104 – Follow rules

Page 110 – Share with and care for those in need

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• Discuss the different responsibilities children are given as they mature. • Discuss the associated consequences of not being given these responsibilities. • Discuss the dangers of being given too much responsibility too soon.

• How many people in the world do not have a ‘fair go’? Give some examples. • What can we do to help these people? • If all the wealth in the world was distributed evenly throughout the world, would that make everything okay? • Is it always obvious that someone is in need? • Do you think that if ever you are in need, people will care for you because they have seen how you have cared for others? • How many selfless people do you know who care for others without expecting rewards?

Page 111 – Support reconciliation

• What does the word ‘reconciliation’ mean? • What makes reconciliation difficult? How could we overcome these difficulties? • Why do you think some people may not welcome reconciliation?

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Page 105 – Be honest and seek truth

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• Is it okay to regularly tell small lies? • What problems might ‘skeletons in the cupboard’ create in the future? • Are there any times when telling lies can be justified?

Page 106 – Show integrity

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• Showing integrity means always being truthful, whatever the cost. Discuss this statement. • List people who are good role models for integrity. Explain why. • List people who are not good role models for integrity. Explain why not.

Page 107 – Be useful

• How can research help a group of people in need? • Have you ever contributed to medical research by supporting a fundraising event? • Which causes do you feel most passionate about?

Page 113 - Support freedom

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• How do rules make life easier? • Discuss different ‘rules’; e.g. of baking, of lighting a fire, of planting seeds. • Why do students believe some rules are stupid? Are they justified in their opinions?

• What does freedom mean to you? • Why might some people not live in freedom? • What freedom do you enjoy every day?

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• Helping someone else removes the focus from you. Is this a good or bad thing? • Helping someone else emphasises the good things in your life. Discuss. • Helping someone else: a pleasure or a chore? Discuss.

Page 114 - Strive for peace • What are some ways you could promote peace in your school or community? • What kinds of things might prevent peace? • What does it mean to live in peace?

Page 108 – Get involved in the community • What do you get from the community? • Do you feel a responsibility towards your community? • What ideas do you have for improving facilities in the community for your age group?

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Be the community kind – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples A five-year-old girl looked on earnestly as her mother was applying make-up. ‘I’m going to look just like you, Mummy’, she said proudly. ‘When you grow up, sweetheart?’ replied her mother. ‘No, tomorrow, Mummy’, answered the little girl excitedly. ‘I’ve just put on some of your Oil of Old Lady.’

Fish Bone

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Be the community kind – Behave responsibly

Gaining responsibility As you grow and mature, it is important to be given appropriate responsibilities in different areas of your life. These help to prepare you for the time when you may be totally responsible for yourself and those close to you. 1. Describe, in detail, two responsibilities you have in different areas of your life. Responsibility 2

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Responsibility 1

2. What important things are you learning by having these responsibilities? Responsibility 1

Responsibility 2

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3. (a) What personal responsibilities do you think are important to be successful at secondary school?

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(b) What would be the possible long-term consequences for not taking these responsibilities seriously?

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Be the community kind – Respect authority

Authority versus anarchy There are many news stories from around the world, detailing confrontations between people in authority and members of the public. Some incidents are relatively minor, such as the police breaking up a noisy party in the early hours, but others are far more serious, such as the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing, China.

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2. Research two news stories, describing incidents in which: (a) you believe the authority figures were justified in their behaviour,

(b) you believe the authorities were too heavy-handed.

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1. Define the words authority and anarchy, describing the relationship between them.

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3. Choose one of your incidents and list the arguments for and against the actions and beliefs of:

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(b) the members of the public. for

(a)

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Be the community kind – Follow rules

Find your way In theory, rules are made to make life easier, just as signposts are provided to make a journey more straightforward. Life without rules would be as difficult as going on a journey without signposts guiding the way. Can you imagine it? Rules are not just about what you can and cannot do, they also cover how you should behave in different situations; e.g. being polite and courteous. 1. Make a list of all the rules you have been told to follow.

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clubs/activities

shopping malls

cafe/restaurant

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2. Use your opinion to put each rule into a box.

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3. (a) On a separate sheet of paper and using your ‘relevant’ rules, devise a ‘Life’s journey’ board game for a year in the life of players of your age. (b) Devise rewards for following rules and forfeits for disobeying them. (c) Play your game to see how well it works. Values education toolkit

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Be the community kind – Be honest and seek truth

A visit to mystic Maria Some people are very good at disguising their dishonesty, while others turn bright red from the neck up when they tell the smallest of lies. Whichever you are, the one person you cannot deceive is yourself! 1. Imagine you are at a fair and decide to visit Mystic Maria, the fortune teller. You know she will be able to use her crystal ball to see into your past as well as your future. (b) Assuming you will want to be more honest and truthful, what will Mystic Maria predict for your future?

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(a) Mystic Maria will use particular incidents from your past to describe how truthful and honest you are. What will she say to you?

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2. (a) On a separate sheet of paper, design a set of balance scales, which you will make using card and other basic construction equipment. (b) Construct the scales. (c) Cut pieces of card to fit on to the scale pans. (d) Label one pan ‘truth’, the other ‘deceit’. Each time you are honest or dishonest, place a card on the appropriate pan. (e) Which way do your scales tip at the end of each day?

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Be the community kind – Show integrity

Be strong and act with integrity When acting with integrity, we show people that we care how our behaviour affects others. Sometimes, it takes courage to demonstrate what we believe is morally or ethically right because we fear the opinions of our peers who may pressure us to act against our will. This pressure is often very strong and difficult to resist. 1. In a small group, plan a scenario where the hero has to battle against his/her conscience and peers to resolve a situation.

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(b) List the characters and their role in the story.

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(a) Set the scene for the scenario.

(c) Detail the situation which troubles the hero. Include the pros and cons he/she is juggling.

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(d) Plan a resolution and conclusion where the hero:

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[ii] stands up to his/her peers and acts according to his/her conscience.

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[i] buckles under pressure from his/her peers.

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2. Act out the scenario, including both endings. 3. (a) Ask your audience to vote, by secret ballot, for the ending they believe demonstrated the right way to resolve the situation. (b) Which ending received more votes?

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Be the community kind – Be useful

Community requests If you make the effort to look, you will find many areas of the community where your input will be appreciated.

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1. Using a street map and directory of your local area, list the places in your community which would benefit from your efforts; for example, retirement villages, playgroups, areas of environmental significance.

2. For each type of place, list the sort of activities you could be involved in; for example, bringing and returning library books, donating toys, planting trees. place

activities

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3. Make a list of contact details for each place on your list. You may need to contact the local council for some details. place

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contact details

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4. On a separate sheet of paper, write to the appropriate person at each place, outlining your ideas and requesting permission to carry them out. Good luck! 5. How do you feel about the prospect of being really useful in the community?

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Be the community kind – Get involved in the community

Support your local community Local councils across the country advertise and support events provided for the enjoyment of all members of the community. Some of these events are put on for free by the councils. All of these events flourish with the support of the public. If this disappears, there will be no apparent need for such events in the future and the common wail of, ‘I’m so bored. There’s nothing to do!’ will ring true. 1. (a) Look through the events information pages of the local papers and other sources; e.g. library, community centres.

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(b) Record the events suitable for each of the age groups below. 5–10s

15–18s

over 18s

10–15s

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under 5s

over 50s

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. Choose one age and, onv ai separate of paper, plan an illustrated •category f or r e ewsheet pu r po s e sonl y• information booklet for all the events advertised for one month.

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(a) How will your booklet be organised?

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(b) What important information will you include for each event?

(c) Where would be the best places to leave copies of your booklet, to ensure they reach the appropriate age group?

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Be the community kind – Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all

The international commission of jurists The International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), held its first conference in New York in 1952. It was attended by legal representatives from North America and Eastern and Western Europe, all of whom were committed to the defence of human rights.

Dr Linse had been active in exposing threats to human rights in the Soviet Union. In July 1952, Linse was held prisoner by the KGB, accused of spying. A year later, he was executed. More than 50 years on, the ICJ has grown to include legal professionals from 62 countries across Africa, Asia/Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, Latin and North America and the Caribbean.

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1. (a) Type ‘human rights violation’ into a search engine such as Google.

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The main aim of the ICJ is to protect and promote human rights by taking an objective, impartial The ICJ continues to promote human rights for and authoritative legal stance in all its cases all by providing legal expertise and experience and working towards the throughout the world. implementation of international The catalyst for establishing the ICJ was the standards at the national level. case of West German lawyer, Dr Walter Linse.

(b) Find four countries, from different parts of the world, where people are denied their human rights.

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(c) Make brief notes to describe what is happening in each country.

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Be the community kind – Share with and care for those in need

Community services There are many charity organisations across Australia and around the world, dedicated to helping those in need; e.g. Uniting Care, the Salvation Army, St Vincent de Paul. These organisations are run mainly by volunteers who offer their time and services for the good of others. 1. Research to find charity organisations in your local area. List them here.

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2. Choose one organisation and complete the information table below.

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Name of organisation:

Country and year established:

Number of members worldwide: © R. I . C.Pu bl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Number of members in Australia:

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Services offered to the community:

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3. What practical help could you offer to support this charity organisation?

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Be the community kind – Support reconciliation

Reconciliation award Reconciliation is about bringing together different groups of people to live in equality and harmony. In Australia, it more particularly refers to acknowledging the history of Australia and the rights and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, as well as encouraging all Australians to help build a better future for our country. Find a small group of people to work with. Imagine you are the committee that decides on an Australia-wide reconciliation award for groups, associations or businesses.

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1. List three criteria you think the winner of a reconciliation award should meet. • • •

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2. Read the descriptions of the three finalists for this year’s award below.

‘Move it’ music festival organisers

A wildlife reserve and information centre that includes walks through the reserve with Indigenous guides, displays on the reserve’s history, sales of Indigenous and contemporary art from the local area and information leaflets on how the Cockatoo Creek environment is being preserved for future generations.

A three-day event that attracted thousands of people. All styles of Australian music were showcased, including Indigenous and country music. Young musicians were invited to participate in workshops led by Australian music professionals from all walks of life. Indigenous youth were particularly encouraged to apply.

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Cockatoo Creek Reserve

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Highgate community newspaper Av weekly newspaper that highlights role models •f orr e i e w p u r p o s e s onl y• of all cultures in the community and features a

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section on Indigenous news, including articles on health, education and sport.

3. Discuss each finalist in your group and decide on the winner. Use your criteria from Question 1 to help you. When you have decided on a winner, write the reasons for your decision.

The winner is Reasons:

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Be the community kind – Contribute to research

Web page design What causes do you feel most strongly about? Preventing cruelty to animals? Working towards peace? Supporting people with a particular disability or disease? 1. Invent an imaginary organisation that supports one of the causes listed above or another you believe strongly in. Use the Internet or other resources to research some facts about the cause to help you design a web page for your organisation. The web page must contain: • The name of the organisation • A mission statement (a statement that describes the organisation’s beliefs and aims) • Links to other associated web pages • Easy-to-read information on current research being done by the organisation

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You can also add any other information or features you feel are necessary. Try having a look at real websites that support your cause to give you ideas.

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2. Design your website on a sheet of scrap paper, using appropriate colours, images and layout to create the mood you wish to communicate. When you are happy with your design, create it in the space below.

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Be the community kind – Support freedom

Freedom of thought … In a small group, answer these questions about freedom. 1. Brainstorm to write a list of words your group associates with freedom.

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2. US president Abraham Lincoln said, ‘Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves’. Do you agree? Give your reasoning.

3. Freedom of speech is seen as a basic human right. But should people always be free to say whatever they choose? Imagine you are listening to a debate on the topic ‘Complete freedom of speech should always be upheld’. Write points you think each team might make. Affirmative

Negative

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4. (a) What freedoms do you enjoy in Australia that are denied to people in some other countries?

(b) Are there any freedoms people in your group wish they had? Describe them.

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Be the community kind – Strive for peace

What is peace? Peace symbols have been used by people for thousands of years. Some common peace symbols are discussed below. The colour white is often used as a symbol of peace, innocence and truth. Waving a white flag means to declare peace or to surrender. Blue is sometimes also viewed as the colour of peace as it is the colour of the sky and sea.

The peace sign was probably first seen during World War II. It was widely used during the peace protests of the 1960s and 1970s.

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The olive branch has been a symbol of peace since ancient times. It is seen on the flag of the United Nations and the flags of Cyprus and Eritrea. The white dove is a symbol for peace for many cultures and those of the Christian faith.

The Banner of Peace is a universal symbol. The inside circles represent either past, present or future surrounded by culture. The ankh, an ancient Egyptian symbol, was adopted during the 1960s by hippies as a peace symbol. For the ancient Egyptians, the cross represented life and the circle represented eternity.

1. Using an appropriate computer program, design your own peace symbol. You may use any of the ideas above or your own. Your symbol must communicate that peace: • requires action • requires communication between people • eliminates fear of the unknown or unfamiliar.

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The rainbow is a sign of peace and hope for many countries.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. Plan your design in the space below. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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shapes

colours

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images

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3. Create your design and print it on a separate sheet of paper. Values education toolkit

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Point to yourself and touch your chest

And I …

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And I love life

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love …

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Hug yourself

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life!

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Hands and arms outstretched above your head.

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References Books Lifestyle choices Ages 11+ Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Multiple intelligences Ages 11+ Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Bullying and conflict resolution Lower secondary Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Articles

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‘The power of positive affirmations’ by Jayaram V from http://hinduwebsite.com/selfdevt/ affirmations.htm

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http://www.ldpride.net/learningstyles.MI.htm http://wiki.ehow.com/Exercise-an-Open-Mind http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/mistakes/ http://www.personal-development.com/chuck/learning.htm http://www.oprah.com/tows/pastshows/tows_past_20010305.jhtml

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Websites http://www.chaminade.org/inspire/learnstl.htm

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons http://www.quotationspage.com •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• http://www.reconciliation.qld.gov.au

http://weather.about.com/library/weekly/aa032802a.htm http://www.icj.org

http://www.gagirl.com/heart/heart.html

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http://encarta.msn.com/media (Note: Websites correct at time of publication.)

(Six kinds of best values education program http://www.sixkindsofbest.com)

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Values Education Toolkit: Ages 13-15  

The Values Education Toolkit, featuring the Six Kinds of Best concept, is a series of blackline masters expressly designed to assist the tea...

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