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Ages 4–6

VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT

A CONCEPT BY DAVID KOUTSOUKIS RIC-2773 6.8/717


VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 4–6) Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2006 Copyright© David Koutsoukis 2006 ISBN 1 74126 356 5 RIC–2773

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VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 6–8) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 8–10) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Ages 10–12) VALUES EDUCATION TOOLKIT (Lower secondary)

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Foreword Values education in schools is crucial for developing future citizens of good character. The Values education toolkit, featuring the Six kinds of best concept, is a series of five books expressly designed to assist the teaching of values education in primary and lower secondary schools. The varied activities in this book extend across all major learning areas and will have relevance for a wide range of student learning styles and intelligences. Titles in this series are:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Contents

Teachers notes .................................................. iv – ix Curriculum links ...................................................... x Certificates ....................................................... xi – xvi Reflection sheets ......................................... xvii – xix Be kind to yourself .................................... 1–24

Seek a fair go for all ............................................... Manage and resolve conflict ................................... Cooperate and be a team player .............................. Support and include others .................................... Value family life ...................................................... Treat others the way they need to be treated ..........

39 40 41 42 43 44

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• Values education toolkit — Ages 4–6 • Values education toolkit — Ages 6–8 • Values education toolkit — Ages 8–10 • Values education toolkit — Ages 11+ • Values education toolkit — Lower secondary

Be the achieving kind ........................... 77–96 Overview ............................................................ 78–79 Teachers notes .................................................. 80–81 Have a go! ............................................................... 82 Try lots of different things ...................................... 83 Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing ...... 84 Do things to the best of your ability ....................... 85 Pursue quality and personal excellence ................ 86 Use your talents ....................................................... 87 Develop a sense of purpose ..................................... 88 Manage your time effectively ................................. 89 Manage your money wisely ..................................... 90 Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them ................................................... 91 Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals .......................................... 92 Look at different ways of doing things— creativity and innovation ................................... 93 Develop good communication skills ...................... 94 Seek good role models ............................................ 95 Chatterbox ............................................ 96

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Be kind to the environment ............... 45–60

Overview ............................................................ 46–47 Teachers notes .................................................. 48–49 Clean up after yourself ........................................... 50 Keep the land, air and waterways clean ................. 51 Recycle and don’t waste ......................................... 52 Save water ............................................................... 53 Conserve energy ...................................................... 54 Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species ............................................. 55 Use environmentally-friendly products .................. 56 Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources ...................................................... 57 Consider using resources that can be replaced ................................................... 58 Value our cultural heritage .................................... 59 Chatterbox template .............................. 60

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Overview ................................................................ 2–3 Teachers notes ...................................................... 4–5 Be proud of your uniqueness .................................... 6 Develop a sense of identity ......................................... 7 Know your strengths and weaknesses ...................... 8 Exercise regularly ..................................................... 9 Eat well .................................................................... 10 Sleep well ................................................................ 11 Take time to relax ................................................... 12 Minimise risks ......................................................... 13 Keep learning and growing .................................... 14 Strive for success ..................................................... 15 Love, and value the love of, others ......................... 16 Develop a circle of good friends ............................. 17 Stand up for yourself .............................................. 18 Make good choices .................................................. 19 Forgive yourself if you make mistakes ................... 20 Be positive ............................................................... 21 Be useful .................................................................. 22 Have some fun ........................................................ 23 Be proud of the things you say and do ................... 24

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Be kind to others......................................25–44

Overview ............................................................ 26–27 Teachers notes .................................................. 28–29 Value relationships ................................................. 30 Respect the rights of others .................................... 31 Be polite and use good manners ............................ 32 Praise people who do things well ........................... 33 Develop good people skills ...................................... 34 Work at building and maintaining relationships . 35 Be tolerant and understanding of difference ......... 36 Respect other points of view ................................... 37 Don’t bully or put others down .............................. 38

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Be the learning kind ...............................61–76

Overview ............................................................ 62–63 Teachers notes .................................................. 64–65 Be positive about learning ...................................... 66 Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you ......................................... 67 Recognise the value of knowledge ......................... 68 Have an enquiring mind ........................................ 69 Determine how you learn best ................................ 70 Have an open mind ................................................ 71 Be a critical thinker ................................................ 72 Have a global perspective ....................................... 73 Seek learning opportunities everywhere ................ 74 Learn from your mistakes ...................................... 75 Keep learning .......................................................... 76

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Be the community kind ..................... 97–114

Overview ............................................................ 98–99 Teachers notes .............................................. 100–101 Behave responsibly ............................................... 102 Respect authority .................................................. 103 Follow rules ........................................................... 104 Be honest and seek truth ...................................... 105 Show integrity ....................................................... 106 Be useful ................................................................ 107 Get involved in the community ............................ 108 Strive for justice and a ‘fair go for all’ ................. 109 Share and care for those in need .......................... 110 Support reconciliation .......................................... 111 Contribute to research .......................................... 112 Support freedom ................................................... 113 Strive for peace ...................................................... 114 ‘And I love life’ ................................... 115 References .......................................... 116

Values education toolkit


Teachers notes What are values?

Values education encourages students to become ‘nice human beings’.

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Values are ideals that guide our behaviour and decisions, and help us distinguish between what is right or wrong. They outline Values within school curriculums what is important to us in terms of our conduct, our interaction with others and how we might live our lives in a meaningful way. Generally speaking, there are nine agreed values to be incorporated Values give us a guiding framework by which to lead our lives. into school curriculums. People who engage in antisocial behaviour often lack a values These are: framework. Care and compassion Doing your best Why teach values? ‘Fair go’ Freedom Developing good values gives us a structure to guide our conscience Honesty and trustworthiness and helps us make good choices. If we have strong values and are Integrity put in challenging situations, we are more likely to make good Respect decisions according to those values. Developing strong values Responsibility also helps address our spiritual needs and self-esteem by giving Understanding, tolerance and inclusion. us a personal sense of identity and direction. In addition, it helps develop a sense of responsibility for the consequences of our own The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept incorporates all these values. behaviour and how our actions might affect ourselves, others and the environment. The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept Teaching values in schools is a proactive approach towards The ‘Six kinds of best’ is a model that outlines six core values for managing student behaviour. It gives students effective strategies becoming a person of good character and for leading a happy and to help them lead happy and successful lives. successful life. It frames the core values in a way that students, Values can be incorporated into a whole-school approach and can teachers and parents can remember and apply in everyday situations. It provides ‘anchor points’ upon which we can reflect include: when faced with decision-making situations and helps us make good choices. It may be considered as a ‘recipe for life’. • encouraging staff to model good values,

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• including values in the school vision and mission statements,

The ‘Six kinds of best’ are: Be KIND to yourself ................................. (Respect yourself) Be KIND to others ...................................... (Respect others) Be KIND to the environment ............ (Value the environment) Be the learning KIND ................................ (Seek knowledge) Be the achieving KIND ...................... (Achieve your potential) Be the community KIND ........ (Contribute positively to society)

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• creating a school motto, slogan or ethos based on specific values, • displaying values posters,

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• including values in school rules and policies,

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• including values in structured classroom guidelines such as class rules,

• introducing ongoing daily or weekly values programs, • integrating the teaching of values into all curriculum learning areas, • collating and using resources for specific values education lessons, • inviting guest speakers to the school, • including values-based activities in pastoral care programs, and • teaching values incidentally during class or recess times.

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept uses a play on the word ‘kind’ to make it memorable and repeatable. It also reinforces the word ‘kind’. It provides a mechanism to continually reinforce good values and teach them in context. This book is divided into six sections (as above) to indicate the six core values. Each section has a number of pointers which illustrate and support the six values. The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept provides a framework and a language for teaching and reinforcing values at school and in the home. It aims to make students familiar with the six core values and internalise them by using the ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation. (Refer to page ix, the cover pages of each section and page 115.)

These six fingers represent the ‘Six kinds of best’. Get your students to make the sign. Tell them if they apply these principles throughout their life, they will be ‘A-OK’.

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For example: • When a student makes a negative comment about himself/herself, the teacher may say, ‘Sasha! You’re not being kind to yourself! Are you?’,

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Teachers and parents are encouraged to highlight incorrect behaviours and reinforce correct behaviours by using the language of the ‘Six kinds of best’.

• When one student bullies another, the teacher may say, ‘John! You’re not being kind to others! Are you?’ • When a student drops some rubbish, the teacher may comment about the child not being ‘kind to the environment’. • When the class does well in a test, the teacher may comment that they are really ‘the learning kind’.

© R. . Ca. Pu l i cawell, t i o ns •I When student doesb an assignment the teacher may say that the student is ‘the achieving kind’. •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• • When a group of students help to clean up, the teacher may state that they are ‘the

Make the ‘Six kinds of best’ your personal quest

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community kind’.

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Using the Values toolkit book The activities in this book may be:

– incorporated into a continuing weekly program, – used incidentally as required in the classroom – incorporated into an existing personal development or values program, – used in conjunction with special values events such as a values ‘supercharger’ day or values ‘week’ where a guest speaker works with the students.

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Teachers notes The format of the book

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The book is divided into six sections. The six sections are: • Be kind to yourself • Be kind to others Title page • Be kind to the environment The first page of each section is a title page • Be the learning kind designed to introduce the section. • Be the achieving kind • Be the community kind • A pictorial representation of the affirmation(s) is are also supplied.

Overview A two-page overview of additional activities has been provided for each of the six sections. The activities cover a variety of learning areas and learning styles. Teachers may use the activities to further develop each section with the class or as extension work for more able students.

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Teachers notes pages The student pages are supported by a two pages of teachers notes, which comprise: – an introduction to the section, – a compilation of discussion points for each student page, and – answers (where required). Each double teacher’s page also includes an example of a graphic organiser, which teachers may find beneficial for recording summaries of students’ discussion or for students to record their thoughts. Graphic organisers provide a visual representation of information. They employ four intelligences at the same time—verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial and naturalist. (Different organisers use aspects of the naturalist intelligence, including categorising, classifying, identifying etc.)

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Teachers notes Student pages Each section is divided into a number of key pointers. The bullet points are utilised as individual student pages. The activities on the student pages are intended to be mostly open-ended, ‘fun’ tasks focusing on the eight multiple intelligences.

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The final two pages in the book include: a pictorial representation of the ‘I love life’ affirmation, a bibliography of references and suggested readings to further teacher knowledge, and appropriate websites.

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Each student page includes: – the title of the relevant section and the bullet point being covered – title of the student page.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f or v i e p r p os es o l y •to draw, write, paint All student activities included in r thise book may bew enlarged tou A3 size to allow adequate space forn early learners Additional information Discussion and student reflection about their own personal experiences form an important part of values education. For this reason, discussion points form a major portion of the teacher information section of teachers notes for each section. or complete work. Teachers should use their creative talents to add different painting and paper skills to large scale shapes where applicable to develop manipulative skills.

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‘By applying the ‘Six kinds of best’ principles, students and adults will lead a happy, successful and fulfilling life and make them feel like saying ‘I love life!’’

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Adults may scribe words for any students who need assistance with any written activities included in the book. Any worksheets which include a lot of script should be used with older students or more capable students in the age group, or worked through slowly and carefully with younger, less-abled students.

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David Koutsoukis is the creator of the ‘Six kinds of best’ concept. He is an educator with over 20 years’ experience who has a passion for encouraging people to develop good values and become persons of good character. He is also the author of the Behaviour management toolkit, the R.I.C. Behaviour management and Values poster sets, and the Daily dose of fun series of books. David is now a full-time presenter and consultant who works with educators, helping them build positive school cultures. He conducts professional development programs for teachers throughout Australia, New Zealand and South-East Asia on how to effectively deliver the Six kinds of best program. David also does a motivational program for students entitled Make the six kinds of best your personal quest. For more information about presentations and resources for schools by David Koutsoukis, visit www. schoolmasters.com.au or email admin@schoolmasters.com.au

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í˘˛

Be KIND to others

Respect others

Be KIND to Yourself

Respect yourself

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Be KIND to the environment

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Seek knowledge

1. Clean up after yourself 1. Be positive about learning 2. Keep the land, air and 2. Seek knowledge about waterways clean yourself 3. Recycle and don’t waste 3. Recognise the values of 4. Save water others 5. Conserve energy 4. Have an enquiring mind 6. Care for natural habitats, —be curious wildlife and endangered 5. Determine how you learn species best (learning styles) 7. Use environmentally friendly 6. Have an open mind products 7. Be a critical thinker 8. Consider environmentally 8. Have a global perspective friendly energy sources 9. Seek learning opportunities 9. Consider using resources 10. Learn from your mistakes that can be replaced 11. Keep learning (sustainable development) 10. Value our cultural heritage

Achieve your potential

Be the Learning KIND Be the Achieving KIND

key Pointers

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1. Value relationships 2. Respect the rights of others 3. Be polite and use good manners 4. Praise people who do things well 5. Develop good people skills 6. Build and maintain relationships 7. Be tolerant and understanding of others 8. Respect other points of view 9. Don’t bully or put others down 10. Seek a ‘fair go’ for all 11. Manage and resolve conflict 12. Cooperate and be a team player 13. Support and include others 14. Value family life 15. Treat others the way they need to be treated

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1. Be proud of your uniqueness 2. Develop a sense of identity (know what is important to you) 3. Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses 4. Exercise 5. Eat well 6. Sleep well 7. Take time to relax 8. Minimise risk 9. Keep learning and growing 10. Strive for success (and get some ego food) 11. Love, and value the love of, others 12. Develop a circle of quality friends 13. Stand up for yourself (be confident but humble) 14. Make good choices 15. Forgive yourself if you make mistakes 16. Be positive 17. Be useful (and you will feel good about yourself) 18. Have some fun 19. Be proud of the things you say and do

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Six core values

Values Framework

The Six Kinds of Best

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1. Have a go! 2. Try lots of different things 3. Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing 4. Do things to the best of your ability 5. Pursue quality and personal excellence 6. Use your talents 7. Develop a sense of purpose 8. Manage your time 9. Manage your money wisely 10. Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. Show persistence and selfdiscipline to achieve your goals 12. Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation 13. Develop good communication skills 14. Seek good role models

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1. Behave responsibly 2. Respect authority 3. Follow rules 4. Be honest and seek the truth 5. Show integrity—develop a sense of what’s morally right, and act that way 6. Be useful 7. Get involved in the community 8. Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. Share and care 10. Support reconciliation 11. Contribute to research 12. Support freedom 13. Strive for peace

Contribute positively to society

Be the Community KIND

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation is a series of actions which reinforces the six core values in a memorable and fun way. Reciting the affirmation engages visual, auditory and kinaesthetic learners.

I am one of a kind.

I am kind to myself.

(Right index finger in the air in front of body.)

(Clenched fist over heart.)

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r o e t s Bo r e p o u I am kind to others. And I am kindk to S the environment.

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(From clenched fist over heart, swing right arm clockwise and point outwards.)

(Touch left index finger with right index finger— Auslan sign language for ‘E’.)

I am the learning kind.

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(Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height–like a book. Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand and swing your hand up to touch the top of your head—putting the information from the book into your head.)

I am the achieving kind.

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(Point upwards—aim for the stars.)

And I

And I am the community kind.

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(Point to yourself and touch your chest.)

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(Form an ‘A’ shape in front of your body with your fingers—like a house.)

Love

Life!

(Hug yourself.)

(Hands and arms outstretched above your head.)

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Curriculum links

The activities in the book predominantly support student learning in the following key learning areas and topics/strands for each State: NSW

Vic.

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education

SA

Qld

Health and physical education

Health and physical education

• Personal and social • Knowledge and development understanding • Self-management skills • Health of individuals and communities • Interpersonal skills

• Promoting the health of individuals and communities • Enhancing personal development

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• Health of individuals and population • Growth and development • Self and relationships • Interpersonal relationships • Personal health choices • Safe living • Values and attitudes • Skills: – Communicating – Decision-making – Interacting – Problem-solving

WA

Studies of Society and Environment

Human Society and its Environment

Studies of Society and Environment

Society and environment

Society and environment

• Patterns of place and location • Relationships with places • Resource systems • Roles, rights and responsibilities • Significant events and people • Time and change • Identities • Cultural diversity

• Family and neighbourhood (Level 1) • Community and participation (Level 2) • Australia’s people and places (Level 3) • History (Level 4) • Geography (Level 4)

• Investigation, communication and participation • Place and space • Culture • Time, continuity and change • Resources • Active citizenship

• Time, continuity and change • Place, space and environment • Societies and cultures • Social systems

• Time, continuity and change • Place and space • Culture and identity • Systems, resources and power

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Science and Technology Science • Built environments • Physical phenomena • Products and services

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Science

Science

Science

• Earth and beyond • Biological science: – Living together: past, • Energy and change present and future • Life and living • Earth and space sciences: – The changing earth • Physical science: – Energy and its uses

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• Earth and space • Energy systems • Life systems

• Earth and beyond • Energy and change • Life and living

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Teacher – student self-reflection checklist Name Go through the list, tick the appropriate boxes and see how you rate. You will notice a profile that will indicate which of your values are strongly developed, and which areas you need to improve. í˘ą Be kind to yourself

Strongly agree

Agree

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Strongly disagree

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1. I am proud of my uniqueness 2. I have a strong sense of identity 3. I know my strengths and work on my weaknesses 4. I exercise regularly 5. I eat well 6. I sleep well 7. I take time to relax 8. I minimise risks 9. I like learning 10. I strive for success 11. I love, and value the love of, others 12. I have a circle of quality friends 13. I stand up for myself 14. I make good choices 15. I forgive myself if I make mistakes 16. I am positive 17. I am useful 18. I have fun 19. I am proud of the things I say and do

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Disagree

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Strongly agree

1. I value relationships 2. I respect the rights of others 3. I am polite and use good manners 4. I praise people who do things well 5. I work at building and maintaining relationships 6. I am tolerant and understanding of difference 7. I respect other points of view 8. I don’t bully or put others down 9. I seek a fair go for all 10. I try to manage and resolve conflict 11. I cooperate with others 12. I support and include others 13. I value family life 14. I treat others the way they need to be treated

Agree

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Disagree

Strongly disagree

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name í˘ł Be kind to the environment

Strongly agree

Agree

Strongly disagree

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í˘´ Be the learning kind

Strongly agree

1. I am positive about learning 2. I seek knowledge about myself, others and the world around me 3. I recognise the value of knowledge 4. I have an enquiring mind—I am curious 5. I know how I learn best 6. I have an open mind 7. I am a critical thinker 8. I have a global perspective 9. I seek learning opportunities everywhere 10. I learn from my mistakes 11. I am a lifelong learner

Agree

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1. I clean up after myself 2. I don’t pollute the land, air or waterways 3. I recycle and don’t waste 4. I don’t waste water 5. I conserve energy 6. I care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species 7. I use environmentally friendly products 8. I use environmentally friendly energy sources 9. I use resources that can be replaced 10. I value our cultural heritage

Disagree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name í˘ľ Be the achieving kind

Strongly agree

Agree

Strongly disagree

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1. I have a go! 2. I try lots of different things 3. I know what I am good at and enjoy doing 4. I do things to the best of my ability 5. I pursue quality and personal excellence 6. I use my talents 7. I have a sense of purpose 8. I manage my time effectively 9. I manage my money wisely 10. I set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. I am persistent and self-disciplined at achieving my goals 12. I look at different ways of doing things 13. I have good communication skills 14. I have good role models that I look up to

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1. I behave responsibly 2. I respect authority 3. I follow rules 4. I am honest and seek the truth 5. I show integrity—I know what is morally and ethically right, and I act that way 6. I am useful 7. I get involved in the community 8. I strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. I share with and care for those in need 10. I support reconciliation 11. I contribute to or support research 12. I support freedom 13. I strive for peace

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I am a one of a kind

Right index finger in the air in front of body.

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1. Be kind to yourself

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Be kind to yourself – overview • Play the ‘Food traffic lights game’. One student and the teacher become the traffic light police and have to decide as each student names a particular food, if it is healthy (green) and they can proceed and have some fruit; or a bit healthy, (orange) and they get another turn; or unhealthy (red) and they go to the end of the line.

BE PROUD OF YOUR UNIQUENESS • Students make a collage of their face using a paper plate and appropriate hair, eye and skin coloured materials. • Students lay on sheets of butcher paper and have their outline drawn. They paint clothes, hair and facial features and help to cut out and label their picture with their name. Display and compare their unique ‘portraits’. • Students compile ‘All about me’ booklets. These may include a photo, traced hand and foot shapes, a name strip (traced and coloured), eyes to colour appropriately, pages for cut out pictures of; for example: foods I like, toys I like, animals I like and drawings of pets, favourite toy.

SLEEP WELL

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• Students relate the time of going to bed in relation to an activity. For example, ‘I go to bed after I watch my favourite cartoon show’, ‘Mum reads me a story before I go to sleep.’ • Participate in and view role-plays about sleeping patterns, such as a child who keeps getting out of bed at bedtime and what the parents do make him or her stay in bed and go to sleep. • Discuss what’s good about getting into bed. Students then draw a picture on a sheet of paper under the caption, ‘I like going to bed because … ’ They then take turns to ‘read’ their pictures; e.g. ‘I like going to bed because I have happy dreams’.

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DEVELOP A SENSE OF IDENTITY

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• Students sitting in a circle complete the sentence ‘I am good at …’ (cricket, drawing etc.) • Sit in circles of five or six. Each student takes turns to clearly state their favourite song, food, drink, game, book etc. as suggested by the teacher. Change the order of who speaks first. • Discuss and demonstrate similarities and differences between pairs of students; e.g. Byron and Cam both have fair hair but Cam is taller than Byron. Then ask students to find a partner who has something the same and to work out something that is different.

TAKE TIME TO RELAX

• Students perform charades, for others to guess, which show their favourite way to relax. • Find pictures in magazines of children and adults doing activities they find relaxing. Cut out and glue to card to create a mural. • Play relaxing music and have students tense and tighten all their muscles, and then relax as they imagine that they are snowmen slowly melting onto the ground.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons KNOW YOUR STRENGTHS AND WORK ON YOUR •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• WEAKNESSES

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• During outside time, fitness or play times students count the number of times they can jump, skip etc. Repeat the task over a given time and try to increase the number. • Draw a picture of something they are good at on one side of a large star shape. Draw something they need to improve on the other side. Cut out and add glitter to the ‘good’ side. • Students complete the ‘Two stars and a wish’ sheets. They should draw pictures of themselves doing two things they are good at beside the two stars and something they would like to do better beside the wand.

• Identify safety signs at school or in the local area and say what they mean. • In a picture, circle children doing risky things such as not wearing a bike helmet or climbing on top of the monkey bars. Also identify children playing in a safe way. • Discuss ‘things that can hurt us at home’ and find photos and illustrations to cut out, and draw pictures to glue onto a safety poster with a big red ‘Stop’ sign.

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EXERCISE REGULARLY • Participate in action rhymes and games such as the ‘Hokey pokey’ and ‘Heads, shoulders, knees and toes’ that involve using different muscle groups. • Each day students practise moving like different animals from a selected category; e.g. farm, water, flying or jungle animals.

KEEP LEARNING AND GROWING

• Students state one thing they have learnt to do. For example; write their name, hop on one foot six times. • Colour and sequence a set of pictures showing people of different ages and what they can do; e.g. new baby with a ‘dummy’, baby crawling, toddler playing in sandpit, through to grandparent reading to grandchild. • Ask students to identify things they can now do that they couldn’t do before they came to school. Compile a class list.

EAT WELL • On a paper plate, cut out and glue food pictures from magazines from each food group to make a healthy main meal as directed by the teacher.

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Be kind to yourself – overview STRIVE FOR SUCCESS

• Students put a hand puppet on each hand and role-play a situation where one puppet makes a mistake and the other tells him or her what to do to try to rectify it and to forgive himself or herself. • Discuss: If you did something really, really bad and you felt terrible about it, what could you do to make yourself feel better? e.g. say sorry or try to fix up your mistake. How could other people help you to feel better about it?

• Students learn a ‘success’ phrase to say to themselves when they do something well. For example; ‘I tried hard!’, or ‘That looks good!’ • Create a variety of awards that students have to strive to win each week; e.g. ‘Best listener’, ‘Best manners’, ‘Best tidy up person’, ‘Most improved painter’. • Set a very achievable, specific, class goal for each day. Students should discuss how they tried to achieve it, what was difficult or easy, and evaluate their success at the end of the day and then reset or change the goal for the following day.

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BE POSITIVE

• Listen to and talk about the story of Pollyanna. • Copy positive words into speech bubbles drawn next to smiling, positive looking children. Examples could include ‘Excellent’, ‘Keep smiling’, ‘Keep trying’. • Role-play things you could say to a sad friend to make him or her feel better?

LOVE, AND VALUE THE LOVE OF, OTHERS

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• Make heart-shaped biscuits to give to loved ones (with a kiss and a hug and an ‘I love you’). DEVELOP A CIRCLE OF GOOD FRIENDS

BE USEFUL

• Draw faces on large coloured pop sticks, add hair and write the names of friends on the stick. Use to roleplay your friends playing games together. • Complete a four-page booklet titled ‘My friends’, by drawing a picture of three different friends they like to play with on each page and writing or scribing a sentence. • Use a ‘t-chart’ to record student ideas about what a good friend looks like (friendly, kind, smiling), sounds like (‘let’s do it together’, ‘I’m sorry’, ‘can I help you?’) and feels like (happy, good, fun).

• Students take turns to be a ‘helper’ at school. • Cut and glue sentences under the pictures showing children doing useful things at home or at school. • Students draw a picture of themselves doing something helpful at home to glue to a wall chart of a large house and garden with the caption; ‘We do lots of things to help at home’. Suggest that they draw themselves with a happy face to show how they feel when they are helping others.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur poses onl y• HAVE SOME FUN STAND UP FOR YOURSELF

• Listen to and sing silly songs every afternoon just before going home from school. Repeat using silly movements or actions. • Draw and colour a picture about something fun they like to do. Glue it onto heavy card. An adult should cut it into about ten pieces to make a jigsaw. Give it to another student to construct. • Invite students to take turns to tell a joke or ask a riddle.

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• Learn and practise saying assertive phrases such as ‘Please don’t push me! I don’t like it!’ • Discuss times when students should ‘tell tales’ to a teacher or adult and when they should stand up for themselves and be assertive. • Role-play different ways of saying ‘no’ politely in a variety of situations; e.g. your friend wants you to watch television and you want to go for a swim.

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BE PROUD OF THE THINGS YOU SAY AND DO

• Practise saying ‘Please’, ‘Thank you’ and ‘Excuse me’. • Complete sentences such as ‘My teacher is proud of me when …’, ‘I am proud of myself when …’, ‘My dad is proud of me when … ’ • Students work in pairs with puppets to take turns in saying nice things to each other after the teacher has modelled the process. They then choose their best comment to repeat to the class.

MAKE GOOD CHOICES

• Teachers give a small group of students a verbal or written scenario where they have to decide on what to do. With teacher direction, the decision could be role-played for other students to view and discuss. • Discuss the choices made by characters in a fairytale and what could have happened if they had made a different decision. FORGIVE YOURSELF IF YOU MAKE MISTAKES • Listen to stories where characters do something wrong but try to fix up their mistakes; for example: The grasshopper and the ants.

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Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Often students are told to be nice to other people, but how often are they told to be kind to themselves? All people, at times, feel bad about themselves or put themselves ‘down’. In fact, we are often harsher critics of ourselves than others are. It is really important to encourage students to think positively about themselves as much as possible to develop high self-esteem—to ‘be kind to yourself’.

Page 11 – Sleep well

Worksheet information

• Discuss the rooms where students sleep. Do they have their own room or do they share with a brother or sister? What do their bedrooms look like? What colour is it? Does it have a ‘theme’; e.g. space, fairies, television characters etc.? Students may draw the picture on their blankets or quilt, or practise writing skills by drawing straight, curly or zigzag lines on the worksheet. For best use, enlarge the sheet to A3 size.

Page 6 – Be proud of your uniqueness

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Page 12 – Take time to relax

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• Take a photograph of each student’s head and shoulders and attach to the appropriate space in the frame template. The rectangular space is for the student’s name. A student can write his/her own name, have it scribed by the teacher or the teacher can track the name for the student to trace. Students colour the eye to match their own and draw and colour hair around the face to match their own. Use an ink pad to make thumb prints. Display so students can compare and notice their uniqueness.

• Read the rhyme with the students and ask them to perform the actions. Repeat each day until the students are able to recite the rhyme as well. Use daily after lunch to prepare students for lessons.

Page 7 – Develop a sense of identity • Discuss things students like to eat, drink and play; colours, books and TV programs they like etc. Bring to their attention that they don’t all like the same things. Students can circle and colour the things they like on the worksheet. Compare with a classmate or small group. They could draw extra pictures of ‘likes’ or ‘dislikes’ on the back of the sheet.

Page 13 – Minimise risks

• Discuss each picture separately. Where is it? What happens there? What things are in the picture? Allow students to cross or tick each one after discussion.

© R. I . C.PPage ub l i cat i ons 14 – Keep learning and growing Page 8 – Know your strengths and work on your • Discuss who the people may be in the pictures and the objects. orr evi ew pu r p o se n Students draw a line froms each o person to l they object• they have weaknesses •f learnt to use.

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Page 9 – Exercise regularly

Page 15 – Strive for success • Discuss things which the students think they are good at and things they would like to be good at. Discuss how to get better at doing something. Complete the worksheet.

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• Through discussion, help students identify the things each of them are good at and the things they need to improve upon. Students cut out the wand (or teacher or helper has wands pre-cut), draw something they are good at on one side and something they need to improve upon on the other. Add glitter to the ‘good’ side. When students show an improvement with the subject on the other side, add glitter to that side as well.

A child came home from her first day at school. ‘How was school? What did you learn today?’, her mother asks. ‘School was fine’, she replied, ‘but I didn’t learn enough because I have to go back tomorrow!’

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• Teacher/Helper colours and cuts out cards. Each card has an illustration and written directions for performing the actions to the rhyme ‘This is the way we ... (touch our toes etc.)’. Enlarge to A3 size and show students the action to follow; or, a student could turn over a card and show the other students the action to follow. This exercise activity could be done inside or outside.

Page 10 – Eat well • After a discussion about healthy and unhealthy foods, students can draw or find pictures in magazines (or teacher/helper cuts out) of healthy and unhealthy foods. They glue or draw healthy choices in the mouth and unhealthy choices outside the mouth.

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Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes Page 16 – Love, and value the love of, others

• Discuss what is meant by the old expression ‘It’s no good crying over spilt milk’. Make the point that everyone makes mistakes and that we should feel sorry, but that sometimes you can’t fix your mistakes and that there is no need to keep feeling really sad and unhappy about it. • Students can colour the picture. Discuss how the cat is feeling and why.

• Discuss the people we love, why we love them and how we can show and tell them that we love them. • Explain that they are going to make something special to give to someone they love and ask them to decide who they will give their card to and what they would like to say. • Copy the page on red card. An adult can scribe each student’s message on the smaller heart which can be cut out and glued in the middle of the larger heart. Students then decorate both sides of their card with stickers, drawings, cut out pictures, photos etc. and cut it out. They can ‘read’ their message when they give it to the person they love.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Page 21 – Be positive

• Read the story to the students and discuss it. What does it mean to be positive? Is that the same as being happy and cheerful? What are some positive things to say?

Page 22 – Be useful

Page 17 – Develop a circle of good friends.

horrible and bullying him, what he tried to do about it and why it didn’t work. • Discuss what it means to stand up for yourself and the importance of having someone to help you do this. • Photocopy and enlarge the illustration for students to colour in.

Graphic organiser example

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• View and discuss the pictures. Students colour or tick the jobs they could do at home to be useful.

Page 23 – Have some fun

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• Discuss the importance of good friends, how to identify a good friend and how friends can help you. Tell the students that to complete this task, they will need to work together and help a friend. Students should then select a good friend to work with. • Students place one hand on the top of a page with their fingers pointing down and ask their selected friend to trace around it. Then the friend places his or her hand on the bottom part of the page with fingers pointing up, touching the traced fingers and the student traces around it. • Students can colour the hand shapes and the completed pages and display them on a friendship chart.

• Sing the song through with the students while they perform actions relevant to each verse.

Page 24 – Be proud of the things you say and do

• Talk with the students about ‘good words’ to say such as ‘Please’, ‘Thank you’, ‘Excuse me’. ‘May I … ?’ etc. Discuss when and how these need to be used. Practise saying these in appropriate situations and reward students who use them without being prompted. • Students can trace over words on a sheet and cut out the strips, which can then be displayed around the classroom.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 18• – Stand upr for r yourself f o evi ew pur posesonl y• • Read the story and discuss how Lee felt when Larry was being

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• Discuss making choices and how some decisions are good and others are not so good. Explain how some of the choices we make affect our health. Before asking students to circle and colour their food choices, explain that some of the foods we like are not good for our health and that they will need to think about healthy foods and make good choices.. • Discuss the importance of choosing safe things to play with, before asking students to circle and colour their good choices so they can play safely.

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Page 20 – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes. • Read the poem and discuss making mistakes. Encourage students to tell and categorise the mistakes they have made as those they could fix and those they couldn’t. Ask how they felt about them, what they did and what happened to make them feel better afterwards.

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Be kind to yourself – Be proud of your uniqueness

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a sense of identity

Things I like

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Circle and colour the things you like.

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Be kind to yourself – Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses

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Magic fairy wand!

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Be kind to yourself – Exercise regularly

This is the way we …

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Be kind to yourself – Eat well

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Good food smile

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Be kind to yourself – Sleep well

My bed

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Draw your face on the person in the bed and a pattern on the quilt. Colour the remainder of the picture in the same colours as your bedroom. Trace over the words.

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Be kind to yourself – Take time to relax

A relaxing rhyme TEACHER PAGE

I lie down gently on the floor And pretend my body’s feeling sore. I rest my neck, my shoulders and back. I’ll go all droopy like a sack!

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Even my toes droop in the heat!

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r o e t s r I close my eyes and drop my head. B e oo p u I let my shoulders fall like lead. k S I rest my knees, my legs and feet.

I breathe slowly in and out. I think of quiet things all about. The wind, the rain, the birds that sing. Flowers that bloom when itc isa Spring. © R. I . C .Pu bl i t i ons

My armsp are heavy, my too! •f orr evi ew ur pos eelbows son l y•

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My hands and fingers go soft like glue. My body floats like a yacht on the lake ’til somebody whispers ‘It’s time to be awake!’

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Be kind to yourself – Minimise risks

Safe and unsafe places

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Put a cross (✘) on the unsafe places to play and tick (✔) the safe places.

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Be kind to yourself – Keep learning and growing

Now that I’m big …

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Draw a line from the person to the object to show who uses it.

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Be kind to yourself – Strive for success

Be a star!

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In the star shape, draw something you would like to be good at. Write a word (or words) to tell what it is.

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Be kind to yourself – Love, and value the love of, others

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Who do you love?

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a circle of good friends

My hand

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Be kind to yourself – Stand up for yourself

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Trouble in the jungle

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arry was the biggest lion cub in the jungle. He was stronger and rougher than the other cubs and when he roared loudly, you could see that he already had lots of very sharp teeth. Some of the other cubs didn’t like him and didn’t want to play with him. He knew this and it made him cross and bad-tempered.

One of the smaller cubs, Lee, was the one that Larry would always pick on. Larry would hide in the jungle and wait until Lee walked past, then he would pounce on him and bite his tail or scratch his neck. If Lee was eating something tasty, Larry would take it off him and eat it himself. and I think I might be able to help you. You know bullies like Larry are often Lee was very frightened and sad and cowards. They are frightened about he cried a lot. He just didn’t know what others knowing that they are bullies. to do. He tried to stay away from Larry, They worry about what will happen to but that didn’t work because Larry kept them when they are found out. Bullies finding him. His life was very miserable. really don’t like it when someone stands up for themselves. I think you should At last Lee decided that he had to do tell Larry that you’ve had enough, that something about his problem so he told you’ve been talking to me about it and his uncle. Lee’s uncle was a very wise that unless he changes his ways, he will old lion who had lived in the jungle for be in serious trouble’. a long time and he had seen many things. As he walked away Lee felt much bigger and stonger and braver. He would stand ‘You have done the wisest and most up for himself. He wasn’t alone. His uncle important thing now’, he said.‘You have was right, Larry didn’t seem as scary told someone about your problem now.

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Be kind to yourself – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes

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Be kind to yourself – Be positive

The forest friends

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nce upon a time in a dry, brown forest, there lived four animals —a bear, a fox, a mouse and

an owl.

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The bear’s name was Bart. He had a thick, brown coat and a black nose which could sniff all the smells in the forest. Fred, the fox, had a shiny, red coat, a bushy tail and black eyes which darted all around, watching everything very carefully. Mavis, the mouse, was small, grey and inquisitive with a long, thin tail which followed along behind her when she scrambled around. Oscar, the owl, had layers of fluffy feathers and a sharp beak which he used skilfully for picking up things.

‘Now is the time for us to help each other!’, he said. ‘If we are clever we can get away from the fire and find a safe place to stay until it passes! I know that we can do this!’

© R. I . C.Pub l i cat i ons Mavis scuttled into the undergrowth to find a safe pathway. Bart kept his nose •f orr evi ew pur p os oout nl y•the fire was to the aire tos find where

Although the animals had seen each other in the forest, they were not friends. Each of them thought that the others might want to eat them for a meal. So they each kept to themselves!

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going. Fred used his eyes to search for embers which may start new fires in the Summer was long and hot in the forest. undergrowth, and Oscar used his clever The trees thirsted and the leaves crinkled beak to pick up branches to swat out and dried up. The floor of the forest any little fires along the way. was bare and dirty. The animals began to get irritable and grumpy. Oscar, the Soon, they had reached a small, owl, was the only one who stayed calm blackened clearing with a dry creek and cheerful. He could often be heard bed. saying things such as; ‘At least my beak ‘We’ll be safe here now’, said Oscar.‘The isn’t feeling cold!’, and ‘Isn’t it good that fire has already been through here and my feathers keep me from getting burnt there is nothing left to burn’. by the sun!’, or ‘Won’t it be nice when the rain comes, to help the grass grow!’ As each of the animals searched for a suitable spot to stay, Oscar could be One day, the forest became smoky heard muttering to himself, ‘Isn’t it great and smelly and the animals began to know what we can do when we all to feel frightened. A deadly forest fire work together! I was positive that we was approaching the area where would be alright!’ the animals lived. Oscar called all the The animals were friends from that day animals together. on!

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Be kind to yourself – Be useful

Being helpful at home

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Colour or tick the pictures of jobs you could do at home to help.

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Be kind to yourself – Have some fun

Silly song

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S I love to sing a silly song, silly song, silly song. I love to sing a silly song, S-s-silly song!

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(to the tune ‘This is the way …’)

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I like to move in a silly way, silly way, silly way. I like to move in a silly way, S-s-silly way!

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Be kind to yourself – Be proud of the things you say and do

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Good things to say

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2. Be kind to others

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arm clockwise and point outwards.

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Be kind to others – overview VALUE RELATIONSHIPS

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• Match each group of ‘parent’ animals to their babies. • Construct a ‘Babushka/Russian doll’ style family using various sizes of cardboard rolls, with Dad being the tallest and widest, and baby being the smallest and shortest — all fitting inside each other to make one family. • Students draw their face in the centre of a sheet of paper and draw and label pictures of other children and adults with whom they have a good relationship. • Discuss why grandparents are special, the things they say and do, and what they enjoy. Invite grandparents to a morning or afternoon tea and entertain them.

• Each day students nominate others who have done something well: e.g. being kind, packing up quickly or drawing a good picture. They should give reasons for their nomination and that childs name is written in a star shape and displayed. DEVELOP GOOD PEOPLE SKILLS • Students sit in pairs and role-play conversations, which include saying: ‘Good morning! How are you?’, along with appropriate responses. • Students use collage skills to create a face with a large, happy, smiling mouth. Display with the words, ‘Smile and make someone happy!’ • Complete a ‘We like people who … ’ chart.

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RESPECT THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS

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• Cut and paste the belongings of each family member underneath their picture. • Reward students who keep their own working or eating area tidy so that others are not bothered by their untidiness. • Make up role-plays where students don’t respect the rights of others. Demonstrate, and repeat, the correct behaviour. Examples could include pushing past someone to get into line first, or talking and disrupting while others are speaking in class. • Discuss why it’s important for everyone to learn to take turns.

WORK AT BUILDING AND MAINTAINING RELATIONSHIPS

• Create a ‘fold-out’ book about a friend. Draw a picture and write (or have an adult scribe) one sentence which says something nice about their friend. • Sketch a portrait of your friend by having them ‘sit’ for their portrait. Include all the details. Write one sentence which tells why they are a good friend and display it with the completed portrait. • Participate in a play or listen to a narrative which shows a problem involving how friends should and shouldn’t act. • Draw pictures of good friends and print or have words scribed to describe their qualities; e.g. kind, honest, play nicely with me, giggle with me. • Make a card and a small gift to give to someone you love.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons BE POLITE AND USE GOOD MANNERS •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Play the game ‘May I?’ Select one student to be Mum (or

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• Group and count students in different categories such as eye colour, skin colour, likes, dislikes, clothes worn, favourite sports. • Identify differences in children in a ‘Spot the difference’ illustration. Differences in the bottom picture could include adding freckles on a child, giving one curly hair instead of straight, making one taller, smiling with front teeth missing etc. • Create a mural of students’ thumbprints, footprints or handprints to highlight how we are all different. • Read the story of The ugly ducking and discuss how the ‘ducking’ was different, why he was rejected by the others and how this made him feel.

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PRAISE PEOPLE WHO DO THINGS WELL • Supply students with a card on which stamps or stickers may be collected each time they do something well. • Students decorate and colour merit certificates with messages of praise, such as ‘Congratulations on a job well done!’ As a class, decide on two or three students each day who deserve a certificate.

Values education toolkit

BE TOLERANT AND UNDERSTANDING OF DIFFERENCE

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Dad). Other students line up about 10 metres in front of Mum. Mum selects one student and says how many ‘giant’ or ‘baby’ steps to take. The student must say ‘Mum, may I?’ and wait for Mum to answer ‘yes’ before he/she moves. If the student forgets, he/she must go back to the starting line. Mum may say ‘No’ even if the question is asked properly. • Match labels of good manners words such as ‘Please’ and ‘Excuse me’ to pictures of people saying and demonstrating those manners. • Use puppets to role-play simple senarios either with the teacher or another student demonstrating both good and/or bad manners; e.g. buying an ice-cream or answering the telephone. Other students should be encouraged to comment on their manners

RESPECT OTHER POINTS OF VIEW • Divide students into pairs. The first student thinks of an adjective such as ‘long’ and the partner must give a word which is the opposite. Repeat using different words with each partner taking turns to supply the first word.

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Be kind to others – overview • Students complete the sentence ‘I like … but … (friend’s name) likes …’ • Individual students place a sticker or star on a chart to vote for their favourite in certain categories; e.g. colour, animal or food. DON’T BULLY OR PUT OTHERS DOWN

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SEEK A FAIR GO FOR ALL

SUPPORT AND INCLUDE OTHERS

• Students work in groups to create a city or suburb using wooden blocks or cardboard boxes. • Make a list of words that describe how you feel when others won’t let you play with them.

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• Learn and practise using assertive phrases such as ‘I statements’ to express feelings; for example: ‘I feel angry when …’, ‘I don’t like it when … ’ • Teacher reads a question to students who are sitting in the centre of the room. Students decide if their answer to the question will be ‘yes’ or ‘no’ and move to the appropriate side of the room. Examples of questions could be; ‘Do you think children should be made to eat broccoli?’, or ‘Do you like spiders?’. Students will observe how the mix of children changes on each side of the room, depending on their point of view. • Discuss, using a ‘Y-chart’ to list some of the things that bullies do, how being bullied feels and what they can do about it.

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‘pairs’ then spend the next five minutes telling each other about themselves—family, hobbies, favourite food etc. (The teacher may list the things to be related on the board in pictorial or word form before commencing the game.) Shuffle the animal cards and repeat the activity so that the students get to alternate. • Participate in board games, jigsaw puzzles and cooperation games inside and outside, rotating groups regularly. • Play team relay games.

VALUE FAMILY LIFE

• Students create a book about their family. Each family member will have a page with a picture on it and a sentence which tells why they are important to the family. Students should include a page about themselves. • Students draw a picture of their family participating in a favourite activity and create a decorative frame. A caption may be scribed. • Students bring photos of family members to school to show and tell others about. Photos can then be displayed on a ‘our families’ board.

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MANAGE AND RESOLVE CONFLICT

TREAT OTHERS THE WAY THEY NEED TO BE TREATED

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• Students take turns when playing games or being a class helper. • Encourage students to make new class members feel welcome by looking after them when they arrive by showing them the toilets, drinking fountains, where to sit when eating etc. • Read the story of Goldilocks and the three bears. Discuss if it was fair that Baby bear’s porridge was eaten, his chair was broken and that Goldilocks slept in his bed. Then invite students to talk about things that they think are unfair to themselves or others and what should or could be done to solve them.

• Students complete the sentences: ‘When Mum is sad, I … ’ ‘When Dad is angry, I … ’ ‘When I am lonely, I … ’ ‘When my sister acts nasty to me, I … ’ etc. • Teachers present students with scenarios; e.g. ‘Leah has broken her leg. How should she be treated?’, or ‘Callum has made a big improvement with his printing. How should he be treated?’ Students discuss and/or role-play how they should be treated. • Discuss different ways to make sad people happy.

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• Read familiar stories such as The little red hen and ask students to identify the conflict and how it was resolved. Repeat using the story of The little yellow chicken and compare the solutions. • Follow steps for controlling anger—stop and take a deep breath—think, and then choose the best way to act—stay calm and in control—talk about how you feel. • Discuss some of the reasons why children fight with each other and what their parents and teachers do that stops the fighting. COOPERATE AND BE A TEAM PLAYER

• Create enough cards for two students to each have a picture of the same animal. Students move around the room making the sound of their animal until they find their ‘mate’. The

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Values education toolkit


Be kind to others – Teachers notes Learning to be kind to others is an essential element in the development of good people skills. These skills are important in forming and maintaining the many different relationships which are an integral part of living in society. Students need to understand the nature and importance of relationships and how to form and support them. Comprehending and considering the needs of others and knowing how to interact with them in a positive way are the keys to good relationships. Worksheet information

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• Students draw the members of his/her family on a sheet of paper slightly smaller than the doors on the house then colour and cut out the house. The doors are then cut open and folded back. Students (or an adult helper) glue the family to the house so that the family can be seen when the doors are opened.

Page 31 – Respect the rights of others • Respecting the rights of others means not taking or using their things. Students complete the worksheet to show which things belong to each person.

Page 32 – Be polite and use good manners • Colour and cut out the finger puppets. Glue the edges together to fit around the students’ fingers. Use the appropriate puppets to respond with the correct ‘polite’ saying for given scenarios.

Page 37 – Respect other points of view

• Students may draw pictures or write words to complete the worksheet. Adults may scribe if necessary. It is important for students to compare answers to appreciate other points of view.

© R. I . C.PPage ub ca t i sdown 38 l –i Don’t bully oro putn others • Discuss what is happening in the picture with the students. Theyr should identify whos is playing nicely and who • f o rdor evwell i ew pu po se on l y •is not. Page 33 – Praise people who things Discuss what ‘bullying’ means. Do the students think that • Students may decorate the certificate after being rewarded for doing something well.

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• Discuss how facial expressions such as a smile can communicate our feelings to others. A smile can also make another person happy. • Students colour and cut out the face, then attach wool or twisted paper for hair. Cut two lengths of paper approximately 30 cm x 3 cm, join at right angles and ‘pleat’. Attach the nose to the face at the spot indicated by the cross.

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• The nursery rhyme, Little Miss Muffet, can be used to teach the concept of seeking a fair go. Students can colour and cut their own characters to perform the rhyme or the teacher can enlarge a class copy to A3 size. Attach a concertina folded strip to the spider to make it ‘dangle’ in front of Little Miss Muffet. Craft sticks can be attached to the back of Miss Muffet. Ask students if they thought it was fair of the spider to frighten her. Did he mean to do it? Was he after her curds and whey? Was he just trying to be friendly and dropped in to say hello? How could he have given her a fair go?

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Page 35 – Work at building and maintaining relationships

• Students copy or write the name of a friend and draw a picture. Then, they write (or have an adult scribe) why they like their friend and draw a picture. Students cut along the dotted lines, glue onto coloured card and fold into a card to present to his/her friend.

Page 36 – Be tolerant and understanding of difference • Read the rhyme to the students and discuss what it is about.

Values education toolkit

Page 39 – Seek a fair go for all

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anyone in the picture is bullying or just being mean? What would they do in that situation?

Page 40 – Manage and resolve conflict

• Colour and cut the two clowns—one showing Conrad when he is angry and in conflict and the other when he is calm and in control. Attach a craft stick to each. Discuss Conrad’s angry looks and feelings with the students. What could have made him angry? What should he do to stay in control? What makes them feel angry? What do they do when they are angry? What should they do?

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Be kind to others – Teachers notes Page 41 – Cooperate and be a team player • Enlarge, copy twice onto card, colour and cut out cards. Laminate for durability. Students cooperate in pairs to play ‘Animal snap’ or ‘Concentration’. (Can also be used to play the game suggested in the overview on page 27 for this bullet point.)

Graphic organiser example Concept charts Looks Tastes Feels

Page 42 – Support and include others

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• Discuss the importance of letting others join in and not being left out. Students trace over the lines next to each face in a different colour to find which game to join in with.

Smells

Sounds

Senses chart

Page 43 – Value family life

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Who

What

Where When Why

Page 44 – Treat others the way they need to be treated

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• Discuss how families should love and care for each other. Also discuss how families are made up differently—one or two parents, step-mother or step-father, number of sisters and brothers etc. Students colour and cut out the cards, then match the parents to the young.

5W chart

• Read the story to the students, then discuss how each of the animals treated each other. Point out how the lion was thinking about swallowing the mouse after becoming annoyed at being woken up, but changed his mind and treated the mouse how she needed to have been treated.

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Something to think about: A mother, determined not to place any gender restrictions on her daughter, watched her playing with cars and trucks. ‘Tell me about your game’, she said. ‘Well!’, replied her daughter innocently, ‘The big truck is the daddy. This is the mummy and the little car is the baby’.

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Be kind to others – Value relationships

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My family

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Be kind to others – Respect the rights of others

Who owns it?

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1. Look at these family members.

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2. Cut out the belongings and glue them under the correct family member.

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Be kind to others – Be polite and use good manners

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Polite puppets

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Be kind to others – Praise people who do things well

‘Well done’ certificate

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Well done!

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Be kind to others – Develop good people skills

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Smile

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Smile

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Be kind to others – Work at building and maintaining relationships

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I like my friend because T ea ch er

‘My friend’ book

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This is my friend m

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Be kind to others – Be tolerant and understanding of difference

You and me

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I have black hair. Your hair is red. I sleep on a bunk. You sleep in a bed. I have yellow skin. Your skin is brown. I like to run. You hang upside down.

I have two sisters. You have one brother. I have two dads. You have one mother. My house has one storey. Your house has two. You have one pet.© I live inI a zoo. R. . C .Publ i cat i ons

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I am your friend and you are mine. We play together all the time. We are so different as you can see. But I like you and you like me.

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We’re not the same but that’s okay. We learn from each other every day. Maybe grownups should be more like us. We just play together. We don’t make a fuss!

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Be kind to others – Respect their points of view

These are a few of my favourite things. 1. Draw pictures or write words in each box, then ask a friend to complete the other side.

Friend r o e t s B r e oo p u k S

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Me

favourite food

favourite food

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favourite colour

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favourite school activity

favourite school activity

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Be kind to others – Don’t bully or put others down

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Kind or mean?

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Be kind to others – Seek a fair go for all

Little Miss Muffet

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Little Miss Muffet Sat on a tuffet Eating her curds and whey. Along came a spider And sat down beside her And frightened Miss Muffet away.

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Be kind to others – Manage and resolve conflict

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Conrad, the clown

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Be kind to others – Cooperate and be a team player

guinea pig

Animal Snap – R.I.C. Publications

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monkey

hermit crab koala

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Animal Snap – R.I.C. Publications

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ladybird

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ladybird

turtle

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turtle

mouse

mouse

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snail

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koala

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elephant

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dog penguin

worm

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frog

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guinea pig

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Values education toolkit


Be kind to others – Support and include others

Come and join in!

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Help each person find their way to join in with a game.

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Be kind to others – Value family life

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Parents and babies

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Be kind to others – Treat others the way they need to be treated

The lion and the mouse

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nce upon a time, a big, strong lion was sleeping in the jungle. Suddenly, he was woken up from his sleep by a little mouse running over him.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u The lion was annoyed at being S woken from his sleep and grabbed the mouse with one of his huge paws. He opened up his enormous mouth as if to swallow the mouse. ‘Please, Mr Lion, let me go’, the little mouse called out. ‘I’m sorry I woke you up. I know I’m little, but one day I may be able to help you.’

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He roared again even louder, but still no-one came to help.

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The lion thought about what the mouse said and laughed.

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He roared and he roared and he roared. At last, someone heard him. It was the little mouse.

‘I don’t see how a little mouse could help an enormous lion like me’, he said, ‘but I will let you go. Be off with you’.

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She started to chew on the net. She chewed and chewed until she had made a hole big enough for the lion to get out.

Suddenly, he fell into a hunter’s net. The poor lion was trapped and couldn’t get out.

The lion was very happy and thanked the little mouse. ‘I’m glad I could help you’, she said. ‘Now you know that little friends can be great friends.’

‘Help, help, help!’ he roared, but no-one came to help him.

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3. Be kind to r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S the environment

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finger – Auslan sign language for ‘E’.

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Be kind to the environment – overview CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF

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• Sing the rhyme ‘This is the way we pick up our toys ... ‘ with actions to reinforce the concept of students cleaning up after themselves. Repeat using other actions such as ‘pick up our clothes’, ‘ put away the food’, ‘stack the dishes’ etc. • Make doorknob hangers or signs to remind students to clean up their bedroom, play area at home, games corner in the classroom etc. • Have a scavenger hunt to collect litter from the playground after recess or lunch. Then locate the bins which students should have used and discuss possible reasons why students didn’t use them and the problems this causes.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S CONSERVE ENERGY

• Listen to the story of Lester and Clyde by James Reece about two frogs who live in a pond which becomes polluted. Follow up the story by asking students to create a polluted pond environment by drawing a large, brightly coloured picture using wax crayons or oil pastels and covering it with runny black paint. • Introduce the term ‘pollution’ and ask students what it means. Discuss different causes of pollution in a specific area; e.g. the ocean, rivers, cities or the air we breathe. Write these on individual red ‘stop’ cards and attach them to a large collage representing that particular environment. • Have students cut out pictures from magazines or draw their own, showing polluted and clean environments. Glue onto two large sheets of paper labelled ‘Clean’ and ‘Dirty’.

• To make students aware of how many things at home and school use electricity, show or draw pictures of domestic appliances and lights. Discuss what would happen if those things couldn’t work because there was no electricity, and write your answers next to each picture. • After a discussion about how to conserve energy, students draw a picture about something they could do to save energy; e.g. turn off lights that are not needed, walk to school with mum. A sentence can be scribed or written by students and pictures displayed. • Discuss different forms of transport and the relative amounts of fuel each uses. Students can find and cut out drawings of; for example: aircraft, trucks, cars, motorbikes, bicycles and skateboards to attach to the appropriate labelled sections of a chart; e.g. ‘these use lots of fuel’, ‘these use some fuel’ and ‘these use no fuel’.

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KEEP THE LAND, AIR AND WATERWAYS CLEAN

RECYCLE AND DON’T WASTE

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• Students create buildings, robots, cars and houses using recycled boxes brought from home. Discuss what the boxes had in them and why it is good to recycle them. • Create craft items such as Christmas wreaths or mobiles using strips of plastic shopping bags. • Colour and identify pictures of people reducing, reusing and recycling items. • Make a recycling table and ask students to bring examples of items suitable for recycling for display. Discuss why we recycle.

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CARE FOR NATURAL HABITATS, WILDLIFE AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

• Take students on a nature walk around the school to see how many attractive plants, animals and insects they can see. Explain the need to care for them. • Students take an active role in caring for a class pet; e.g. bird, guinea pig; sharing duties for feeding, cleaning the cage etc. Set up a roster of students whose parents are willing to allow their child to look after the pet on weekends and holidays. • Create a collage of native flora and fauna found in the local environment and discuss why and how these should be protected.

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SAVE WATER

• Write signs together to display above sinks and taps (with illustrations) to remind students and adults to turn off taps after using them. • Use finger puppets in the shape of water droplets, taps, baths, showers etc. and make plays about saving water. • Discuss ways children can help their family to save water. Students then draw a picture showing examples of themselves saving water. Values education toolkit

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USE ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS • View a variety of environmentally-friendly shopping bags from different stores. Compare and sort by size, shape, colour and labels. Encourage students to bring in recycled shopping bags as well.

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Be kind to the environment – overview • Show students actual examples of environmentally-friendly products available at the supermarket and how they can be used as alternative cleaning products etc. • Discuss the problems caused to the environment by plastic bags and the ways that people can carry their groceries home that reduces the need for so many plastic bags.

• Visit, or walk to, an important landmark in the local area. Discuss why it has been erected and why it is important to the community. • Identify natural and built features of significance, firstly in their local environment and then into the wider community, within their own country and overseas. • Invite an older person who has lived in the local area for many years, to talk to the students about the positive aspects of what life was like there when they were young, emphasising how the environment has changed and what is still the same.

• On a cold day, try out some ‘old’ ways to keep warm—rub hands together, jump up and down ten times in a row, ‘Do the Hokey Pokey’ etc. Ask students for suggestions for keeping warm without turning on a heater. • Role-play ways to keep warm on a cold day without using a heater and how to keep cool on a hot day without using an air conditioner or electric-powered fan. • Survey the students to find if any of their homes use solar powered hot-water systems. Discuss what they are, why some people buy them and why they are friendly to the environment. CONSIDER USING RESOURCES THAT CAN BE REPLACED (SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT)

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CONSIDER ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY ENERGY SOURCES

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VALUE OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE

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• Plant a fast-growing native tree in the playground for the class to nurture during the year. Paint the class name and year on a recycled fence paling and erect next to the tree. • Ask students to bring an article of clothing no longer needed for anyone at home and donate the clothes to a suitable charity for reuse. • Make greeting cards using recycled materials including cardboard, paper, magazines and cards.

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Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes The environment can be defined as the world that exists around us. This is not just the physical conditions of a place, but also includes all the conditions and influences that affect it. Human behaviour is responsible for many detrimental changes in the environment and students need to be aware of how they should care for the environment so that the things they do have a lower impact on it.

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Worksheet information

Page 50 – Clean up after yourself

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• Discuss ways in which students can help at school and home to help clean up. Students colour the toys and the box, then cut them out and glue the toys onto the toy box shape.

Page 51 – Keep the land, air and waterways clean • Take the students for a walk and count the pieces of rubbish in the playground. Discuss types of rubbish which students may have seen in parks and rivers. Talk about haze in the sky and introduce the word ‘pollution.’ Discuss the pictures on the worksheet and where the rubbish is most likely to be found. Students draw lines to match the rubbish to the place it is most likely to be found.

© R. I . C.PPage ub i cat i ons energy 57 –l Consider environmentally-friendly • Discuss what ‘recycle’ means. Give examples. Cut pieces of sources coloured paper• as wide as ‘Colin andv about 20 cm long.p •u Students useo three different crayons colour the f o rCan’ r e i e w r p s escoloured on l yto • Students complete the worksheet as directed. pattern on the fan template, then cut it out and concertina Page 52 – Recycle and don’t waste

fold along the dotted lines to make a fan. (Make one so they can see the finished product.) Discuss how using a fan like this would save ‘energy’.

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• Read the poem to the students. Repeat allowing students to make appropriate actions. Students may also like to make appropriate noises for water sound words such as ‘plop’ etc.

Page 54 – Conserve energy

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• Discuss things in the home and school which are powered by electricity. Students complete the worksheet as directed.

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Page 53 – Save water

Page 58 – Consider using resources that can be replaced • Explain to the students that a tree has to grow for a very, very long time (can take more than 100 years) before it forms a hollow where animals such as possums, bats, sugar gliders, parrots, frogs or snakes can live. Discuss how trees should not be cut down unnecessarily. Students join up the dotted lines to see what kind of animal lives in the hollow.

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Page 55 – Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species

• Students colour the Australian animals at the bottom of the page, then cut them out and glue them over the correct outline. The rest of the picture can be coloured when glue dries. Discuss the importance of caring for natural habitats etc.

Page 56 – Use environmentally-friendly products

Page 59 – Value our cultural heritage

• Enlarge the worksheet to A3 size. Colour, cut out and fold to form an eight-page booklet to read to a small group. Students can share experiences if they have visited any of the places. Discuss other heritage sites within their own state.

• Discuss the problems plastic shopping bags can cause to the environment. The picture shows an alternative environmentally-friendly cloth bag. Students can cut out pictures of foods from grocery catalogues (or teacher precuts) and ‘fill-up’ the bag with shopping items.

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Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes •

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Categories

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Graphic organiser example

Something to think about: You must be a school teacher if: you feel like hitting the next person who says that it must be nice to work from 8.30 to 3 pm and have lots of holidays, you have no life from January to December, you encourage your spouse by telling they are ‘a good helper’, meeting a child’s parents instantly answers the question ‘Why is the child like this?’ you believe ‘extremely annoying’ should have its own box on the report card, you know one hundred good reasons for being late, or you don’t want children of your own because there isn’t a name you can hear which does not elevate your blood pressure.

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Be kind to the environment – Clean up after yourself

Toy cleanup

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Help Maxie put away her away her toys by cutting them out and gluing them onto the toy box.

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Be kind to the environment – Keep the land, air and waterways clean

Dirty stuff!

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Join the rubbish to the place where it makes a mess.

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Be kind to the environment – Recycle and don’t waste

Colin Can 1. Colour and cut out Colin Can.

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2. Fanfold coloured paper for his body and glue the bits together.

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3. Trace the words.

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Be kind to the environment – Save water

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Plip! Plop! Make it stop! Water is wasting Every drop!

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Save water

© R. I . C. Publ i cat i ons Splish! Splash! •f orr evi ewTurn pu r p osesonl y• the tap!

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Gurgle! Gush! Brush! Brush! Brush! Clean your teeth! Turn the tap off underneath!

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Save some water! Please don’t nap!

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Be kind to the environment – Conserve energy

Powerful things!

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1. Colour the light globe yellow and cut it out. 2. Cut out pictures of things that use electricity and glue them to the shape.

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Where do they live?

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Be kind to the environment – Use environmentally-friendly products

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Going shopping

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Keep cool

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Be kind to the environment – Consider using resources that can be replaced

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Who lives in the tree?

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Be kind to the environment – Value our cultural heritage

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the Nullarbor Plain. Cradle Mountain.

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the Great Barrier Reef.

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the Old Melbourne Gaol.

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the Sydney Harbour

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Parliament House.

Uluru.

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Values education toolkit


chatterbox TEMPLATE A chatterbox is a fun method to reinforce concepts as well as engage learners who utilise the visual/spatial, verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical and bodily/kinaesthetic intelligences while encouraging the interpersonal intelligence.

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Use the pattern given to encourage students to make individual chatterboxes relating to specific areas of the Values toolkit. A specific example is given on page 96.

Instructions

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Begin with a square piece of paper or light card.

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Fold each corner in so that they meet in the centre of the square.

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Fold the chatterbox in half, so that the numbered squares are on the outside.

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Place thumbs and forefingers under the square flaps. Move thumbs and forefingers in an ‘open/shut’ motion. This will mean that the chatterbox opens and shuts, revealing the eight ‘triangular’ numbers each time.

1 2

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Number each half of the triangular ‘flaps’ (eight in all). Any numbers can be used. Number also each of the four square flaps on the underside of the construction.

3 4

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to meet at the centre. This will create four triangular flaps.

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Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height— like a book.

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Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand.

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Swing your hand up to your head—putting the information from the book into your head.

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Be the learning kind – overview BE POSITIVE ABOUT LEARNING • Write a class motto to recite daily which says ‘Learners are grinners’, ‘Learning makes you grow smarter every day!’ • Help to create a positive atmosphere in the classroom by taking photos of students participating in various learning activities. Display with a sentence about what is happening, including the students’ names. • Make a list of people who ‘taught us things’ and talk about what students learnt from each of them.

DETERMINE HOW YOU LEARN BEST (LEARNING STYLES) • Student divide into groups as directed by the teacher. Groups will include ‘students who like to draw best’, ‘students who love to count best’, ‘students who love to do physical activities best’ etc. • Students participate in different activities based on a theme; e.g. ‘Toys’. These should include drawing or designing a toy, sorting toys into categories, moving like specific toys, using toys to make music etc. Discuss with students what kind of activities they enjoyed doing best and what they were best at. • Play a memory game. Place six objects on a tray. Tell the students you want to find out how well they look at something and remember it. Allow them to look, then cover the tray and see how many they can remember. Then tell them you want to see how well they listen and remember. Say the names of six objects and ask them to recall the objects. Discuss if they learnt better through their ears or eyes.

• Complete a worksheet which gives information about height, weight, hair and eye colour, likes, dislike, number of family members etc. Repeat when interviewing another student in the room. • Give students verbal questions to answer about their classroom, playground and other areas within the school grounds. Questions could include: ‘How many boys/girls in your class?’, ‘Where are the jigsaws kept?’, ‘Where does your teacher park his/her car?’, ‘What is the principal’s name?’ • Students think of a question to ask a class member to find out something they would like to know about him or her. Alternatively students ask the teacher a question about a specific topic; e.g. the weather . The teacher answers or models how or where she/he could find the answer.

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SEEK KNOWLEDGE ABOUT YOURSELF, OTHERS AND THE WORLD AROUND YOU

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• After listening to a story ask students open-ended ‘I wonder why?’ and ‘what would have happened if ?’ type questions and encourage them to formulate some of their own.

HAVE AN OPEN MIND © R. I . C.P•u b l i c a t i ons Students, in groups of two or three, relate things they like or dislike, hobbies, favourite television programs, favourite •f orr evi ew pu r posesonl y• television characters etc. as directed by the teacher.

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• Students relate what their parents jobs are. Write the occupations on card and discuss what parents need to know to be able to do their jobs. Students draw a picture of their parents doing their job to display with the ‘occupation’ words. • Identify different people at their school and the jobs they do, and what they have to know to do that job. Include classroom teachers, the librarian, the gardener, parent canteen workers etc. • Invite parents or grandparents to talk to the students about a particular skill, how and when they learnt it, and how useful it is; e.g. knitting, making bread, kite flying.

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• Read well-known stories such as The three billy goats gruff to the students and have them suggest alternative endings. The original and alternative endings could be role-played. • After listening to a traditional fairy tale, ask the students to think of two bad and two good things about specific ‘bad’ characters.

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RECOGNISE THE VALUE OF KNOWLEDGE

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HAVE AN ENQUIRING MIND - BE CURIOUS

• Students answer ‘What am I?’ questions and formulate some of their own for an adult to scribe. • Students choose classroom items or appliances or supply common household ones. They attempt to explain its use and how it works to the class or small group.

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Be the learning kind – overview • Share examples of times you have made mistakes, how you learnt from it and tried not to let it happen again. It could be as simple as colouring outside the border of a picture or misspelling one of the student’s names. • After listening to a story, discuss the mistake(s) made by different characters, what happened as a result of that mistake, what the characters might do next time and if they think they learnt anything from their mistake(s).

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BE A CRITICAL THINKER

• Students display completed art or craft work and say what they like or dislike about it, and the ways it could be improved. • View and/or discuss cartoons, children’s shows such as ‘Sesame Street’ and popular children’s movies to identify what elements are real or based on real life and what are make believe. • Discuss favourite television advertisements; why they like them, what the people who made them want you to buy or do, if their product really is the best and if everything they tell you is true.

• Invite a parent or grandparent into the classroom to share skills and talents with the students. Examples may include hobbies, musical abilities, computer skills etc. • Create large blank footprint outlines for students to draw or write about something they learnt each day or week at school or home. • Ask students to ‘interview’ an adult to find out one interesting thing that person learnt to do after he or she left school (and their age at that time). Compile a list and determine the oldest learner and vote for the most interesting thing learnt.

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KEEP LEARNING

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• Read stories about children in another country. Sample food and listen to music from the country. • Cut out pictures in magazines of scenes of people wearing their traditional clothing and landscapes from other countries. Create a mural to compare and contrast with their own environment. Discuss similarities and differences and what the weather might be like in each country.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Ar GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE •HAVE f o r e vi ew pur posesonl y•

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SEEK LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES EVERYWHERE

• Take the students for a nature walk in the school grounds. Talk about and discuss interesting things discovered, particularly if given by the students themselves. • Match labels of the places and people students learn things from; e.g. classroom teacher, swimming teacher, library, parent, grandparent, television. • Talk about libraries; what they are, why we have them and what is kept in them. LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES • Students say what he/she likes or dislikes about a piece of their own work and discuss how to make it better next time.

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Be the learning kind – Teachers notes Learning enables us to grow as individuals. Learning new things keeps our mind active and makes us more interesting human beings. It is important that children understand the benefits of learning and realise that knowledge gives us more choices and opportunities in our lives. Children and adults should continue to be curious and seek learning opportunities everywhere. As teachers, we can help children to recognise mistakes as important lessons rather than failures. We can provide learning opportunities in a range of intelligences to enable children to discover the types of learners they are, and we can work towards installing a lifelong love of learning in all our students.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Page 72 – Be a critical thinker

Worksheet information

• Enlarge the worksheet to A3 size. Students colour the picture on the cover, then draw a picture (or write words or have an adult scribe words for them) for six different things that they like learning about. Students colour the picture on the final page. The book is then cut out and folded with adult assistance.

Page 67 – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you • Students complete the worksheet by drawing pictures, writing or copying words and circling the correct picture (Question 3). Students may need to interview their friend to complete Question 5.

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Page 66 – Be positive about learning

• Instruct and assist students where necessary to make the paper plate teddy bear shown on page 72. The aim is to encourage them to do as much as possible independently, then to be critical of their own work and see how they could improve their teddy if they made it again.

Page 73 – Have a global perspective

• Colour, cut and construct the finger puppets. A suggested name and the country each comes from is given. Some are dressed in traditional costumes worn on special occasions and others are dressed in clothes worn every day. Use the finger puppets to tell the students about each country. When they are familiar with each, students can make up their own conversations in pairs, using the puppets.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 74 – Seek learning opportunities everywhere • f o r r e v i e w p os stoo nl ythey• •u User thep illustration ase a basis talk about what can find Page 68 – Recognise the value of knowledge

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Page 69 – Have an enquiring mind • Read the ‘What am I?’ questions for students to answer. Students may like to make up some of their own for others to answer.

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and learn about in the library. Encourage students to share their experiences of visits to the local and school libraries.

Page 75 – Learn from your mistakes

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• Read the rhyme to the students. Students may point to the words as the rhyme is said. Discuss the jobs of the people in the picture and what they do and how a person can become a dentist, doctor or teacher. Students colour the pictures.

• Read the story of Jane’s bad day to the students, who can mime or role-play each event. Discuss the things Jane did wrong and what she could do to prevent the same mistake from happening again.

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Page 70 – Determine how you learn best

• Teachers complete the sheet with the students. Students count which box or boxes have the most ticks to see how they learn best. As this is a simplified version, a learning style may not be obvious.

Page 76 – Keep learning

• Students draw/write/have scribed in the leaf template something they have learnt at school, home, out of school activity etc. The leaves can then be displayed around a tree trunk outline so other students can learn new things by viewing what others have done.

Page 71 – Have an open mind • Three alternative endings for popular nursery rhymes have been given to read to students, or for the students to read. They can use an ‘open mind’ to suggest alternative endings for the given nursery rhymes or other nursery rhymes or fairytales they know.

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Be the learning kind – Teachers notes Graphic organiser example Concept charts Know

Wonder

Learned

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Something to think about: I am sad to report that today the writer of the Hokey Pokey died. His funeral was very sad. The saddest part was putting him in his casket. They put his left arm in, they put his right arm in, and well, you know the rest …

Know–Wonder–Learned chart Event

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Be the learning kind – Be positive about learning

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Learning is fun.

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I love learning

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Be the learning kind – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you.

My friend Complete the worksheet.

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1. This is my friend.

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Be the learning kind – Recognise the value of knowledge

Clever people

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Colour the picture and read the rhyme.

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o c . cThree e men at the tap her r o t s sthink r pe Who do youu they are? Clap! Clap! and snap!

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Be the learning kind – Have an enquiring mind

What am I? I have four legs.

I have no legs.

I have two legs.

I have two ears.

I have scales.

I have two ears and eyes.

I have fur. I bark. What am I?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S I like water.

I have skin.

I have no lungs to breathe with.

I cry.

What am I?

What am I?

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Answer: a baby

Answer: a fish

Answer: a dog

I have six legs.

I have fangs.

I have feathers.

I have three body parts.

I live in a web.

I have a sharp beak.

I live in a colony.

I eat other insects.

I sleep during the day.

I am very strong.

What am I?

What am I?

What am I? Answer: an owl

Answer: a spider

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I have wings.

I have eight legs.

Answer: an ant

In have a roof. IC have. sixP legs. © R . I . u b l i c a t i o s I have windows. I have wings. I have doors. doors. I have I have windows. •f orr evi e wstripes. pur posesI have on l y• I have a roof.

I buzz.

I have walls.

What am I?

What am I?

What am I?

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I can be any colour. I am hard.

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I make dust in a classroom. I can be rubbed off. What am I?

Answer: a bee

Answer: a car

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I have four wheels.

Answer: a room or a house

I am soft.

I have many pieces.

I can be any colour.

I can be fitted together.

o c . che e r o t r s super I can be shaped by hand.

I make a picture or shape.

I need to be kept in a container.

What am I?

What am I?

Answer: playdough

Answer: chalk

Answer: a jigsaw puzzle

I hang down.

I can be high.

I am small.

I have a seat.

I am hard.

I can be dangerous.

Children sit on me.

I am slippery.

I am up high.

I go backwards and forwards.

Children play on me.

I give light.

What am I?

What am I?

What am I?

Answer: a swing

R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

Answer: a slide/slippery dip

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Answer: a light globe

Values education toolkit


Be the learning kind – Determine how you learn best

How do you learn best? Tick the boxes to find out how you learn best. Am I body-wise?

Am I word-wise?

I like playing sport. ❏ I like making things with my hands. ❏

r o e t s Bo r e p o u k I am good at spelling. ❏ I don’t like to sit at my desk. ❏ S I love to read books. ❏

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I like writing stories and poems. ❏

Am I logic-wise?

Am I picture-wise?

I like solving puzzles. ❏

I am good at drawing. ❏

I like to know how things work. ❏

I like to do jigsaw puzzles. ❏

© R. I . C.Publ ca t i o ns Ii can read maps easily. ❏ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

I like number games. ❏

Am I music-wise? Am I nature-wise?

I enjoy team sports. ❏

I work best on my own. ❏

I like working in groups. ❏

I have one or two close friends. ❏

I like to meet new people. ❏

I write in a diary in my free time. ❏

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I like to sing. ❏ I enjoy listening to rhymes/raps or music. ❏ I play (or would like to play) a musical instrument. ❏

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I like to collect natural objects. ❏ I prefer being outside to inside. ❏

o c . che e r o t r s s r u e p Am I people-wise? Am I self-wise?

I like to care for animals. ❏

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Be the learning kind – Have an open mind

Different endings Humpty Dumpty

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Jack and Jill

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Humpty Dumpty Sat on a wall Humpty Dumpty Had a great fall All the king’s horses And all the king’s men Glued Humpty back together again!

Jack and Jill © R. I . C.P ubl i cat i ons Went up the •f orr evi ew p ur p os eshill onl y•

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To fetch a pail of water Jack fell down And sat on the ground And Jill roared with laughter!

. te o Little Miss Muffet c . che e r o Little Miss Muffet r t s super Sat on a bucket Eating her tuna mornay Along came a spider And sat down beside her And Miss Muffet said ‘Good day!’ R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Values education toolkit


Be the learning kind – Be a critical thinker

Paper plate teddy bear Instructions: Students will need a paper plate, white or coloured cotton wool balls and glue. Some students will need assistance with cutting and gluing.

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1. Students colour and cut out each part of the teddy bear below.

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2. They glue cotton wool balls over the back of the paper plate and on each ‘ear’ of the teddy bear.

3. Cotton wool balls can be painted to match the rest of the teddy bear if desired. 4. Glue (or staple) the paws and head to the paper plate.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Be the learning kind – Have a global perspective

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S glue

glue

Children around the world

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons GRANI • f orr evi ew pur posesoKANORO nl y• glue

glue

TAMARINE, from Thailand

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INDIRA, from India

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, from Kenya

o c . che e r o t r s super glue

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glue

, from Greenland

glue

MAZAT, from Mexico

glue

NETTY, from Norway

TARKAN, from Turkey R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

Jeshi, from Japan

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Values education toolkit


Be the learning kind – Seek learning opportunities everywhere

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Learn in the library

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Be the learning kind – Learn from your mistakes

Jane’s bad day

J

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ane was having a very bad day. When she woke up she felt cold, as her doona wasn’t tucked in properly and had fallen off during the night.

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When she was having breakfast, she poured orange juice on her cereal instead of milk. When she was getting dressed, she couldn’t find her shoes. She found them under the couch in the family room.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons When she cleaned herv teeth, shep •f orr e i ew ur posesonl y•

When she was painting, she used green paint to colour the sun instead of yellow.

When she got home, she called her mum her teacher’s name instead of ‘Mum’.

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spat out some toothpaste on her dress.

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When she got in the car to go to (kindy/prep/preschool/school), she bumped her head getting in.

When she was playing with her puppy, she tripped over on the grass as her shoelace was undone.

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o c . che e r o t r s super When it was playtime, she found When it was her turn for ‘Show and tell’, she had forgotten to put the toy in her bag that she wanted to show.

When it was time for bed, she couldn’t find her teddy bear. She found him already tucked up in bed under the doona. Jane kissed her mum and dad goodnight and cuddled her teddy.

she had put her older brother’s play lunch in her bag instead of hers. She had also forgotten her hat, so she had to sit in the shade and not go out to play.

R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

‘I think tomorrow will be a good day’, she whispered to him.

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Be the learning kind – Keep learning

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The learning tree

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5.erBe the or e st Bo p ok u S achieving kind

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achieving kind

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the stars.

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Values education toolkit


Be the achieving kind – overview HAVE A GO! • Set up a roster of physical activities to complete in the playground. Rotate on a regular basis. Reward those who try hard to have a go at anything unfamiliar. • Award merit certificates or merit badges or distribute stickers to those students who ‘Have a go’ and don’t fear failure. • Encourage students to have a go at telling a joke to the class. Some students may need to practise telling it to a friend or a smaller group first. Reward students with a ‘I had a go at telling a joke’ certificate.

• Students decorate large personal paper folders to store work done to the best of their ability. Things that can not be filed, such as completing a jigsaw or cleaning up the games corner, could have a drawing or sentence written about it and be signed by the teacher. • Discuss how the hare and the tortoise felt after the race and contrast this with how each would have felt if the hare had won. Use this to make the point that even if the tortoise had lost the race he would have felt better because he would have known that he did his best and that can be a good feeling.

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PURSUE QUALITY AND PERSONAL EXCELLENCE

TRY LOTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS

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DISCOVER WHAT YOU’RE GOOD AT AND ENJOY DOING

• Students complete work after being told ‘ This piece of work is to be your best work because … ’ to encourage students to complete good quality work. Motivate other students by stating how well a particular student has completed something. • Keep work samples from the beginning of the year and show students in Term Two or Three. Repeat the activity encouraging them to complete it as well as, or better than, before. • Encourage self evaluation by asking the students to say, ‘I think my work is …, but I think it will be even better next time if I … ’.

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• During ‘activity’ or ‘freeplay’ time, set out and constantly change activities on a regular basis so that at least one activity is completely new and uses different skills or processes. • Students take turns at news telling sessions to explain or show others favourite activities they like to do. • Show and discuss different foods in a particular category; e.g. fruit—encouraging students to try one they haven’t tasted before.

© R. I . C.Publ i ca t i ons USE YOUR TALENTS • Complete a mural or collage for display or presentation •f orr evi ew p u r posesonl y• utilising the talents of appropriate students.

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DO THINGS TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY

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• Place gold stars or stickers upon all work that is completed well. Students may give suggestions for any ways to improve their own work.

Values education toolkit

• Hold a special afternoon where students are able to show something they are good at to others. This may include sporting activities, singing, musical talents etc. • Create a class picture book showing students participating in activities they are best at. • Use a digital camera to photograph each student doing something they are good at or the end product of something they’ve made. These can be displayed inside a large star shape with the caption, ‘We shine’.

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• Students sit in a circle and take turns at mentioning one thing that they think they are good at. The other students raise their hand if they agree. Those with hands down may be called upon to state something else they think the chosen student is good at. • Draw or paint a picture to display something students have discovered they are good at and enjoy doing. • Complete a ‘two stars and a wish page’ telling two things you do well (stars) and one thing you would like to do better (wish).

DEVELOP A SENSE OF PURPOSE

• Students draw or paint pictures of things that are important to them. • Wear a blindfold and try to guess an object by touch, with the only clues allowed explaining the purpose or use of the object. • Discuss occupations and ask students to select one they would like to do. Identify the nature of the occupation and what skills, talents and training they would need. Students draw a picture of themselves in the future doing this job.

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Be the achieving kind – overview MANAGE YOUR TIME EFFECTIVELY • Students complete a given number of activities over a certain number of days and record their completed activities on a card kept by the teacher or adult helper. • Using finger or hand puppets, tell the story of one puppet that was late for school due to wasting his/her time and how the other puppet was early and had time to play with friends before school began. • Play ‘Beat the clock’. Record how long daily tasks—packing away equipment or lining up—take. Try to improve on the previous time taken, so that you ‘don’t waste time’.

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• Organise a class ‘shop’ with play money for students to buy goods. • Find ways through a maze to match the pictures on different coins to the value shown on the coins. • Discuss saving money to buy a special item. Students then make a paper mache money box in an animal shape. SET WORTHWHILE GOALS AND MAKE PLANS TO ACHIEVE THEM

• Give groups of students the same squiggle picture to add to and turn into an artwork. Compare the individual students’ completed pictures. • Students use a variety of craft materials to create an imaginary creature that can fly. Emphasise that they should try to make their creatures different from everyone else’s.

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MANAGE YOUR MONEY WISELY

DEVELOP GOOD COMMUNICATION SKILLS

• Learn new words to use instead of ‘said’, such as ‘yelled’ or ‘shouted’ as related in a story. • Two students sit with their backs to you with a barrier or space between them. You give them clear instructions for drawing a diagram or picture. Compare completed pictures. • Brainstorm to make explicit; ‘what good listeners do’ and ‘what good speakers do’. These items can then be used for class and individual goals. • Play ‘Chinese whispers’ to demonstrate the importance of speaking clearly and listening to and remembering what is said.

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SHOW PERSISTENCE AND SELF-DISCIPLINE TO ACHIEVE GOALS

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Students relate details about something they wish to build, such as a castle or city, and how they will go about constructing it. • Plan, then role-play and explain the steps involved in making their bed, making cereal for breakfast etc. Other students can identify if an important step has been missed out. • Set a daily class goal and discuss what students need to do to achieve this goal. Progress should be displayed and success evaluated at the end of the day.

SEEK GOOD ROLE MODELS

• Students complete a set physical activity such as throwing beanbags into a hoop and try to better their score each time. • Read the story of The hare and the tortoise, discussing how the tortoise won the race by slowly and steadily sticking to his goal and why the hare lost. • Tell the old story about Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, who was inspired to lead his men back into battle and success instead of giving up. He was hiding in a cave after a terrible defeat and decided to try again after watching a spider’s persistent battle to climb back up to the web it was making.

• Students state their favourite person (sporting hero, television character etc.) and why. • On a long, thin strip of paper, students draw or list five people they learn different things from and draw or write something they have learnt from them after their names. Students can hang or display the lists in their bedroom. • Discuss the type of person the students admire and would wish to be like. Talk about the reasons why these people are admired; e.g. their appearance, achievements, success, kindness, personality. Create a collage of pictures of students’ selected role models.

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LOOK AT DIFFERENT WAYS OF DOING THINGS – CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION • Students listen to fables and give suggestions for different ways the animals may solve the problems.

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Values education toolkit


Be the achieving kind – Teachers notes To discover what it is we are good at and enjoy doing, it is necessary to try out a range of different experiences and activities —especially when we are children. Students need to understand that they will have to take risks and overcome feelings such as fear to achieve something worthwhile in life. Other qualities or skills, such as persistence and time management, are also important, and are worth exploring and learning about.

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Worksheet information

Page 82 – Have a go!

• Use the ‘matching coin to price activity’ to stimulate discussion about saving and looking after money wisely.

• Students may colour and cut out the merit badges after having been given one for ‘having a go!’

Page 83 – Try lots of different things

Page 91 – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them

Page 92 – Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals

• Discuss the pictures of children doing different activities. Students complete the activities on the worksheet as directed.

• Discuss how hard it is sometimes to keep trying when you can’t do something you really want to do. Invite the students to tell about occasions when they persisted and achieved some success. • Explain that they will need to keep trying different paths before they work out how the mouse can reach the cheese and the car can find its way to the petrol. Once they have worked out the correct path, they can draw it using a coloured pencil.

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Page 84 – Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing

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• Discuss what the children in the pictures are doing and whether the students have tried the activity themselves or not! Complete the worksheet and discuss why students chose those particular ones.

• Explain to the students that the pictures show a plan about getting ready for kindy/prep/preschool/school. Their goal is to colour, cut and sort them into a sensible order; e.g. they might get dressed before eating their breakfast, but they would clean their teeth after eating.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Read the poem to the students, then repeat it asking them to pick out the rhyming words. Discuss why it is important to always try to do your best work.

Page 86 – Pursue quality and personal excellence

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• Give the students the first picture to colour in unaided on one day. On a different day discuss the animals and their colours. Students colour each animal carefully after it is discussed— one at a time—ensuring that they colour between the lines. Compare the pictures.

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Page 87 – Use your talents

• Read the fable and discuss how foolish the donkey was to just follow what the dog did, instead of trying to think of his own ideas. • Encourage students to think of other ways for the donkey to get more attention from the farmer and to make himself more popular. • Photocopy and enlarge the illustrations for students to colour in.

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• Students or teacher colour and cut out pictures. Students sort pictures into things they are good at (talented at) and not so good at.

Page 88 – Develop a sense of purpose

• Discuss some of the occupations their parents’ have and the purpose of each job. Read out the ‘What am I?’ clues to the students, who must try to guess the name of each job.

Page 89 – Manage your time effectively • Use the merit certificates to reward students for being on time to line up after playtimes, clean up puzzles, not wasting time etc. Write the recipient’s name in the rectangular space.

Values education toolkit

Page 93 – Look at different ways of doing things— creativity and innovation

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Page 85 – Do things to the best of your ability

Page 94 – Develop good communication skills • Explain that speaking, listening, writing and reading are all ways of giving and getting messages. • The development of good listening skills is an essential part of effective communication. Explain to the students that they will need to listen very carefully and follow each instruction. Ensure that the students have a copy of the worksheet ( it may be enlarged to A3) and appropriate coloured pencils.

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Be the achieving kind – Teachers notes • Read each instruction twice, allowing sufficient time for the students to comprehend and complete the task. The instructions have been included on the worksheet for those students who can read and to demonstrate a different means of communication.

Graphic organiser example Venn diagrams

Page 95 – Seek good role models

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S A

AB

B

Not A or B

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Teac he r

• Explain that there are special people we admire and would want to be like. Discuss some of the qualities we value and explain that we are all individual and may choose very different types of role models but that they should be really good people. • Encourage the students to talk about their heroes and to explain why they want to be like them. • Students may draw or glue a picture of their heroes on the worksheet and write, or have an adult scribe, information about the person they chose. Create an ‘Our heroes ‘ display.

Cartoon and picture strips

Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3 Picture 4 Picture 5

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Something to think about: The kindergarten teacher was standing outside her room as the children entered one morning. When David came past, he winked his left eye. ‘Why, David’, said the teacher, ‘a re you winking at me?’ ‘No! I’ve just got my turn signal on’. replied David, making a carefully executed left turn into the classroom.

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Values education toolkit


Be the achieving kind – Have a go!

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Teac he r

Merit badges

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Be the achieving kind – Try lots of different things

A maze of many things

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Teac he r

Draw a line to connect all the pictures of activities you would like to try.

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Be the achieving kind – Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing

I enjoy …

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Teac he r

1. Put a cross on the pictures which show things that you are good at or enjoy doing.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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2. Draw a picture of something that you would like to try.

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Be the achieving kind – Do things to the best of your ability

Do your best!

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I do my best On every test. I do not rest. This is no jest!

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My work is good. Just as it should. I knew I could Just as you would!

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I do not wait. I won’t be late! © R. I . C .P bl i cat i ons This isu my fate! •f orr evi ewwork pur osesonl y• My isp great!

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Be the achieving kind – Pursue quality and personal excellence

The zoo

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Teac he r

1. Colour the picture.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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2. Colour the picture.

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Be the achieving kind – Use your talents

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Teac he r

What are you good at?

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Values education toolkit


Be the achieving kind – Develop a sense of purpose

What am 1? I help to keep people safe. I help to look after people’s property. I stop people who are driving too fast and give them a fine. Who am I?

I look after animals who are sick or have been hurt.

We look after the people who are hurt and take them to hospital.

I look after cats, dogs, pet rabbits, guinea pigs, pet birds and sometimes even horses.

Who am I?

Who am I?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Answer: a police officer

Answer: an ambulance officer

Answer: a veterinary

I look after people in hospital.

I drive a special truck that has hoses to put out fires.

I cut, colour and blow dry people’s hair.

I change their bandages if they have a wound.

Who am I?

I make them look nice.

I give them medicine to make them feel better.

Who am I?

Who am I? Answer: a hairdresser

Answer: a firefighter

I work outdoors.

I drive a tractor.

I fix people’s cars if they are not working properly.

Who am I?

Answer: a plumber

Answer: a farmer

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I ride on a motor bike.

People come to see me if they are not feeling well.

I deliver mail to people’s houses.

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I work out what is wrong with them and how to make them better.

Answer: a mechanic

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Who am I?

Who am I?

Answer: a nurse

©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons I use special tools like a wrench. I fix leaky taps. Who amo I? n Iv fix people’s •f orr e i ewtoilets.pur pose s l y• I lay pipes that carry water to people’s houses.

I look after cows and sheep. I plant crops.

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I work in a salon.

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I wear a special uniform.

My partner and I drive in a special van to where there has been a car accident.

I work underground.

I wear a helmet with a torch on the top.

o c . che e r o t r s super Who am I?

I dig for precious metals such as gold. Who am I?

Answer: a postal deliverer

Answer: a doctor

Answer: a miner

I fly people from place to place in a plane.

I find out what is happening in the world.

I have a special chair for people to sit in.

I sit in the cockpit.

I write about it.

Who am I?

Then I read it at news time on the television.

I look in their mouth and check their teeth.

Who am I? Answer: a pilot

Values education toolkit

I clean and fix their teeth. Who am I?

Answer: a reporter

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Answer: a dentist

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your time effectively

‘Clock’ awards To

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© R. I . C .P ub l i cat i otime! ns Thank you for being on •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your money wisely

Fruit and coin match Cut out the coins below. Glue them next to the fruit that matches that price.

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ok

5c

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or eBo 10e cr st

50 c

$1

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$2

20 c

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Be the achieving kind – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them

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Teac he r

Getting ready

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Be the achieving kind – Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals

Which way?

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1. How can the mouse get the cheese?

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. How can the car get some petrol?

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Be the achieving kind – Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation

he farmer and his wife lived in the country in a beautiful old farm house. There were many animals on the farm with them. The chickens and ducks lived in their yard close to the house and there were lots of cows and sheep living out in paddocks some distance from the house.

of special little treats. There wasn’t any work that he had to do and so he played and had a great time.

© R. I . C.Pub l i cat i ons ‘It’s just not fair’, the donkey thought. ‘Why should I work when that dog• plays all day? I •f orr evi ew pur pos es on l y

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The farmer looked after all of his animals very well. They had plenty of food to eat and water to drink. They were all feeling happy and content with their lives, except for one animal, the donkey. There wasn’t much hard work for him to do and he had a warm comfortable stable beside the house with a pleasant yard and a lovely shady tree to stand under when it was warm. There was much to be happy about, but the donkey was feeling very miserable.

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wish I could do something to make the farmer like me as much as his dog.’

So one night as the farmer and his wife sat down to tea, the donkey ran into the house and jumped up onto the farmer’s knee, just as he’d see the dog do.

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The donkey and the dog

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But of course the donkey was much too big! He knocked over the kitchen table and all the dishes and cups and saucers fell with a crash onto the floor and broke.

foolish donkey and sent him to bed without Because his yard was so close to the house, any tea. The donkey wished that he had been he could see and hear all that happened inside clever enough to think of his own ideas. the house. He knew that the farmer’s dog, Rex, The moral is: Don’t try to be something you’re was allowed inside the house during the day not. and at night. Rex had a basket in front of the fireplace and the farmer often gave him lots R.I.C. Publications • www.ricgroup.com.au

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Be the achieving kind – Develop good communication skills

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Breakfast

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Instructions

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Draw a cross above the telephone. Draw a little bird outside the window. Colour the table blue. Colour the flowers pink. Draw a ribbon in the girl’s hair. Draw some food on the baby’s highchair tray.

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Be the achieving kind – Seek good role models

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My hero

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My hero is

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Chatterbox

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Use the chatterbox to reinforce concepts from this book.

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Instructions 1. Cut out the square. 2. Place the square with the written side down and fold as directed on page 62. 3. To use with a partner: • Ask your partner to select an affirmation and ‘open and close’ according to the number of words or syllables. • Ask your partner to select a number and ‘open and close’ the chatterbox the given number of times. • Ask your partner to choose a number and open to reveal a nice comment about the person! Values education toolkit

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r o e t 6. Be the s Bo r e p ok u S community kind

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Be the community kind – overview SHOW INTEGRITY – DEVELOP A SENSE OF WHAT’S MORALLY AND ETHICALLY RIGHT, AND ACT THAT WAY

BEHAVE RESPONSIBLY

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• Discuss wrong behaviour as it occurs in the playground or classroom. Talk about the results of some actions and consequences of wrong behaviour. • Make a list of things that annoy others. • After a discussion about looking after themselves and their belongings, students can draw a picture of themselves doing this at home. An individual caption could be added; e.g. ‘I look after my …’ • Role-play the correct and incorrect way to behave in a certain situation; e.g. leaving an apple core on the ground in the lunch area instead of putting it in the bin.

• Students makes good choices between two different ways to act in given situations. • Use a puppet and ask ‘What should you do when … ?’ questions; e.g. What should you do when you break a friend’s toy? • Read a scenario to the students about a child who found a wallet with money in it on the footpath. Give different endings—one where the child keeps the money and one where the child finds out who the owner is. Discuss.

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• Draw a school ‘tree’ which shows the principal at the top and other relevant staff members on the branches. Talk about what responsibilities each has at school. • Role-play taking a message to the principal showing respect; e.g. knocking on the door, appropriate greetings, saying please, thank you and excuse me. • Organise visits from people in occupations of authority such as the police or fire brigade, or excursions to their place of work. Plan questions to ask before the visit.

• Allocate helpers to give out supplies, empty containers, collect lunch orders etc. Rotate on a regular basis. • Discuss how you feel after you have done something really useful and helped someone. Make a list of useful things you can do at home and school and who you would help. • Identify people in the community who volunteer to help at their school; e.g. canteen or tuckshop workers, parent helpers in the classroom.

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RESPECT AUTHORITY

INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY © R. I . C.PubGET l i c at i o ns • Students form groups to clean up the playground in association with s a community • Look at pictures of road signsr or signs around the school • f o r e vi e wandp u r po esclean-up onday.l y• • Make gifts for elderly people living in a community care say what they mean. FOLLOW RULES

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STRIVE FOR JUSTICE AND A ‘FAIR GO’ FOR ALL

• Students take turns to talk about their homes, customs, family, traditions etc. (to develop awareness of valuing diversity.) • Invite someone who came to the local district as a migrant to talk about what happened to them when they arrived, what was difficult and what helped them to feel better. • Learn how to say hello in different languages. • Have parents assist students in preparing food from different countries to taste and compare.

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BE HONEST AND SEEK THE TRUTH

• Discuss specific scenarios such as not telling Mum or Dad the truth if you accidentally break a vase or window. Why do people lie? What are the consequences? • Discuss what being honest means and why we can’t trust dishonest people. • Read the story of Pinocchio, the boy whose nose grew longer every time he lied. Play ‘Pin the nose on Pinocchio’!

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facility, perhaps for Mother’s or Father’s Day. • Complete a four-page booklet about things they like to do in their community; e.g. play at the local park, go to the library.

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• Draw pictures to relate important classroom rules such as ‘Put you hand up to speak!’, ‘Wait for your turn!’ and ‘Be quiet and listen during news or “show and tell” sessions’ etc. • Students determine a set of appropriate rules for different class activities; e.g. playing in the home corner, using sports equipment. Consider safety and equity issues. • Participate in board games that have pictorial and written rules for home, school etc. Players move forward for landing on a rule being followed and backwards for landing on a rule not being followed.

SHARE WITH AND CARE FOR THOSE IN NEED • Read stories and view pictures about disabled students of the same age. Discuss. • Invite a parent to bring a baby into the class and discuss how dependent babies are and the kind of care they need. Encourage students to ask questions and to relate ways in which they could help a baby.

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Be the community kind – overview • Students participate in raising or donating funds for a nominated worthy cause they are able to relate to. • Visit a local nursing home and perform items for the patients to enjoy. SUPPORT RECONCILIATION

• Students take votes for specific activities to complete or the art or craftwork which they like the best, or give opinions for the stories which they like or dislike etc. • Learn about zoo animals and the cages they are kept in. Discuss why they are kept in cages, how ‘free’ some of them would feel and how appropriate their cages are. • Discuss the things children would not be able to do if they lived in a country at war.

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CONTRIBUTE TO RESEARCH

• Wear special clothing or colours and donate a coin to support a given fund-raising campaign for research. • Encourage students to donate a coin to make a money chain for medical research. • Learn how events such as Telethon and Appealathon raise money for medical research in children’s hospitals.

STRIVE FOR PEACE

• Students participate in a ‘quiet time’ after breaks, or listen to soothing music or a story before leaving school. • Discuss and generate a list of what students think of when they hear the word, ‘peace’.

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• Create a ‘Colourful world’ mural using pictures of children from all countries around the world, cut from magazines and glued onto coloured card. • Role-play saying something to new students to make them feel welcome. • Identify the features on the Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags.

SUPPORT FREEDOM

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Be the community kind – Teachers notes Introduction The community refers to any group of people, ranging from close family and friends in the local neighbourhood to the population of all countries around the world. By being community kind, we are playing our part to strive for a peaceful, harmonious life for all. This requires compromise and understanding from individuals and a willingness to follow order for the good of the community.

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used for a finger puppet activity on page 73, so students may be familiar with them. Students could use the finger puppet forms to say hello in different languages.

Worksheet information

Page 102 – Behave responsibly

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Page 103 – Respect authority • Make a list or draw pictures of adults who tell you what to do (authority figures). Read each sentence with the students then ask students to draw a line to the picture that goes with the sentence.

Page 104 – Follow rules

Page 110 – Share with and care for those in need • Enlarge the worksheet to A3 size, colour and cut out each picture. Use them to stimulate discussion about being aware that others have different needs from themselves and how they could care for them. Examples could include walking slowly and carefully around someone with a ‘zimmer’ frame, finding out why someone is upset or giving up their seat on a bus for a pregnant lady.

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• Enlarge the picture to A3 size. Discuss the children in the picture who are doing the right thing and those doing the wrong thing. What are the consequences of wrong actions? How do you feel when you do the right thing?

Page 111 – Support reconciliation

• Enlarge to A3 size and get the teacher or students to colour the poster and display to stimulate discussion about getting along with people of different nationalities etc. Students could sing the song, ‘It’s a small world after all’.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Page 112 – Contribute to research Page 105 – Be• honest andr seekr truth f o e v i e w p ur posesonl y• • Information on this page tells of several fundraising days • Read the scenarios to the students and discuss what should be for medical and health research. Teachers can explain the significance of any of these days to the students, so they understand why their families and school may be supporting the cause.

said.

Page 106 – Show integrity

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• Enlarge the worksheet to A3 size. Two or four players will need a counter each to play the game. Each player will need a different coloured marker. Players must throw a six to begin and move as directed on the game. The winner is the player who reaches ‘Finish’ first.

Page 113 – Support freedom

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• Sing the song with the students and show appropriate actions for each verse. Students may help to make other verses for the song.

• Use the classroom picture as a picture talk for students to identify how they could be useful in the classroom; e.g. put rubbish in the bin, clean blackboard/white board, tidy bags.

• Use the lions and the cage on page 113 to discuss the concept of freedom. Photocopy the outlines onto heavy card, colour, cut and attach a craft stick to the back of each figure. Hold the ‘sad’ Leo behind the cage and discuss why he has a sad face when he is behind the bars of the cage. Hold up the ‘happy’ Leo and describe the kind of area he might live in at a zoo that makes him still feel ‘free’.

Page 108 – Get involved in the community

Page 114 – Strive for peace

• Ask students to identify places in their local community, especially those that the students use. Identify the places on the worksheet in ‘Braden’s community’ and help Braden to find the path to each place, using a different coloured pencil.

• Students can make their own dove, or the teacher can make one, to use as a stimulus to talk about the importance of keeping the world a peaceful place and how the dove is a symbol of peace. The dove can be photocopied onto heavy card and cut out. White cotton wool balls can be glued over its body.

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Page 107 – Be useful

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Page 109 – Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all • Identify different nationalities in the classroom and find out if any student knows how to say ‘hello’ in another language. The children shown on the worksheet are the same as those

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Be the community kind – Teachers notes Graphic organiser example Evaluation charts

Something to think about: Plus

Teacher: Class, we will have only half a day of school this morning! Class: Hooray! Teacher: We will have the other half this afternoon!

Interesting

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Teacher: You aren’t paying attention to me! Are you having trouble hearing! Pupil: No, teacher, I’m having trouble listening!

PMI chart

Positive (+) Plus or Like or Agree

Negative (–)

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Minus

Negative or

Dislike or

Disagree

Plus/Minus T-chart

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Be the community kind – Behave responsibly

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Do the right thing!

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Be the community kind – Respect authority

People who tell us what to do Join the picture of the person to the sentence which tells how each helps people in the community.

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(a) Parents make rules to help children do the right thing at home and be safe.

(b) Police officers make rules to keep people safe on the roads, in their homes and ©work. R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons where they

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(c) Teachers make rules to be fair to everyone and to keep children safe.

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(d)

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Be the community kind – Follow rules

The ‘rules’ song This is the way we put up our hand, Put up our hand, put up our hand. This is the way we put up our hand When we follow the rules!

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Take our turn, take out turn. This is the way we take our turn When we follow the rules.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S This is the way we take our turn,

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons This is the way we listen to others, •f orr evi ew p ur p ses ontol y • Listen too others, listen others.

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This is the way we listen to others When we follow the rules. This is the way we share the toys, . t e the toys, share the toys. o Share c . cthe This is way we share the toys e h r e o t r s When we follow the rules. s up er

This is the way we pick up our mess, Pick up our mess, pick up our mess. This is the way we pick up our mess When we follow the rules. Values education toolkit

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Be the community kind – Be honest and seek truth

Telling lies Listen to the scenarios and decide what to do. (a) Todd and James are wrestling in the loungeroom when they accidentally knock over one of Mum’s vases and break it. Mum will be angry when she finds out what happened.

(c) Tom wants to be friends with Jack because he is a really good runner. He usually plays with Chris. One day Chris asks him to play a game with him while he is waiting for Jack to come outside. He has already promised Jack that they would play together.

What should she do? Should she lie to Ashleigh or Eliza?

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What should they tell her?

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(b) Georgia is going to Ashleigh’s birthday party. Eliza asks her to come to the movies with her on the same day.

What should he say?

(d) Samantha wore her new dress to school. She asks her friend David what he thinks of it. He does not like Samantha’s dress at all.

(e) Dylan, Jared and Stephen are playing cricket. Jared is batting when Dylan throws a ball which seems to hit the wicket. Jared is really disappointed to get out so soon. Dylan asks Jared if it hit the wicket or not as he couldn’t see clearly.

(f) The family is having dinner. Jessie, the dog, is underneath the table waiting for someone to give her a scrap of food. Joshua quietly gives her a scrap. Mum and Dad don’t like Jessie to be fed scraps from the table. ‘Are you feeding the dog?’ they ask.

What should Jared say?

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What should he say?

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(g) Silvia and Sarah were playing with their dolls in the hallway. Silvia got bored cleaning up and went to play with the computer. When Dad comes home he trips over the dolls left behind. ‘Who left this out?’ he yells. What should Silvia say?

(h) Tom sees Ben’s new lunchbox sitting on the seats after lunch. It has a great picture of a dinosaur on it. He picks it up to look at the picture because dinosaurs are his favourite thing. ‘Are you stealing my lunchbox?’ Ben calls when he sees him.

(i) Robert and Mark have jobs at home. Mark’s job is to bring in the rubbish bin. One day Mark forgets and Robert brings it in instead. Mum gives them pocket money for doing their jobs. What should Mark say?

What should he say?

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Be the community kind – Show integrity

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The ‘right and wrong’ game

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Be the community kind – Be useful

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The classroom

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Be the community kind – Get involved in the community

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Places in a community

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Be the community kind – Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all

namaste!

Hola!

I’m, Indira from India.

I’m, Mazat from Mexico.

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Saying ‘hello’

Jambo!

Sa-Wa dee

I’m, Kanoro from Kenya.

I’m, Tamarin from Thailand.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Hejsa!

Konnichiwa!

I’m, Grani from Greenland.

I’m, Jeshi from Japan.

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Hei!

I’m, Tarkan from Turkey.

I’m, Netty from Norway.

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Be the community kind – Share with and care for those in need

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Caring for others

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Be the community kind – Support reconciliation

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‘It’s a small world’ poster

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Be the community kind – Contribute to research

Medical research and health promotion days Daffodil Day

World Red Cross Day

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Daffodil Day is celebrated on the third Friday World Red Cross Day is celebrated on the in August each year. Throughout the month birthday of the founder of the Red Cross, Henri of August merchandise is available, with Dunant, on 8 May each year. This special proceeds going towards cancer research into day not only raises money to support the Red the causes and potential cures for this disease. Cross cause through door knock donations, The Cancer Council Australia, who organises but highlights awareness of the millions of the fundraiser, also promotes messages to help Red Cross workers and volunteers throughout change attitudes about cancer and to provide the world who provide services which help support for sufferers and their families. The protect the dignity of people in need. daffodil was chosen as the symbol of hope for all people who are touched by cancer, as Red Nose Day it blooms in spring, and represents new life, Red Nose Day is vitality and growth. celebrated on the last Friday in June each year. World Heart Day It is the major fundraiser World Heart Day is celebrated on the last for the SIDS (Sudden Infant Sunday in September each year. The World Death Syndrome) and Kids Heart Federation (WHF) and its members organisation. Proceeds go worldwide organise a variety of activities that towards research into the syndrome to attempt encourage people of all ages to be aware of to find out why infants die in their sleep. It also the risk factors for cardiovascular disease helps the parents of children who have died and stroke. A theme is chosen each year; e.g. from other causes such as accidents. ‘Red ‘How young is your heart?’ or ‘Healthy weight, noses’ are available for people to purchase for healthy shape’. Activities are generally free, themselves, their car or a building to ‘wear’. while others are suitable for fundraising; e.g. Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea ‘Jump rope for heart’. This event is run by Cancer Council Australia Jeans for Genes Day and is held on the last Thursday in May each Jeans for Genes Day is celebrated on the year. Business, school or private groups are first Friday in August each year. People are encouraged to host a morning tea where encouraged to wear jeans on that day for the participants give a donation for the privilege. price of a small donation. Proceeds are given Proceeds go towards cancer research, to places such as the Children’s Medical education programs and support services Research Institute to help fund research into for those with cancer and their families and carers. those suffering from genetic diseases.

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Be the community kind – Support freedom

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Leo, the lion

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Be the community kind – Strive for peace

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Dana, the peaceful dove

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Point to yourself and touch your chest

And I …

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And I love life

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life!

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Hands and arms outstretched above your head.

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Reference Books The Virtues Project (TM) educator’s guide Linda Kavelin Popov Sustainability Published by R.I.C. Publications (Page 41) The 7 habits of highly effective people by Stephen Covey

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Six thinking hats by Edward De Bono

Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner Taxonomy of educational objectives by Benjamin Bloom Revised Bloom’s taxonomy by Lorin Anderson

Multiple intelligences Ages 5–7 Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Class Ideas Magazine Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Lower primary themes Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Me Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Toys Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS Colours Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS

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The tipping point by Malcolm Gladwell

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Lifestyle choices Ages 6–8 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Let’s begin The family Ages 5–7 Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS

Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS

Published by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS

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www.charactercounts.org/ www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicsAlpha.aspx?p=237

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Websites

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www.kidshealth.com/kid/feeling/

(Note: Websites correct at time of publication.)

(Six kinds of best values education program http://www.sixkindsofbest.com)

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Values Education Toolkit: Ages 4-6  

The Values Education Toolkit, featuring the Six Kinds of Best concept, is a series of blackline masters expressly designed to assist the tea...