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Western Australia

Society and Environment – D Teachers Guide

R.I.C. Publications RIC-1131 5.2/637


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Foreword Society and Environment will help to increase the students’ knowledge and understanding about their local community and environment and provide them with opportunities to compare their situation to that of others. The seven workbooks in the series look mainly at Australia—its people, its heritage, its political and legal systems and its place in the world.

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Each workbook is accompanied by a comprehensive Teachers Guide designed to provide a structured resource for the teacher. The Teachers Guide provides teachers with clear guidelines as to the outcomes being covered, answers, assessment, discussion and background information to support the workbook where necessary. The information provided within this Teachers Guide will assist teachers in their planning, programming and assessment. Each topic provides teachers with a number of opportunities to focus on various aspects of literacy.

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The aim of the workbook is to assist students to better understand the community they live in and to make sound decisions about local, national and worldwide issues.

This program was devised to offer students and teachers alike the opportunity to develop a wide range of language, discussion and group-working skills that will complement all learning areas in the school curriculum.

Contents

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Outcomes and Indicators Society and Environment D .................... ii – v •f orr evi ewandp ur pand othese so nl y• vi Society Environment Teacher ......................................... Resources .......................................................................................... vii How to use Society and Environment ................................................ viii

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Society and Environment Workbook .................................................... ix Society and Environment Teachers Guide ............................................. x Assessment/Evaluation ....................................................................... xi

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Students with Special Needs ............................................................. xii Blank Map—The World .................................................................... xiii Blank Map—Australia....................................................................... xiv Blank Map—Western Australia ......................................................... xv Flags of Australia ..................................................................... xvi – xvii Blank Semantic Web ........................................................................ xvii Group Discussion Recording Sheet ................................................... xix Further Research Recording Sheet ..................................................... xx Beliefs ......................................................................................... 1 – 20 Working Together ...................................................................... 21 – 42 Australian Communities ............................................................ 43 – 64 National Parks ........................................................................... 65 – 82

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Outcomes and Indicators Society and Environment D Beliefs Our beliefs are formed as a result of a range of influences and experiences. These influences and experiences very between people and between cultures, creating diversity within Australian communities. This unit investigates the religious and other beliefs held by people and invites students to identify their own beliefs and recognise the grounds on which they have been formed.

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Workbook Teachers Guide Pages Pages

Famous People Christianity Islam Buddhism Aboriginal Beliefs, Customs and Traditions Different Faiths Beliefs Beliefs that Influence My Life

2–4 5–7 8–9 10 – 12 13 – 16 17 – 18 19 – 21 22 – 24

3–5 5–7 7–8 8 – 10 10 – 12 12 – 13 14 – 15 16 – 17

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Topic

Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Culture •f orr e vi ew puthat r p os es o nl yand• C3.1 Understands cultural groups have traditional non-traditional

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aspects. Understands that different groups in communities function to meet various needs. Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals.

Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

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Outcomes and Indicators Society and Environment D Working Together Communities are social groups whose members reside in a specific locality, share governments and have a cultural and historical heritage. Communities are cooperative and dynamic, developing and changing to meet the needs of their members, and are interdependent with other communities, particularly during times of need.

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Workbook Teachers Guide Pages Pages

Communities Edgewater Clarktown Clarktown Survey Clarktown Community Services Public Contributions Community Facilities Local Council – Roles and Responsibilities Helping Each Other Cooperative Community

26 – 27 28 – 30 31 – 33 34 – 35 36 – 38 39 – 40 41 – 42 43 – 44 45 – 47 48 – 50

23 –24 24 – 25 26 – 27 27 – 28 28 – 30 30 – 31 32 – 33 33 – 34 35 – 37 37 – 38

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Topic

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Resources R3.3 that individuals and groups value different forms of work. •f orr evi ew Understands pur p osesonl y•

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Outcomes and Indicators Society and Environment D Australian Communities Australian communities are coloured with broad-ranging historical and cultural roots. These aspects of communities are explored through the services they provide, the charity organisations they embrace and the significant events and celebrations they hold. Communities worldwide are made unique through these aspects and provide a comparison with the way we choose to live our lives in Australia.

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Workbook Teachers Guide Pages Pages

Different Communities in Australia Community Involvement Buildings in Your Community Charity Organisations Local Community Celebrations Community Celebrations in Other Countries Significant Events in Australia Interview with an Older Community Member Life in an Overseas Community

52 – 53 54 – 55 56 – 57 58 – 61 62 – 63 64 – 65 66 – 68 69 – 71 72 – 74

46 – 47 47 – 48 49 – 50 50 – 52 52 – 53 54 – 55 56 – 57 58 – 59 59 – 61

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Topic

©R . I . CSpace .Publ i cat i ons Place and PS3.3 Understands that people have different views about which places •f orr evi ew r p sesonl y• need p to beu cared for.o

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Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. Understands that different groups in communities function to met various needs. Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals.

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C3.3

Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

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Outcomes and Indicators Society and Environment D National Parks Approximately 3 200 Australian National Parks have been created to conserve culturally or scientifically significant locations in their natural state. Their preservation and management is the responsibility of governments, community groups and the individuals who use them. Workbook Teachers Guide Pages Pages

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S National Parks Parks National Parks in Your State Forest Management Kakadu Park Study Rules Who’s Responsible?

76 – 77 78 – 80 81 – 84 85 – 86 87 – 91 92 – 95 96 – 98 99 – 100

67 – 68 68 – 69 70 – 71 72 – 73 73 – 75 76 – 77 77 – 78 79

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Topic

Place and Space PS3.1 Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. PS3.2 Understands that the use people make of different places is affected by natural and built features.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur p opeople sehave so nl y• PS3.3 Understands that different views about which places need to be cared for.

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Resources R3.1 Understands that people have to make choices in their use of limited resources. Natural and Social Systems NSS3.1 Understands that elements of natural systems link to form cycles of which people are a part.

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Society and Environment and the Teacher

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The learning area of Society and Environment encourages students to develop an understanding of how groups and individuals live together and interact with their environment. Through this learning area, students understand and develop a respect for cultural heritage, social justice, democratic processes and the sustainability of their environment.

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The main goal of Society and Environment is to take students on a journey to various parts of Australia, its history, and other parts of the world—and then bring them back to their own community within Western Australia to compare and evaluate life within it. Regardless of where students live within Australia, they will all benefit from, and see relevance to themselves in, the activities within the Student Workbook. Students are constantly being asked to think about Australian and world issues in relation to their own community in order to develop their own reasoned views.

The Society and Environment workbooks encourage the students to: • study the interaction between people and their environment • make sense of these interactions and develop values aimed at improving these relationships for the future • study local, regional, national and global issues and develop an understanding of their importance • develop and extend their knowledge of those issues which are relevant to themselves • make judgments on moral and ethical issues using their understanding of democratic processes, social justice and the sustainability of their environment • use various strategies to make sense of the way the world is changing • make reasoned and informed decisions as active citizens in their community • manage their own actions based on the skills and understandings attained in this learning area Success in teaching Society and Environment depends on using a varied approach. Students may work independently, in small groups or as a whole class, depending on the situation or task involved. Flexibility is the key to encouraging students to find the mode of working which best suits them.

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Discussion is used on a regular basis throughout the program to encourage critical thinking and to provide students with the opportunity to share, listen and evaluate their own thinking and that of others. The teacher’s role in the discussion situations is that of facilitator; it is important that students are allowed the opportunity to share their own views and ideas without being judged. Questioning should be used to encourage students to search for alternatives before making a final decision in relation to a topic or situation. Grouping students helps them to get to know one another and develops an understanding of the importance of being able to work cooperatively with others to achieve a common goal. Shy students are more likely to express themselves in small groups, where they may be intimidated by a whole-class situation. Groups should be changed regularly, rather than having them set for each Society and Environment lesson.

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Teachers Notes


Resources Providing teachers with a comprehensive guide to each unit, including: •Unit focus •Unit topics •Outcomes and indicators •Focus for each topic •Keywords for each topic •Resources required for each topic •Background information for each topic •Introductory discussion for each topic •Suggested activity outlines •Clear and concise answers •Additional activities for each topic •Further topics for discussion and debate

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The Teachers Guide

The Student Workbook

Providing students and teachers with: •a range of activities catering for different learning styles and teaching methodologies •sample studies •opportunities to relate activities to local environments and communities •a mix of contemporary and traditional content •a comprehensive range of topic areas •opportunities to develop a wide range of skills

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Additional Resources

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Any successful Society and Environment program draws on a range of resources to provide variety and the opportunity to use and develop skills in a wide range of areas. It is recommended that students use various sources to support their work within the Society and Environment workbook. Some of these additional resources include: •a world globe •a world map •a large map of Australia •the Internet—this resource is extremely fluid and sites were active at the time of publication. Specific sites were generally not included in the workbooks because of this limitation. Recommended sites listed within the Teachers Guide have been organised into those suitable for teachers and those suitable for students, according to the level of language used within the site and its presentation. •the school and local libraries •each other, parents, grandparents •organisations which specialise in the area being studied •local and State newspapers and magazines •video documentaries where appropriate

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•people from the local community Teachers Notes

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How to Use Society and Environment 1. Select the unit you wish to teach. Each workbook contains four units—one for each term of the school year. They can be taught from the first unit in sequential order to the last unit, or you can move throughout the book in an order that suits what is happening in your classroom/community/local environment. 2. Read the complete unit. It is important to read the entire unit before dealing with it in class to avoid any surprises and to ensure you have an understanding of where the unit is heading. This allows you to be prepared with resources, to organise any incursions or excursions which may support the unit, and to ensure a collection of adequate resources is gathered within the classroom to enhance learning in that area. Each unit is broken into discrete topics. These topics may run over one or more lessons, depending on your students, the topic or the amount of work that needs to be covered. It is left to the teacher’s discretion to ensure adequate coverage of the topic is attained.

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3. Develop a plan.

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4. Encourage discussion.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Develop an interest in •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• further research.

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6. Provide opportunities for students to share their knowledge.

The information provided within each workbook has been thoroughly researched. Certain topics lend themselves to further research, as the topic is so large that not all information could possibly be included in a workbook for students. Students should be encouraged to research topics of personal interest. Developing skills in this area encourages independent learning which is critical in any student’s education journey.

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Each topic within Society and Environment relies on class or group discussion. This is a key feature for developing oral skills. Students are given the opportunity to clarify their thinking, express their views, listen to others and discuss or debate the topic or issue at hand. This technique is instrumental in students developing maturity and a level of understanding that will prepare them for the real world.

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Students are often a rich source of knowledge in our multicultural society. Students are able to source information from relatives and friends and provide a valuable resource for others in their class. Students who have taken the time to further research topics of personal interest should also be encouraged to share their knowledge. This shows students you value their independent learning and gives meaning to their additional study.

7. Use your community. The community has a great deal of resources to offer the primary Society and Environment learning area—after all, that is what it is all about. Inviting community members and organisations into your classroom to impart knowledge to students adds an extra dimension to their learning, making it ‘real’ and—most importantly— giving you a break from having to ‘know everything’.

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Teachers Notes


Society and Environment Workbook The Unit Topic begins with a unit title. This can be used to lead the students into the introductory discussion found in the Teachers Guide. The Lesson Focus and Keywords provide students with a basic overview of what they will be learning about in this topic and give them the opportunity to find the meaning of any difficult words before they begin. Text, tables and artwork provide students with a concise source of information related to the topic. Students may need to read through the information provided several times to ensure they have a clear understanding of what they are reading and to assimilate the information before tackling the supporting activities.

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Teachers may also use the strategy of searching for keywords and phrases to further encourage students to read the text over again. These keywords and phrases help to clarify the information for the students and make the task of completing the activities easier.

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Assisting weaker readers with this text is recommended to ensure their understanding is clear or they will struggle to complete the activities accurately.

Various types of activities have been provided for the students to draw information from the text. They include: • three levels of questioning • retrieval charts; brainstorming; explosion charts • local area comparative studies • semantic grids • flags • flow diagrams; ordering • matrixes • cloze passages • tables; reading graphs • profiles • time lines • mapping; longitude/latitude • reports • cause/effect; fact/opinion • keywords/key facts

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Each unit topic is finished off with Topics for Discussion/Debate. These statements, questions or sentence starters are designed to encourage students to develop their own thoughts and ideas and share them with the class or in small groups. This technique develops oral language and critical thinking skills.

The unit topics also have Additional Activities provided. These are only suggestions and have been designed to link the students’ newfound knowledge across the learning areas. Search Engine Keywords have been included to assist the students with any further research they wish to undertake using the Internet.

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Society and Environment Teachers Guide Each Unit begins with an introductory page providing teachers with: • an overview of what students will be learning in the unit; • the topics which have been selected to develop understanding in the unit; and

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The Unit is then broken down topic by topic, with each topic providing the teacher with: • the corresponding workbook pages;

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• the outcomes and indicators being treated through the study of the unit.

• the focus of the topic;

• the keywords being introduced within the topic;

• resource requirements for successful completion of the topic, including relevant Internet sites listed separately for the teacher and student; • background information for the teacher on areas which may appeal to students, require clarification or possibly lead to misunderstanding;

© R. I . .Pquestions ubl i t i on s to lead the students •C suggested forc ana introductory discussion into thinking about the topic; •f orr evi e wguidelines, pur posuggestions seso nl •the class for • activity offering on how toy organise the particular lesson or activity; • suggested additional activities; and

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• clear and concise answers for each activity; • suggested topics for discussion and debate.

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Each Unit then concludes with an assessment tool (see following page) which has been designed to indicate broad student understanding and also provide opportunity for student feedback. It is recommended that students work through the assessment independently where possible to provide feedback to the teacher of where understanding has taken place or where the student needs further development.

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Assessment/Evaluation Assessment and evaluation is an ongoing process conducted in a variety of ways by the teacher or a support person within the classroom. Teachers generally evaluate students based on: • observations—noting any key learning milestones; • anecdotal—keeping general notes on student behaviour, skills, techniques, strengths and weaknesses; • evaluation of written work—collating and marking students’ work;

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• evaluation of oral work—recording students’ skills and techniques in this area; and

Assessment and evaluation techniques may vary from student to student depending on their individual abilities, strengths and weaknesses. For example, you would not expect a student who is working at a reduced level to achieve the same results with the activities in the workbook as a student who is working at his/her optimum level or above.

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• evaluation of activities designed as assessment tools and provided in the Teachers Guide.

Through assessment of each student’s individual work practices, teachers are able to gauge which students require extension and which require remediation. Assistance can then be given to those students where necessary to ensure they are developing to their full potential.

Because allP students work att their own ability level, assessment of their © R. I . C. ubwilll i c a i o ns understandings should not consist solely of one piece of work. Ite is envisaged teachers will assess regularly on their day-to-day •f orr evi w pthat ur po s esstudents onl y•

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performance, as well as using the assessment tool provided at the end of each unit of work in the Teachers Guide. The assessment tool used on its own will not be an accurate representation of the student’s ability or understanding of the unit and should be used only in conjunction with the term’s work.

The assessment tool provided at the end of each unit in the Teachers Guide as shown on this page is supported with a proforma which can be copied for each student and attached to his or her portfolio assessment. It provides the Outcomes covered over the unit and room for the teacher to comment on the various aspects involved in the Society and Environment workbook program.

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Students with Special Needs All students will work at different rates at different ability levels—which should be taken into consideration when planning a unit of work from the Society and Environment workbook. It is important to remember that we are assessing students’ skills, knowledge and understanding in this area, not their ability to read and write. Society and Environment is the study of people as social beings, as they have existed and interacted with each other and the environment, in time and in place. Therefore, students who have particular difficulty with literacy should not be disadvantaged in this learning area.

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It is crucial that the teacher takes the time to develop a rapport with the student— develop a relationship in which the student feels comfortable with the expected tasks. Those students who need additional assistance could be given the unit to read through prior the lesson, so when they come into the lesson they already have a headstart on the rest of the class.

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Remediation

Providing students with the opportunity to read and reread the text as often as they feel comfortable with prior to the lesson offers them one strategy to familiarise themselves with the text. Encourage students to look for keywords and phrases and to use any maps, tables or diagrams to help them develop meaning from the text.

Encourage students to then reada through then questions ©R . I . Cthe. Pub l i c t i o s and work out where they might find the answers, without actually completing the activities. After this work, the o students will come thel lesson armed with the •f orr e vi eintroductory w pu r p se s oton y•

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resources and confidence they need to complete the activity along with the rest of the class. Their confidence will grow as they feel they are keeping up with everyone else and their time won’t be wasted during the lesson.

Teachers can also assist students by establishing a language-rich environment where print is presented in natural and meaningful contexts. Depending upon the unit topic for the term, classroom displays could reflect the information students may require.

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Those students who find the activities in the workbook too easy can be extended through various additional activities. Students can be encouraged to research the topic further through the use of the Internet, library, newspapers, or by contacting specific organisations and sourcing local information. Students can be responsible for gathering resources to provide the class with additional topic material. Displays can be created to benefit the entire class. A group of students can also be made responsible for assisting the teacher when organising guest speakers or when on excursions to various facilities in the local area.

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Teachers Notes


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The World

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Australia

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Western Australia

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Australian flag

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Flags of Australia

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Aboriginal flag

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Flags of Australia

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New South Wales

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South Australia

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Northern Territory © R. I . C. Publ i cat i ons Western Australia •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Queensland

Victoria Teachers Notes

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Semantic Web (Brainstorming)

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Group Discussion HOW

Group Members:

TO

KEEP

THE

PEACE

1. Take any disputes to the Mediator. 2. Each person must take a turn to express an opinion, WITHOUT INTERRUPTION, to the Mediator.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3. Remember, don’t interrupt the person expressing a point of view.

Group Leader:

r o e t s Bo r Mediator (peacekeeper): e p o u k Reporter: S Researcher(s): Scribe:

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4. The Mediator must listen carefully to each person. Ask questions if something is unclear.

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5. Allow each person to ask the speaker questions to clarify anything that is not understood. 6. Ask each person what information he/she has to back up his/her opinion.

DISCUSSION/DEBATE TOPIC

7. Sometimes we have to agree to disagree. Not everyone has to agree on everything.

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8. Remember to respect that we all have different ideas— and because someone else’s idea is different from ours, doesn’t necessarily mean his/ her idea is wrong.

• • •

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OUR FINDINGS

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OUR PLAN

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Further Research TOPIC

Where I will get my resources

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RESOURCES I will use

NOTES

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o c . Information should be presented chein a clear and e r easy-to-follow format. See the example. o t r s super Heading • You are now ready to present your information.

Clear paragraphs, each with its own idea • Introduction and conclusion • Accurate facts •

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Beliefs

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Beliefs Unit Focus Our beliefs are formed as a result of a range of influences and experiences. These influences and experiences very between people and between cultures creating diversity within Australian communities. This unit investigates the religious and other beliefs held by people and invited students to identify their own beliefs and recognise the grounds on which they have been formed. Unit Topics

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• Famous People ....................................................................... 3 – 4 • Christianity ............................................................................. 5 – 7 • Islam ...................................................................................... 8 – 9 • Buddhism ........................................................................... 10 – 12 • Aboriginal Beliefs, Customs and Traditions ......................... 13 – 16 • Different Faiths ................................................................... 17 – 18 • Beliefs ................................................................................ 19 – 21 • Beliefs that Influence My Life ............................................. 22 – 24

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The topics selected to develop this understanding are:

Outcomes and Indicators

Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

Culture ©R . I . CUnderstands .Pub i ca t i o n s and non-traditional C3.1 thatl cultural groups have traditional aspects. •f orr e v i e w pur p os esino nl yfunction • to meet C3.2 Understands that different groups communities

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C3.3

various needs. Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals.

Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

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Famous People Workbook Pages: 2 – 4 Topic Focus Students will learn what beliefs are and how people with strong beliefs can influence the lives of others. Keywords belief, independent, devote, decision, influence, volunteer

Resources

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http://home1.pacific.net.sg/~alquek/teresa1.htm

Ian Kiernan – A Short Biography

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Mother Teresa

http://www.westernculture.com/ancientgreeks.html

Eddie Mabo – Time Magazine

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/articles/intl/0,3266,33689,00.html

Students Mother Teresa: Angel of Mercy

http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9709/mother.teresa/

Clean Up Australia

© R. I . C . Publ i cat i ons Eddie Mabo orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Background•f http://www.cleanup.com.au

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/australians/emabo.htm

Mother Teresa - 1910 – 1997

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Born in Albania, Mother Teresa attended a government school and became deeply religious from the age of 12. At 36 she set up her own home to help the poor and sick of Calcutta after she received a ‘divine call’ to work among the poor. Four years later, she set up ‘Missionaries of Charity’. She was awarded the Pope John Peace Prize in 1971 and the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979. A statue is dedicated in the southern Hungarian city of Roszke where she was born, to the late Mother Teresa of Calcutta who devoted her life to helping the poor.

o c . che e r o t r s super Ian Kiernan

In 1987, Kiernan, an Australian builder and solo yachtsman, was inspired to begin what has become the nation’s largest community environmental organisation. His efforts include ‘Clean Up Sydney Harbour Day’, and ‘Clean Up Australia Day’. In 1993, ‘Clean Up the World’ was launched after gaining the support of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). His most recent venture is aimed at moving the organisation from ‘Cleaning Up’ to ‘Fixing Up’. To date, the program has been successful in discovering and helping implement long-term solutions to many environmental problems facing Australia, including one of the most prominent—excessive waste. He is now chairman of Clean Up Australia, a national non-profit organisation which strives to inspire and work with all Australians to clean up, fix up and conserve our environment.

Beliefs

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Eddie Mabo

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Introductory Discussion

What makes a person famous?

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Mabo, a Torres Strait Islander, spent a large part of his life fighting to change Australian laws to restore native title to his family’s land. At 31 he got a job as a gardener at James Cook University. He began to attend seminars and read what white anthropologists and white ‘experts’ had to say about his people. In 1981, a land rights conference was held at James Cook University, where he made a very important speech which spelt out land ownership and land inheritance on Murray Island. A lawyer at the conference suggested there should be a test case to claim land rights through the court system. Ruling on the 10-year court battle, Justice Moynihan came to the conclusion that Eddy (Koiki) Mabo wasn’t the son of Benny Mabo, and ruled that he had no rights to inherit Mabo land. Eddie persisted, fighting until he died of cancer in 1992. Five months later the High Court of Australia made the historic ruling that native title existed.

Record the students’ predictions about how and why Mother Teresa, Ian Kiernan and Eddie Mabo became famous.

Activity – Pages 3 – 4

Break the class into three mixed groups, giving each group one famous person to read about and discuss. Rotate one-third of each group to each of the other groups and encourage the students to share their knowledge with their new group members. Use the discussion from these groups to complete question 1 on page 3.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr e vi e wtop ur s esspace on l y Allow students return to p theiro own working and read • all three parts of page 2 to complete question 2. Discuss, as a whole class, the similarities and differences the students have derived to answer question 2(d).

Answers 1.

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Briefly discuss what is meant by ‘beliefs’. Allow the students time to record their ideas in the explosion chart on page 4.

Person

Beliefs

Actions

Mother Teresa

Total surrender to God – to love Him in every single person we meet.

Devoted her life to helping the sick and poor.

Used money from awards to fund many centres to help the sick and poor.

That waterways should be free from pollution.

He organised a group to clean up Sydney Harbour.

Led to a Clean Up Australia Day and then Clean Up the World.

White laws were wrong. Land was handed down from generation to generation.

Fought in the High Court for land rights.

The High Court declared that native title did in fact exist.

o c . che e r o t r s super Ian Kiernan

Eddie Mabo

Results

2. (a) Mother Teresa helped the poor because she believed strongly in helping others. (b) False; True; True; True (c) When Australia was colonised in the 1700s, all land was declared ‘no-one’s land’ (terra nullius) and became Crown Land. (d) Answers will vary R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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3. Answers will vary 4. Answers will vary 5. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Research one of the following people: Nelson Mandela, Indira Gandhi, Caroline Chisholm, Fred Hollows, Mary Mackillop, Martin Luther King. 2. Interview family members about their beliefs.

Discussion/Debate

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 1. My belief is more important than your belief!

Christianity

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2. An environmental belief is more important than a religious belief!

Workbook Pages: 5 – 7

Topic Focus

The student will gain an understanding of the Christian faith.

worshipped, crucified, universe, symbol, slay, guidelines © R. I . C.P ubl i ca t i o ns Resources •f orr evi e wfollowing pu r po esonl y• • The websites ares recommended: Keywords

Teacher Basic Christian Beliefs

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Background

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http://people.enternet.com.au/~beswick/basicch.htm

Catholicism – Basic Tenets

http://catholicism.about.com/religion/catholicism/library/weekly/blcathfaq.htm

Students Christian Beliefs

o c . che e r o t r s super http://thechapel.org/html/christian_beliefs.html

David and Goliath

http://www.virtualchurch.org/david.htm

A Christian is a person who believes in Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour. Christians believe that Jesus was a teacher who lived in Nazareth and taught in Galilee and Jerusalem in the time of the Roman Empire; that he is the son of God; and that he lived and died for others and was raised from the dead. Jesus is called Christ because it is believed he is the Messiah, who came from God to establish the Kingdom of God in which people are restored to a new relationship with God. He is called Lord by Christians because he rose from the dead, and Saviour because through the sacrifice of his life and his conquest of sin and death he saved man from the consequences of sin.

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Introductory Discussion What to you know about Christianity? Do you think that going to church is an important part of Australian culture? Many children are taught Bible stories. Do you know any Bible stories? What is so important about these Bible stories? Activity – Pages 5 – 6

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Allow students time to read the information on page 5. Ask them to select and contribute one piece of information about Christianity. Complete the questions which follow the text. 1. Jesus Christ

2. To save people from their sins

3. They believe there is life after death 4. Bible: Old Testament; New Testament

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Answers

5. The Romans crucified Jesus – he rose from the dead three days later 6. A ceremony of acceptance into the Christian church 7.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 9. A place of worship

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Activity – Pages 6 – 7

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10. Answers will vary

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8. 67%

Predict what the messages might be from the story of David and Goliath, based on prior knowledge and the pictures on pages 6 and 7.

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Read the passage and ask the children to write the two messages they think the story is trying to give Christians. Encourage the students to share their ideas and justify why they feel the messages they found were the most significant. Answers 1. Answers will vary; Teacher check

Additional Activities 1. Identify the different Christian denominations that exist in your local community. 2. Locate the Christian churches in your local community.

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Discussion/Debate 1. Christian beliefs are more important than any other beliefs. 2. People don’t need to go to church to worship God. He can be worshipped anywhere.

Islam

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Workbook Pages: 8 – 9

Topic Focus

The students will gain an understanding of the Islamic faith. submit, practices, forbidden, procedures, charity

Resources

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Keywords

• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Al-Islam http://www.al-islam.org/beliefs/index.html

The Koran online

© R. I . C .Publ i cat i ons Students Discover Islam (comprehensive) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• http://www.hti.umich.edu/k/koran/browse.html

http://www.discoverislam.com/

Background

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Islam is the only religion in the world that says that its precepts are ‘natural’. In Islam, the beliefs have primary position, they are the roots, and the practices are branches that are dependent for their existence on the roots. The primary belief is that of the Unity and Supreme sovereignty of Allah, the almighty, the Everpresent, the Everlasting, the All-knowing. Allah sent prophets to convey His message. He selected Imams to safeguard His message and ordained a Day of Judgment when the deeds of His creatures will be measured and rewarded or punished accordingly. Islam is the last divine religion and Prophet Mohammed is the last Messenger of Allah. In Islam, Allah has created all the commandments and decrees that will be needed by people until the end of the world. His commandments are there to guide his people to proper belief and to show them a proper way to live their lives.

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Introductory Discussion What do you know about Islam? Do you think Islam is practised very widely in Australia? Why? Why not? Activity – Pages 8 – 9 Read the information on page 8. Ask each child to select and contribute one piece of information from the text they feel is important to the Islamic faith. Answer the questions which follow. Beliefs

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Answers 1. 622 2. Mohammed the Prophet 3. Strict 4. God of Islam 5. They each have the crescent and star or stars: Pakistan; China; Turkey 6. The holy book that guides followers of Islam.

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7. Life on earth is a period of testing for the time in paradise that follows death. 8. Pray to Allah five times a day while facing in the direction of Mecca.

Before reading the story ‘I need a lamp in front’, discuss the reasons why many religions might choose to use stories and tales to teach their followers messages.

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Activity – Page 9

Read the story and allow the students time to write what they feel the son is trying to tell his father. Discuss why the father had been so reluctant to understand what the son was saying. Answers

1. That he needed to be generous before he died to receive the benefits when he died.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 1. Find out if there are any followers of Islam in your community. •f orr ev ewtop ucountries r po se siso l y • 2. i Research locate where Islam then main religion.

Additional Activities

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Buddhism Workbook Pages: 10 – 12

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The students will gain an understanding of the Buddhist faith. noble, cycle, deeds, material possession, self-denial, plight

Resources

• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Buddhism (Webcrawler page – excellent links)

http://www.webcrawler.com/kids_and_family/religion_and_beliefs/buddhism/

Students Buddhism http://www.webcrawler.com/kids_and_family/religion_and_beliefs/buddhism/

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Background The teaching of the Buddha is ‘to do no evil; to cultivate good; and to purify one’s mind’. The Buddha was born Siddhartha Gautama, a prince of the Sakya tribe of Nepal, in approximately 566 BC. At 29 he left home to seek the meaning of ‘the suffering’. He abandoned the way of self-mortification after six years of yogic training and instead sat in mindful meditation beneath a bodhi tree. On the full moon of May, with the rising morning star, Siddhartha Gautama became the Buddha, the enlightened one. The Buddha wandered the plains of northeastern India for 45 years, teaching the path or ‘Dharma’ he had realised in that moment. The Buddha’s last words were ‘Impermanent are all created things; Strive on with awareness.’

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Read the information about Buddhism on page 10. Ask each student to select one piece of information from the text they feel is significant to the religion and share it with the class.

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Introductory Discussion

Allow the students time to complete the questions which follow.

Activity – Pages 10 – 11 Answers 1. India

2. There is suffering; suffering has a cause; suffering has an end; there is a path that leads to the end

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 3. One would be reborn as a poor or sick person.

4. Avoid too much wealth and luxury as well as too much self-denial and self-torture. 5. Because it has no beginning or end – it is continuous 6. Buddha 7. Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia and Japan

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8. False

Activity – Pages 11 – 12

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Take turns to read the story of ‘The Blind Men and the Elephant’.

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Discuss whether any of the blind men were wrong in their description of an elephant and why. Ask the students to write in their own words what the king’s teaching was from the experience. Are there groups of people today who believe their knowledge is all there is? Is there an end to what we can learn? Answers 1. That we should not think our knowledge is all there is; there is a great deal to learn about our world and we only see a limited part of it.

Additional Activities 1. In groups, reproduce the experiences of the blind men by using blindfolds and an unknown object. Describe what you feel. 2. Research to find if there are any Buddhist temples in your community. Beliefs

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Discussion/Debate 1. This story has a message only for the followers of Buddha. 2. Buddhism is the most practical of all religions.

Aboriginal Beliefs, Customs and Traditions

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Workbook Pages: 13 – 16

The students will investigate how Aboriginal Australian beliefs, customs and traditions contribute to Australian and community identities.

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Topic Focus

Keywords

traditional, creation story, harmony, ancestors, customs, kinship

Resources

• A selection of Aboriginal Creation stories

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• Stories of the Dreaming (Has separate teacher page) • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Aboriginal History and Culture Research Project (Comprehensive) http://www.aaa.com.au/hrh/aboriginal/ http://www.dreamtime.net.au/

The first Australians: kinship, family and identity

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http://www.aifs.org.au/institute/pubs/fm1/fm35eb.html

Students Aboriginal History and Culture Research Project http://www.aaa.com.au/hrh/aboriginal/

Stories of the Dreaming

o c . che e r o t r s super http://www.dreamtime.net.au/

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures have changed over time. Before the arrival of Europeans, Australia was largely an unspoilt country. To maintain the fragile environment and because of seasonal variations, people would only stay in an area for a certain time. Indigenous people lived a hunter and gatherer life. Every part of the animal and plant was eaten or used to make things such as clothing, baskets, tools and weapons. Indigenous people passed down information through generations about the boundaries and nature of their land and stories of creation through songs, dance, art and storytelling.

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Introductory Discussion What do you know about Aboriginal beliefs, customs and traditions? Do you think Aboriginal beliefs are similar to or different from the religions we have been investigating? Why? Activity – Pages 13 – 14 Read the information on page 13. Discuss whether there are any Aboriginal beliefs, customs or traditions which should be adopted by all Australians.

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Allow the students time to complete the activities on page 14. Answers

2. Creation stories tell: how the Aboriginal people’s world was made; how animals came into being; how language groups evolved.

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1. Through stories passed on by their parents and grandparents

3. Men make tools and weapons and hunt for larger animals; women collect plants and smaller animals for food; women rear children and look after the aged. 4. Older children are responsible for looking after younger children; grandparents are responsible for teaching children. 5. First Holy Communion; bar mitzvah; initiation; birthdays 6. Answers will vary 7. Answers will vary

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 8. (a) Sharing is important: what you give and receive will balance out. (b) Answers will vary

Activity – Pages 15 – 16

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Provide the students with a range of Creation texts to peruse. You may like to take the students to the library to find Creation stories of their own. Allow the students time to read and discuss a variety of stories. Read ‘The Two Wise Men and the Seven Sisters’. If a copy of the story can not be found, refer to the example on the top of page 15 to piece together the story with the students. Alternatively, find and read a different creation story and model the process of finding the relevant information to complete the table.

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Students can work in pairs to investigate two stories of their choice using the tables provided on page 15. The information from this exercise can be used to develop an understanding of the common features of Aboriginal Creation stories. A table has been provided on page 16 to assist students to extract this information and note similarities. Discuss these findings as a whole class.

Allow students time to retell and illustrate their favourite Creation story in the space provided on page 16. Answers Answers will vary

Beliefs

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Additional Activities 1. In small groups, re-enact your favourite Creation stories. 2. Invent and write your own Creation story, based on information you have collected. Discussion/Debate 1. Discuss the importance of passing beliefs down from generation to generation.

r o e t s B r e Different Faithsoo p u k S

Workbook Pages: 17 – 18

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2. Discuss the importance of behaving correctly within society.

Topic Focus

The students will identify what is similar and different in the faiths studied.

Keywords

Resources

practices, laws, texts, symbols

• Maps of the local area ©R . I . C.P ub i cat i ons • The following websites arel recommended: Teacher •f orr ev i ew pu r pos esonl y• Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance http://www.religioustolerance.org

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Students Aboriginal Australia – Spirituality http://www.dreamtime.net.au/indigenous/spirituality.cfm

Background

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This unit investigates, through comparison, the similarities and differences between four ‘religions’ to make students aware of a fraction of the broad range of beliefs which can be held within a community. While students should in no way be encouraged or persuaded to alter their beliefs, they should be encouraged to adopt a tolerant attitude and to respect the variety that exists. Religious tolerance promotes tolerance towards all faiths and respects that everyone should be able to follow their own religious beliefs and practices freely, even though others may view them as false. To be tolerant does not require that we accept other beliefs as true.

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Introductory Discussion There are many different faiths; many more than have been discussed in the workbook. Make a list of other faiths which have not been discussed. Do you think all of these different faiths are true? Debate how this could or could not be true. Are some faiths more difficult to follow than others? Why do you think people would choose a faith which is difficult to follow? R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Activity – Pages 17 – 18 Using information from pages 5 – 16, complete the table on page 17 comparing Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and Aboriginal Spirituality. Students should be encouraged to work in pairs to extract this information and discuss similarities and differences among the faiths. Ask the students to write the two most prominent similarities and differences in the spaces provided. Encourage the students to share and attempt to justify the similarities and differences they felt were most significant with the class.

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Share the findings of this investigation as a whole class. Answers 1. (a)

Faiths

Major Beliefs

Christianity

Practices and Laws

Texts and Symbols

There is one God who created the Attend churches to worship on a Bible Cross universe and still looks after it. regular basis. Baptism and communion are two common practices.

Life on earth is a period of testing for the time in paradise that follows death.

Islam

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Provide the students with maps of the local area and encourage them to interview local community members, to determine the whereabouts of sacred places and places of worship in their local area. Tables have been provided on page 18 as a guide for students to investigate the faiths studied in the workbook and three other religions.

Very strict Worship Follow the rules of the Koran.

The Koran is the book that guides followers of Islam.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

The symbol of Islam is the crescent and a star.

Buddhism teaches four noble truths: – there is suffering – suffering has a cause – suffering has an end – there is a path that leads to the end.

Aboriginal Spirituality Ancestors devised a plan of what things would be created and how

(b) Answers will vary

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Discussion/Debate

People should follow the middle way.

Tripetaka Wheel

Kinship system

Aboriginal people pass on information regarding their beliefs through the telling of Creation stories. Aboriginal people carved or painted symbols and designs to communicate important information.

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1. Create a diorama of a religious custom or ritual.

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1. Uluru is a sacred Aboriginal site. Should tourists be allowed to climb over Uluru? 2. Our own faith is more important than anyone else’s faith.

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Beliefs Workbook Pages: 19 – 21 Topic Focus The students will learn how people’s writing, such as stories, poems etc., can influence the actions of others. Keywords graffiti, dumped, polluted, ranger, environment, caring, interview

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.efmedia.org/wp2-1_1.html

Students Greenpeace

http://www.greenpeace.org

Background

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher The Warrior Poet (environmental poetry)

Greenpeace Australia was founded in 1977. The original Greenpeace organisation began in 1971 in Vancouver, Canada after the United States of America set off a one megaton nuclear bomb 1 200 m below sea level in 1969. A second test five times the size was announced and concerned conservationists formed the group ‘Greenpeace’ and registered their protest at the proposed site for the explosion. The global campaign goals currently held by Greenpeace are: preventing climate change by stopping fossil fuel projects and promoting alternatives, eliminating sources of persistent organic pollutants and preventing toxic waste dumping, protecting the oceans from overfishing and whaling, and protecting future generations from the effects of nuclear contamination. Over 2.4 million people worldwide support Greenpeace. In Australia, Greenpeace has over 75 000 supporters.

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Introductory Discussion

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What are some of the important issues facing the future of your community?

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What are some of the important issues facing the future of the world? Which are more important? Which issues would be the most productive to support? What are things you feel strongly about? Do you have a belief about what should be happening in your community or in the world?

Activity – Pages 19 – 21 Read the story on page 19 with the class. Discuss the reasons why this story might have been included under a heading ‘beliefs’. Allow the students time to complete the questions which follow the story. Discuss the beliefs held by people in the community which influence the way we live or work. Identify particular people in the community who hold strong beliefs and make a class list of them.

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Direct the students into pairs or small groups suitable for conducting an interview. Allow the students time to discuss Interview questions 1 – 4 on page 20 with their partner or group members. Ask them to choose a community member from the class list to interview. The students should then be guided through the presentation plan on page 21. They will need to discuss and complete the plan before preparing their interview. Each pair or group can write the responses for each of the interview questions, including two additional questions directly relevant to their chosen person.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Answers

1. It was crowded and smelly.

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Allow the students time to practise or prepare their interviews before presenting them to the class.

2. Empty drink cans, lumps of wood, bottles, an old bike frame, pieces of plastic. 3. Idiots 4. False

5. That the beautiful spot he remembered as a boy was so polluted. 6. Answers will vary

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 7. The writer cares for the environment and doesn’t like pollution. 8. Do not pollute the environment.

Interview - Answers will vary

Additional Activities

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Beliefs

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1. Read the following stories that portray strong environmental beliefs: Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, The Lorax, Lester and Clyde. 2. Identify environmental issues important to your community. Create a poster to get a message across to the people in your community about this issue.

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1. The only way to save the environment is to pass new laws.

2. Repairing our environment should be important to everyone.

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Beliefs that Influence My Life Workbook Pages: 22 – 24 Topic Focus The students will identify the beliefs that influence their lives and the lives of their families. Keywords leisure, environment, influence, spirituality

Resources

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http://new.ozsearch.com.au/cgi-bin/search/search.fcgi?search =CAT&Category =Sports%20and%20Leisure

World Health Organization http://www.who.int/home-page/

Religions, Faith Groups and Ethical Systems http://www.religioustolerance.org/var_rel.htm

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Ozsearch Internet Guide – Sport and Leisure

Web66: International School Web Site Registry (see other schools’ websites) http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools.html

Yahoo: Religion and Spirituality (Directory)

© R. I . CEnvironment .Pub i ca t i ons Yahoo: andl Nature (Directory) Students •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• Web66: International School Web Site Registry (see other schools’ websites) http://dir.yahoo.com/Society_and_Culture/Religion_and_Spirituality

http://dir.yahoo.com/Society_and_Culture/Environment_and_Nature

http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools.html

Yahoo: Religion and Spirituality (Directory)

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Yahoo: Environment and Nature (Directory)

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http://dir.yahoo.com/Society_and_Culture/Environment_and_Nature

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Our beliefs are not restricted to religion. Indeed, our belief system is composed of opinions we form and information we gain on virtually every issue which has an impact on our lives. Our beliefs are constantly modified and influenced by people and surroundings. We are encouraged to have an opinion and often subconsciously develop beliefs on a broad range of issues from the environment to health and fitness. These beliefs may change as we gain more information or may be internalised and adopted into our lifestyles. Our beliefs can have a profound impact on the way we choose to live our lives and can inspire us to have tremendous input into our community, such as in the lives of those investigated in the first unit of this chapter, ‘Famous People’.

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Introductory Discussion What are some of the factors that influence your beliefs? Are there some beliefs you keep private? Why? Is it difficult to hold a belief which is different from the beliefs of others? Why? How do you think we need to treat people who hold beliefs which are different from our own?

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Activity – Pages 22 – 24

Students who feel confident about their beliefs may wish to share their stance with the class.

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Discuss the beliefs people might hold in each of the areas outlined on page 22. Give students time to complete the table independently and encourage them to consider the things they feel are important about each of these situations, rather than what they think others will think.

Ask the students to select their six most important beliefs from the table and write them into the circles on the explosion chart on page 23. The students can then argue why these beliefs are important to them on the lines below. Question 3 on page 24 asks the students to identify beliefs about things which are more specific to the school environment. Ask the students to write their beliefs about each of the four areas listed without discussing their answers. Once complete, allow the students to work with a partner and write their partner’s answers into the space provided in the table.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The students may find it necessary to briefly discuss and clarify their partner’s beliefs before questions 4 and 5n comparing the similarities and •f orr evi ew pcompleting ur po ses o l y• differences between their beliefs.

Answers 1. Answers will vary

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Discuss why there are similarities and differences between the beliefs of people from the same class. Revisit some of the external factors which influence our personal beliefs.

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Additional Activities

1. List all the people who influence your life. Will this list stay the same as you grow older? 2. How will the influences on your life differ from those of a student living in Pakistan?

Discussion/Debate 1. Our beliefs are the same as those of our parents. 2. Belief in yourself is the most important belief to have.

Beliefs

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Beliefs Assessment and Evaluation The activity on page 20 is provided as one assessment tool in the study of this unit. It is designed to indicate broad student understanding and also provide opportunity for student feedback. The following outcomes were addressed in this topic of study. The following pages can be photocopied as a record of student performance or as a proforma for portfolio assessment. Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work. Culture C3.1 Understands that cultural groups have traditional and non-traditional aspects. C3.2 Understands that different groups in communities function to meet various needs. C3.3 Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals. Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

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Outcomes

Administration

Distribute the activity sheet on page 20 of the Teachers Guide, one per student. Ask students to write their name in the top right-hand corner of the page. Read through the activity sheet to ensure students are clear about what they are being asked to do. At this stage, give students the opportunity to seek clarification of any part of the activity sheet they may not understand. It is important students work independently on these activities—this provides a true representation of what students understand or of their lack of understanding. Once students have completed the activity, collect the worksheets. Mark and record results. From this activity sheet, some students may be found to require further work to develop their understanding in a particular area.

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Answers

1. (a) A belief is an opinion we form based on information we gain on an issue which has an impact on our lives. (b) Answers will vary; Christianity: there is one God who created the universe, He sent His son Jesus to the world to save people from their sins, there is life after death, the Bible holds messages and guidelines that govern the way they should live their lives. Islam: has a range of beliefs which are strictly controlled, life on earth is a period of testing for the time in paradise that follows death, people’s good and bad deeds are recorded and will determine whether they go to heaven or hell. Buddhism: there is suffering which has a cause and an end, there is a path that leads to the end, life is a cycle of birth and rebirth, people should not focus on material possessions and without them perfect peace and happiness occurs.

o c . che e r o t r s super 2. Answers will vary. 3. Answers will vary. 4. (a) environment – we should protect endangered species. (b) health – a healthy body promotes a healthy mind. (c) politics – all adults should have the right to vote. (d) poverty – we should help those in need. (e) religion – we should respect the religious beliefs of others.

5. Individual people, family, local community, society, conscience, knowledge, experience, environment. 6. Answers will vary. R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Beliefs Student Name:

Date:

Task At the conclusion of the unit ‘Beliefs’, students were asked to complete an activity sheet independently to demonstrate their understanding of the unit.

Pointers Demonstrated

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Discussion and Debate Needs Improvement

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• Displays an awareness of and respect for other religions. • Demonstrates an understanding of what influences their own and others’ beliefs. • Can link commonly held beliefs to key issues in their community. • Demonstrates an ability to identify their own beliefs and justify why they hold them.

Needs Further Opportunity

Satisfactory

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General Comment

Satisfactory

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Needs Improvement

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Satisfactory

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Student Comment

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Beliefs 1. (a) What is a belief?

(b) Describe a belief held by each of these faiths: Christianity Islam Buddhism

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3. Briefly retell an Aboriginal Creation story.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Match these issues to a commonly held belief. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• •

• a healthy body promotes a healthy mind

(b) health

• we should respect the religious beliefs of others

(c) politics

• we should protect endangered species

(d) poverty

• we should help those in need

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(a) environment

(e) religion

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4.

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2. Name four different faiths practised in your local community.

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• all adults should have the right to vote

5. List three factors which influence what we choose to believe.

6. What do you consider will be the biggest issue facing your community in the future?

Write some reasons why you believe this.

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Working Together or e st

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Working Together Unit Focus Communities are social groups whose members reside in a specific locality, share governments and have a cultural and historical heritage. Communities are cooperative and dynamic, developing and changing to meet the changing needs of their members, and are interdependent with other communities, particularly during times of need. Unit Topics

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• Communities ...................................................................... 26 – 27 • Edgewater .......................................................................... 28 – 30 • Clarktown ........................................................................... 31 – 33 • Clarktown Survey ............................................................... 34 – 35 • Clarktown Community Services .......................................... 36 – 38 • Public Contributions ............................................................ 39 – 40 • Community Facilities .......................................................... 41 – 42 • Local Council – Roles and Responsibilities ......................... 43 – 44 • Helping Each Other ............................................................. 45 – 47 • Cooperative Community ..................................................... 48 – 50

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The topics selected to develop this understanding are:

Outcomes and Indicators

Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

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Communities Workbook Pages: 26 – 27 Topic Focus The students will understand and describe communities in the local area and other parts of Australia. Keywords community, cooperating, trading, local

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.ic.org/laev/Index.html

Students Yarrabah Aboriginal Community

http://www.indiginet.com.au/yarrabah

Background

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher LA Eco-Village (A cooperative community)

Yarrabah, situated in Northern Queensland, is an example of an Aboriginal community. The community began with an Aboriginal group who originally inhabited the Yarrabah area living a very traditional lifestyle. An Anglican missionary began to visit and encourage the people to move to a mission settlement. The group’s leader supported the idea and moved to the mission now known as Yarrabah Community. When the mission closed in the 1960s, the new Yarrabah Community came under the control of the Queensland Government. The first Community Aboriginal Council was established, which in 1986 became selfgoverning. There are many services provided in the community including its own hospital, primary and secondary schools, preschool, library, shops and a museum.

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Activity – Pages 52 – 53

What does the term ‘community’ refer to?

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What makes a group of people a ‘community’ rather than simply a group?

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Divide the class into two groups. Ask one group to read ‘What is a Community?’ and individually record three important points from the passage. The other group can complete the same task after reading ‘Cooperating in Communities’. Encourage the students to share their findings with the whole class. Write a summary of the important points from each passage where the class can see it. Allow the students time to read the passage they have not read. Ask the students to complete questions 1– 4 on page 26 using the information the class has recorded. Based on this information, the students can then work in pairs or small groups to discuss and record notes about cooperation in communities. A spokesperson from each group can then be asked to read his or her group’s discussion points to the class. Briefly discuss the ways in which families cooperate. Give the students time to complete questions 6 – 7 individually.

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Answers 1. A large or small group of people who live near each other and share common interests. 2. Answers will vary 3. Answers will vary 4. To work together; to be helpful 5. Answers will vary 6. Answers will vary

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Edgewater 7. Answers will vary

Additional Activities

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1. Use community newspaper clippings, pamphlets, magazines,

Workbook Pages: 28 – 30

Topic Focus

Keywords

Resources

The students will understand and differentiate between the natural and built features of a community.

©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons natural, built, needs, employment, leisure •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• http://www.atn.com.au

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Students Australian Tourism Net http://www.atn.com.au

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Australian Tourism Net

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http://www.austtravel.com.au

Advertising is a powerful means of conveying a message to a specific audience. In the case of the advertisement for Edgewater included in this unit, a community itself is being advertised, depicting what our society deems its most appealing aspects. Emphasis is placed on leisure and prosperous industry and focuses on the balance this township has reached between people and the environment.

Introductory Discussion Discuss the difference between natural and built environments. Imagine an environment where nothing has been built. Discuss the implications of living in an environment such as this.

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Activity – pages 28 – 30 Read the ‘tourist pamphlet’ on page 28 as a whole class. Discuss informally some of the built and natural features mentioned in the text. Allow the students time to complete questions 1 – 4(a). Discuss the ways in which people are employed in Edgewater. What do the people who are not involved in the banana industry do? Ask the students to work in pairs to brainstorm the different types of employment in their community and record their ideas in the space provided on page 30.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S With their partner, complete activity 5. Answers

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Discuss what makes something in a community a tourist attraction. Consider the different types of people who travel and what might appeal to these different groups.

1. (a) A natural feature is one that is found in or formed by nature. (b) A built feature is one that is made by humans.

2. (a) Natural features: white sandy beaches, rainforest, Black Mountain, Penguin River, countryside; Built features: 400 shops, Edgewater Mill, Old Gaol, Port Edgewater, four sports ovals, 10 pubs, 2 nightclubs, leisure centre, watersport park, library, cinema, cafes, restaurants. (b) Answers will vary

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3. (a) football, pubs, leisure centre, library, cricket, nightclubs, watersport park, cinema, netball, cafes, radio, gun club, restaurants, bowls, tennis, shopping (b) Answers will vary

4. (a) Exporting bananas (b) Answers will vary

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Additional Activities

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5. (a) Answers will vary

1. Design a tourist pamphlet for your own community. Include all necessary information and pictures.

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2. Make a television ad in small groups, telling everyone how great your community is to visit. 1. Natural features are more important than built features. 2. I would like to live in Edgewater because ...

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Clarktown Workbook Pages: 31 – 33 Topic Focus The students will locate and identify built and natural features of the local community. Keywords natural, built, industry, attractions, services, shire/council

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

Students National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

Background

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments (Comprehensive)

Many communities are dependent on their environment for their existence. Industry and, in many cases, tourist attractions are provided by the environment. Within the community, both natural and built environments can be areas for review and improvement. These improvements are balanced between our changing needs and our beliefs about what is important. For example, we may need more housing, but believe it is wrong to damage an area of the environment which is biologically diverse. It is our right to have input into our community’s development.

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Introductory Discussion

How much do you know about your community?

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Activity – Pages 31 – 33

If the students live in a large city, discuss where their community starts and ends. Is it clearly defined? Why? Is a community made up of people, built things, natural things or a combination of some or all of these things?

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Ask the students to read the table about Clarkson on page 31 and complete the information about their own community in the first column of the table on the following page. Discuss each of the criteria on the table as a whole class and encourage the students to add anything they may have missed in the second column of their table. Discuss why the students live in the community they do. Would anyone like to leave it? Why or why not? What could be done to make the community somewhere everyone would like to live? Why would it be impossible to meet everybody’s needs in one community? Give the students time to complete questions 2 – 3. Discuss some the suggestions for improvements from question 3 and develop a ‘Top 5’ list of improvements for the community. Allow the students time to complete questions 4 – 5 independently.

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Answers 1. Answers will vary 2. Answers will vary 3. Answers will vary 4. Answers will vary 5. Answers will vary

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Additional Activities

1. Write a letter to your council telling if what you like about your community and what you would like improved. Remember to include suggestions for how it could be improved and reasons why it should be improved. 1. The council wants to close the local library, because it costs too much money to run and maintain. Discuss ways the community could help to keep the library open.

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Discussion/Debate

Clarktown Survey

Workbook Pages: 34 – 35

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The students identify and record work and leisure activities of people in the community. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Topic Focus

Keywords

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http://au.yahoo.com/Regional/Countries/Australia/Recreation_and_Sport

Students Yahoo – Australian Sports and Recreation

http://au.yahoo.com/Regional/Countries/Australia/Recreation_and_Sport

Background

To achieve a balanced lifestyle, the members of a community involve themselves in both work and leisure activities. Participation in the work environment assists a community to provide basic goods and services to sustain itself and to achieve economic stability. Participation in leisure activities not only provides relief and variety to the lives of workers but also develops a sense of community, which builds the foundation for meeting community challenges as a unified group. Both elements are important parts of the life of a community.

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Introductory Discussion Debate what is more important: work or leisure. Do you think your community is work-oriented or leisure-oriented? Why? Activity – Pages 34 – 35 Give the students time to read the survey on page 34. Ask them to compare the figures for work with the figures for leisure. Why do you think the total figures for leisure are higher than those for work?

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Discuss why surveys such as these might be used. Who would use them? Allow the students time to complete questions 1 – 5 independently. Answers

2. Number of people: involved in different jobs; who are involved in various leisure activities; who would use various facilities in Clarktown

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1. To find out people’s views; To record lots of information

3. To develop facilities which would be most useful to the people of Clarktown

4. (a) Work: a job in which you earn money; Leisure: time that is free from work

5. Working Opportunities: mining industry; retail, farming, services, other; Leisure Opportunities: Indoors, camping/ outdoors, lawn bowls, golf, other

Additional Activities

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1. Collect information about work and leisure activities of people in your community. Develop a survey for family and friends to complete. Organise the results as a class on a tally or graph. What can you find out about your community?

Discussion/Debate 1. It is more important to work than it is to have time for leisure activities. because ...

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2. Our community needs more

Clarktown Community Services

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Workbook Pages: 36 – 38

The students will determine the community facilities available and their source of funding.

Keywords community, facilities, membership, ratepayers Resources • The following websites are recommended: Teacher National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments (Comprehensive) http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

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Students National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

Background Part of the role of local government is to ensure the delivery of local services which meet local community needs. These must be affordable and delivered equitably, efficiently and effectively. Local revenues and resources can be supplemented by external resources, including commonwealth or State/Territory grants when appropriate.

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Introductory Discussion

Investigate a single facility such as sports grounds and brainstorm the costs involved in the upkeep; e.g. irrigation, mowing, fertilisers, pest and disease control, renovation, purchase of goal posts and other sporting equipment, gardeners’ wages or maintenance contract etc.

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Where does the money come from to run facilities such as local clubs and recreation facilities?

Activity – Pages 36 – 38

Give students time to read the ‘Clarktown Community Services Directory: Leisure Facilities’ on page 36. The students can then use the information in the table to complete questions 1 – 2.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons As a whole class, brainstorm to find some of the people in the community who provide services and/ or facilities. Allow the students to work in pairs and decide •f orr evi ew pu r p se sactivity on l y • upon one of these people too interview. This would best be set as homework or as part of an organised excursion.

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The information gathered from these interviews can then be discussed as a whole class. From this discussion, brainstorm to find ways different services and facilities can work together to help each other. Encourage the students to take notes from the discussion and record them in the space provided on page 37. Discuss what might happen if facilities are not used by the community. Ask the students to complete activities 6 – 7 investigating reasons why services and facilities close down and the impact this would have on them and other members of the community.

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As a whole class, generate suggestions as to how services and facilities could be kept in business. The students can write the best suggestions to respond to question 8. Answers

1. To pay for upkeep of the facility; wages of people who work at the facility 2. pool, library 3. Answers will vary 4. Teacher check 5. Answers will vary 6. Answers will vary

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7. Answers will vary 8. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Walk around your community. List the variety of facilities your community members share. What does this show you about the needs of your community? Discussion/Debate

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1. The council should provide funding for all community facilities.

Workbook Pages: 39 – 40

Topic Focus

The students will understand the local council’s contribution to youth activities.

Keywords

Resources

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2. All community facilities would be free to community members.

grant, contribution, youth

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons • The following websites are recommended: Teacher •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y•

National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments (Comprehensive) http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

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Students National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments

Local government is elected by the local community to respond to its aspirations and concerns, and to meets its needs within available resources. It must be electorally accountable to the local community, and manage its affairs in a transparent way. The Declaration on the Role of Australian Local Government states that ‘local government must seek to provide good governance for its community by being fully informed on local issues; by considering all aspects of environment, social and economic wellbeing through effective strategic and corporate planning based in extensive community consultation; and by balancing competing claims and interests openly, fairly and sympathetically’. (Councillor John Campbell, President, Australian Local Government Association Chair, 1997)

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Introductory Discussion How are changes made in a community? Do you think that community members should have a say about changes in the community or should that be the responsibility of the elected councillors? Why? Do you think you could make something happen in your community? How could you go about it? R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Activity – Pages 39 – 40 Read the passage ‘Brad has his say ...’ as a whole class. Allow the students to complete questions 1 – 4. Hypothesise that a new youth facility will be going into their community. Ask for suggestions about what should be included at the facility. Not all suggestions can be included. Discuss the difficulties in deciding fairly what should be included and what should not. Using the graph on page 40, have the students conduct a survey of their fellow class members to determine the most popular suggestions.

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Think about the types of things youths could do to take care of their new facility to help students answer question 7. Answers

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Ask the students to use the information they obtained from the survey to answer question 6.

1. Because the shops are closed meaning the carpark is empty and it is safer 2. fractions (maths)

3. She meant to hurry up; she had made a pun in reference to the skate park 4. Letter: Answers will vary 5. Answers will vary

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Additional Activities 6. Answers will vary 7. Answers will vary

1. Develop a list of rules for the new youth facility.

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2. Make a list of other community groups who would benefit from a new facility. Discussion/Debate

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1. Children should have more say in how the council spends its money on youth projects.

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2. The youths in a community should be responsible for looking after their facilities.

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Community Facilities Workbook Pages: 41 – 42 Topic Focus The students will learn the importance of sharing community facilities. Keywords sharing, facilities, protest

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We have a responsibility to contribute to the development of a community. Different parts of the community have different needs and beliefs about the direction of their community. All community members must recognise the needs of all parts of the community when providing support or fostering change. It is important, however, to allow reasonable viewpoints to be heard in order for equitable compromises to be reached.

Introductory Discussion Who owns community services and facilities?

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Background

Do you think that certain services and facilities should be kept for certain parts of the community? For example, should lawn bowls be available only to retirees? Is it fair for rules to be made about the use of community services and facilities? Why?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Look at the headline on the newspaper article on page 41. Predict what the text might be about. bep a protest about theo issue discussed? •f orr e vi e wWillpthere ur ose s n l y•What do you

Activity – Pages 41 – 42

think they will be protesting?

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Read the article and revisit the predictions the students made. Were they correct? If they had concluded something else, what influenced them to reach that decision. Allow the students time to complete questions 1 – 6.

Discuss the rules put in place for the skate park and discuss why they are necessary. If rules are necessary, can a satisfactory solution to the problem be reached? What could a solution be? Give the students time to complete questions 8 – 9.

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Encourage the students to discuss the following questions in pairs or small groups and complete question 9. What is your opinion of protesters? Would you protest for something you believe in? Is protesting an effective way of ‘getting results’? Why?

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Answers 1. True 2. To make them a focus in the headline and indicate a direct quote from the article. 3. People have already made their views on the rules of the park clear to the council. 4. Chris Wood 5. Because her sons will be too young to use the facility. 6. Answers will vary

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 7. Answers will vary; safety precautions 8. Answers will vary 9. Answers will vary

1. Find articles in your local community paper where people express their viewpoints. Bring to class to discuss. Do you agree/disagree? Why?

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Additional Activities

2. Select a community topic/issue. Interview a friend to find out how he/she feels about it. Present your interview as a newspaper article.

Discussion/Debate

1. Community facilities should not have rules.

2. Community members should be responsible for their own safety.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Local Council – Roles and Responsibilities •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Topic Focus

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Workbook Pages: 43 – 44

The students will investigate the roles, responsibilities and procedures of a local council.

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments (Comprehensive) http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

National Capital Authority (ACT): Annual Report (exemplar) http://www.nationalcapital.gov.au/ar9900/Contents/contents.htm

Students National Library of Australia: Australian Local Governments http://www.nla.gov.au/oz/gov/local.html

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Background Local Governments are elected for the following reasons: •to represent their local communities; •to be a responsible and accountable sphere of democratic governance; •to be a focus for community identity and civic spirit; •to provide appropriate services to meet community needs in an efficient and effective manner; and •to facilitate and coordinate local efforts and resources in pursuit of community goals.

Introductory Discussion

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Why do we have a council?

What sort of decision is a council required to make?

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What do you think are the most important roles played by a council?

Activity – Pages 43 – 44

Read the information about Clarktown Shire Council with the class. Encourage questioning to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the council and its members. Discuss the projects approved by the Clarktown Council and the amounts spent on each. Suggest what process may have been followed to have these things approved. Consider which of these projects were most important to the community. Discuss whether the community priorities would be the same as their personal priority. Students can complete question 1.

©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Encourage the students to refer back to the information on page 43 to identify the roles and responsibilities of council members and complete question 2. •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y• Discuss the types of resources which could be used to find out the names of

Answers 1. (a) Answers will vary

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people holding positions on their communities’ councils. The activities in questions 3 – 4 could be set as a homework task allowing students to use human resources to collect information about their community. This information should be fed back to the class and collated as a resource for future reference.

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2. (a) work with the mayor to make major decisions (b) day-to-day management of the council

(c) work with the councillors to make major decisions (d) oversees all council construction

3. Answers will vary 4. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Interview a councillor in your community to find out about his/her role and what he/she is responsible for. Discussion/Debate 1. Why is it so important for community members to be able to have their say? R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Helping Each Other Workbook Pages: 45 – 47 Topic Focus The students will investigate some ways in which communities help each other. Keywords natural disaster, cyclone, fundraising, survivors, refugees Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Cyclone Tracy Information Students Apex Club Australia

http://apex.org.au

State Emergency Service (NSW) http://www.ses.nsw.gov.au

The Salvos (Salvation Army) http://www.salvos.net/menu.html

Australia Red Cross http://www.redcross.org.au/

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http://www.ntlib.nt.gov.au/tracy/

Rotary in Australia © R. I . C .Publ i cat i ons Background •f orr evi ur p o sesgroups on l y Ine thew wake p of Cyclone Tracy, community of all kinds• launched fundraising http://www.rotary.org.au/

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activities and other initiatives designed to give practical help to the cyclone victims. Within the Northern Territory, small communities along the Stuart Highway organised themselves to meet Darwin refugees with food, rest, mechanical aid, and fuel. Major reception centres were set up at Katherine, Tennant Creek and Alice Springs. The people of Alice Springs raised over $105 000 in less than a day for immediate cash assistance. Beyond the Northern Territory, armed services personnel were recalled from leave, and at each major airport, Salvation Army and Red Cross workers established clothing depots so that those who had flown out in pyjamas or without shoes could be clothed. Information centres were set up in each State with the Red Cross taking particular responsibility for maintaining a list of names of refugees and their temporary addresses. Newspapers were published for Darwin refugees. Public housing waiting lists were waived so that Darwin families could be given priority. Further afield, support came from some of the world’s poorest countries such as Bangladesh and Lesotho, which sent money and messages of encouragement.

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Introductory Discussion When would whole communities help each other? How could a whole community provide support for another? Who would make the decisions about what would be done? Why would it be a good policy to help other communities in need? Activity – Pages 48 – 50 Read the passage about Cyclone Tracy on page 45. Discuss the types of services which might be destroyed in a situation such as this and the types of help which would be needed. Discuss what might have happened to the Darwin community if other communities had not assisted.

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Divide the class into four groups. Give each group a community group to research from the grid on page 47 (Rotary, Apex, Salvation Army, Red Cross). The students can find the aim of their selected group on the Internet (see web sites listed in resources). Alternatively, information about these groups could be sourced during a library lesson. Each group can then contribute its findings to assist the remainder of the class to complete the table for question 4.

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Ask the students to use the information in the text to complete questions 1 – 3.

In each group, the students can then discuss questions 5 – 7 and record ideas in point form in the spaces provided.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Answers

Help given to survivors

Community

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gave food, places to rest and sleep, fuel and car repairs

raised over $100 000

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sent money

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2. Answers will vary

3. Goods: housing, food, aircraft, vehicles; Services: doctors, nurses, transport, cleaning up 4.

Community Group Rotary Apex Salvation Army Red Cross

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Aims To achieve world understanding and peace through international humanitarian, educational, and cultural exchange programs Make the ideal of service the basis of all enterprise, develop more intelligent and aggressive citizenship, form enduring friendships, render altruistic service and build better communities, promote international understanding and friendship

To help people who are less fortunate or unable to cope with their current situation. To prevent and alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found.

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5. Because they help others in time of need 6. Answers will vary 7. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Collect examples from newspapers or magazines of communities in crisis. Brainstorm ways your community could help. Follow up your ideas by writing to the local council for help. Discussion/Debate

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1. All adults should volunteer shoe of their time to a community group.

Workbook Pages: 48 – 50

Topic Focus

The students will learn about being a cooperative community member.

© R. I . C.P ubl i cat i ons cooperative, volunteer, brigade Resources •f orr evi e w pur posesonl y• • The following websites are recommended: Keywords

http://www.ic.org/laev/Index.html

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Guides Australia

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Teacher LA Eco-Village (A cooperative community)

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Country Women’s Association of Australia http://www.cwaa.org.au/

NSW Rural Fire Service

http://www.bushfire.nsw.gov.au/main.htm

Background

Scouts Australia is an organisation designed to cater to the needs of boys while encouraging them to ‘give something back’ to the community. An example of the work scouts do is the ‘Nepal Environment Project’ which is a joint Australia – Nepal initiative aimed at bringing scouts from both nations to work together to assist nature to correct environmental damage in Nepal. Projects such as these present opportunities for boys to be involved in worthwhile projects and feel a great sense of achievement and worth, while learning the skills which will allow them to become involved or initiate further community and environment-based projects of their own. Working Together

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Introductory Discussion How do the members within a community help each other? Whose responsibility is it to help others in the community such as children, the elderly or people who are sick? Activity – Pages 48 – 50 Allow the students to read the passage ‘Helping Others’ on page 48 and complete question 1.

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Develop a class list of the types of volunteer work people do in their community. Use the list as a guide for the class survey in question 4. Students can then conduct a survey of their classmates to determine who have family members who volunteer in these areas. The results can be recorded on the graph provided for comparison. Discuss whether they and their families are helpful community members. What would happen if no-one volunteered to help in their community? What would change? Ask students to complete question 4.

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Discuss the volunteer roles different people in the community assume. Do these people take on these roles by choice? What do you think makes them want to do volunteer work? Students can complete questions 2 – 3.

Develop a class explosion chart of ways the students could help in their community. The ideas suggested by the class can be used to assist students in completing their own explosion chart in question 5.

Break the class into small groups and ask them to decide on one particular thing ©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons that students could do to help in their community. Have the students follow the instructions in question 6 to create a poster for display around the school, •f orr e vi ew u p osehelpful so nl ymembers. • encouraging theirp peers tor be responsible, community Answers 1. (a) agreed

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(b) finished (c) top (d) no-one (e) beneath

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2. bushfire brigade, school canteen, Country Women’s Association, nurse, scouts, visit the elderly, collect firewood. 3. scouts, visit the elderly, collect firewood 4. Answers will vary 5. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Your class is the local council and represents all other students in your ‘community’. Devise ways the members of your community can help each other. Remember to include roles, responsibilities, time and funding. Discussion/Debate 1. People are too busy with their own activities to help others. 2. How would you feel if there wasn’t anyone to help you in a crisis situation? R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Working Together Assessment and Evaluation The activity on page 41 is provided as one assessment tool in the study of this unit. It is designed to indicate broad student understanding and also provide opportunity for student feedback. The following outcomes were addressed in this topic of study. The following pages can be photocopied as a record of student performance or as a proforma for portfolio assessment. Outcomes Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

Answers

Distribute the activity sheet on page 41 of the Teachers Guide, one per student. Ask students to write their name in the top right-hand corner of the page. Read through the activity sheet to ensure students are clear about what they are being asked to do. At this stage, give students the opportunity to seek clarification of any part of the activity sheet they may not understand.

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Administration

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It is important students work independently on these activities—this provides a true representation of what students understand or of their lack of understanding. Once students have completed the activity, collect the worksheets. Mark and record results. From this activity sheet, some students may be found to require further work to develop their understanding in a particular area.

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1. (a) a cooperative social group whose members reside in a specific locality, share governments and have a cultural and historical heritage. (b) features constructed by people

(c) features which occur without the input of people

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3. Answers will vary

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2. Answers will vary

4. Answers will vary; library, public pool, parkland, sporting facilities, golf clubs, tree planting, construction of some roads, footpaths and buildings, project work based on the community’s needs.

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5. Answers will vary; fundraising, providing shelter, first aid, providing food, emotional support. 6. Answers will vary; Rotary, Apex, Salvation Army, Red Cross, Scouts, Girl Guides, Society of St Vincent de Paul, Country Women’s Association, Anglicare, Good Sammy.

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Working Together Student Name:

Date:

Task At the conclusion of the unit ‘Working Together’, students were asked to complete an activity sheet independently to demonstrate their understanding of the unit.

Pointers Demonstrated

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• Displays an understanding of built and natural features and provide examples to support their understanding. • Recognises work and leisure opportunities in their own community. • Demonstrates their knowledge of the services provided by local councils. • Understands ways communities and community groups help others in need.

Needs Further Opportunity

Satisfactory

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Working Together 1. (a) What is a community?

(b) What is a ‘natural’ feature?

(c) What is a ‘built’ feature?

(b) Name five leisure opportunities in your community.

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2. (a) Name five built features found in your community.

3. (a) Name five working opportunities in your community.

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5. How can communities help one another in difficult times?

6. Name two community groups which help others. Give examples of the help they give. Community Group

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Australian Communities Unit Focus Australian communities are coloured with broad-ranging historical and cultural roots. These aspects of communities are explored through the services they provide, the charity organisations they embrace and the significant events and celebrations they hold. Communities worldwide are made unique through these aspects and provide a comparison with the way we choose to live our lives in Australia. Unit Topics

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• Different Communities in Australia ..................................... 52 – 53 • Community Involvement ..................................................... 54 – 55 • Buildings in Your Community .............................................. 56 – 57 • Charity Organisations ......................................................... 58 – 61 • Local Community Celebrations ........................................... 62 – 63 • Community Celebrations in Other Countries ....................... 64 – 65 • Significant Events in Australia ............................................ 66 – 68 • Interview with an Older Community Member ..................... 69 – 71 • Life in an Overseas Community .......................................... 72 – 74

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The topics selected to develop this understanding are:

Outcomes and Indicators

Place and Space PS3.3 Understands that people have different views about which places need to be cared for.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y• Resources

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Culture C3.1 C3.2

Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work.

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R3.3

Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. Understands that different groups in communities function to meet various needs. Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals.

o c . che e r o t r s super C3.3

Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

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Different Communities in Australia Workbook Pages: 52 – 53 Topic Focus The students will compare other communities to their own. Keywords isolated, generator, traditional, quarters, possessions Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Wadeye Aboriginal Community Aboriginal Community

http://www.cchs.usyd.edu.au/bach/pub/community/Aboriginal%20community.htm

Students Wadeye Aboriginal Community http://www.indiginet.com.au/wadeye

Australian Bush Tucker

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http://www.indiginet.com.au/wadeye

http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/egg/egg0597/bushtuck.html

Alice Springs School of the Air http://www.assoa.nt.edu.au

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Communities are groups or categories of people who have something in common with each other which distinguishes them in a significant way from other groups. •f orr evi ew pu po seons nl yand• How a community isr defined depends itso geographical cultural boundaries

Background

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Introductory Discussion

and on its members. In the case of Aboriginal communities, extended families are important, and are organised differently among traditional, rural and urban settings. These families operate differently in each community. Aboriginal communities usually maintain a distance between themselves and the nonindigenous community. How this boundary is maintained varies from place to place, and is an important element in community identity. Traditional lore, culture and the Aboriginal identity of community members are also important.

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Do you think there are basic services that all communities must have to function properly? What are they? Do you think there are any services in your community you could live without?

Activity – Pages 52 – 53

Look at the map of the ‘Corella Bore Community’ on page 52. Predict from the map what the community might be like (where it is, who lives there). Read the passage as a whole class, allowing the students to ask questions after each point should they need clarification and to comment on how it is different from their own community. The students can then complete questions 1 – 4 independently.

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Answers 1. Aboriginal people mostly belonging to one extended family. 2. Hot; because the church is open and people generally sleep outside or under the verandas. 3. health, education, church 4. Answers will vary

Additional Activities

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1. Map your own community and compare it to Corella Bore or maps of communities near you.

Discussion/Debate

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2. Create a profile of your community following the format used for Corella Bore. 1. What are the factors that make communities in Australia different? 2. What are the necessary services every community needs?

Community Involvement

Topic Focus Keywords

Workbook Pages: 54 – 55

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The students will identify parts of the community they are involved in. •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y•

Resources

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Aged Services Association (NSW and ACT) http://www.agedservicesassociation.com.au

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community, services

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http://www.dungog.nsw.gov.au/i4.htm

Gannawarra Shire Council

http://www.gannawarra.vic.gov.au

Town of Cambridge (Click Services A–Z) http://www.cambridge.wa.gov.au

Background The Aged Services Association (ASA) represents, church, charitable and community-based organisations which provide housing, care and support services to more that 50 000 older people in their own homes, retirement villages and residential aged care facilities. It began as the Association of Voluntary Geriatric Agencies in NSW and was founded by the Anglican Church, the Baptist Church, the Big Sister Movement, the Catholic Church and the Churches of Christ. Today, it is a registered industrial organisation of employers who are aged and community R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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care providers in the non-profit, charitable sector. The ASA is a representative organisation and represents members’ views politically at a Commonwealth and State level. Introductory Discussion What services and facilities do you use in your community? How often do you use them? Are there any parts of the community you would like to get involved in?

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Activity – Pages 54 – 55

Model a drawing of the school’s local community, using the students’ ideas about what should be included. Give the students time to draw a map of the local community around their house and ask them to include labels or speech bubbles where appropriate.

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Discuss what a ‘bird’s eye view’ is. Look at the map on page 54. Allow the students to work in pairs to investigate the map and answer questions 1 – 3.

Discuss the similarities and differences between Jordie’s life and the students’ lives. Note also how the lives of the students in the class vary despite the fact that many of them live in the same community. Discuss reasons why. Direct the students to question 5 to note similarities and differences between their life and Jordie’s.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Answers

1. swimming training, drama class

2. movies, swimming at the beach, rollerblading, swimming lessons, drama lessons. 3. aquatic centre, cinema, shopping centre, train, school, skate park, cafe, kiosk 4. Answers will vary

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1. Put all the information gathered from the individual maps above onto a large map of the community. Discuss which areas or facilities are most widely used.

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1. What facilities would you like to see in your community and why? 2. Discuss the various forms of transport available in your community.

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Buildings in Your Community Workbook Pages: 56 – 57 Topic Focus The students will observe buildings and places in their community and investigate what they are used for. Keywords building, goods, services, facility

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au

Students National Trust Properties (Tasmania)

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher National Trust of Australia (NSW)

http://www.tased.edu.au/tasonline/nattrust/properti.htm

City of Sydney: Historical Buildings

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/hs_historical_buildings.asp

Background

The National Trust of Australia focuses on protecting all aspects of Australian heritage, whether it be environmental, cultural or structural. The organisation is not a government-funded body; it raises funds primarily through membership fees and donations. Among the successes of the group are the Great Barrier Reef being spared from oil exploration and being added to the World Heritage list, stopping a nuclear power station from being built at Jervis Bay, restoring the Chinese Joss House in Bendigo, and the conservation of the Queen Victoria Building in Sydney’s CBD.

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Activity – Pages 56 – 57

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Have you ever taken notice of what the buildings and places around your school are used for? Make a class list of the things people use buildings for.

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To complete this lesson, you will need to go on a short excursion into the school’s local community so students can identify local buildings and classify them by use. Show the students the table on page 56. Read through the lists of uses to ensure students are familiar with the possibilities before visiting the local neighbourhood. Explain that they will need to give a name to each building they visit and write it along the top of the grid. The students should take their workbook with them on the excursion and tick the relevant boxes when visiting each building. On return, discuss which were the most commonly occurring buildings in the school’s local community. The information collated can then be used to complete questions 1 – 2.

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Answers 1. Answers will vary 2. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Take photographs of places, buildings and people in your community. Label and make a class display.

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2. Design a building suitable for your favourite activity.

Discussion/Debate

1. Which buildings in your community should be preserved? Why?

Charity Organisations

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2. Which buildings in your community should be upgraded? Why?

Workbook Pages: 58 – 61

Topic Focus

The students will find out about charity organisations that use paid and unpaid workers to cater for our communities’ needs.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons charity, assistance, committee, relief, volunteer, disaster, fund-raising •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Resources Keywords

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Frederic Ozanam: Chronology

http://www.cptryon.org/vdp/tree/svdp/stoz/chron.html

Students Society of St Vincent de Paul – Services

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Australia Red Cross

http://www.redcross.org.au/

Salvation Army: Services and Programs http://www.salvos.net/social

Background The Society of St Vincent de Paul is a charity organisation committed to empowering those seeking to break free of the cycle of poverty. The organisation endeavours to be an active advocate on behalf of those in need and a central point for the wider community to meet the needs of others. The long list of services to the community includes emergency food which supplies needy families with non-perishable food, materials for work and for home, including clothing and furniture, and adult education courses to empower people to gain employment Australian Communities

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and become self sufficient financially. Introductory Discussion What is ‘charity’? What do charity organisations do? Do you think they play an important role in the community? Develop a class list of known charity organisations. Activity – Page 58

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Ask the students to return to their work space and nominate a student from each group to give a brief description of the charity organisation investigated. The students should be encouraged to ask questions at this point.

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Break the class into three groups. Have each group read one of the passages on pages 58 – 60 outlining a charity organisation (Society of St Vincent de Paul, The Red Cross, The Country Women’s Association). Each group should work together to answer the questions relating to its passage.

Allow the students time to read the remaining two passages and answer the corresponding questions. Check answers together. Students can then work in pairs to design a poster encouraging people to donate to one of the three organisations investigated and to complete the summary table on the bottom of page 61.

Answers ©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Saint Vincent De Paul

1. The main wage-earner had died from cholera.

2. Because he did not like to see people suffering.

(b) True

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(b) Someone who escapes to another country for safety, especially during war (c) A serious shortage of food, usually caused by drought.

o c . che e r o t r s super (d) The giving of help or money to people who need it.

The Red Cross

1. That the wounded would often lie for days on the battlefield and die from hunger or thirst 2. During future wars, all sick and wounded soldiers should be cared for, regardless of which country they came from 3. (a) True (b) False (c) True 4. Answers will vary 5. Answers will vary

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The Country Women’s Association 1. Women living in the wilds of the countryside were unable to learn new skills. 2. Raising money for charities; research into health; and to help those in other countries 3. Answers will vary 4. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Research and list all the charity organisations in your town, suburb or community.

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2. Interview a member of a charity organisation. 1. How can you get involved in a charity organisation? 2. What are the benefits of joining a charity organisation?

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Local Community Celebrations

Workbook Pages: 62 – 63

Topic Focus

The students will collect information about local community celebrations. © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Keywords •f orr evi ew pufestival, r po sesonl y• venue, celebration, charity Resources

http://www.blessingfleet.asn.au/

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Australia’s Cultural Network: Portal (click ‘Festivals and Events’) Students Blessing of the Fleet, Ulladulla

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http://broomewa.com/shinju

Anzac Day Dawn Service

http://www.anzacday.org.au/education/tff/dawn.html

Background

Anzac Day is arguably the most significant and widely acknowledged Australian ‘celebration’. The Dawn Service has become an integral part of commemorations on 25 April. Its origin is divided between the Reverend Arthur Ernest White of Albany, WA and Captain George Harrington of Toowoomba, Queensland. Reverend White noted the significance of Albany as the ‘last sight of land these Anzac troops saw after leaving Australian shores’ and acknowledged that a commemorative service should be held there at the first light of dawn each Anzac Day to remember them. He is quoted to have been the first to say the now Australian Communities

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traditional words, ‘As the sun rises and goeth down we will remember them’. In Toowoomba, in 1919, Captain Harrington and a group of friends visited the graves and memorials of men killed in action in World War I and placed flowers (not poppies) on the headstones. Afterwards they toasted their mates with rum. In following years these men followed a similar pattern but adjourned to Picnic Point at 4.28 a.m. (the time of the original Anzac landing), where a bugler sounded ‘Last Post’ and ‘Reveille’. Introductory Discussion

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S What events do Australians celebrate each year?

Local communities also hold their own celebrations. Can you think of any special celebrations which are held in your community? What is special about your community that you feel should be celebrated?

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Why would a community put effort into preparing for celebrations such as these?

Activity – Pages 62 – 63

Locate Fremantle on a map of Australia. Discuss what is special about its location (seaport). Together, read through the events held in Fremantle each year on page 62. Discuss why they may have chosen to hold these particular celebrations. For example, why would a Busker’s Festival be held? What does that suggest about the people who live in the Fremantle community? Allow the students time to complete questions 1 – 4.

Discuss where the information about these events may have been found. Develop ©R . I . C . P ubl i ca t i on s a short class list of the places they may be able to find out about events happening inv their community. •f orr e i e w pur posesonl y•

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4. (a) Elvis Alive in Fremantle; Busker’s Festival, Sardine Festival

(b) Australia Day; Indigenous Cultural Fair; Anzac Day Dawn Service; Fremantle Fishing Fleet Festival (c) John Hughes Big Walk

5. Answers will vary

Additional Activities 1. Volunteer to design posters for an up-and-coming community event. 2. Develop a calendar of events for your school community. Discussion/Debate 1. What Anzac Day means to all Australians. 2. What Australia Day means to different groups in Australia. R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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Community Celebrations in Other Countries Workbook Pages: 64 – 65 Topic Focus The students will gather information on the different ways communities celebrate and consider the value of the event to the individual. Keywords

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festival, carp, thanks, speech, shamrock, cheerleader • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Thanksgiving Recipes

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Resources

http://www.thanksgivingrecipe.com/default.asp

Holiday Lesson Plans and Activities (Good links)

http://members.aol.com/Donnpages/Holidays.html

Students Holidays and Festivals Around the World (Dutch school site) http://www.internet-at-work.com/hos_mcgrane/holidays/

An American Thanksgiving

© R. I . C .P ubandl i cat i ons Chinese Festivals Dragon Lore Happy •f orr evi e wHanukka pur posesonl y• http://www.night.net/thanksgiving/#gobble

http://members.aol.com/donnandlee/ChineseFestivals.html http://www.caryn.com/holiday/holiday-chan.html

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Background Just as different Australian communities hold celebrations which are pertinent to their identity and beliefs, so to do other countries. The tradition of Thanksgiving in the United States is known worldwide as an American custom, but after investigation of the celebrations held by native American Indians, its roots are thought to extend far back into history. Similarly, some authorities link the American Thanksgiving with the ancient Jewish observance of Sukkot, which expresses thanks to God for the bounty of the earth. The traditional celebration held by Americans stems from Pilgrims as early as 1621 holding feasts over several days to give thanks for their harvests. George Washington declared 26 November as a national day of ‘thanksgiving and prayer’ after his inauguration as the nation’s first president in 1789.

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Introductory Discussion Why do Australians celebrate? People in other countries celebrate. Do you think they celebrate for the same reasons? List celebrations that are held in other countries.

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Activity – Pages 64 – 65 Read and discuss each of the three celebrations described on page 64. Ask the students if any parts of these celebrations seem unusual. Do they think any of their celebrations might be seen as unusual to children in other countries? Use the information from page 64 to complete activities 1 – 2 independently. Before completing question 3 discuss reasons why each of the celebrations listed may or may not be celebrated in Australia. Answers

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Name

Special food eaten

How it was celebrated

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving parade Turkey Speech of thanks Feast

Pete

St Patrick's Day

Wear green Party

Yoshi

Children's Day

Fly carp streamers Rice cakes Display warrior dolls

Black pudding

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Ashley

Event

2. Thanksgiving: turkey, marching, speech, thanks; St Patrick’s Day: black pudding, green, shamrock, dancing; Children’s Day: rice cakes, carp, strength, success

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Additional Activities •f orr ev ew uabout r p se ntol y •explaining 1. i Write a diaryp entry ano event yous haveo been recently, 3. Answers will vary

what it meant to you and how you celebrated it.

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2. Select one special day and research its origin. Prepare a presentation for the class. Discussion/Debate

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1. Should Australians celebrate events from other countries?

2. Most ‘special days’ are really just an excuse for shops to increase their sales.

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Significant Events in Australia Workbook Pages: 66 – 68 Topic Focus The students will explore significant events and who celebrates them. Keywords organise, conditions, evacuated, commemorate, reunite, preparation Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Anzac Day – Education (Resources)

Australian Cultural Network: Chinese New Year http://www.acn.net.au/articles/snake/

Students Anzac Biscuits Recipe

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http://www.anzacday.org.au/education/education.html

http://www.kidlink.org/KIDPROJ/MCC/mcc0060.html

Clean Up Australia http://www.cleanup.com.au/

Arbor Day

http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/forest_facts/arbor_day.html

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons An event with growing significance in Australia is the celebration of the Chinese New Year. Chinese people first came to Australia in large numbers during the •f orr evi ew r p e sChinese-Australian onl y•families can trace gold rush of p the u 1850s ando 60s,s and many

Background

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Introductory Discussion

their settlement in Australia to that time. Chinese New Year, pronounced in Chinese as ‘xin ninan’, occurs on the first day of the first month of the lunar calendar. The Chinese-Australian community holds a variety of events to celebrate the arrival of the Chinese New Year. Since 1979, a 92-metre long Great Dragon has appeared in the streets of Melbourne, while in Sydney, festivities stretch to two weeks and include a grand parade, Dragon boat races and night markets.

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List some significant events in Australia’s history. Why are some celebrated and others not? A celebration does not necessarily mean a party. How else do people celebrate?

Activity – Pages 66 – 68

Allow the students time to read the three passages about Australian celebrations on pages 66 – 67 and complete the quiz. When completed, use the questions in the quiz to guide discussion about each of the celebrations. Encourage the students to share experiences they have had celebrating each of these events. Following this discussion, students can complete questions 1 – 3 independently.

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Answers Quiz 1. Ian Kiernan 2. World War I 3. Firecrackers 4. Dawn Service 5. Sydney Harbour

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 6. Lotus seeds 7. 1993

8. Good luck

10. Lanterns

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9. 8 months

Page 68

1. Clean Up Australia: pollution, volunteers, plastic bags, success, results; Anzac Day: battle, evacuated, war, horror, bravery; Chinese New Year: firecrackers, lanterns, joy, wealth, happiness 2.

Clean Up Australia

Who

Volunteers

Anzac Day

War veterans and soldiers and public

Chinese New Year

Chinese

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• How

Cleaning up their local Dawn service and environments marches through the city

To reduce pollution

Why

Celebrations Parades Traditional food

To remember all those To welcome in the new year who fought and died in wars

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Discussion/Debate

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3. Answers will vary

1. Research Chinese lanterns and construct one. 2. Bake Anzac cookies.

o c . che e r o t r s super 1. Is Anzac Day significant for all Australians?

2. Why do you think Clean Up Australia/World Day has been such a success?

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Interview with an Older Community Member Workbook Pages: 69 – 71 Topic Focus The students will collect information about their community through direct and indirect experiences. Keywords

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

dairy, interview, district, power, freeway, government • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Internet Family History Association of Australia http://ozgenie.bizland.com/

Students Lilydale and District Historical Society http://www.art-technology.com.au/lilyhist

Background

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Resources

To find out information about the history of your local community, log onto HistoryAustralia.org.au. This site is the registered domain name of the Internet Family History Association of Australia (IFHAA). The IFHAA is a non-profit, Internetbased family history society and membership is free and open to any researcher with an interest in Australian Family and Local History. The IFHAA pages are a collection of genealogy resources including mailing lists, message boards and member contributions relating to many aspects of researching Australian local and family history.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Activity – Pages 69 – 71

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Do you think your community has changed very much over the last hundred years? How could you find out about the ways things have changed during that time? Do you think there will be much change over the next hundred years?

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Break the students into pairs. Have them read through the interview orally, each partner choosing to be either the reporter or Mrs Cameron. Still in pairs, allow the students to complete questions 1 – 7. Discuss Mrs Cameron’s last line in the interview. Why would she be wishing things were like the old days? Are there things about your community you wish had not changed? Are there things that have changed since you were a small child? Would you prefer them to have stayed the same? Are all changes good changes? Allow the students to write their opinion to answer question 8.

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Answers 1. 96 years old 2. pioneer – one of the first people to settle in a region century – a period of 100 years christened – a ceremony to be received into the Christian Church shingles – thin pieces of wood used to cover roofs and sides of houses 3. Her father and men from the district

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4. electricity; transport; roads; population; buildings; houses; facilities – hospitals, cinema, churches, university 5. Mrs Cameron’s Schooling: Educated at home by mother; learnt reading, writing and sums; learn about British history, cooking; Grew own vegetables

6. Answers will vary

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My Schooling: Answers will vary

7. Answers will vary 8. Answers will vary

Additional Activities

1. Conduct an interview with a long-standing member of your community. 2. Research and record the major changes in your community as a time line.

© R1.. I C.good? Publ i cat i ons Is. change 2. Do we take our past for granted? How can we learn from it? •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y•

Discussion/Debate

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Keywords

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The students will collect information on people in communities overseas and compare their lifestyles and experiences with their own.

o c . che e r o t r s super province, population, anthem, respect

Resources

• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Sriwittayapaknam School in Thailand (Very comprehensive) http://www.sriwittayapaknam.ac.th/

Students Nattawud’s Student Homepage in Thailand http://www.thailandlife.com/nattawud_02/index.html

Sriwittayapaknam School in Thailand http://www.sriwittayapaknam.ac.th

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Background The school described in this unit, Sriwittayapaknam School, is located in Samut Prakan City, about 30 kilometres south of Bangkok in Thailand. The school is privately owned, catering for students aged between 3 and 15, and is noted for its high academic record and forward-looking policy. This is reflected in its investment in new technology. Investigation of Sriwittayapaknam School reveals the similarities and differences between Australian schools and schools in neighbouring countries. Special note should be given to the private nature of this particular school and further investigation of Thailand will create a clearer picture for students of the diversity which can exist within a country.

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Introductory Discussion

Imagine you live in Thailand. What do you imagine life would be like there?

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Do you think that people in other countries have a similar lifestyle to ours?

Activity – Pages 72 – 74

Locate Thailand on a map of the world. Discuss what the students know about countries in that part of the world. Read the passage ‘Living in Thailand’. As this is a lengthy passage, you may choose to let students read quietly in pairs or break the passage by its subtitles and have each pair report back to the group with what they have learnt. While the students are waiting for others to finish reading, they should be encouraged to locate Thailand on the map on page 73 and colour it.

© R. I . C. ubl i c at i o nsthe lifestyles in Australia and Discuss theP similarities and differences between Thailand. Which community would you prefer to live in? Why? Which things about your community do r youp think Pratya would like?n •f orr evi ew pu o se so l y• Allow the children time to complete questions 2 – 3. Answers

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1.

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Thailand

City/Town:

Samut Prakarn

Type of house:

terrace house

Number of bedrooms: 2

Australian Communities

School starts at:

8:00 a.m.

School finishes at:

3:45 p.m.

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Food eaten at morning break: meat fried on a stick, fried noodles, fried chicken and quail eggs, ice drink

Lunchtime activities:

stamp club, chess club, computer club, cartoon club

School uniform:

black shorts, white shirt, tie; dark blue skirt, white shirt, tie

Favourite sport:

basketball, football

Interests:

Thai kickboxing, TV, computer games

Favourite food:

double cheeseburger and fries

Places of interest:

crocodile farm, naval museum/ old fort, ancient city/Buddhist temples

Industries:

Food and drink, cloth and clothing, plastic and chemicals

Improvements:

not so crowded/ polluted

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Additional Activities

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Where is lunch eaten: classroom

1. Communicate with students in another school overseas, via the Internet. 2. Have a ‘Thai food’ day in your class or your school. Find recipes and prepare them with your teacher’s help.

Discussion/Debate

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Australian Communities Assessment and Evaluation The activity on page 63 is provided as one assessment tool in the study of this unit. It is designed to indicate broad student understanding and also provide opportunity for student feedback. The following outcomes were addressed in this topic of study. The following pages can be photocopied as a record of student performance or as a proforma for portfolio assessment. Place and Space PS3.3 Understands that people have different views about which places need to be cared for. Resources R3.3 Understands that individuals and groups value different forms of work. Culture C3.1 Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. C3.2 Understands that different groups in communities function to meet various needs. C3.3 Understands that membership of different groups influences the identity of individuals. Natural and Social Systems NSS3.2 Understands that members of groups and communities have rights and accompanying responsibilities.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Outcomes

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Distribute the activity sheet on page 63 of the Teachers Guide, one per student. Ask to u write their name in the topo right-hand corner •f orr evi estudents wp r po s e s nl y •of the page. Read through the activity sheet to ensure students are clear about what they are being

Administration

asked to do. At this stage, give students the opportunity to seek clarification of any part of the activity sheet they may not understand.

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It is important students work independently on these activities—this provides a true representation of what students understand or of their lack of understanding. Once students have completed the activity, collect the worksheets. Mark and record results. From this activity sheet, some students may be found to require further work to develop their understanding in a particular area.

o c . che e r o t r s super 1. Answers will vary

2. (a) Answers will vary; supply of water, food, shelter, clothing, health care (b) Answers will vary

3. provide free services to people in need, or for the protection of aspects of the environment 4. (a) to recognise significant events or issues which are relevant to their community (b) Answers will vary 5. (a) Thanksgiving: speech of thanks, turkey (b) St Patrick’s Day: green, shamrock (c) Children’s Day: carp, rice cakes 6. Answers will vary; Australia Day, Anzac Day, Christmas, Easter, Queen’s Birthday, New Year’s Eve 7. Answers will vary

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Australian Communities Student Name:

Date:

Task At the conclusion of the unit ‘Australian Communities’, students were asked to complete an activity sheet independently to demonstrate their understanding of the unit.

Pointers

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Demonstrated

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Discussion and Debate

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• Demonstrates an awareness of community services which are necessary. • Recognises the contribution made by charity organisations to their community. • Understands that celebrations are held to recognise events or issues significant to local and wider communities. • Demonstrates an awareness of similarities and differences between their community and communities in other parts of the world.

Needs Further Opportunity

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Workbook Activities •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• | Needs Improvement

Satisfactory

|

Needs Improvement

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Satisfactory

|

Additional Activities Needs Improvement

Satisfactory

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General Comment

Needs Improvement

|

Satisfactory

|

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|

|

Satisfactory

|

Student Comment

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Australian Communities 1. Name one part of the community you are involved in. How are you involved?

2. (a) List three basic services a community needs to function independently.

(b) List three services in your community you could live without.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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3. What do charity organisations do?

4. (a) Why do communities celebrate?

(b) Give examples of events celebrated in your local community.

5.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Match these celebrations from other countries their customs. •f orr e v i ew ptou r p osesonl y•

(a) Thanksgiving

• green

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(b) St Patrick’s Day

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(c) Children’s Day

• speech of thanks • rice cakes

• turkey

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• carp

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6. Name and describe a significant event celebrated in Australia.

7. Compare your school to the school in Thailand described in your workbook. How are they similar?

How are they different?

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National Parks or e st

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National Parks Unit Focus Approximately 3 200 Australian National Parks have been created to conserve culturally or scientifically significant locations in their natural state. Their preservation and management is the responsibility of governments, community groups and the individuals who use them. Unit Topics • National Parks .................................................................... 76 – 77 • Parks .................................................................................. 78 – 80 • National Parks in Your State ............................................... 81 – 84 • Forest Management ........................................................... 85 – 86 • Kakadu ............................................................................... 87 – 91 • Park Study .......................................................................... 92 – 95 • Rules .................................................................................. 96 – 98 • Who’s Responsible? ......................................................... 99 – 100

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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The topics selected to develop this understanding are:

Outcomes and Indicators

Place and Space PS3.1 Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. PS3.2 Understands that the use people make of different places is affected by natural and built features.

©R . I . CUnderstands .Pub l i cat i ons PS3.3 that people have different views about which places need to be cared for. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Resources R3.1 Understands that people have to make choices in their use of limited resources. Natural and Social Systems NSS3.1 Understands that elements of natural systems link to form cycles of which people are a part.

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National Parks Workbook Pages: 76 – 77 Topic Focus The students will identify what they know and what they would like to know about National Parks. Keywords conservation, refuge, environment, natural heritage, sacred

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.atn.com.au/parks/parks.htm

Great Outdoor Recreation Pages – National Parks – Australia

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Australia’s National Parks

http://www.gorp.com/gorp/location/australi/park/parks.htm

Students Australia’s National Parks http://www.atn.com.au/parks/parks.htm

Great Outdoor Recreation Pages – National Parks – Australia http://www.gorp.com/gorp/location/australi/park/parks.htm

Background

Most Australian National Parks and reserves are within easy reach of main cities © R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons and towns. Some are reached by road, some by air, and a few by rail. Many parks contain fragments of Aboriginal culture—paintings, burial grounds and ceremonial •f orr evi ew r p o s eso l ycases, •parks are owned sites. Thesep rare,u sacred sites are protected and,n in some

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Introductory Discussion

by the Aboriginal people. Every year, more than 4 000 000 people visit Australia’s National Parks and, as a result, almost all parks have walking tracks and picnic spots. In some parks, camping is allowed in designated areas and some allow bush camps. Visitors to National Parks can undertake a range of activities such as abseiling, bushwalking, botanical pursuits and discovering Australia’s colourful birds, mammals, and reptiles.

o c . che e r o t r s super Have you ever been to a National Park?

Why had that area been made into a National Park?

Who decides what should be made into a National Park?

Activity – Pages 76 – 77

The students can begin by reading the introduction to the topic at the beginning of page 76. Break the class into groups to research what is meant by the following terms: conservation park, reserve, refuge and natural heritage. Have the students report their findings to the class and allow the students to complete questions 1 – 2. Share experiences the students have had at National Parks. Discuss the reasons why the parks were created and their general characteristics. Students can record their personal experiences in question 3.

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Answers 1. Answers will vary 2. Answers will vary 3. Answers will vary

Additional Activities

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. Arrange for a National Park employee to talk to your class about National Parks.

Discussion/Debate

Topic Focus

1. All of Australia should be one big National Park.

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2. Working with partners or in groups, research to find National Parks that are also Aboriginal heritage sites. Present a report on one of these to the class.

2. People should be kept away from sacred Aboriginal sites so they are not damaged.

Parks

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i oWorkbook ns Pages: 78 – 80 •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y• The students will learn about State and National Parks; their rules, conservation and locations. natural, heritage, reserve

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Keywords

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http://www.educationplanet.com/search/Environment/Ecology/Parks/ National_Parks/Australia/

Students Education Planet – National Parks – Australia

http://www.educationplanet.com/search/Environment/Ecology/Parks/ National_Parks/Australia/

Background National Parks, and other conservation reserves, exist to protect Australia’s natural diversity. They are also centres of cultural heritage for Aboriginal Australians who have occupied the land for more that 40 000 years, and for the generations of immigrants who have arrived since colonisation in 1788. The first laws to protect the country’s scenic areas were passed in Tasmania in 1863. In 1879, the Royal National Park was established south of Sydney. This was Australia’s first and the R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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world’s second National Park. There are now around 3 200 national parks, conservation parks, reserves, and refuges set aside in Australia, covering 5.3% of the Australian landmass. In addition to this, 228 marine and estuarine areas have been set aside, covering a further 38 million hectares. Introductory Discussion Why do we need to conserve areas of land in National Parks? How do we go about ensuring this land is conserved?

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Activity – Pages 78 – 80

Students can work independently to list rules they think should be applied to all National Parks in Australia and then share their thoughts with the class.

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Read the information about National Parks on page 78 and discuss questions 1 – 5 allowing the students to complete each questions as a result of what they have learnt.

Discuss the effects of tourists upon National Parks. Allow the students to work in small groups to brainstorm the main attractions for tourists in each of the environments listed on page 80. Discuss and record any elements common to all National Parks. Answers

1. Answers will vary, but along the lines of an area of land that has been put aside as a nature reserve and contains a snapshot of nature at work for all to see and enjoy.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

2. (a) Answers will vary; because we have such a varied landscape; large areas of land (b) Answers will vary

3. To incorporate all different types of environments

4. (a) The speed and efficiency of today’s technology can destroy large areas in a short time; less wilderness left

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Discussion/Debate

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1. Is there an environment in or near your community that is under threat? Write to your council requesting it to be made a park. Be sure to include your reasons why. 1. Tourism should be stopped in National Parks to preserve the environment. 2. ‘People are more important than parks.’

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National Parks in Your State Workbook Pages: 81 – 84 Topic Focus The students will learn where National Parks exist in their State and Australia and the location of some heritage sites. Keywords information, tourism, location, natural, cultural, undisturbed

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.npws.nsw.gov.au

Students NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service http://www.npws.nsw.gov.au

Willandra Lakes – World Heritage Site

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http://www.gorp.com/gorp/location/australi/park/ns_willa.htm

Background

Each State is home to significant protected areas which have become part of their identity. For example, in Queensland we find the Great Barrier Reef; in the Northern Territory, Kakadu; Western Australia, Ningaloo; South Australia, Lake Eyre; Victoria, Grampians; Tasmania, Cradle Mountain; New South Wales, Blue Mountains. The environmental diversity of each State is also notable. Across Australia, rainforests, deserts, mangrove swamps, eucalypt forests, alpine herbfields, coastal heaths, grasslands and many other environments can be found. The Parks which preserve these environments range in size from massive tracts of wilderness to tiny historic sites.

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Activity – Pages 81 – 82

Have you visited any National Parks?

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Have you heard of any National Parks you would like to visit? Why are they of particular interest to you? Look at the map on page 82. Discuss which names the students recognise and brainstorm any they know of which have not been included on the map. Using an atlas and the grid on page 82, have the students draw their State and locate their capital city. Students can then locate three National Parks in their atlas and include them on their map. To complete this task, the areas of each park can also be found in an atlas.

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Answers 1. Answers will vary

Activity – Pages 83 – 84 As a whole class, read the ‘World Heritage Sites’ describing a range of Australian National Parks. Discuss the climate and special features of each site, based on its short description and any general knowledge the students may have. Using an atlas, the students can then find the areas marked on the map on page 84 and record their names.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Answers

1. Heard and McDonald Islands

3. Tasmanian Wilderness

4. (a) Naracoorte Fossil Site (b) Riversleigh Fossil Site 5. Lord Howe Island Group 6. Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves 7. Willandra Lakes Region 8. Shark Bay

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2. Macquarie Island

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 9. Uluru–Kata Tjuta National Park

10. Kakadu National Park 11. Fraser Island

12. Queensland Wet Tropics 13. Great Barrier Reef

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National Parks

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1. Research to identify a National Park in three countries other than Australia. Show on a world map. 2. Select one Australian National Park near you and research to report its special features. Present your findings to the class.

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1. Why is one area of Australia considered important enough to be a World Heritage Site and others not?

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Forest Management Workbook Pages: 85 – 86 Topic Focus The students will learn how forests require management and how people are finding alternatives to chopping down native trees. Keywords native forest, plantations, clearfelling

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S National Association of Forest Industries

http://www.nafi.com.au/faq/management

Students Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry – Australia http://www.affa.gov.au/outputs/forestry.html

National Association of Forest Industries http://www.nafi.com.au/faq/management

State Forests of NSW

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Forestry Australia is an organisation aimed at achieving fully accredited sustainable •f orr e vi ewof Australian pur poandse sowhile nl y •the needs of management forests plantations meeting

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Introductory Discussion

http://www.forest.nsw.gov.au

governments, forest owners, industry and forest communities. It is dedicated to identifying and protecting forests based on conservation, cultural and heritage values, and also to creating sustainable native forests through effective management and ensuring there is no conflict between sustainable forest management and hardwood woodchip production. Sharing the ideal to ‘think globally but act locally’ is Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Australia, whose goal is to assist the forestry industry to grow, improve and capitalise on new opportunities while protecting the environment and contributing to the prosperity and quality of life in rural and regional Australia. While forestry enables us to continue to provide sustainably produced wood, it will increasingly provide opportunities to help reduce the level of greenhouse gases, control salinity and improve biodiversity conservation.

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http://www.affa.gov.au/outputs/forestry.html

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry – Australia

o c . che e r o t r s super Do you think we should be chopping down trees? Why? Are you prepared to give up timber products? What alternatives do you think we have?

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Activity – Pages 85 – 86 Read together the information at the top of page 85. Discuss whether the students feel the solutions given are satisfactory. Do they see any long-term or short-term problems with these suggestions? Allow the students to complete questions 1 – 5. Refer to the text stating that ‘chopping down trees causes great damage to the environment’. Discuss what kind of damage is occurring as a result of chopping down trees. How could these problems be rectified? Students can answer the remaining questions independently.

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1. heating, building, furniture, housing etc.

3. Because this is where large amounts of timber can be found in one place

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2. Answers will vary

4. People have only begun to realise that it causes great damage to chop down trees and many years for them to grow again. 5. More National Parks, bans on logging, use of fast-growing plantation trees 6. Answers will vary 7. Answers will vary 8. Answers will vary

© R. I . C .Pu bl i ca i on s groups to locate 1. Research in newspapers andt through environmental areas where there is debate on the logging of forests. Present your information to r thep class. sure to present both sides of the debate. •f orr evi ew pu oBes es on l y •

Additional Activities

Discussion/Debate 1. All logging should be stopped in Australia.

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2. People need homes and you can always replant trees.

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Workbook Pages: 87 – 91

The students will learn about one of Australia’s most famous National Parks— Kakadu.

Keywords Kakadu, Northern Territory, billabong Resources • The following websites are recommended: Teacher Kakadu – Australia’s Ancient Wilderness http://www.pbs.org/edens/kakadu/

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Friends of Kakadu http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kakadu/

Students Kakadu – Australia’s Ancient Wilderness http://www.pbs.org/edens/kakadu/

Kakadu and Jabiru Visitors Guide http://www.northernterritory.com/3-5.html

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Kakadu is richly diverse in flora and fauna and ancient Aboriginal cultural reserves mark it as perhaps Australia’s and the world’s most important window into the existence of early man. Kakadu is also valuable in terms of the millions upon millions of dollars in revenue it could provide Australia should its uranium ore, situated within the park, be mined. Australia contains nearly a third of the world’s uranium reserves, but holds only 10 per cent of the global market. After worldwide debate, the World Heritage Committee (WHC), declared Jabiluka (the area to be mined) ‘not in danger’ and the decision was made to mine, causing company stock to skyrocket. However, production which was to begin in 2001 will not open until at least 2006. In spite of the WHC ruling, many international environmental organisations will continue to lobby against the Jabiluka mine.

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Background

Introductory Discussion

Kakadu is Australia’s largest land-based National Park. What are some of the advantages of preserving such a large area?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Allow the students time to read the information about Kakadu on page 87. Refer •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y• to ‘Wildlife at Kakadu’ and discuss why certain types of wildlife are more plentiful

Activity – Pages 87 – 91

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than others. Challenge the students to find the names of two creatures for each category listed on the table and develop a class chart of their findings. This activity may be most effectively used in the library where the students have access to a wide range of resources. Read ‘The Kakadu Seasons’ with the students. Discuss the impact these seasons would have on how people living ‘on the land’ would exist. The students can use the information from pages 87 – 88 to complete questions 2 – 5 and 7 – 8. They will need to use an atlas to complete numbers 1 and 6.

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Allow the students to work in pairs to complete the creative task of naming the ‘six seasons’, using standard English, in the spaces provided on pages 90 – 91. Discuss the maintenance of Kakadu. It is not easy to manage such a large area. What are some of the problems its carers face? In the space provided, ask the students to record their suggestions and how they might be solved.

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Answers 1.

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2. Longest continuing human culture in the world have lived in the region for 40 000 years. 3. Introduction of tobacco, alcohol and foreign plants and animals has meant great changes to the Aboriginal culture and tradition. 4. Gagudju people 5. Answers will vary; doesn’t list specific species 6. (1) South Alligator River (2) West Alligator River (3) Wildman River

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20 000km2

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

7. Explorers would have thought them to be alligators because that’s what they would have been called where they came from 8. Answers will vary

Answers for ‘six seasons’ – Teacher check

Additional Activities

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1. Watch a video about Kakadu National Park. Discuss its features. 2. Write to students in a school in the Northern Territory to find out more.

Discussion/Debate

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1. Kakadu is such an important historic and environmental area, it should be off-limits to visitors.

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2. Saltwater crocodiles should be removed from Kakadu because human safety comes first.

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Park Study Workbook Pages: 92 – 95 Topic Focus The students will make a study of a National Park, refuge, local reserve or local park. Keywords conservation, management, responsible, wildlife

Resources

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S http://www.atn.com.au/parks/parks.htm

Students Australia’s National Parks

http://www.atn.com.au/parks/parks.htm

Background

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• The following websites are recommended: Teacher Australia’s National Parks

Conservationists are those who advocate or promote the preservation of areas which are significant, culturally or scientifically, in their natural state. They take on the role of managing a natural environment to ensure it is not destroyed in the process of development. In the face of the rapid change which accompanies the development of communities, responsibility needs to be taken for the conservation of natural environments which have been identified as being significant. Each person can make a contribution to conserving these areas in his or her local environment.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Introductory Discussion

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Identify the conservation areas near your school. Who is responsible for their management? Are they well maintained? Could any improvements be made?

Activity – Pages 92 – 95

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Decide upon a local conservation area to investigate with the class. Discuss the information to be recorded about the area and give the students time to research and complete the details of its location and general description on pages 92 – 95. Though it is not necessary, visiting the location being investigated will assist students in recording accurately and will help them become aware of the impact people have upon their environment and what can be done to improve the situation, even in their local environment. Answers Conservation area study – Answers will vary

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Additional Activities 1. Survey your class members to find out the most appealing aspects of the park studied. 2. Create an ‘advertising brochure’ describing the highlights of the park. See page 28 of the student workbook for ideas. Discussion/Debate

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Workbook Pages: 96 – 98

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1. How could the park you have studied be improved to create a greater awareness of the need for conservation?

Topic Focus

The students will learn about the rules for using National Parks and why these rules exist.

Keywords

Resources

rules, important

•C The. following area recommended: © R. I . Puwebsites bl i c t i ons Teacher Australia’s Movement (Background) •f orr evi e w pWilderness ur po ses onl y• http://www.wilderness.net/ijw/articles/australi.cfm

Students National Park Rules and Regulations (Canada)

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http://www.canadianrockies.net/jasper/jnpregs.html

Death Valley (USA) National Park Rules and Regulations http://www.americanparks.net/death_valley_rules.htm

Bushwalking Code of Practice (NSW)

http://www.bushwalking.org.au/code.html

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The Bushwalking Code as described by the Confederation of Bushwalkers NSW outlines the responsibility National Park visitors have to protect and preserve the natural landscape for the enjoyment of future generations. The code focuses on the following areas: being self-reliant and prepared, ‘treading softly’ by keeping to the designated paths, knowing what to do in emergencies, taking rubbish away, being hygienic, conserving the purity of waterways, being careful with fire, choosing campsites carefully, protecting plants and animals, and respecting Aboriginal heritage. When visiting National Parks, we need to behave like conservationists and have a minimal impact on the environment. This means doing nothing and leaving nothing that shows where we have been.

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Introductory Discussion Why are rules necessary? Why are rules so important in National Parks? List some rules most commonly associated with National Parks. Activity – Pages 96 – 98

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Read through the rules listed on page 97. Discuss why these rules are set and the consequences of not following them. In some cases, allowing one person to break the rule would have little impact; however, if many people broke the rule the results could be devastating. Ask the students to select what they feel are the four most important rules. Have them write a reason to justify their choices in the table provided.

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Brainstorm to decide upon the different areas of a National Park which need protecting and ask the students to record these on the explosion chart at the top of page 96. Use the list of rules developed by the class as a guide for students to complete the table on the remainder of the page.

Discuss the need for special rules in environments which are unique. Discuss in particular the differences in the rules that would be needed for the Great Barrier Reef National Park and Mount Kosciuszko. Students can record points from this discussion to answer questions 1 – 2. Students can then be given time to outline an argument for and against the use of rules in National Parks. These points could later be used in a class debate.

©R . I . C.Publ i cat i ons Answers •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 1. Answers will vary 2. Answers will vary

Additional Activities

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1. Use the Internet to find what rules are set for parks in different parts of the world. 1. There shouldn’t be any rules—people should be responsible for themselves.

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2. Don’t let anyone visit National Parks—then we won’t need rules.

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Who’s Responsible? Workbook Pages: 99 – 100 Topic Focus The students will learn more about National Parks in their State. Keywords government, organisation Resources

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Australian National Parks are supported primarily by a parks and wildlife-related department in each State or Territory. How each park is used is dependent upon its location, access to the park and the facilities provided. Single parks such as the Great Barrier Reef and Kakadu attract over 250 000 Australian and overseas tourists each year and are valuable assets to the tourism industry in Australia.

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Background

Poster card Coloured pencils, textas or poster paints

Introductory Discussion

Each State and Territory has a government department responsible for National Parks. Discuss why there are often entry fees to National Parks. What are people ‘buying’ when they enter?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons The students can work in pairs or small groups to investigate what is offered in their State’s National Parks. Direct the students to the web sites listed on page •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 99 as a starting point for their research. Explain the task of creating a poster

Activity – Pages 99 – 100

using the cues listed (i) – (vi) and encourage each group to complete the table at the bottom of the page before designing and making its poster.

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National Parks Assessment and Evaluation The activity on page 81 is provided as one assessment tool in the study of this unit. It is designed to indicate broad student understanding and also provide opportunity for student feedback. The following outcomes were addressed in this topic of study. The following pages can be photocopied as a record of student performance or as a proforma for portfolio assessment. Outcomes Place and Space PS3.1 Understands that the features of places are influenced by various natural processes. PS3.2 Understands that the use people make of different places is affected by natural and built features.

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Understands that people have different views about which places need to be cared for.

Resources R3.1 Understands that people have to make choices in their use of limited resources.

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PS3.3

Natural and Social Systems NSS3.1 Understands that elements of natural systems link to form cycles of which people are a part.

Administration

Distribute the activity sheet on page 81 of the Teachers Guide, one per student. Ask students to write their name in the top right-hand corner of the page. Read through the activity sheet to ensure students are clear about what they are being asked to do. At this stage, give students the opportunity to seek clarification of any part of the activity sheet they may not understand.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr e vi ew pur posesonl y• It is important students work independently on these activities—this provides a

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true representation of what students understand or of their lack of understanding. Once students have completed the activity, collect the worksheets. Mark and record results. From this activity sheet, some students may be found to require further work to develop their understanding in a particular area. 1. (a) areas set aside by the government for the purpose of conservation

(b) because we need to conserve culturally or scientifically significant locations in their natural state for future generations

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2. (a) Accept all reasonable answers which reflect an understanding of the question, e.g. forest, desert, ocean, island, lake. (b) Answers will vary

3. (a) Great Barrier Reef – world’s most extensive coral reef system (b) Kakadu National Park – spectacular escarpments

(c) Shark Bay – marine fauna, including a large number of dugongs (d) Fraser Island – largest sand island in the world

(e) Lord Howe Island Group – breeding ground for the endangered wood hen (f) Willandra Lakes Region – oldest cremation site in the world 4. (a) Answers will vary; housing, furniture, paper, woodchip etc. (b) Not ‘clearfelling’, where all trees in an area are cut down; creating National Parks to ensure we keep many of our forests alive; planting quick-growing plantation trees and replanting in areas that have been cut down. 5. To ensure all aspects of the park are protected. 6. (a) Each State and Territory has a government department that is responsible for National Parks. (b) abseil, bushwalk, birdwatching, rock climbing, have a picnic R.I.C. Publications~www.ricgroup.com.au

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National Parks Student Name:

Date:

Task At the conclusion of the unit ‘National Parks’, students were asked to complete an activity sheet independently to demonstrate their understanding of the unit.

Pointers Demonstrated

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• Recognises the natural diversity which is protected in National Parks and why it is important to preserve it. • Demonstrates their knowledge of National Parks in Australia. • Can give reasons for the preservation of natural resources such as timber. • Understands that rules need to be followed to ensure the conservation of natural landscapes.

Needs Further Opportunity

Satisfactory

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons | • f o r r e v i ew pur posesonl y• Additional Activities |

Workbook Activities

Needs Improvement

Needs Improvement

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Skills and Attitudes

General Comment

Satisfactory

Satisfactory

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Needs Improvement

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Satisfactory

| Satisfactory

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Student Comment

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National Parks 1. (a) What is a National Park?

(b) Why are National Parks important?

(b) Name five National Parks you would like to visit.

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2. (a) Name five environments which are preserved in National Parks.

3. Match these World Heritage sites to their significant features. (a) Great Barrier Reef

• largest sand island in the world

(b) Kakadu National Park

• oldest cremation site in the world

©R I . C.Pu bl i ca t i ons • . • spectacular escarpments Lord Howe •v • world’s most extensive coral reef system •Island f oGroup rr e i ew pu r po s eso n l y •

(c) Shark Bay

• breeding ground for the endangered wood hen

(d) Fraser Island (e) (f)

Willandra Lakes Region •

• marine fauna including a large number of dugongs

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4. (a) List five ways we use timber.

(b) How can forests be managed to make sure there will be timber in the future?

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5. (a) Why are rules necessary in National Parks?

6. (a) Who is responsible for National Parks?

(b) Circle the things you might do in a National Park. abseil

bushwalk

go shopping

drive rally cars

birdwatching

rock climbing

feed animals

light bonfires

have a picnic

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Society and Environment Teachers Guides WA: Book D - Ages 8-9