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Primary health and values Written with

Jenni Harrold

Other titles to support this curriculum area Bullying

Values Education

Conflict Resolution

RIC–0654 to RIC–0656

PR–2781, PR–2784, PR–2787, PR–2790, PR–2793, PR–2796, PR–2799

RIC–0581 to RIC–0583

Bullying Stimulus Posters

The Environment

Conflict Resolution Posters

RIC–7001

RIC–0548 to RIC–0550

RIC–7006

Bullying and Conflict Resolution (Lower Secondary) RIC–0584

RIC-0575 4.3/420


Primary health and values—Book B R.I.C. Publications Published in 2003 by R.I.C. Publications Copyright Jenni Harrold and R.I.C. Publications 2003 The author wishes to acknowledge the extensive knowledge of the writers at R.I.C. Publications who contributed to this project. This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Additional titles available in this series: Primary health and values—Book A Primary health and values—Book C Primary health and values—Book D Primary health and values—Book E Primary health and values—Book F Primary health and values—Book G

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ISBN 1 74126 074 4 RIC–0575

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Email Address: mail@ricgroup.com.au Home Page: http://www.ricgroup.com.au

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View all pages online.

Internet websites In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

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Primary health and values Foreword Primary health and values introduces and develops the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that will assist students to lead healthy and fulfilling lives. Students will consider what it means to be healthy—physically, socially, mentally and emotionally—and will be given experiences to assist them to become responsible, caring members of society. The book is divided into two sections. The first section—Healthy lifestyles— offers students the knowledge to make informed decisions about safety, nutrition, the media, drugs and more. Through guided classroom discussions and activities, students are encouraged to think critically about health issues and the challenges they face as they grow and develop.

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Primary health and values provides a comprehensive coverage of the health content, supports teachers in planning and implementing lessons and, through collaborative learning and thoughtful discussion, promotes a lifelong commitment to healthy, active lifestyles. Contents

Other titles in this series:

Primary health and values – Book A Primary health and values – Book C Primary health and values – Book D

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The second section—Personal development and relationships—focuses on character building and values. Most experts agree that people with defined values and a good self-image are better equipped to deal with challenging situations. The activities in this section encourage students to consider their own values and develop a sense of self-worth. This section also focuses on the importance of showing respect for and tolerance towards others and valuing diversity in our society.

Primary health and values – Book E Primary health and values – Book F Primary health and values – Book G

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Teachers notes Teacher information ...............................................................................................................................................................iv – v Suggestions for teaching health and values ................................................................................................................. vi – vii Assessment indicators ...................................................................................................................................................... viii – ix Assessment proformas ......................................................................................................................................................... x – xi

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Personal development and relationships Becoming a healthy person......................... 40 – 41 Rules for working together .......................... 42 – 43 Doing the right thing ..................................... 44 – 45 Appreciating others ....................................... 46 – 47 I am special ..................................................... 48 – 49 Making decisions ........................................... 50 – 51 Strengths and weaknesses ......................... 52 – 53 Bullying ............................................................. 54 – 55 Friendship ........................................................ 56 – 57 Showing love and respect ........................... 58 – 59 Feelings ............................................................ 60 – 61 Uncomfortable situations ............................. 62 – 63 Sharing and negotiating ............................... 64 – 65 Communicating .............................................. 66 – 67 Problem-solving .............................................. 68 – 69 No worries! ...................................................... 70 – 71 We are all different .........................................72 – 73 The environment ..............................................74 – 75

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Healthy lifestyles A healthy life ...........................................................2 – 3 Healthy or unhealthy? .......................................... 4 – 5 Healthy lunches ..................................................... 6 – 7 Food choices .........................................................8 – 9 Sleep and rest ................................................. 10 – 11 Changes ............................................................ 12 – 13 Fitness ............................................................... 14 – 15 Exercise .............................................................. 16 – 17 Recycle, reuse ................................................. 18 – 19 People in the community ............................... 20 – 21 Health products .............................................. 22 – 23 Safety rules ...................................................... 24 – 25 Medicines ......................................................... 26 – 27 First aid .............................................................. 28 – 29 Danger ............................................................... 30 – 31 Safe and unsafe .............................................. 32 – 33 To share or not? .............................................. 34 – 35 Choices ............................................................. 36 – 37 Food advertisements ...................................... 38 – 39

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Teacher information Primary health and values is divided into two sections. These are: Healthy lifestyles – offers students the knowledge to make informed decisions about safety, nutrition, the media, drugs and more. Through guided classroom discussions and activities, students are encouraged to think critically about health issues and the challenges they face as they grow and develop. Personal development and relationships – focuses on character building and values. The activities in this section encourage students to consider their own values and develop a sense of self-worth. This section also focuses on the importance of showing respect and tolerance towards others and valuing diversity in our society. The notes on the following pages provide comprehensive information about terms and concepts used in this book.

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A teachers page accompanies each student worksheet. It provides the following information:

Background information has been included to enhance the teacher’s understanding of the concept being taught and to provide additional information to relate to the students.

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Specific indicators explain what the students are expected to demonstrate through completing the activities.

Discussion points have been suggested to further develop ideas on the student worksheet. They can also encourage the students to comprehend, assess and form opinions about what they have read.

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What to do gives suggested step-bystep instructions for the activity. The accompanying worksheet may be the focus of the activity or it may be where the students record their ideas after completing a task or discussion.

Answers to all worksheet activities are included. Some answers will need a teacher check, while others will vary depending on the students’ personal experiences, opinions etc.

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Additional activities can be used to further develop the outcomes being assessed. These activities provide ideas to consolidate and clarify the concepts and skills taught in the activity.

Outcome links appropriate to each state are provided across the main learning area.

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Teacher information

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A variety of student worksheets is provided, which may contain a selection of role-plays to perform; scenarios to read and consider; information to read, discuss and answer questions about; or values or feelings to consider and compare with others.

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Questioning activities where students are required to consider and evaluate personal feelings or values.

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Student activities to reinforce and develop understanding of the concept.

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Several pages provide a selection of role-plays or scenarios for students to use in a variety of ways. R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Other activities include completing tables or reading and labelling diagrams.

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Suggestions for teaching health and values Primary health and values introduces and develops the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that will enable students to lead healthy and fulfilling lives. Students will consider what it means to be healthy—physically, socially, mentally and emotionally—and will be given the tools to become responsible, caring members of society. Many of the activities in this book provide students with an opportunity to formulate their thoughts on a topic and express their opinions and feelings. Classroom discussions are valuable for encouraging critical and reflective thinking. Teaching health

Creating a safe atmosphere

• Create a safe atmosphere in the classroom so students feel they can share their thoughts and feelings.

For an effective health lesson to take place, students need to feel comfortable enough to share their thoughts, feelings, opinions and past experiences. They need to feel there will be no ridicule, no put-downs and a nonjudgmental atmosphere.

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• Identify what it is the students are going to take away from the lesson. (Refer to the ‘Indicator’ in the Teachers notes for each activity.)

• Listen to and be honest with the students. (Give something of yourself. Share some of your own experiences, where appropriate.) • Show respect for the students’ thoughts and feelings. • Be non-judgmental.

In your responses, encourage students to analyse their statements by asking such things as ‘What could happen if you did that?’ or ‘Who else would be affected by that?’, rather than giving your own opinion.

One way to promote this safe atmosphere during discussions with younger students is to make the effort to sit the students in a circle, even if it means going to another room to do this. Some schools call this time ‘circle time’. Set clear rules, such as one student speaking at a time and no put-downs or pulling faces. Make the circle a ‘safe place’ where the students feel comfortable to talk openly about their feelings, worries and achievements.

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• Begin with a discussion or, with older students, a hypothetical situation. (Refer to the ‘Discussion points’ in the Teachers notes for each activity.)

Students can be encouraged to become respectful listeners. Ensure that students raise their hands if they wish to make a comment; or, for younger students, an item can be placed in the middle of the circle such as a ‘talking stick’ or small toy. Only students holding this are able to speak.

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Although students should feel free to express their opinions, it is important that they understand there is a ‘right’ conclusion, rather than letting them think whatever they conclude is correct.

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Explain to the class that many people only ‘half listen’ as they are thinking about what they might say when the speaker stops. Some people don’t even wait for the speaker to stop, and interrupt him or her in the middle of a sentence. During ‘circle time’, teachers and students have the opportunity to share their thoughts without being interrupted.

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With some topics, students may make suggestions where you can respond ‘Is that the RIGHT thing to do?’. Such a question can promote discussions regarding individual, group, community and global values. Who is it ‘right’ for?

It is important for students to understand that personal issues discussed during these ‘open forum’ meetings are not to become topics of conversation outside the classroom. Teachers will also need to show respect to the students unless, of course, issues are raised involving abuse or that need attention by parents. Teachers will then need to consult their principals regarding any action that needs to be taken.

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Once the class has a routine set in place to discuss health issues openly and respectfully, these skills can be transferred to discussions about issues affecting the class, such as conflict and bullying.

Growth and development/Drug education The community is generally united in its overall opinions and goals in relation to young people. In the areas of growth and development and drug education, the form and timing of this education vary among different community groups and are based on a wide range of factors, mainly concerned with religious and community expectations. Activities in both these areas are provided in this series; however, the author recognises the right of schools, teachers and parents to guide education according to their own priorities.

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Suggestions for teaching health and values Values education

Collaborative learning

Most definitions agree that ‘values’ are those qualities which an individual or a society considers to be important as principles for conduct.

When students are able to work together in groups, they are encouraged to communicate and express their ideas. It is important that teachers monitor groups working independently to ensure that all students are working together as a team. By allocating a role for each group member, it is more likely that the dynamics will be equitable. The roles of the students can be swapped regularly to give each member the opportunity to participate in all tasks.

The Primary health and values series helps students to consider their personal strengths and weaknesses and reinforces the advantages of having a strong set of values.

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A person’s set of values affects his or her thinking and behaviour. When people are confident in themselves and have strong values, it is easier to do things that are ‘right’. Those who have weaker values can often be led easily and may do things they don’t really want to do.

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Teachers can foster the development of personal qualities such as perseverance, kindness and dealing with stress and criticism. They can also discuss some values with students, such as honesty, generosity and tolerance. Teachers might also like to discuss other things people may value, like pets, music and the environment.

Allow time at the end of the group tasks for the students to evaluate their team skills and to make targets to work towards the next time they form as a group. Some activities may work better if the groups are organised by ability levels, others will be enriched by mixed ability groupings. To enable all students to work together at some stage during the year, randomly select groups for some activities.

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Teachers can encourage students to have a positive selfimage through praise and by recognising their achievements.

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Tolerance and empathy

minimise generalisations and stereotyping, and

promote the need to combat prejudice and discrimination.

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promote the understanding and acceptance of individual differences,

Differentiating activities

The activities in the Primary health and values series have been designed so they can be followed precisely or adapted by teachers. This flexibility allows teachers the opportunity to modify lessons and worksheets to meet the needs of students with varying abilities and special needs.

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Tolerance and empathy should be encouraged in students. Activities such as drama games, which require students to put themselves in someone else’s place and imagine how that person feels, can help to foster empathy. Tolerance is an ongoing process that teaches students not to hate. Teachers can teach tolerance most effectively by modelling tolerant behaviour in the classroom and playground, ensuring students are exposed to multicultural literature and images, and teaching them about various faiths, ethnicity and lifestyles. Educating students to be tolerant will:

To meet the special needs of English as a second language (ESL) students or those who have low levels of literacy, plan a time to introduce keywords and concepts. Having other adult support is ideal as the group can work in a quiet area away from the classroom. Keywords can be enlarged and discussed. Being immersed in the language before a topic begins gives these students an advantage, especially during the teacher discussion part of the lesson when most teachers tend to speak quite quickly.

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promote the idea that differences can enhance our relationships and enrich our society,

This book emphasises the importance of respecting the feelings and emotions of others. It uses scenarios to help students ‘put themselves in the shoes’ of others. When students develop empathy for others, the dynamics of situations can change.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

If other adults are not available, mixed ability groups will allow ESL students and students with low literacy levels to observe and be guided by other students. Students who seem to ‘race’ through the activities and worksheets and who understand the content very quickly can be challenged by looking at the topic in greater depth (rather than being given more of the same). They can go beyond the facts and conduct research related to strands of the topics that interest them. By meeting the needs of individual students, allowing the students to learn collaboratively and by having very clear instructions and expectations, health lessons should run smoothly.

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Assessment indicators Below are the indicators from the activity pages of Primary health and values – Book B. These indicators can be transferred across to the assessment proforma on page x. By using proformas, teachers can meet the needs of outcomebased learning experiences in health education. The format of each page is ideal for inclusion in student portfolios or for reporting purposes. Using proformas allows teachers to provide a well explained, logically presented indication of progress to both students and parents. Indicators have been developed as a basis for determining progress towards achieving outcomes. Healthy lifestyles

Pages 4 – 5

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• Makes choices about healthy and unhealthy lunch foods.

• Identifies behaviours required for personal safety.

Pages 26 – 27

• Understands appropriate uses of medicines and alternative methods of pain relief.

Pages 28 – 29 Pages 30 – 31

• Understands basic first aid steps. • Recognises common items that can be dangerous. • Knows how to respond in an emergency. • Recognises safe and unsafe situations.

• Recognises influences on food choices and makes personal decisions.

• Recognises the importance of sleep and rest to maintain a balanced lifestyle.

Pages 12 – 13

• Recognises how achievements and responsibilities change.

Pages 16 – 17 Pages 18 – 19

Pages 22 – 23

Pages 24 – 25

Pages 10 – 11

Pages 14 – 15

Pages 32 – 33

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Recognises the care needed by different groups of people.

Pages 34 – 35

• Identifies the importance of physical activity.

• Makes choices to promote personal health.

Pages 36 – 37

• Makes personal choices.

Pages 38 – 39

• Considers how the media affects health choices.

Pages 50 – 51

• Identifies people who make specific decisions. • Retells a good and a bad decision. • Identifies strengths and weaknesses. • Relates feelings about attempting new things. • Identifies bullying situations.

• Recognises the effects of exercise on the body. • Appreciates the importance of recycling.

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Personal development and relationships Pages 40 – 41

Pages 42 – 43

Pages 44 – 45 Pages 46 – 47

Pages 48 – 49

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• Describes health-related facilities and services in the community. • Recognises products he/she uses to assist in keeping healthy.

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Pages 8 – 9

Pages 20 – 21

• Distinguishes between healthy and unhealthy foods.

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Pages 6 – 7

• Identifies what people do to stay healthy and create a balanced lifestyle.

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• Identifies independent living skills. • Expresses feelings about exercise and friendships. • Identifies aspects about himself/ herself which develop self-esteem.

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Pages 2 – 3

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• Matches pictures to appropriate rules. • Writes a rule appropriate to a situation in a picture. • Selects right and wrong decisions. • Illustrates scenarios appropriately. • Identifies actions which show appreciation. • Follows rules to play a game. • Reads a poem about individuality. • Identifies specific aspects which make him/her unique.

Pages 52 – 53

Pages 54 – 55

• Identifies strategies to cope with bullying situations. Pages 56 – 57

Pages 58 – 59

Primary health and values

• Identifies qualities which maintain good relationships. • Completes a crossword about maintaining friendships. • Identifies actions which show love and respect. • Matches actions to specific people. R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Assessment indicators Pages 60 – 61

Pages 62 – 63

Pages 64 – 65

Pages 68 – 69

Pages 70 – 71

• Identifies information about problem-solving steps from a poem. • Uses problem-solving steps to solve a problem. • Identifies events that cause stress or worry. • Identifies activities that combat stress and aid relaxation. • Identifies differences and similarities among people. • Describes how to care for the environment.

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Pages 74 – 75

Using the health and values assessment proforma (page x)

An explanation of how to use the proforma. Learning area

• Fill in the appropriate learning area, for example: Health – Healthy lifestyles

Task(s)

• Give a brief description of the activity and what was expected of the students.

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Pages 66 – 67

• Identifies feelings for a given situation. • Identifies situations which evoke particular feelings. • Completes a cloze about dealing with uncomfortable situations. • Relates details about an uncomfortable situation and evaluates his/her solution. • Completes an acrostic about sharing. • Completes a word search using ‘negotiation’ words. • Completes a news-telling plan. • Evaluates listening skills.

• Write the relevant outcome(s) that match the activity (see the Teachers notes accompanying each worksheet) and refer to your state’s documents.

Assessment

• Write the relevant indicator(s) as listed above and assess appropriately.

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Teacher comment • Use this space to comment on aspects of an individual student’s performance which can not be indicated in the formal assessment, such as work habits or particular needs or abilities.

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Outcome(s)

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Using the skills and attitudes assessment proforma (page xi) An explanation of how to use the proforma. Assessment

• Assess the specific development of an individual student in these areas.

Teacher comment • Use this space to comment on an individual student’s skills and attitudes.

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Assessment proforma – health and values Name

Year

Term

Learning area

Task(s)

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The student was asked to:

Outcome(s)

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Teacher comment

x

Needs further opportunity

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The student:

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Assessment proforma – skills and attitudes Name

Year

Term

Assessment The student:

Demonstrated Needs further opportunity

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• recognises the importance of physical activity to personal health

• recognises the importance of a balanced diet to personal health • appreciates the need for safe practices in a range of situations

• manages his/her time effectively

• makes decisions for himself/herself • shows an understanding of fair play • participates in and enjoys group activities • works cooperatively to complete a task • recognises his/her weaknesses and works to improve them • sets goals for himself/herself

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• strives to achieve the best results in personal performance

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• achieves goals for himself/herself • communicates effectively • listens effectively

• makes and maintains positive relationships

• shows sensitivity and tolerance towards others

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• shows respect for others • has a positive self-image

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• recognises the need for balance among physical, emotional and social health

Teacher comment

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• appreciates the similarities and differences between himself/herself and others

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Teachers notes

A healthy life

Indicator • Identifies what people do to stay healthy and create a balanced lifestyle.

Background information To stay healthy physically we need to keep clean, get plenty of sleep, eat healthy food, drink water, get lots of exercise and have regular check-ups with the doctor and dentist. Mental and emotional health develops through enhancing positive relationships between family, friends and other people students come into contact with.

The lesson Discussion points: • How do you feel when you are healthy? • How do you feel when you are unhealthy? • What do we need to do to stay healthy? • Who helps to keep you healthy? What to do:

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Teacher check

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• Students can work in small groups to discuss all the things they need to do to stay healthy. As a class, discuss the suggestions offered in Question 1. Ask students to draw pictures to show some of the things they need to do to stay healthy. • Discuss how students feel when they are unhealthy and healthy. Write words to describe these feelings to answer Question 2. • Give students opposing activities and ask them to choose which is the healthier alternative. Students can make up their own with a partner and then choose healthy activities for Question 3. Answers

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Additional activities

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• Students could draw and write about any activities they have a habit of doing that may not be healthy. • Find magazine pictures that show healthy people, things and lifestyles to make a collage.

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Health curriculum links

2

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.9

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, DMS1.2, ALSS1.6, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.1

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


A healthy life Draw pictures to show some of the things you do for a healthy life.

sleep well

exercise every day

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make friends

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keep clean

brush your teeth

talk over problems

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breathe fresh air

relax

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My life is

drink lots of water

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visit the dentist

o c I feel when I am unhealthy. . che e r o t r s life. upforear Circle the activity you would s choose healthier I feel

when I am healthy.

(a) watch television OR play at the park (b) stay up late

OR go to sleep at the same time each night

(c) eat fruit

OR eat lollies

(d) drink soft drink

OR drink water

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Teachers notes

Healthy or unhealthy?

Indicator • Distinguishes between healthy and unhealthy foods.

Background information The Healthy Eating Guide is a model used to show how foods are grouped into different areas.

The lesson Discussion points:

Vegetables and legumes

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• Provide students with magazines and ask them to find pictures of their favourite foods. Students can cut out the pictures and glue them onto the worksheet. (Students can also draw pictures instead.) Students will need to decide which foods are healthy and which are unhealthy. Ask them to colour the correct word in each box. • Ask students to count the number of healthy and unhealthy foods and survey the class to see whether they chose more healthy or unhealthy foods. Answers

Bread, cereals, rice, pasta and noodles

Fruit

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• How do you know if a food is healthy or unhealthy? • Do you choose more healthy or unhealthy foods? • How are foods grouped? • Which groups should you eat a lot of? • Which groups should you only eat a little of? • What are your favourite foods? What to do:

Milk, yoghurt and cheese

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Answers will vary

Additional activities

• Create a class book by asking students to bring in a favourite healthy recipe from home. • Survey family members to find favourite foods and decide if each is healthy or unhealthy.

Drink plenty of water

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Lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs nuts and legumes

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Choose these sometimes or in small amounts

Health curriculum links

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Nat.

2.8

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, PHES1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC1.2, 2.2

SA

1.8

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Healthy or unhealthy? (a) Cut and glue a magazine picture or draw one of your favourite foods into each box.

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(b) Colour if each food is healthy or unhealthy.

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Teachers notes

Healthy lunches

Indicator Background information

• Makes choices about healthy and unhealthy lunch foods.

There is a move in most schools to provide healthier alternatives for students who choose to buy their lunches.

The lesson Discussion points: • What do you like to eat for lunch? • Do you prefer home lunches or school lunches? • Are your lunches usually healthy? • How could you improve on what you eat for lunch? What to do:

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Canteens/Tuckshops should support nutritional education taught in class. They have a responsibility to provide essential nutrients needed by growing children.

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• Provide students with an example of what you had for lunch. Write or draw the foods and ask students to decide which were healthy. Students can recall their own lunch and draw what they ate to answer Question 1. Have them circle the foods that were healthy. Ask ‘Who had a healthy lunch?’. • Ask students if they usually bring their lunch from home, if they buy it or if there is something else they do. Students can indicate what they do in Question 2 and decide which they prefer. Survey students to see what is the most popular preference. • Provide a school canteen/tuckshop menu and ask students to work in pairs to decide which lunch foods are healthy and which are not. Students should draw pictures of each for Question 3. • Ask students to decide on their favourite healthy lunch brought from home and purchased from the canteen/tuckshop. Students complete Question 4. Answers

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Some students buy food at the canteen/tuckshop every day. When a canteen/tuckshop is used often, it may have a large influence on children’s health and nutrition.

Developing good eating habits early will provide long-term health benefits in adulthood. Canteens/Tuckshops can:

• make it easier for students to select healthy food choices if they are uncertain,

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Additional activities

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• Students can work in pairs or small groups to list some foods not provided in the canteen/tuckshop that students may like to buy. All foods need to be healthy. • Students can write letters to canteen/tuckshop staff or parents which include pictures of their favourite canteen/tuckshop lunch or lunch from home. They can then present the letters to the appropriate people.

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• provide appropriate food choices for the school community,

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Answers will vary

• provide a variety of healthy food options which are good value for money, good quality and tasty,

• still make a profit or cover costs. School staff members who support the canteen/tuckshop should, where possible, serve as role models by supporting healthy food choices.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

6

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.8

WA

SMS2

NSW

V4, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC1.2

SA

1.8

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Healthy lunches

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(a) Do you usually … (i) bring your own lunch from home? (ii) buy your lunch at school?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw what you had for lunch today. Draw a circle around the healthy foods you ate.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (b) Which do you prefer? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (iii) do something else?

w ww

Healthy canteen/tuckshop food

. te

m . u

Draw different foods you could buy from the canteen/tuckshop for lunch. Decide which are healthy and which are not so healthy. Not so healthy canteen/tuckshop food

o c . che e r o t r s super

What would be your favourite healthy lunch to have … from home?

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

from the canteen/tuckshop?

Primary health and values

7


Teachers notes

Food choices

Indicator • Recognises influences on food choices and makes personal decisions.

The lesson Discussion points: • Who chooses the foods you eat? • When do you decide what foods you want to eat? • Where do different foods come from? • How do different foods taste? What to do:

A sensible diet and plenty of exercise helps to keep the body healthy. It is important to make wise decisions about what to eat. A range of factors influence what people choose to eat. The following categories include influences that may affect a student’s eating habits.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• family – economics, location, cooking skills, parental preferences • media – appealing advertising, interest in trying something new, advertised ‘specials’

ew i ev Pr

• If possible, provide some samples of foods that taste sweet or sour. Ask students to think of foods that have these tastes and draw pictures in the space provided to complete Question 1. • Discuss with students who chooses the different foods they eat. When do they choose their own foods? Ask students to draw pictures of their favourite foods for the meals shown in Question 2 and then write the main person who chooses these foods. • Discuss how different foods originated from different cultures. Survey students in the class to see if they can name some foods from different countries. Students can match each food shown in Question 3 with the country it came from. Ask students to think about their favourite food from another country. Answers

Teac he r

Background information

• cultural – family staple foods, family recipes, religion, special occasions • health/medical – special diets for illness/medical conditions/ weight/allergies

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (b) curry and rice – India (d) quiche – France

w ww

m . u

1. – 2. Answers will vary 3. (a) sweet and sour pork – China (c) tacos – Mexico (e) pizza – Italy 4. Teacher check

• seasonal – availability of foods, different foods during winter/summer months

Additional activities

• If there are students who are from different cultural backgrounds, organise a taste of different foods. Ask parents to supply foods from their culture and have a lunch. Discuss tastes and likes and dislikes. Students can write about their favourite meal. • Discuss other influences on food choices (see Background information). Students can cut and glue magazine pictures under the different headings to create a class collage.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

8

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.7

WA

SMS2

NSW

V4, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

n/a

SA

1.8, 2.8

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Food choices Draw two foods that taste … sweet

sour

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Lunch Breakfast Dinner

Snacks

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw your favourite foods for each meal. Write who chooses what you eat.

w ww

Match these foods to the countries they come from.

. te

(a) sweet and sour pork •

• Mexico

(b) curry and rice

• Italy

• France

(c) tacos

(d) quiche (e) pizza

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . • China che• e r o t • s • India r s uper

Draw and label your favourite food from another country.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

9


Teachers notes

Sleep and rest

Indicator • Recognises the importance of sleep and rest to maintain a balanced lifestyle.

The lesson Discussion points:

Students need to have a regular number of hours of sleep each night. Often, they need more sleep than adults. Students need to be aware of the importance of restful activities to reduce stress and relax the body.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Why is it important to get enough sleep? • What do you do to rest? • How many hours of sleep do you get every night? • Does that change on weekends? • How do you feel when you wake up in the morning? • What is your bedroom like? • What do you like most about your bedroom? What to do:

Background information

• Act out a short scene where you feel tired because you did not get enough sleep the night before. Describe how you feel. Ask students to discuss how they feel when they don’t get enough sleep and write words to describe those feelings to answer Question 1. • Survey students to find out what time they usually go to sleep each night. Discuss if times may change on the weekends and why that might be so. Ask students to write in the times they usually go to sleep for Question 2. • Talk about how you might feel when you wake up in the morning and the things you might do. Have students indicate what they do when they wake up to complete Question 3. • Ask students to draw a picture of how they look when they wake up in the morning to complete Question 4. • Talk about resting and the difference between doing something restful and sleeping. Ask students what they like to do when they are resting. It might be reading a book, watching television or lying down and dreaming about something. Students should be able to write an answer for Question 5 about some things they do when they are resting. • Students can gather in small groups to discuss what their bedrooms are like. Do they share? What is their favourite thing about their bedroom? Is it relaxing? Do they sleep well in their bedroom? Ask students to write what they like most about their bedroom to answer Question 6. Answers

w ww

Answers will vary

. te

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students can draw a map of their bedroom, including the furniture and other items they may have. • Students could look through magazines and newspapers to find pictures of different bedrooms and furniture they would like to have when they get older. Students could write about why they like the items they have chosen.

10

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links Nat.

2.9

WA

SMS2

NSW

V4, ALS1.6, PHS1.12

Vic.

PHIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.1

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Sleep and rest Write words to describe how you feel when you don’t get enough sleep.

What time do you usually go to sleep …

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Sup in the morning, I … Draw what you look like when When I first wake (b) on the weekend?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(a) on a school night?

you first wake up.

(a) close my eyes again. (b) get up straight away. (c) hide under the covers.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (e) feel• hungry. (d) feel happy.

w ww

(g) moan and groan.

. te

(h) stay where I am for a while.

m . u

(f) get up slowly.

o c . che e r o t r s super

What do you like to do when you are resting?

What is the best thing about your bedroom?

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

11


Teachers notes

Changes

Indicators • Recognises how achievements and responsibilities change. • Recognises the care needed by different groups of people.

The lesson Discussion points:

Change is an important part of our lives. Everything grows and changes with us—physically, mentally and emotionally. The growth stages from birth – child – teenager – adult – parent – grandparent are all important events in our development. When we talk about these stages with our families (i.e. parents, grandparents, brothers/sisters) we find that we all experience similar growth changes throughout our development or lives. All this change and development helps to build the unique characteristics of the individual child.

• Discuss with students what the terms ‘responsibility’ and ‘achievement’ mean. Ask students to volunteer to relate some achievements they have had recently. Ask them to think of the responsibilities they now have. These may include responsibilities at home, at school or in the community. Students could discuss in groups some of the responsibilities and things they have achieved, or hope to achieve, at the different stages shown in Question 1. • Discuss with students how different groups of people need to be cared for in different ways; for example, babies may need a lot of attention, love, sleep, special food, clothing etc. Ask students to draw pictures that represent the type of care needed for the three age groups listed in Question 2. • Discuss basic physical changes that affect girls and boys as they grow. Relate to the level of maturity of the students in the class. Students can volunteer suggestions and write them in the space provided in Question 3. Answers

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• What things have you achieved so far? • What would you like to achieve in the future? • How do we care for people at different ages? • How do boys and girls change as they grow? • What responsibilities do you have now? • What responsibilities will you have in the future? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

Different age groups need different types of care. Students will have different responsibilities and achievements at different stages.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Teacher check

Additional activities

• Students can complete a time line to show the different responsibilities and achievements they have had since they were babies. This could be provided as a homework activity, with parental input. • Students write a story about what they might be doing when they are adults.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

12

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.1

WA

CHL1, CHL2

NSW

GDS1.9

Vic.

HPSR0101, HPSR0201

Qld

EPD2.3

SA

2.4

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Changes Complete the table to show the achievements and responsibilities you have had and might have in the future. Age

Things I have achieved/will achieve

baby

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

now

My responsibilities

teenager

adult

Draw pictures to show things that are needed to care for people.

© R. I . C.PuMe bl i cat i onsGrandparents •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Babies

. te

o c . che e r o t r sand girls as they grow. r upe Write some changes that wills happen to boys Boys

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Girls

Primary health and values

13


Teachers notes

Fitness

Indicator • Identifies the importance of physical activity.

The lesson Discussion points: • Why is it important to stay fit? • How do you keep fit? • What types of activities do you like to do to keep fit? • How long do you spend on physical activities in a week? What to do:

Background information Physical activity can help with weight control, a healthier heart, improved lung capacity, clearer skin, good muscle tone, better sleep patterns and more energy. It can also provide teamwork skills, discipline, commitment, improved self-esteem and confidence.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Make a list of different activities students participate in to stay fit. Discuss those they do at school and those they do after school and on weekends. Talk about favourites and why they enjoy different activities. Students can draw two activities they participate in to complete Question 1. • Discuss the importance of regular exercise and ask students to indicate how much activity they do by ticking the boxes in Question 2. • Students can write a sentence for Question 3 to explain why fitness is so important. Discuss the benefits. See Background information for suggestions. • Students can complete Question 4 as a homework activity by recording the time they spend on physical activity for a week. Discuss results. Were there certain days when students did more activity; for example, on the weekends? Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answers will vary

Additional activities

. te

m . u

w ww

• Students can survey parents and relatives to create a list of activities they participated in when they were younger. Ask students to volunteer to teach the class a game/activity they found out about. • Students can draw the various places where they participate in physical activities.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

14

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.5

WA

CHL2, SMS2

NSW

V5, COS1.1, ALS1.6

Vic.

HPMP0202

Qld

PHIC2.1

SA

1.2

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Fitness Draw two activities you do to keep fit. At school

After school

Teac he r

every day.

most days.

only at school.

once a week.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S I do something physical to keep fit:

only on weekends. hardly ever.

Write a sentence to explain why it is important to stay fit.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww Day

Monday

Tuesday

. te

Wednesday

How long?

m . u

Record how much time you spend doing something physical for one week.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

15


Teachers notes

Exercise

Indicator • Recognises the effects of exercise on the body.

The lesson Discussion points: • How does exercise make your body feel? • Do different types of exercise affect your body in different ways? • Why do you exercise? • What is the best thing about your favourite sport? What to do:

Background information Involvement in physical activity may make the body feel sweaty, warm or flushed. A faster heartbeat and different breathing patterns will also be experienced, along with fatigue. The person may feel an increased buildup of muscle.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Teacher check

ew i ev Pr

• Ask students to colour the boxes to indicate how they feel when they exercise to complete Question 1. • If possible, take students on a short, slow walk and then play a quick, fast game of soccer. Ask students to think about how their bodies are affected by both types of activities to complete Question 2. • Students can discuss in small groups what their favourite sport is and talk about what they like the most, where they play and what equipment they need. Students can complete Question 3 individually. Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Additional activities

w ww

. te

m . u

• Students can write a short account of their favourite sport and present it to the class or in small groups as an oral speaking activity. • Students can create an acrostic poem to show the benefits and effects of exercise and staying fit.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

16

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.5

WA

CHL1, CHL2

NSW

V5, ALS1.6

Vic.

HPMP0202

Qld

DCSPA2.3

SA

2.2

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Exercise Exercise makes me feel:

Use ticks to show how these types of exercise can affect your body.

healthy

Effects

tired

sweaty

Walking

Playing soccer

r o e t s Bo r fast heartbeat happy e p ok u fast breathing fit S warm

tired

lazy

red face thirsty

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

full of energy

puffed © R. I . C. Publ i cat i ons (a) Draw ao picture ofv you playing (b) dos youo like toy play •f rr e i e w pur pWhy ose nl •this sport?

w ww

. te

m . u

your favourite sport.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(c) Where do you play this sport? R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

17


Teachers notes

Recycle, reuse

Indicator Background information

• Appreciates the importance of recycling.

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Show a variety of household items and ask students which they think can be recycled. Talk about how they can recycle at home. Make a list to show suggestions. Discuss how the items in Question 1 can be recycled and ask students to write or draw pictures of what can be made from them. • Students should consider the items shown in Question 2 and decide which can be recycled or reused. Discuss how all the items shown can be recycled or reused. Ask students to think about other items that can’t be recycled. • Discuss the importance of water to our bodies and why it needs to be conserved. Talk about water not being an endless source and how we often have water restrictions in Australia. Create a list of ways we can save water and ask students to draw pictures for Question 3 to show what they can do. • Ask students to think of a way they can help to reduce the amount of rubbish at school and write their suggestion to complete Question 4. Answers

Water is a precious resource that needs to be conserved as often as possible. Some ways of saving water include taking shorter showers, turning off the tap when we brush our teeth, rinsing dishes with the plug in the sink, filling the dishwasher/ washing machine to capacity, fixing leaking taps, using the half flush on toilets and using a rainwater tank.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• What is recycling? • How can we recycle items used at school? At home? In the community? • Why do we need to save water? • How can we save water? • Why is water so important to our health? • How does too much rubbish affect our health? What to do:

Recycling has become an ongoing practice and many homes are provided with containers to encourage the recycling of household items. Some recy clable materials include glass, newspapers/ magazines/brochures/paper, steel/aluminium cans, milk/juice cartons, soft drink bottles and ice-cream containers.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Working in small groups, students can deliver a proposal that was suggested by one group member for Question 4. Groups can explain their ideas to the whole class, who can vote on their favourite. The winning proposal could then be taken to administration. • Students can find or draw pictures to show items that should be recycled or reused and create a class display.

18

m . u

w ww

1. (a) newspaper – any other paper products (b) soft drink can – other cans and tins (c) plastic – containers, other plastic products (d) food scraps – pet food, mulch 2. All items can be recycled. 3. See Background information for suggestions on how to save water. 4. Teacher check

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links Nat.

2.11

WA

SMS2

NSW

V4, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.5

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Recycle, reuse Show what can be made when these things are recycled. (a) newspaper

r o e t s r (d) B foodo scraps e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

(c) plastic

(b) soft drink can

Tick the boxes to show the things that can be recycled or reused. milk carton

soft drink bottle

books

plastic bag

magazines

ice-cream container

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons empty can cardboard clothing •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

Draw pictures to show ways of saving water.

. te

m . u

Water is very precious and we need to save as much as we can.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Suggest a way your school can recycle to reduce the amount of rubbish.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

19


Teachers notes

People in the community

Indicator • Describes health-related facilities and services in the community.

The lesson Discussion points: • What places and people in the community help us to stay healthy? • Where do you go for different health services? • How do people choose who to see for health reasons? • What is your family doctor/dentist like? What to do:

Background information Students should be able to identify services, facilities and people that/who keep them safe and healthy and how they can access them in the local community. Health and safety information can also be found on the Internet.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Ask students to consider the different places in the local community they and their family might make use of. Direct students to Question 1 and talk about places students and their families would go to for each of the reasons given. Students can draw and label the appropriate facility for each. • Direct students to Question 2. Brainstorm to make a list of people in the local community who help to keep them healthy. Discuss the different roles and responsibilities of these people. Students can tick or highlight those people they have visited for health reasons. • Ask students to think about why their parents have chosen the doctor and dentist their family uses. Discuss the different qualities that the students’ doctors and dentists have. Do they like the doctor or dentist their family goes to? What do they like/dislike about them? Why do we choose certain health workers? (It may be a variety of factors, such as location, personality, price, availability, parking or habit.) Some students may need to complete Question 3 after they have asked their parents. Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Teacher check

w ww

m . u

Additional activities • Students write a letter (real or imaginary) to a health worker in the community explaining to him/her why he/she uses his/her service and how it is appreciated. • Arrange a class visit to one of the facilities or service providers discussed. Alternatively, invite a health service provider to visit the class and talk about his/her role in the community.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

20

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.10

WA

n/a

NSW

V4, ALS1.6, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0202

Qld

PHIC2.4

SA

2.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


People in the community Draw and label where would you go if you … had a toothache.

felt sick.

Teac he r

wanted to exercise by swimming.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e okout’. needed surgery. p wanted to ‘work u S

had to buy medicine.

w ww

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Make a list of people in your community who help to keep you healthy.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

How do you think people choose a doctor or dentist to visit?

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

21


Teachers notes

Health products

Indicator • Recognises products he/she uses to assist in keeping healthy.

The lesson Discussion points:

Teac he r

• What products do you use to keep healthy? • Who buys these products? • Where are they bought from? • Are there any rules to use them safely? • Will you use other products when you are older? What to do:

Background information Students should be able to identify health products they use in their house and discuss the reasons for using them. With so many different brands, choosing suitable products is usually left to parents and students may have little say in what they use. Media advertising, particularly on television, may also influence product choice.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

• If possible, bring in some examples of different health products that might be used by the students. Discuss what each is for and ask students to show which ones they use regularly. A tally of products can be made to show results. Ask students to draw and label pictures of products they use to help keep them healthy to complete Question 1. • The teacher can choose two health products and discuss a way of using each safely and responsibly. For example; keep razors away from children, close your eyes when using shampoo. For Question 2, ask students to choose two products they drew for Question 1 and write how to use each safely. • Ask students to think about who chooses the health products they use. In most cases, this will be the parent who does most of the shopping. Are there any times when the students choose their own products? Students answer Question 3. • Talk with students about how we may use different health products as we get older. For example, razors, deodorant and face creams. Ask students to draw and label products they think they might use when they are older. Answers

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

Answers will vary

. te

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students can look through magazines to find pictures of different health products. Brand names can be listed and prices compared. • Create a class graph to show the numbers of students who use different health products.

Health curriculum links

22

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.10

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, COS1.1, DMS1.2, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0202

Qld

PHIC2.4

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Health products Draw and label pictures of some health products you might use.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Write how youS can use two of these products safely and responsibly. Product –

w ww

. te

Who chooses the health products you use?

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Product – •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . c e r Draw and label otherh e o t r s super products you might use to keep you healthy when you are older.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

23


Teachers notes

Safety rules

Indicator Background information

• Identifies behaviours required for personal safety.

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• What do you need to do to stay safe? • What other things influence personal safety? Discuss the environment and the behaviour of others. • What safety rules do you follow? Discuss rules for home, school, play areas, the pool/beach and fire safety. • How do you travel to school? • What rules do you need to follow on your way to school? What to do:

Personal safety depends on the environment and the behaviour of ourselves and others. Students need to take personal responsibility for their own safety and recognise situations where they need to follow rules. Accidents can happen and many are preventable.

• Ask students to volunteer ideas to make a list of the different places and situations in which safety rules should be observed. Direct students to the rules shown in Question 1 and ask them to finish drawing pictures to show when and how the rules are used. • Talk with students about the ideas in the Discussion points and have them choose the correct word to complete each sentence in Question 2. • Survey students to see how they travel to school each day. Group students according to how they travel. Ask them to discuss the safety rules they need to follow each time they leave the house to travel to school. Students can individually write safety steps to complete Question 3. Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

Additional activities

m . u

w ww

1. Teacher check 2. (a) safe (b) water (c) left, right (d) sunscreen, hat 3. Teacher check

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Create a poster that shows safe behaviour. • Use a flow chart to show consequences of breaking safety rules. For example, a child is playing with matches ➔ the room catches on fire ➔ the fire brigade attends ➔ the house burns down.

Health curriculum links

24

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.12

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, SLS1.13

Vic.

HPIP0201, HPSR0202

Qld

PHIC2.3

SA

2.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Safety rules Finish drawing pictures to show these safety rules. Wear a helmet when riding a bike.

Always close the pool gate.

Teac he r

Write the correct word or words for each sentence .

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s BAlways r oowear a seatbelt. Only swim betweene the flags at p theu beach. k S

hatR safe right water © . I . C.Pu bl i cat i ons sunscreen •f omade rr e i ew ur poseso l y• (a) Rules are tov keep me p . n left

(b) Learning to swim will keep me safe in the and

. te

(d) I should always wear when I am playing outside.

m . u

w ww

(c) I need to look

. when I cross the road. and a

o c . Write steps to show how to be safe on the way to school. ch e r er o t s super

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

25


Teachers notes

Medicines

Indicator • Understands appropriate uses of medicines and alternative methods of pain relief.

The lesson Discussion points:

All medicines should be stored in a safe place, out of the reach of children. Students should be aware there are a number of alternatives to medicines when they are feeling unwell.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• What are medicines for? • When have you taken medicine? • Who gives you medicine? • What do some medicines taste like? • Do all medicines make you feel better? • Do you always need to take medicine when you are feeling sick? • What else can you do? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• Ask students to think about different medicines they have taken. Do any students take medicine on a regular basis? Be sensitive to students who may be in this category and do not wish to discuss their illness. Students can draw and label a picture of a medicine they have used and write why they needed it to complete Question 1. Some examples might include cough mixture, a headache tablet, asthma spray or an allergy medication. • Discuss rules we need to follow when using medicines. Students can help to compile a list. Direct students to the sentences in Question 2 and the words shown in the box. Ensure all students can recognise each word in the box and understand its meaning. Have students select the correct word or words to complete each sentence. • Ask students to consider bullet points six and seven from the Discussion points. After discussion, allow students to answer Question 3 and to draw alternatives to pain relief for Question 4. Answers

w ww

1. Teacher check 2. (a) adult (b) kept, children (c) dose (d) doctor (e) Sometimes, better

. te

Additional activities

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask students to bring in labels from medicines they may use and discuss the information presented on each. • Ask students to write a story about a time they were sick. What happened? Who looked after them? Did they visit a doctor? Did they take medicine? How long did it take to get well?

26

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links Nat.

2.9

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, COS1.1, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0202

Qld

PHIC1.4, PHIC2.4

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Medicines Draw and label a picture of a medicine you have taken. Write why you had to take the medicine.

Teac he r children

doctor

(a) An

better

adult

kept

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Write the correct Sword or words for each sentence.

Sometimes

dose

should give you medicine when you are sick.

(b) Medicines should be

away from

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i o ns of medicine. •f orr evi ewifp ur posesonl y• (d) Visit a you don’t get better soon.

.

(c) You must take the correct

(e)

w ww

to make you feel

.

. te

Do you take medicine every time you feel sick?

m . u

you don’t need medicine

o c . c e he Draw pictures to show what you can do insteado ofr t r s su r pe taking medicines when you are feeling sick. At home

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

At school

Primary health and values

27


Teachers notes

First aid

Indicator • Understands basic first aid steps.

Background information A basic first aid kit may include the following items:

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Survey students to see who has had a minor injury before. What first aid was given? Who gave the first aid? Ask students what they would do if they stepped on a piece of glass and cut their foot. Direct students to the flow chart in Question 1 and discuss the sequence of events. Have students complete the pictures to explain the first aid given. • Students can number the boxes in Question 2 to show the correct sequence for treating a minor burn and a blood nose. Discuss answers. Note: First aid authorities advise placing cold, wet towels on the neck and forehead after applying pressure for a persistent blood nose. • Show students the items included in the class/school first aid kit and discuss what each is used for. Ask them to draw some of the items to complete Question 3. Answers

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• What is first aid? • Who can provide first aid? • What things are in our class/school first aid kit? • What first aid items do you have at home? • Who can you ask for help if you are injured? What to do:

• a range of bandages and dressings • adhesive tape and strips • gloves • antiseptic lotion • cream and wipes • a kidney dish • a hot/cold pack • scissors • forceps • a splinter probe • saline solution • thermal accident blanket

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

1. Teacher check 2. (a) Minor burn – 3, 1, 4, 5, 2 (b) Blood nose – 4, 3, 1, 5, 2 3. Teacher check

Additional activities

. te

• Discuss other minor injuries that may happen to students and write steps for basic first aid as a flow chart. • Students can work in pairs to practise basic first aid, using items found in a basic first aid kit. Students can role-play the correct sequence of events for other pairs.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

28

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.12

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, PSS1.5

Vic.

HPIP0202

Qld

PHIC2.3

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


First aid

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Complete the flow chart with pictures to show basic first aid.

Number the steps from 1 to 5 to show the order of actions you should take.

© R. I . C.Publ i ca i on s (b) At blood nose f orr evi ew pur pos esonl y• Dry• carefully Clean your face

(a) A minor burn

w ww

Apply antiseptic cream or lotion

Wait for the blood to stop

m . u

Move away from danger

Find a tissue for the blood

. tinjury o Rest the e Rest c . che e r Run under cold water r o Pinch t s your nose super

Draw some of the things that are in your class first aid kit.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

29


Teachers notes

Danger

Indicators • Recognises common items that can be dangerous. • Knows how to respond in an emergency.

The lesson Discussion points:

Around the home, school and community there are many items that can be dangerous if misused. Students need to be able to recognise these and have an understanding of how to avoid dangerous situations.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Talk about how some items can be dangerous if not used properly. Students can work in small groups to discuss items that can be dangerous and make a list. Direct students to the pictures in Question 1 of the worksheet and have them consider how each item can be dangerous. Students can write an answer to explain each. • Discuss with students the telephone number to call in case of emergency. Complete Question 2. Talk about the services that can be accessed. Students need to be aware that the emergency service number should only be called in a real emergency. Ask students to think about emergency situations that would require calling the fire, police or ambulance service. Discuss suggestions and ask students to write those they think are life threatening to answer Question 3. Answers

The police, ambulance and fire brigade are the three major organisations that provide emergency services to our communities. These services can usually be accessed by telephoning 000. There are often separate numbers that can be used when situations are not life threatening. Students need to understand the difference between emergencies that are life threatening and those that are not.

ew i ev Pr

• What things around your house, school and community can be dangerous if not used properly? • Can you recognise things that might be dangerous? • What can you do in an emergency? • When would you use different emergency services? • How do you think you would react in an emergency? • What emergency procedures are in place at your school? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Teacher check

Additional activities

• Students can draw a simple plan of the classroom. Have them walk around the room to see if they can isolate any areas or items that could be dangerous. Ask them to mark a cross on their map and label what they see as dangerous. • Discuss emergency procedures in place at the school. Ask students to draw flow charts or pictures that show what to do in the different emergencies recognised at the school. • Design a poster to show how common items can be dangerous in the home, class, school or local community.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

30

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.12

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, SLS1.13

Vic.

HPIP0201, HPSR0202

Qld

PHIC2.3

SA

1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Danger

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Write how these things can be dangerous if not used properly.

w ww

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

If there was an emergency, what number would you call?

. te

o c . the fire service? c e her r o t s super For what emergencies might you call …

the police service?

an ambulance?

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

31


Teachers notes

Safe and unsafe

Indicator • Recognises safe and unsafe situations.

Background information Students need to be aware of behaviours, people and situations that/who can make them feel unsafe. It is important they know people who they can talk with if they feel unsafe. Although the concept of ‘stranger danger’ is essential, people students know may also make them feel unsafe.

The lesson Discussion points: • What makes you feel safe? • What makes you feel unsafe? • Who can you go to when you feel unsafe? • How can you keep yourself safe? • What is a ‘safety house’? What to do:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Discuss with students how different people and places can make us feel safe or unsafe. Ask students to think about those people they always feel safe with and write the names of three of these people for Question 1. Students may wish to share why they feel safe with certain people. • Discuss different environments where students feel safe. These may include home, school, friends’ and relatives’ houses, the park or the shops. Ask students to draw two places where they feel safe to complete Question 2. • Explain the safety house program to students and discuss the situations when they may use one. If the community is small and there are no official safety houses, discuss other locations and people’s houses where they can go if needed. Talk about the times when you wouldn’t use a safety house. Ask students to colour yes or no to show reasons why they would use a safety house to answer Question 3. • Talk with students about strangers and ask them to think about what they might do if a stranger approached them in various situations. These may include walking to and from school, playing with friends at the park or being at the shops. Students can write a sentence for Question 5 to describe what they would do if they were approached by a stranger. Answers

In many communities in Australia, safety houses are provided to help children who may find themselves in an unsafe situation.

w ww

1 – 3. Teacher check 4. (a) yes (b) no (c) no (d) yes (e) yes (f) yes 5. Teacher check

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Additional activities • Students can draw the safety house logo and locate those houses on a map that are close to the school. • Discuss unsafe situations. The teacher may be able to provide a personal experience when he/she felt unsafe. Students can write a real or imaginary story about a time when they or family members were in an unsafe situation and describe what happened.

32

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links Nat.

2.12

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, COS1.1, S1.13

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.3

SA

2.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Safe and unsafe Write the names of three people you always feel safe with.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw two places where you always feel safe.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Do you have safety houses in your community? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

A safety house is somewhere you can go if you are feeling unsafe.

You can go to a safety house if:

w ww

(b) you want an ice-cream.

. te

(c) you want something to eat.

m . u

(a) you are afraid of something.

o c . ch (e) someone bullies you. e r er o t s super (f) you have hurt yourself. (d) you feel unsafe.

Write what you can do if a stranger bothers you.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

33


Teachers notes

To share or not?

Indicator • Makes choices to promote personal health.

The lesson Discussion points: • Why is it important not to share some health products? • What health products can you share? • Will you use more health products as you get older? • Which of these products do you think you will share/will not share? What to do:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

At this age, students may not necessarily use too many different health products. Many of those they do use will be shared with other family members. However, it is important for them to identify some items they should avoid sharing. As students grow older, they will make use of many other products they will not wish to share (make-up, deodorant, shavers, lotions, perfumes etc.).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Ask students to help create a list of health products they use. Decide which items they should and shouldn’t share with others and discuss the health reasons why. Complete Questions 1, 2 and 3. Assist as required. • Ask students to think about health products their parents and older siblings may use. Students can look through magazines to find pictures of different products. Talk about how we use different products as we grow and change; for example, shavers, deodorant and make-up. Ask students to draw pictures to complete Question 4 to show products they may use when they are older and whether they would share them or not. Answers Teacher check

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Additional activities

w ww

. te

m . u

• Students can bring in empty health product containers and create a class display by putting them in the correct category of ‘sharing’ or ‘not sharing’. • Design a magazine advertisement that shows one of the health products students have discussed.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

34

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.9

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, DMS1.2, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.1

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


To share or not? Draw the health products we shouldn’t share. Add two of your own.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok toothbrush medicines comb u S Write two reasons why we shouldn’t share some things. (i)

(ii)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

m . u

Match the correct label to each picture to show health products you can share.

o c Think about healthc products you might use when you are older. . e r Draw two you might h share and two you wouldn’t share. er o t s super shampoo

toothpaste

sunscreen

might share R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

soap

wouldn’t share Primary health and values

35


Teachers notes

Choices

Indicator Background information

• Makes personal choices.

The lesson Discussion points: • When do you need to make your own choices? • How do you know if you are making the right choice? • How does making the right choice make you feel? • Do other people influence the choices you make? What to do:

Although many factors will influence the decisions students make about their health, it is important for them to be able to give reasons why they would make personal choices.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Discuss how we all have to make choices and decisions and be able to know why. Present students with the situations shown on the worksheet and have them make personal choices about what they would do for each. Discuss different decisions as students volunteer their choices. Answers Answers will vary

Additional activities

• Students can role-play the situations presented with a partner. • Ask students to write about a time when they had to choose between two things. What choice did they make? Was it the right choice? Did anyone influence their decision?

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

36

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.10

WA

SMS2

NSW

V2, V4, DMS1.2

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHS1.12

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Choices What choices will you make?

Circle or draw a picture of each choice you make. At a sleepover one of your friends wants to stay awake and another wants to go to sleep.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

You and your twin brother have money to buy something to share. Do you choose to buy a game or a video?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

At a friend’s house, you have a choice of sausages and vegetables or pizza for dinner.

Your friend is playing with matches and wants to light something. You are afraid of starting a fire.

w ww

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te wants to play with One of your friends is going to A classmate o c play at the. park, the other is your asthmac spray. He is a bully e r going to watch a DVD. and you know h note to let him o t r s s r upe have it.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

37


Teachers notes

Food advertisements

Indicator • Considers how the media affects health choices.

Background information Advertising in the media is a powerful influence on health choices made by individuals.

The lesson Discussion points:

Television commercials use many techniques for appeal: • humour • lively music • trendy people • exciting things happening • fast action • a common interest to the target audience (toys, playing with pets etc.) • colour • catchy slogans • famous people • interesting settings A target audience is the group of people the commercial is most likely to appeal to (young children, teenagers, women etc.).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• If possible, show prerecorded television commercials, preferably for food and health products. Ask students which ones they like the best and which they remember most easily. Why do they remember certain commercials? Make a list of some reasons. Ask students to think about their favourite commercials to complete Question 1. • Discuss students’ favourite food advertisements. Are they all for junk or fast foods? Have students think about food advertisements for healthy and junk food so they can complete the table in Question 2. Students need to decide if the advertisement is seen on television or through another form of media. Do they know the brand name? For what meal or occasion would they eat the food? Who makes the choice to buy it? • Ask students how they are affected when they see advertisements on television and tick the box(es) in Question 3. • Students can think about different foods they have seen advertised on television and draw three they would like to try. Question 4 can be done as a homework activity as students may not be able to remember what they have seen. Answers

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• What commercials do you like on television? • What is your favourite food advertisement? • Do some advertisements make you feel hungry? Do they make you want to buy the food right away? • How do you feel about advertising on television? • Do you remember brand names because you have seen them advertised on television? What to do:

w ww

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answers will vary

. te

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Have students tally the number of food commercials during a half-hour children’s program on television and discuss results. • Students can work in pairs or small groups to create their own television commercial for a healthy food they like. Groups may perform in front of the class with discussions following about whether they would buy the product or not.

Health curriculum links

38

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.10

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, DMS1.2, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.4

SA

1.8

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Food advertisements What is your favourite television commercial for … (a) fast food? (b) healthy food? (c) junk food?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Complete the table.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi wtop r p os eso nl y• Ie want gou and buy it straight away.

When you see a television commercial for food, how does it affect you?

w ww

. te

m . u

Advertisements just annoy me. I ask if we can buy it next time we go shopping. I don’t take any notice.

o c . c e Draw and label threeh foods you have seen advertised on television you would r e o t r s super like to buy.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

I just wonder what it will taste like.

Primary health and values

39


Teachers notes

Becoming a healthy person

Indicators • Identifies independent living skills. • Expresses feelings about exercise and friendships. • Identifies aspects about himself/herself which develop self-esteem.

The lesson Discussion points:

As students develop independent living skills, they feel more confident and willing to try new things. It is important that students feel able to express themselves and can communicate effectively. Good mental health is as important as physical health.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• What are some things you can do by yourself at home? • What are some things you can do now that you couldn’t do when you were younger? • When do you feel sad/happy/worried? • Why do we need to exercise? • How do you feel before, during and after exercising? • Why do we need friends? • How do we make new friends? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• Introduce the lesson by singing the song ‘This is the way we brush our hair ...’ etc. using good health habits. • Read the opening paragraph with the students. • Read the heading for the first section and Question 1. Allow the students to complete Question 1 by colouring those activities they can do by themselves. Students may not be allowed to attempt some activities because their parents do not allow them to. Make allowance for this when marking the answers. • Read the next heading and ask the students to complete Question 2 (a), using activities they like to do and activities they do not like to do. Students should list the qualities of their best friend which they like for 2 (b). • Repeat for Question 3. Students should list something they are good at and something that they are getting better at and how they achieved both. • Students complete Question 4 by drawing a picture as directed. Answers

w ww

Answers will vary

. te

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students name or list other independent living skills they have. • Students compile a list of other skills they would like to learn and write about how they could learn them. • List and compare forms of exercise. Graph the 10 most popular ones. • List the qualities which make a good friend. • Students draw their best friend(s) and list their qualities on the front or back of the drawing. • Discuss feelings and the things that promote these feelings. Discuss ways of dealing with feelings such as anger.

40

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.1, 2.5, 2.6

WA

CHL2, IS1, SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V3, V4, V5, V6 DMS1.2, INS1.3, ALS1.6, GDS1.9, IRS1.11, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201, HPSR0201, HPM0202

Qld

PHIC2.1, EPD2.1

SA

1.4, 1.5, 1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Becoming a healthy person As we grow older, we can do more things for ourselves. We become better at saying what we think and feel. We become better at looking after ourselves.

Caring for your health and becoming independent Colour the things you can do by yourself.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Expressing your S feelings (a) When I exercise, I like to

but I don’t like to

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons , because •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

(b) I like my best friend,

w ww

m . u

Feeling good about yourself (a) I am good at

because

. te o c (b) I am getting better at . che e r o t r s super because Draw yourself exercising with your friends.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

41


Teachers notes

Rules for working together

Indicators • Matches pictures to appropriate rules. • Writes a rule appropriate to a situation in a picture.

The lesson Discussion points:

Students should be familiar with rules at home and at school. Rules can help us to work in a team such as the family, help us to get along with others, play and work safely and cope with difficult situations. For rules to be effective, students need to be responsible for obeying them and to understand why they have been put in place.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• What is a rule? • Why do we need rules? • What are some rules to use in the classroom? • What are some rules to use in the playground? • What are some rules that may be used at home? • Who makes rules? • When and how should rules be changed? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• Discuss the questions above and record any relevant information on a chart for future use. • Read the opening paragraph with the students. • View the pictures in Question 1 and discuss what is happening in each picture. • Read each rule and ask the students to connect each rule to its matching picture, using a different coloured pencil for each one. • View and discuss the picture in Question 2. • Students try to think of a rule for the picture such as ‘Always eat at the table!’ Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

m . u

Answers will vary

• • • •

w ww

Additional activities

Remind students of class and playground rules. Compare students’ home rules to find common ones. Discuss ‘adult’ rules such as those for road safety. Discuss games which require rules such as card games. Spend one afternoon playing cards or games which require rules to reward the students for obeying class or playground rules. • If possible, construct class rules at the beginning of the year with the students. Students show more ownership towards a set of rules if they are involved in the compilation of them. • List characteristics of good team members or good team leadership.

42

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.12, 2.13, 2.14

WA

CHL2, SPA.2.2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, V4, INS1.3, PSS1.5, IRS1.11, SL1.13

Vic.

HPSR0202

Qld

EPD2.2

SA

1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Rules for working together Rules help us to get along with each other. Rules need to be fair and should not change. Rules can help to keep us safe.

Take turns

Share

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Match the rules to the pictures.

w ww

. te

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i c t i o s •a •n Listen when others speaking •f orr evi ew pur posesoare nl y•

Put your hand up to speak

o c . che e r o t r s super Write a rule for this picture.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

43


Teachers notes

Doing the right thing

Indicators • Selects right and wrong decisions. • Illustrates scenarios appropriately.

Background information

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Read and discuss the opening sentences with the students. • Selected students may read the scenarios to the class or the teacher may read them. • After each scenario, allow the students time to discuss and colour the word yes or no. Answers

• Does it feel right? (What does your conscience say?)

ew i ev Pr

• What are some difficult decisions you have had to make? • What are some easy decisions you have had to make? • How do you know when a decision is right or wrong? • How do you feel when you make the right decision? • How do you feel when you make the wrong decision? • What can make decisions hard to make? (peer influence) • Who can you talk to about difficult decisions? What to do:

Teac he r

Children need to learn to think about whether something is right or wrong before making a choice. They need guidelines for making the right decisions because sometimes deciding on the right choice may not be clear cut. To help children make the right decisions, they may find the following questions helpful to think about before making a decision:

• Can my decision hurt someone, including myself? • Is it fair?

• Would I like it if someone did it to me? • Have I been told not to do this because it is wrong?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• How do I really feel about it?

Answers will vary

• Will I like myself later if I do this?

w ww

• Relate other scenarios orally to the students and allow them to make the decisions. • Discuss times when parental permission must be gained before doing something. • Discuss times when it may be okay to ‘deviate from the rules’. • Read books where characters may need to make decisions. • List ways of doing the right thing to protect the environment, such as picking up rubbish, recycling, reusing and conserving water, flora and fauna. • Students relate news articles which show people or companies doing the right or wrong thing.

. te

• What would my mum and dad say about it? When decisions prove far too difficult, it is a good idea to talk it over with someone you trust and respect.

m . u

Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

44

Primary health and values

Nat.

HR2.14

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V2, DMS1.2, INS1.3, PSS1.5, IRS1.11, SL1.13

Vic.

HPSR0202

Qld

EPD2.2, EPD2.4

SA

1.5, 1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Doing the right thing Every day we have to make decisions. Some decisions are easy and some are hard. Deciding to do the right thing can sometimes be difficult. Sometimes we need to think hard before deciding what is the right thing to do.

Read each story, then colour yes or no to show if the right decision was made.

r o e t s Amanda asked her friend, B r e oo Sasha, to come to her house p u kto play. They after school S walked straight to Amanda’s

They made the right decision.

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Sam and Todd were playing a computer game. They decided to take turns.

house after school.

They made the right decision.

© R. I . C.Publ i ca t i oand ns Kamal Luke found a Gameboy™ when they were •f orr evi ew pur pos esonl y• bike riding. They decided to

Aleisha had to go with her Mum to visit her Mum’s friend, Sarah. Aleisha didn’t like Sarah’s daughter so she sulked and was nasty all through the visit.

take it home and keep it.

She made the right decision.

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They made the right decision.

o c . c e he r Josh went to Ben’s birthday party. There was o t r s it su a lot of food and Josh ate toop much. When er was time to eat the birthday cake, Josh asked if he could take his home to eat later. He made the right decision.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Appreciating others

Indicators • Identifies actions which show appreciation. • Follows rules to play a game.

The lesson Discussion points:

Children interact with people every day. They belong to various groups, meet new people and have close relationships with peers, family and teachers. To develop positive relationships with these people, it is important to show appreciation for them. Appreciation may be shown in various forms such as praise, giving affection and gifts, helping, doing special things, showing consideration, sharing worries and joys and listening and talking to people. When we show appreciation for other people, we show that they are valued and we enhance relationships.

• The rules of the game are as follows: – Players must each have a counter and one die between them. – Players take turns to throw the die and count the number of squares to move. – When a player lands on an action which shows appreciation, he/she moves forward extra squares. – When a player lands on an action which does not show appreciation, he/she goes back. – The winner is the player who passes the ‘Finish’ square first. • Teachers may photocopy enough copies of the game to share between groups of two to four players. Copying onto card will make the game more durable. • Read all the information on the worksheet and allow students to play the game. Answers

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Who are the people you interact with each day? • What are some ways to show someone that you appreciate what they do for you? • Would you show appreciation in the same way to everyone? • Would you show appreciation in the same way to the same person each time? • What are some ways your teacher shows that he/she appreciates good behaviour or good work? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

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n/a

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Additional activities

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• List easy ways of showing appreciation so students may use them with family, friends and acquaintances. • Teachers create, and students play, other games which show desirable and undesirable behaviours. • Praise and reward students constantly for correct behaviour. • Discuss and list nice things to say about other people. • List jobs to help parents at home and ask students to try to do them occasionally. • Notice students being good and showing appreciation for others. Award a special merit certificate each week to students ‘caught being good’.

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Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.13

WA

IS2

NSW

V2, V3, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, PSS1.5, GDS19, IRS1.11

Vic.

HPSR0202

Qld

EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Appreciating others

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

This game is about showing appreciation for others. Each time a player lands on an action showing appreciation for someone, he/she moves forward. But each time a player lands on an action which does not show appreciation for someone, they must go back. This game is suitable for two to four players.

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R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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47


Teachers notes

I am special

Indicators • Reads a poem about individuality. • Identifies specific aspects which make him/her unique.

The lesson Discussion points:

S ometimes it is difficult for students to have a clear view of themselves. They exist in a community which expects them to play different roles, many of which involve different behaviours. They are constantly being bombarded with media expectations of body images and materialistic values. They are moulded by their own experiences, by culture, sexuality and socioeconomic status and by peer, familial and gender influences. It is important for a student to be aware that he/she is a multifaceted, unique individual who is valuable.

• Discuss the questions above. • Read the poem with the students. • Read the instructions for Question 2. Allow time for students to complete each sentence. • Students who have written answers may draw a suitable picture in each box if there is enough space. Answers

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• How are you different from others? • What are some physical features you have that you like? (Do you have nice eyes, hair or freckles?) • What are some things you do well? • What things do you do well at home? • What good qualities do you have? (loyal, funny, good leader, good helper etc.) • What do people like about you? • What skills or qualities would you like to have or improve? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

Identity grows as students relate to different people in different places. Feelings and thoughts are more difficult for students to express, but play a valuable part in defining who a person really is and how they respond to others.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answers will vary

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• Students write their names and decorate them. • Students create a poster about themselves using pictures from magazines. Students may cut out any pictures which relate to things they do or like such as favourite foods, hobbies, likes or favourite colours. • The teacher may choose a student of the week. This student brings in a photograph of himself/herself and gives a short talk about himself/herself. • Compare likes and dislikes of the class. • Hold a special day where students bring in medals, trophies or awards. • Ensure that all students have the opportunity to be a class monitor or helper to develop leadership skills. • Praise, reward and encourage the efforts of all students all the time. Students should be encouraged to ‘have a go’ as much as possible.

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Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.1, 2.9

WA

SMS2

NSW

V1, V2, V3, V4, V6, COS1, INS1.3, ALS1.6, GDS1.9

Vic.

HPSR0201, HPSR0202

Qld

EPD2.1

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


I am special It is important to remember that each of us is special.

Read the poem ‘I am special’. I am special. Can’t you see? You look like you. I look like me. We don’t speak or act or dress alike. I like to rollerblade. You like your bike.

Teac he r

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r o e t s Bthe same. r Our families are different. Our feelings aren’t o e ok We don’t haveu ap lot in common – not even our names. But I like you and you like me. S Each of us is special – as special as can be!

Write something good about yourself in each box and draw a picture. I like the way I look because ...

At school, I am good at ...

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At home, I am good at ...

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

I am a good friend because ...

Primary health and values

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Teachers notes

Making decisions

Indicators • Identifies people who make specific decisions. • Retells a good and a bad decision.

The lesson Discussion points:

It is important students learn to stop and think about whether something is right or wrong before making a choice. Having choices and making decisions can have consequences, both positive and negative. Students need to become independent, in control of some of the aspects of their life and learn to face the consequences.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the instructions for Question 1. • Read each decision with the students and allow them time to tick the relevant box. NOTE: Some decisions may be made by more than one person. For example, ‘The books I read’ may be decided by the teacher at school, the student at the library and a parent at bedtime. • Explain what ‘bad’ and a ‘good’ decisions are. • Read Question 2. Students write about a decision they made that was bad or had bad consequences. • Repeat for Question 3. Answers

The steps for decision making are: • define the problem

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Why do adults make a lot of decisions for children? Do you agree with these decisions? Why/Why not? What decisions made by adults would you like to make for yourself? How do you know when you have made the right decision? How do you feel? • How do you feel when you know you have made the wrong decision? • What are ‘consequences’? • Does knowing possible consequences help you to decide what to do? • What are some good and bad consequences of decision making in different situations? • What are some steps to make decision making easier? What to do:

Teac he r

• • • •

Background information

• brainstorm possible solutions

• evaluate the ideas and consider all consequences • decide on a solution and carry it out.

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Answers will vary

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Additional activities

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• Allow students to make easy decisions at school within guidelines as much as possible. • Relate scenarios where decisions have to be made and allow students to discuss choices. • Discuss situations that arise in the class or playground that require choices to be made. Decide whether decisions are good or bad. • List the qualities of a good decision maker. • Allow students to view the decision making steps on a chart for use. • Discuss other people or things who/that may influence decisions. For example, friends, background etc. • Discuss the possibility that even when a bad decision has been made, students will learn from their experiences.

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Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.13, 2.14

WA

SMS2

NSW

V3, V4, V6, INS1.3, DMS1.2, PSS1.5, IRS1.11

Vic.

HPM0202

Qld

EPD2.2, EPD2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Making decisions People have to make decisions every day. Some decisions are small and some are very important. Sometimes other people need to make decisions for you.

Tick the boxes to show who makes these decisions for you. Decision

Me Parent Friend Teacher Other

r o e t s Bo r e What I have for breakfast p ok u S The books I read

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Teac he r

What time I get up in the morning

My hairstyle for the day The games I play at school The clothes I wear at home

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons or eclass vi ew pur posesonl y• Who• I sitf next tor in Who I play with

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What I eat for dinner

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When I do my homework What I watch on TV

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o c . cdecision e Write about a ‘bad’ you made by yourself. her r o t s super When I go to bed

Write about a ‘good’ decision you made by yourself.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Strengths and weaknesses

Indicators • Identifies strengths and weaknesses. • Relates feelings about attempting new things.

The lesson Discussion points:

As unique, valuable individuals, we all have our strengths and weaknesses. It is important to be pleased with our successes as well as the way in which we handle failure. This is difficult for adults to cope with as well as children. Risk taking can be very difficult, but children should be praised and rewarded for any attempts to try something new as well as gaining success. Quite often it is necessary to attempt a new thing many times before succeeding. In this way, valuable knowledge, skills and values will be learnt.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• What are some things you can do now that you couldn’t do last year or when you were a toddler? • What are some things you are good at? • What are some things you are not good at? • Are we all good at the same things? • Do you always enjoy doing the things you are good at? Why/Why not? • Do you always hate doing things you are not good at? Why/Why not? • How do you feel when you have to try something new? • How do you feel when you try something new and you do well? How about when you do not do as well as you hoped? • Why is it good to fail sometimes? • What should you do if you fail many times trying a particular thing? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the instructions for Question 1. • Read each activity with the students and allow them time to circle or cross it. • Read Question 2 and allow students time to answer. • Repeat for Question 3. • Students complete the page by drawing a picture for Question 4. Answers

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Additional activities

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• Reward and praise students constantly for trying, whether they succeed or not. • Encourage risk-taking attempts when reading and writing stories. • Ensure the classroom climate is such that students feel comfortable to try new things and know that they are allowed to fail sometimes. • Name and list some well-known people who have excelled in their chosen field. • Discuss people with disabilities who have succeeded where ‘able’ people may have failed. • Display trophies, awards, medals and certificates students may bring in. • Choose one person each week as ‘Best Achiever’ (i.e. the student who tries hard to achieve something they are not good at—whether they succeed or not!). • Provide opportunities for students to acknowledge their mistakes and think about how to rectify them. This is a valuable learning experience for students. • Reward students for showing appreciation and encouraging others.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.1

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V2, V3, V6, DMS1.2, PSS1.5, ALS1.6, GDS1.9, IRS1.11

Vic.

HPSR0201

Qld

EPD2.1, 2.3

SA

1.1, 1.3, 1.4

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Strengths and weaknesses Each of us is good at some things and not so good at others.

Look at the activities below. Circle those you are good at and cross those you are not so good at. drawing

tying shoelaces

making the bed

writing stories handwriting

r o playing soccer e t s running B r e oo p kriding a bike making new friendsu swimming S

speaking in front of people

reading

(a) Write something else you are good at.

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doing handstands

(b) Write something else you are not very good at.

(a) How do you feel when you have to try something new?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(b) How do you feel when you try something new and don’t do as well as you had hoped?

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(c) How do you feel when you try something new and do well?

o c . e Draw a picture of c you doing something you are really good at. her r o st super

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Bullying

Indicators • Identifies bullying situations. • Identifies strategies to cope with bullying situations.

The lesson Discussion points:

Bullying is very common within our schools. Students bully for many reasons including not fitting in, disliking themselves, peer pressure, wanting to show off, feeling upset or angry and having a fear of being bullied themselves.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the instructions. • Discuss what is happening in each picture and how each situation might be resolved. Students may suggest several solutions. If possible, encourage students to choose a solution that involves each person dealing with the situation himself/herself. • Briefly write words or a sentence on the board to reflect the students’ answers. Students may copy or write the solutions they feel are suitable. • Students may colour the pictures while others are finishing. The teacher may take this time to ask specific students why they chose a particular solution. Answers

Bullying takes many forms, including physical abuse such as hitting, punching and tripping; verbal abuse such as name-calling, teasing and putdowns; and emotional abuse such as gossiping, spreading rumours or making fun of someone, using threatening looks or gestures and excluding and ignoring someone.

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• What happens when you are bullied? • What are some ways people can be bullied? • Do some types of bullying hurt more than others? Explain. • Which types of bullying are easier to cope with? • Which types of bullying are more difficult to cope with? • What can you do if you are being bullied? • Who can you go to for help if you are being bullied? • Why do you think people bully other people? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

Students should be able to recognise bullying situations. They should be shown appropriate strategies to cope with bullying and be encouraged to use them.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Answers will vary

S ome strategies include problem-solving, role-play, tolerance, communication, conflict resolution, avoidance, learning when to ask for help and being assertive (not aggressive).

Additional activities

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• Encourage students to relate situations where they may have been bullied and ask them to say how they dealt with them. Do not force students to tell any information which may be distressing or embarrassing for them. • Create a network picture to show people students trust to go to when they have problems. • Practise problem-solving skills. • Encourage students to be assertive. Practise being confident; i.e. using correct body language, eye contact and speaking clearly. • Encourage tolerance so that less bullying situations occur. Do this by appreciating each others’ similarities and differences. • Be consistent and fair to all students. Do not play favourites. • Provide a happy, secure and safe environment where students are able to express their feelings and know that they will be listened to when they find themselves being bullied.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.12, 2.14

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, V4, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, PSS1.5, GDS1.9, IRS1.11, SLS1.23

Vic.

HSPR0202

Qld

PHIC2.3, EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5, 1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Bullying People who bully pick on people smaller or weaker than themselves. They can make you feel worried, sad and angry if they do not leave you alone.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

All the children in the pictures are being bullied. How do you think they should deal with what is happening?

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o c . che e r o t r s super

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Primary health and values

55


Teachers notes

Friendship

Indicators • Identifies qualities which maintain good relationships. • Completes a crossword about maintaining friendships. The lesson Discussion points:

Every day, children interact with a variety of people– parents, friends, teachers, relatives and day care centre carers. Children react to each of these people differently. Relationships with other people are very important because they give us a sense of who we are and where we belong. They give us comfort and support. Relationships may change or develop over time as children grow older and more independent. Children need to develop skills to maintain happy, healthy relationships. These skills include communication, changing bad habits, negotiation, self-respect and love.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the questions above and the opening paragraph. • Read through the clues with the students. • Students complete the crossword, circling each word as it is used. Answers

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Teac he r

• Who is your best friend? • Why is this person your best friend? • Are all your friends school friends? • Are you friends with the same people you were friends with last year? • What makes a good friend? • Are you a good friend? • If so, why are you a good friend? • If not, how can you become a good friend? What to do:

Background information

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o c . che e r o t r s super

Health curriculum links

Additional activities

• Create a ‘My Best Friend’ art gallery. Students paint a portrait of their best friend and display it in the room. • Students write a description of their best friend. • List qualities needed to be a good friend. • Discuss the concept of pets as best friends. Talk about why they are good friends and how to show them that they are appreciated. • Discuss steps for making a new friend such as how to start conversations with new students at school. • Hold a ‘new friend hour’ where students spend time in class getting to know and playing with a person they don’t usually play with. Allocate partners to students to ensure that no student is left isolated. 56

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.2, 2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, V4, V6, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, GDS1.9, IRS1.11

Vic.

HSPR0201

Qld

EPD2.2, EPD2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Friendship Everyone likes to have friends. Friends are fun to be with. It is good to share things with friends at home and at school. It is not always easy to be a good friend.

Complete the crossword below to find ways to be a good friend. Use the words in the box. Circle each word as you use it. share

important

leave

bossy

listen annoy r o e t s B r e oo p Across u k S 2. I try not to be when we play games.

3. I don’t I do something.

my friends out when

7. I make my friends feel

.

ignore

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consider

help

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Down

8. I can my worries with my friends.

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1. I don’t my friends and play with other children. 4. I try not to my friends with my bad habits.

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6. I feelings.

my friends

9. I try to my friends if they need me.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Showing love and respect

Indicators • Identifies actions which show love and respect. • Matches actions to specific people.

The lesson Discussion points:

Every day, children interact with a variety of people– parents, friends, teachers, relatives and day care centre carers. Children react to each of these people differently. Relationships with other people are very important because they give us a sense of who we are and where we belong. They give us comfort and support. Relationships may change or develop over time as children grow older and more independent. Children need to develop skills to maintain happy, healthy relationships. These skills include communication, changing bad habits, negotiation, self-respect and love.

• Introduce the activity with a song or rhyme about family and friends. • Discuss the questions above. • Carefully view the pictures and make sure the students are aware of who each picture represents. • Students connect the person/pet to the action that is most appropriate. NOTE: Some actions may be appropriate for more than one person, but for this purpose only one action fits each person. • Read Question 2. Students can answer in their own words. Answers

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Who are the people you love and respect? • What things can we do to show these people we love and respect them? • What are some things you have done to show someone you love and respect him/her? • How would you like your family and friends to show you that they love you? • What is the nicest thing you have done for someone to show him/her you love and respect him/her? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students relate other actions they have used to show love and respect to their grandparents, teachers, coaches, siblings and pets. • Students think of one nice thing to do each day to show love and respect to others. Relate these to the class to give others ideas. • ‘Catch’ a student being nice each day and reward him/her appropriately. • Students keep a record of good deeds in an individual booklet and are rewarded at the end of a certain time frame. Students may only enter a deed with teacher approval.

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1. Mum – help by bringing in the washing Dad – pass him the tools he needs Friend – invite her to my house to play Dog – take him for a walk Coach – listen and follow training instructions Grandma – let her cuddle me even though I’m big Teacher – always put up my hand to speak Brother – be quiet while he does his homework Sister – ask before I borrow her things Grandpa – help him out of the lounge chair 2. Teacher check

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.2, 2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, V4, V6, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, GDS1.9, IRS1.11

Vic.

HPSR0201

Qld

EPD2.2, EPD2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Showing love and respect It is important to show our family and friends that we care about them. There are many ways to do this.

Match the action to the person or pet it is best suited for.

r o e t s Bo r • ask before I borrow her things e p ok u S • help by bringing in the washing

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Teac he r

• invite her to my house to play

• pass him the tools he needs

• be quiet while he does his homework

© R. I . C.Pu bl i cat i ons • help him out of the lounge chair •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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• always put up my hand to speak • let her cuddle me even though I’m big

o c . che • listen and follow e r training instructions o t r s super • take him for a walk

Think of the nicest thing you have done for someone. Write about it below.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Feelings

Indicators • Identifies feelings for a given situation. • Identifies situations which evoke particular feelings.

The lesson Discussion points:

Different situations evoke different emotions for different people. Peoples’ reactions are influenced by their personalities and backgrounds. Students should feel confident to express their feelings in family and school situations. Classrooms should be comfortable and secure places for students. Teachers should be openminded and approachable.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Introduce the activity with a song or rhyme about feelings, such as ‘If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands’. • Discuss the questions above. • Read each example in Question 1 with the students and allow them time to write how it would make them feel. • Read each part of Question 2, ensuring that students are aware of the feeling represented by each face. Allow them time to complete each example. Answers

At times, students may experience a number of different feelings relating to one particular situation. For example, a new baby coming into the family may evoke feelings of excitement, worry about changing family dynamics and anger at being replaced as the ‘baby of the family’. Students should be aware that all these reactions are perfectly natural and there is no need to be ashamed of them. The important thing is learning to deal with them in a positive way.

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• When do you feel happy, sad, angry, excited, worried or frightened? • Can you feel more than one emotion in a particular situation? • Does everyone feel the same in the same situation? Why/Why not? • How do you cope when you get angry? What do you do? • Can other people help you when you are feeling sad or angry or worried? • Who are the people who help you? • How do you feel when someone hurts your feelings? • Have you ever hurt anyone else’s feelings? • How can you fix a situation when you have hurt someone else’s feelings? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Additional activities

• Compare feelings shown in the same situation. • Create a series of ‘I feel ...’ books. Students write a story and illustrate a page for each book about anger, sadness, happiness, excitement, worry etc. Keep in the class library and encourage students to read them during free time. • Role-play different emotions using facial expressions and body language. • Discuss the feelings experienced by particular characters in books. • Devise simple strategies for dealing with anger management. • Discuss ways of saying how you feel without hurting anyone else’s feelings.

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Health curriculum links

60

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.1, 2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V3, V6, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, GDS1.9, IRS1.11

Vic.

HSPR0201

Qld

EPD2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Feelings We can have many different feelings.

Read each sentence and write how it would make you feel. (a) Mum and Dad take me to the zoo.

I feel

.

r o e t s BoI feel r e (c) Dad has to go away for a long time with work. p ok u S a baby. (d) Mum is having I feel I feel

(e) My birthday party is coming closer.

I feel

(f) We are moving to a new neighbourhood.

I feel

We can say how we feel.

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Teac he r

(b) My little brother crushes my model plane.

. . . . .

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons (a) I feel angry when •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

(b) I feel happy when

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(c) I feel excited when

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Uncomfortable situations

Indicators • Completes a cloze about dealing with uncomfortable situations. • Relates details about an uncomfortable situation and evaluates his/her solution.

The lesson Discussion points:

As children get older, it is important to encourage independence and responsibility. Learning to cope with uncomfortable situations offers students the power to have more control and independence.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Introduce the activity with a song or rhyme about feelings, such as ‘If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands’. • Discuss the questions above. • Read the sentences at the beginning of Question 1 with the students. • Read each sentence in Question 1 and allow students time to suggest the correct word for the sentence and write it in the space. Students should cross out each word as it is used. • Read the instructions for Question 2 and allow students time to write their answers. Some may not feel comfortable completing this section and may wish to relate it orally or leave the question blank. Answers

It is difficult for parents and teachers to be everywhere at once, so teaching students how to deal with uncomfortable situations in the correct way ensures that the personal safety of a student gradually becomes more his/her responsibility.

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• When do you feel happy, sad, angry, excited, worried or frightened? • How do you deal with these particular situations? • Do you usually ask an adult to help? • Who are the adults you trust the most to help? • What difficult situations have you tried to deal with yourself? • Were you successful? • Did you learn anything? (Whether you were successful or not.) What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

Coping strategies include time out, deep breathing, going away from the situation, learning to say ‘No’ when something doesn’t feel right to do and telling trusted individuals about the situation so they may deal with it.

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1. (1) breaths (2) harm (3) away (4) home (5) no (6) tell (7) respect (8) teacher 2. Teacher check

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Additional activities

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Role-play dealing with difficult situations. • Listen to scenarios about uncomfortable situations and ask students how to deal with them. • Discuss situations where more than one strategy may be used. • Students create a picture of a network of people to go to when they are in trouble. • Form small groups where students relate and discuss solutions to scenarios where there are problems. • Read books involving characters who have to deal with difficult situations. Discuss whether they were successful or not.

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Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.12

WA

CHL2, SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V4, COS1.1, DMS1.2, PSS1.5, SLS1.13

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.3, EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5, 1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Uncomfortable situations Complete the sentences using the words below. Sometimes we can find ourselves in a situation where we may feel frightened, lost, upset, angry or are being bullied. If we do, there are some ways we can help ourselves. teacher

breaths

respect

home

tell

no

(1)

(2)

think clearly and not (3)

We can try to go

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Teac he r

away harm r o e t s Bo r e p ok u We can take to calm down so we can Ssome deep ourselves or anyone else.

from the situation by moving to

another part of the playground or going to another room if we are at

. . © R. I . C Publ i cat i ons If we asked tov doi something and weo think may wrong, •are f o rr e e w pu r p seits obe nl y• (4)

.

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(5)

we can say

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When we find ourselves in uncomfortable situations, we can

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(6)

someone we trust and

(7)

,

o c . che e r o (a) Think of a situation where you have felt uncomfortable. Write about it and t r s s r u e p tell how you dealt with it. such as a parent,

(8)

, older brother or sister or a friend.

(b) Were you happy with the way you dealt with the situation? R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Sharing and negotiating

Indicators • Completes an acrostic about sharing. • Completes a word search using ‘negotiation’ words.

The lesson Discussion points:

It is important for students to be able to share with each other. Sometimes this can be difficult since the world of most children centres around themselves and their own small section of the world.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Introduce the activity with a maths activity that involves sharing counters, lollies or toys. Ask the students why it is better to share than to not. • Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the acrostic to the students, leaving out the unknown words. • Read the words at the side which need to go in the acrostic. • Read the acrostic again, allowing the students to choose and write the missing words from the list. Students should cross out each word as they use it. Repeat until the acrostic is finished. Read the completed acrostic together. • In Question 2, the words in bold can be found in the word search. Students draw a line through each word as it is found. Answers

Learning to share and negotiate are very important skills to learn. Pre-negotiation skills may be taught from school entry. These include skills for positive social behaviours and relationships such as:

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• Why do we need to share? • Is it easy to share? Why/Why not? • Can we learn to share? How can we do this? • What does ‘negotiate’ mean? • Why is listening important when negotiating? • How can we make sure that both parties ‘win’ when negotiating? • What does ‘compromise’ mean? • Is it necessary to compromise to negotiate? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• self-esteem

• awareness of own and others’ feelings • empathy (respecting diversity and differences in others) • anger management/self-control

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

• listening

• searching for (problem-solving)

solutions

• taking responsibility for own actions. The negotiation steps are shown on the student worksheet.

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w ww

1. better, friends, same, Important, all, practise 2.

• communication

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Health curriculum links

Additional activities • • • •

64

Participate in maths activities and games where sharing is needed. Display the negotiation steps in the room for the students to see constantly. Reward students who share during break times and in the classroom. Practise the negotiating steps in the classroom and encourage students to trial them in the playground.

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, COS1.1, DMS1.2, INS1.3, PSS1.5, IRS1.11

Vic.

HPSR0202

Qld

EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Sharing and negotiating It can be hard to share at times. We want to make sure we don’t miss out and that we get our fair share. Sometimes we are upset or angry with people and don’t feel like sharing.

Complete the acrostic by filling in the missing words.

Sharing

r o e t s r with B our o e p ok u And makes sure S that everyone is treated the

all . practise

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Teac he r

Helps us to get on

Really good ‘sharers’ make sure that no-one feels more

friends

I

than anyone else.

same

No-one shares well

the time but it

Gets easier if© youR. . l I . C.Pub i cat i ons

Important

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

better

Look at the word search to find some skills to help you to negotiate well.

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m . u

The steps to negotiate are: • I talk about what happened, what I feel and what I want.

o c . che e r o • We solutions to t r ssuit brainstorm super us both.

• I listen to the other person do the same. I don’t interrupt!

• We decide on the best solution. • We agree to accept this solution. • We shake hands. R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

Communicating

Indicators Background information

• Completes a news-telling plan. • Evaluates listening skills.

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Introduce the activity with a game such as ‘Chinese whispers’ where clear speaking and good listening skills are required. • Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the instructions for Question 1. • Students complete the news-telling plan. • For Question 2, students listen to a group of students relate their news and complete the plan for one news item they heard. • The completed plan may be shown to the student who gave the news item or compared with his/her news-telling plan. • Students complete Question 3 to rate how well they listened. Answers

Speaking effectively can be difficult since children tend to stray from the point often. Giving news, answering questions and speaking to teachers and friends all help to develop speaking skills. A plan for speaking during news times can encourage students to speak more effectively and enhance writing skills as well.

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• Are you a good speaker? • Can people hear you when you talk? • How can you say what you feel without being aggressive? • Can the audience understand clearly what you are saying? • Do you think about what you are going to say before you say it? • Do you make eye contact with your audience? • How can you tell if a person is listening to you? • How can you make it easier for others to listen to you? • What makes a good listener? What to do:

Teac he r

Effective communication develops relationships. It allows speakers to get their point across and say how they feel. It is just as important to be an effective listener so the correct meaning is given and received.

Effective listening is vital to all aspects of learning and may be developed in a number of ways. Listening to audio tapes and stories, following directions, listening to instructions and news and repeating messages all help to develop listening skills.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Answers will vary

Additional activities

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• Students use a similar format to the news-telling plan to complete daily writing. The sections may be compiled to create a few good sentences. • Students may practise giving short talks about a topic chosen by the teacher. These talks may be spontaneous or planned. • Students develop listening skills by drawing pictures according to specific instructions given by the teacher. • Practise listening skills by playing games such as ‘Simon says’. • Discuss characters and actions in books after reading aloud to discover how well students listened. • Play games such as ‘Pass the message’. • Visit an older class to observe a debate or discussion. • Use a variety of speech patterns to match those of characters from books.

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Primary health and values

Health curriculum links Nat.

2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, COS1.1, INS1.3, IRS1.11

Vic.

HSPR0201

Qld

EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Communicating We all need to speak clearly and listen carefully. This is called ‘communication’. It helps us to get along better with others.

How well do you speak? Use the plan below to organise your next news-telling activity.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S What

When

Where

Why

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Teac he r

Who

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons How well did you listen? •f orr evi e w pur posesonl y•

w ww

Who

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What

When

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Listen to another student give his/her news. When he/she has finished, use the plan to write about it. Where

Why

o c . che e r o t r s super

On the scale below, rate your listening skills.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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67


Teachers notes

Problem-solving

Indicators • Identifies information about problem-solving steps from a poem. • Uses problem-solving steps to solve a problem.

The lesson Discussion points:

Everyone is different. We do things in different ways and we often want different things. Sometimes we don’t agree with other people and problems are created.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the questions above. • Read the opening sentences and the poem in Question 1. Ensure that all unknown words are explained to the students. • Discuss the poem and emphasise the questions. • Students copy the three important questions (What is wrong? What can I do? Can we fix it?) to answer Question 2. • Read and discuss the scenario in Question 3 with the students and allow them to write their answers. This question may also be done as a whole class group. Answers

Students encounter problems every day, whether individually or with other students. They should follow these simple rules for solving a problem: • Try to solve problems so that everyone wins.

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• Have there been times when you had to make a decision and found it difficult? • How did you decide what to do? • Were you happy with your solution to the problem? • If so, why? If not, why not? • Are there common steps you or others followed to reach a solution? • Have there been occasions when you have not been happy with your solutions? What were these problems? Why weren’t you happy with the solutions? • Can some problems be solved by saying ‘sorry’? What sort of problems? • Do adults ever say things that hurt other people’s feelings? How do they fix these problems? • What does it mean to ‘compromise’ or ‘negotiate’? What to do:

Teac he r

Background information

• Let people know how you feel.

• Listen to how other people feel. • Say ‘sorry’ if you hurt someone’s feelings. • Be fair to everyone.

The basic problem-solving steps are:

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

Additional activities

• Did we fix it?

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Teach problem-solving strategies through discussion and role-play. • Orally relate other scenarios where problems exist and encourage students to use the problem-solving steps to solve them. • Discuss real-life problems and the solutions as they occur. • Complete and compare problem-solving maths activities. • Think of some ‘good’ problems such as having to decide between two fun outings with the family.

68

• What can we do?

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1. Teacher check 2. (i) What is wrong? (ii) What can I do? (iii) Can we fix it? 3. Answers will vary

• What is the problem?

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.13

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V2, V3, V4, COS1.1, DMS1.2, PSS1.5, IRS1.11

Vic.

HSPR0202

Qld

EPD2.2, 2.4

SA

1.3, 1.5

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


Problem-solving As we get older we can learn to look after ourselves by trying to solve our own problems. This can be difficult for both children and adults to do well.

Read the poem below. I rack my brain. I tear my hair. So I put my mind to the test r o e t s Boto the very best. r To solve my problems e p oyou know u It’s not so hard whenk S That the steps are the same wherever you go.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

It’s hard to cope in the world out there.

What is wrong? What can I do? Can we fix it? I can! Can you?

What are the three important questions you need to ask yourself when trying to solve a problem? Write them below. (i) (ii)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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m . u

(iii) Read the scenario below and use the steps to solve the problem.

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Natalie has made friends with the new girl in her class. Her best friend, Tina, ignores her when she wants to start a game at lunchtime.

o c . che e r o t r s super (a) What is wrong? (b) What can they do?

(c) Can they fix it? R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Teachers notes

No worries!

Indicators • Identifies events that cause stress or worry. • Identifies activities that combat stress and aid relaxation.

Background information Mental or emotional health is as important to maintain as physical health. Good mental health involves:

The lesson Discussion points:

• feeling good about yourself and your life

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss possible things that could cause students to worry or feel stressed about (e.g. falling out with a friend, getting into trouble at school or home, feeling frightened about something.) Complete Question 1. • Discuss some of the ways you could solve the problems students wrote for Question 1. Students write what they did to solve one problem for Question 2. • Discuss who students could talk to if they had a problem. People may include friends, parents, siblings, grandparents, teachers, the principal or the school counsellor. • Discuss the importance of relaxation. The teacher can share his/her relaxation methods with the class. This may include exercise, reading or working in the garden. Students need to think about what they do to relax and where they do these things. For some students, the only time they really relax may be when they are asleep. Explain the importance of keeping a balance between relaxing and keeping physically fit. Watching TV or playing computer games may be considered relaxation but it is not a physical activity. Complete Question 3. • Ask students what makes them feel relaxed. What makes them feel bad or unwell? Read and colour the options in the boxes of Question 4. Discuss students’ choices. Answers

• being able to cope with events that occur in your life • having good self-esteem or being confident • being able to respond constructively to stress in your life.

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Teac he r

• What does it mean to stress or worry? • What can you do to help you stop worrying or feeling stressed? • How do you feel when you are stressed? What does your body do? • Can all problems be solved? Discuss. • Who could you talk to if you had a problem? • What does ‘relaxation’ mean? • Why is it important to relax? What to do:

Ways of building positive mental health include doing things you are good at and enjoy.

It is essential children know they don’t have to deal with worries and stress on their own. They should talk to someone they trust. Someone who will listen, not judge them and try to understand what is being said. Friends are great to talk to but sometimes it is probably best to speak to a family member, especially an adult.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Additional activities

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Teach students to relax. Try these calming and stress reduction yoga techniques. (Choose a quiet, carpeted room if possible.) – Palming Eyes (all ages) • Sit quietly with the spine straight. • Rub the palms of the hands together vigorously until warm. • Place the palms over closed eyes. Feel the warmth and darkness soothe the eyes. Take time to be in this quiet place. – The Child’s Pose (all ages) • Sit with the buttocks on the heels with the knees together. • Exhale, bend the body forward and rest the forehead on the floor. Place the arms alongside the body with the palms up. Be as still as a stone resting under the earth. • Listen and feel your breath going in and out of your body. 70

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1. – 3. Answers will vary 4. red – getting angry with a friend, telling a lie, feeling tired blue – laughing, exercising, reading a book, listening to music, finding a quiet place

When someone feels stressed or worried, physical reactions occur including a fast heartbeat, tense muscles, a tight stomach, feeling sick, fast breathing, sweating, having difficulty sleeping or waking up or feeling tired.

Primary health and values

Health curriculum links

Nat.

2.9

WA

SMS2, IS2

NSW

V1, V4, COS1.1, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPSR0201

Qld

EPD2.1

SA

1.3, 1.6, 1.7

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


No worries! Draw or write about some things that make you worry or stress.

Teac he r

Making time to relax and do things that make you feel good about yourself is important.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S What did you do to solve one of these problems?

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Draw and write about your favourite way to relax.

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o c . che e r o Colour things that could make you feel stressed in red and things that could t r s s r u e p make you feel better or relaxed in blue. reading a book

getting angry with a friend

feeling tired finding a quiet place R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

laughing exercising

listening to music Primary health and values

telling a lie 71


Teachers notes

We are all different

Indicator Background information

• Identifies differences and similarities among people.

The lesson Discussion points:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Discuss the questions above and record any relevant information on a chart for future use. • Read and discuss the opening paragraph with the students. • Students complete drawings of themselves and a friend/family member. • Students record information about each person to complete the boxes in the activity. • Discuss similarities and differences and how we are all unique individuals. • Complete Questions 2 and 3, identifying similarities and differences between the two people. Answers

For children to acquire self-esteem and have unprejudiced attitudes towards others, they need to think of people as individuals, not simply as members of groups with common physical characteristics, religious customs etc.

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Teac he r

• Why do some people look different? • Why do some people look the same? • Who was born in Australia? Who was born in another country? • What foods do you eat that come from another country? • Are there any traditions/customs that you follow in your family? • Does different mean better or worse? • What does tolerance mean? • Is tolerance important? What to do:

We live in a multicultural society. We all look different. We all live differently. Differences can enhance our relationships and enrich our society. Students need to be taught to recognise, appreciate and tolerate differences.

Students should be exposed to people, literature and images that are multicultural and which teach them about other faiths, ethnicities and lifestyles.

Young children may look for basic physical differences such as hair and eye colour or family differences such as the number of people in a family, types of families, whether the parents were born in a different country, whether both parents are working or jobs that parents have.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answers will vary

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Additional activities

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• Survey the students in the class. Note features like hair colour, eye colour, height, weight, country of birth, faiths, favourite foods, music etc. Discuss the similarities and differences. • Graph class results for set characteristics (e.g. eye colour, height, hair colour, foot size). Compare differences. • Write a poem/story about yourself and then a similar one about your friend. Compare the two.

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Health curriculum links

72

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.1

WA

IS2

NSW

V1, GDS1.9

Vic.

HPSR0201

Qld

EPD2.1, EPD2.3

SA

1.3

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


We are all different People are many different shapes and sizes. They have different coloured hair, eyes and skin. People like to do different things. No-one is exactly the same.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Choose a friend or family member to draw. Draw a picture of yourself below. Fill in the boxes to find out more about each other.

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m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Write two things that are the same.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

Write two things that are different.

Primary health and values

73


Teachers notes

The environment

Indicator Background information

• Describes how to care for the environment.

The lesson Discussion points: • What makes up our local environment? • What things in the environment might affect our health? • How can we help to care for the environment? • What is pollution? • How does cigarette smoking affect our health? What to do:

There are many things we can do to care for our environment and keep it clean and safe. Some suggestions include planting trees, riding or walking instead of using the car, keeping places litter free, recycling or saving water.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• Talk with students about the environment and what makes up their local environment. Include home, school and community facilities and places. • Have students work in small groups and ask them to decide what things in the local environment can affect their health. Groups can report back to the class and a list can be created from the suggestions. Discuss students’ ideas. • Direct students to the pictures in Question 1 and discuss each situation. Ask the students how these situations affect our health. What can we do to care for the different environments so our health is not affected? Students can write a sentence about each picture to show how their health can be affected. • Ask students to draw pictures of how they can care for their bedroom and classroom to complete Question 2. Discuss some of the things they might be able to do.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answers

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m . u

Teacher check

Additional activities

• Ask students to talk with their parents to compile a list of parents’ workplaces. Students can decide how their parents’ workplaces can be cared for and draw pictures to describe their suggestions. • Present small groups of students with pictures of different environments. Ask them to suggest ways their environment can be cared for so that it remains healthy.

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Health curriculum links

74

Primary health and values

Nat.

2.11

WA

CHL2

NSW

V4, PHS1.12

Vic.

HPIP0201

Qld

PHIC2.5

SA

1.6

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au


The environment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Write a sentence about these pictures to show how things in the environment can affect our health.

w ww

m . u

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. tebedroom Your Your classroom o c . che e r o t r s super

Draw pictures to show how you can care for these places.

R.I.C. Publications – www.ricgroup.com.au

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Primary Health and Values: Book B - Ages 6-7