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Introduction This thematic package, based on 'Space', has been designed for lower primary students. The activities have been organised into subject foci. Thematic programming ideas have been included so that teachers may integrate the theme across the curriculum.

Table of Contents Page 2

Thematic program ideas

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Language focus Planets - word sleuth Outer space - word study Time capsule - list making Radio messages Memory codes Space adventure - story writing Space templates - artwork/story writing Martian munchies - cooking

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Mathematical focus Space invaders - number Spaceship match - addition Moon visits - problem solving

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Science focus Our sun Day and night Planets Space quiz Moon gazing

19 20-21 22 23

Art focus Starry, starry night Solar system mobile Space rocket Space colony/Milky Way wash

24 25

Health/Phys. ed. focus Fitness test Sun protection

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Space Theme - An Integrated Approach

RIC-0448 2.5/497

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R.I.C. Publications

Space Theme - An Integrated Approach

Literature

Discovery Apollo Voyager Surveyor Pioneer ll

moon landing cosmonauts astronauts rocket launches satellites

Songs Wish upon a star Twinkle, Twinkle Silvery moon Sunshine

Class activities

Space travel

Sayings once in a blue moon wish upon a star over the moon to see stars

Newsbook - collect news articles Visit - observatory Record - moon phases

Discoveries

Fallacies a man in the moon Martians live on Mars a cow jumps over the moon the moon is made of cheese

SPACE

Investigation

Space travellers Yuri Gagarin Laika Neil Armstrong John Glenn

Understandings zodiac leap year seasons/months big bang theory

Poetry The Spinning Earth - A. Fisher Windy nights - R.L. Stevenson Who knows if the moon’s - e.e.cummings

NASA Kennedy Space Center Cape Canaveral

comets meteors supernovas blackholes

Issues greenhouse ozone layer eclipse radiation

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R.I.C. Publications

Space Theme - An Integrated Approach

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How many SPACE words can you find?

Space - word sleuth

universe, lunar, supernova, comet, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus, outer space, meteor, asteroid, Milky Way, Martian, spacecraft, satellite, constellation, rocket, moonlight, radiation, earthling, sunshine, aliens

Use some of these words to create your own space wordsleuth.

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Outer space On the back of this sheet, list words made from the word

ASTRONAUT

e.g. - roast, rats, star

Write the word for these pictures.

How many 'star' words can you list below?

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starfish

Match these 'moon' words and meanings. moonstruck, moonlit, moonstone, moonbeam, moon-faced, moonscape

lit by the moon gemstone mad ray of moonlight surface of the moon a round face R.I.C. Publications

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Time capsule Many people believe that UFOs visit our planet because aliens are curious about our habits, technology and daily lives. What would you place inside a capsule to be sent into outer space to tell other beings about earthlings?

List five earthling habits e.g. - sleeping at night

List three strange earthling hobbies e.g. - bungy jumping

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List four unusual foods eaten by earthlings e.g. - pig’s trotters

Draw and describe a typical earthling.

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Radio messages A 1

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Solve this radio message. 23

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Write the number code for these 'space' words. S

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Write your own coded message for an astronaut to solve.

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Memory codes Complete. To remember the number of days in each month, we can recite the verse, Thirty days has September,

To remember the order of the colours of the rainbow, we can use the code, R O Y

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B I V

To remember the order of the planets according to their distance from the sun, we can use the code,

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons M V E M S U N P •f o rr e vi ewJpu r pose sonl y•

List the names of the nine planets in our solar system.

Create another memory code to remind you of the names of these nine planets e.g. - N E M V J U M P S

Find other lists of things you need to remember and use a code or verse to help. R.I.C. Publications

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Space adventure Use these words and ideas to plan a story. captured ramps hatch aliens danger helmet radio planet

transform robot controls spacesuit ray gun lasers earth visited

intelligent unusual lift-off travelled energy equipment surrounded

beings released darkness explained scientist temperature landed

galaxy radiation flashing universe distance astronaut invade

List some ideas about: • characters (aliens, Martians, scientists, mutants) • time (light years away, 25th Century, in a time warp) • setting (Mars, Milky Way, Earth, inside a spaceship) • events (explosion, caught by aliens, stowaway in space)

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Space templates Enlarge these templates for story writing or artwork.

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Martian munchies You will need: • patty pans • lollies for decoration • packet of round biscuits

• coloured marshmallows • coconut • large oven tray

Instructions: - Lay patty pans out on tray. - Place a biscuit in each patty pan. - Place a marshmallow on top of each biscuit. - Put the trays in a warm oven until marshmallows melt. - Decorate with lollies and coconut to create martians. e.g. licorice bullets, jellybeans, Smarties, bananas, snakes

While waiting for the marshmallows to melt, answer these questions.

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons 2. After which good food is our galaxy named? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 1. Which chocolate bar is named after a planet?

3. Find a type of drink hidden in the word 'planet'.

4. Rearrange the letters of 'earth' to find a body organ. 5. Remove a letter from 'slime' to find a flavour. 6. Find a food name using letters in Saturn and Mercury. 7. What colour are Martians supposed to be? 8. Of what food is the moon’s surface said to be made? 9. Name a spacecraft? 10. Remove a letter and rearrange others in 'aliens' to find an exotic food.

Answers milk, lime, heart, tea, snail, green, nut curry, rocket, Mars, cheese R.I.C. Publications

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Space invaders Destroy these space invaders. 5 100

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© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons Destroy eight space invaders to score 100 points. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• e.g. - 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 20 + 20 + 50 = 100 points Destroy six space invaders to score 100 points.

Destroy five space invaders to score 50 points.

Destroy four space invaders to score 60 points.

Destroy eight space invaders to score 35 points.

How many points would you score if you destroyed all the space invaders?

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Spaceship match Match these astronauts to their spaceships.

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Moon visits You have just landed your craft on the planet Jupiter. There are seventeen moons that surround Jupiter and it is your mission to visit each one. When you open your instructions from General Luny, you are suprised by the code you must crack before you can visit the moons in order. Each moon has been given a coded number.

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123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456789

1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890

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1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890 123456789 1234567890

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Instructions: 1. Crack the code by writing the order in which you will visit the moons. 2. Colour the moons as you visit them. 3. Only visit a moon once. 4. Visits should be to the moon with the lowest number first.

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Visit moons with the numbers 5 or 8, as part of their code, first. e.g. -

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Visit moons with the numbers 2, 3 or 6, as part of their code, next.

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Visitmoons with the numbers 4 or 7, as part of their code, next.

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Which moons are left? Write them in order of their number code below.

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Our sun There are many stars in the sky. Stars are hot balls of gas that give off light. The sun is the nearest star to our earth and that is why it seems so bright and larger than the others. In fact, the sun is only a medium-sized star. The sun is always shining. When it is night-time on our part of the earth, the sun is giving daylight to another part. During the day, the light from the sun is so powerful that it sometimes prevents us from seeing the stars and the moon. The sun’s rays can be harmful to people’s skins. Circle the correct word. When the sun is shining, it is (daytime, night-time) The sun helps plants to (grow, die) The sun keeps us (cold, warm) The sun can be harmful to people (all year, at night)

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons f o rtor e v i ew pur posesonl y• The sun• gives life the earth Draw a picture.

through its warmth and light. Plants need the light to grow. The earth needs the sun’s warmth to provide rainclouds. We need warmth and light for protection.

What damage is caused by the sun?

Answer Yes or No The sun disappears at night.

The sun is harmless.

The sun shines in winter.

Plants need sunlight.

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Day and night When the sun shines on a part of the earth, it is daytime. As the earth spins, that part becomes darkened, which makes it night-time. You will need: • a large ball (earth) • a torch (sun)

• a partner • a sticker (place on earth)

• a dark room

Instructions: - Stick the sticker onto the ball (this is where you are on the earth). - Let your partner hold the ball with the sticker facing you. - Shine the torch on the sticker. - Ask your partner to place one hand on top of the ball and the other underneath while slowly turning the ball around (this is how the earth spins). - Make sure you hold the torch in the same place. Question: What happens to the light on the sticker?

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It takes 24 hours for the earth to turn around once. During that time your part of the earth (the sticker) will experience day and night. The amount of daylight will depend on how close the earth has moved to the sun as it has been spinning. Discuss and complete. In summer, the days are hotter because the earth is

In winter, the days are shorter because

Draw a picture of the night sky.

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Planets There are nine planets that orbit the sun. They are: Mercury, the hottest planet. Venus, the greenhouse planet. Uranus, the tilted planet. Pluto, the coldest planet. Mars, the red planet. Jupiter, the largest planet. Saturn, the ringed planet. Neptune, the blue-green planet. Uranus, the tilted planet. Earth, the only planet known to have life. Read and colour. Neptune was named after the Roman god of the sea because of its bluish-green colour.

Saturn is known as the ringed planet because of the rings of dust and ice particles which surround it.

Š R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Neptune Astronauts have reported Earth as being bluish-brown in colour surrounded by white swirls of cloud.

Saturn Mars is known as the red planet because its soil contains huge quantities of rust.

Earth

Mars

Find out how the other planets got their names and characteristics. R.I.C. Publications

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Space quiz Write these words next to the descriptions. Saturn, Earth, Milky Way, spaceship, Mercury, sun, asteroids, Mars, Pluto, galaxy, black hole

a dead star

planet closest to the sun

our planet

the ringed planet

© R. I . C.Publ i cat i ons •f or r ev i ew pur posesonl y• vehicle for space travel a cluster of stars

our nearest star

little planets of stone

the coldest planet

the red planet Find out about one of these questions. Why isn’t there any noise on the moon? Why can’t we see the stars during the day? What makes the sun so bright? Has there ever been a UFO sighting in your area? What star constellations can you see at night? What is ’daylight saving‘? R.I.C. Publications

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Moon gazing Phases of the moon The Earth has only one moon. It takes about one month for the moon to revolve around our planet. At different times during that month, the moon seems to change shape because it reflects different amounts of sunlight. These relections are called phases. There are four phases of the moon. Draw them below. full moon

first quarter

third quarter

new moon

Looking at the moon If you gaze at the moon, you can see hazy patches of darkness and light. The dark patches are said to represent the 'man in the moon', but they are the low plains of its surface which do not reflect light. What are the lighter areas © R. I . C.Publ i ca t i on s on the moon? •f orr evi ew pur pos esone. onl y• Circle Draw the moon’s surface.

low flat plains high peaks deep valleys

About the moon Because the moon is not as heavy as the Earth, it does not have enough gravity to keep an atmosphere. Our atmosphere helps to protect us from harmful temperatures and radiation, and that is why humans could not live on the moon without special protection. Use these words to locate information about the first moon landing. moon landing, Apollo 11, Edwin (Buzz ) Aldrin, Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, man in space, surveyor, astronauts, walking on the moon R.I.C. Publications

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Starry, starry night Each galaxy has millions of stars. Our galaxy is called the Milky Way. Our sun is one star in the Milky Way Galaxy. If you look up at the stars at night, you can pick out patterns and shapes. Stars that form patterns are called constellations.Some constellations have been named after ancient warriors and gods such as Orion and Perseus. Some have been named after mythical creatures such as Pegasus, the flying horse. Other constellations such as Aquarius and Cancer are named after signs of the zodiac. Another famous constellation is called the Crux or Southern Cross. This constellation can be seen in the Southern Hemisphere and appears on the Australian flag. Join the dots of these constellations. The Crux or Southern Cross

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Orion, the hunter

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Sun

This strip is only a representation of the sun. The sun is many times larger than the Earth, which would make it very difficult to recreate.

• coat-hanger • scissors • a matchbox • string • yellow paper • ruler • paper punch • coloured pencils or crayons

You will need:

Neptune

Jupiter

Venus

Solar system mobile

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Saturn

Mercury

Mars

Earth

Uranus

Pluto


Solar system mobile

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9. Pluto - 9 1/2 matchboxes (47.5 cm)

8. Neptune - 9 matchboxes (45 cm)

7. Uranus - 6 1/2 matchboxes (37.5 cm)

5. Jupiter - 5 matchboxes (25 cm) 6. Saturn - 6 matchboxes (30 cm)

• Punch a hole in the top of each planet and attach each string. • Tie each planet in order along the base of the cardboard strip. • Fold strip in half and staple to the bottom of a coat hanger. • Cover triangular shape of coat hanger with yellow paper to represent the sun. • Glue name for the sun and hang your mobile.

4. Mars - 2 1/2 matchboxes (12.5 cm)

3. Earth - 2 matchboxes (10 cm)

1. Mercury - 1 matchbox (5 cm) 2. Venus - 1 1/2matchboxes (7.5 cm)

• Read all instructions carefully to make your mobile. • Colour and cut out planets. • Use a ruler or a matchbox to measure the lengths of string for these planets.

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footsteps.

Record your findings under these headings. Materials best suited to: • increase speed • make rocket spiral • make rocket travel further • make rocket land upright.

Experiment with the basic design. Remove or add things to create: • a rocket that spirals during its flight • a faster rocket • a rocket that travels further • a rocket that lands upright.

My rocket

Complete. The furthest distance my rocket travelled was

Space rocket

Cut along here and fold into cone.

Nose cone

Focus words to discuss: flight path, launching pad, capsule, nuclear power, The wing and cone may need to be fuselage, universe, re-entry, lift-off, atmosphere, orbit enlarged to fit the size of your roll. Materials you will need: • different size cardboard rolls • plasticine • stiff card and paper • paints or crayons • sticky tape • small objects • scissors Make your rocket following this basic design. - Cut two slits into the cardboard roll and insert the delta wing. - Cut, fold and tape the nose cone to the outside end of the roll. Place a small piece of plasticine inside then seal open end with rolled up paper. - Paint and decorate your rocket. Delta wing - Practice throwing your rocket at a target (perhaps a hoop on an oval).

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One day humans will be able to live in space colonies. Space colonies will need to be built using materials from the environment. They will need to be sealed to protect people from the harsh temperatures and dangerous debris in space. Solar energy will be an important consideration, as light and heat will be needed for energy. Dome- shaped roofing wiil give strength to the buildings and skylights will enable maximum absorption of the sun’s rays. People will need to grow their own food and produce their own air and water. Plan and build your own space colony. You will need: • 2 x 2-litre plastic bottles • paper punch • popsticks • grapefruit • woodwork glue • scissors • plasticine Instructions: - Cut necks from plastic bottles. Peel labels. - Cut a split in one, to allow them to slide together. - Use popsticks to build bases of enclosures. - Cut grapefruit in half. Scoop out pulp. Cut skylights in top. Leave skins to dry in the sun. Sit them on top of popstick structures for dome roofs. - Use plasticine to place buildings inside bottles - Join bottles together. - Make plants and animals from plasticine and press to the inside surface.

Space colony

Milky Way wash Colour with white and yellow crayon then wash with black paint.

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Make up some of your own test exercises.

• Practice opening and closing your hands while shrugging your shoulders. How many times can you do this in one minute?

• Practice opening and closing your mouth while screwing up your nose. How many times can you do this in thirty seconds?

Complete these test exercises. (You will need a friend to time and record your results). • Practice clapping your hands while jumping on the spot. How many times can you do this in one minute?

Are you eligible for a space journey?

Astronauts need to be in peak physical and mental condition to survive a space journey. Doctors need to test that all their bodily functions are in working order before they encounter the stress of space conditions. List some exercises which help to keep you fit.

Fitness test

capacity rate beat weight tone

heart pulse lung muscle body

Match these.

Swimming laps of the pool.

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Sun protection

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Discuss and answer: Why must you be careful not to look up into the sky during a solar eclipse?

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1. The sun’s rays can fade paint.

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Draw and label five things you would need to pack inside this beach bag in order to keep safe from the sun.

If you stand close to a fire, you can feel the energy from the heat. This is like radiation from the sun. Because the sun is a burning ball of gases, it radiates a great deal of energy in the form of light and heat. This energy can sometimes be harmful. Discuss and list how the sun be harmful.

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Lower Primary Themes - An Integrated Approach: Space