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By Jacquelin Melilli

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Goldisocks and the Three Koalas

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For primary/secondary students © Rea dyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Written by Jacquelin Melilli. Illustrated by Melinda Brezmen. (© Ready-Ed Publications 2005) This edition published by Ready-Ed Publications (2010) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood Western Australia 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au

COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

ISBN 978 1 86397 638 1


Goldisocks and the Three Koalas WRITTEN BY JACQUELIN MELILLI © 2001

Inquiries

r o e t s B r e oo Jacquelin Melilli p u k S

Inquiries regarding performing rights and sales should be addressed to:

Website: www.jacquelinmelilli.com

Copyright:

About the Author

This play is fully protected by copyright and is sold subject to the condition that it shall not by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out or otherwise circulated without the Author’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover than that in which it is published.

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Email: drama@jacquelinmelilli.com

Jacquelin Melilli was born in France to a French father and Spanish mother. She came to Australia at the age of four and a half. After mastering the English language, writing stories became her passion.

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Inquires should be addressed to the above address. Permission to perform any play must be obtained from the author or the author’s agent. Royalties must be paid for each and every performance.

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Jacquelin also pursued her love of acting, performing in theatre and some small roles in film, television and corporate videos. In 2001, Jacquelin began teaching drama at the Coffs Regional Conservatorium to students aged between 8 and 16 years. She has written five plays and produced and directed two of her plays into short films. These were screened at the Sawtell Cinema in 2002 to a full house.

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Subject to the conditions prescribed under the Copyright Act, no par t of this publication may lawfully be reproduced in any form or by any means – photocopying, typescript, electronic, recording (including video/digital recording) manuscript, mechanical or otherwise or be stored in a retrieval system or transmitted without prior written permission.

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Photocopying of any part of the play script contained herein is expressly forbidden without payment of photocopying licence.

Jacquelin’s plays require little rehearsal time, minimum props and very simple sets, making them ideal for schools, travelling groups and for performing at Theatre Festivals. A smaller cast makes travelling to different venues easier to manage and the chance of all actors being present at every rehearsal are greater. Jacquelin tries to avoid writing small roles, as she knows most actors like to be on stage as much as possible! Her plays are also ideal for converting into short film scripts, radio plays and puppet shows.


s t n e t Con r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Copyright Information ............................................ 2 About the Author ................................................... 2 About this Series ................................................... 4 Introduction ........................................................... 5 Teachers’ Notes .................................................... 5 Curriculum Links ................................................... 6 Production Roles ................................................... 7 Stage Directions .................................................... 9 Extra Crew for Film Production ............................ 10 Where to Start ..................................................... 11 Storyboarding the Script ..................................... 12 Theatre/Film Planning ........................................ 14 Filming: Suggestion Notes .................................. 16 Using the Camera ............................................... 18 Shooting the Scenes ........................................... 19 Editing a Film ...................................................... 20 Producing a Radio Play ....................................... 21 Putting on a Puppet Show ................................... 22 Suggested Shooting Script .................................. 23

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Goldisocks and the Three Koalas

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Student Workheets: Teachers’ Notes .................................................... 27 Analysing Characters (Students’ Notes) ................ 28 Character Profiles ................................................. 30 Story Comprehension Activities ............................ 32

o c . che e r o t r s super Goldisocks and the Three Koalas About the Play ...................................................... 34 Suggested Costumes and Props .......................... 35 Cast and Background ........................................... 36 The Script ............................................................ 37

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About this Series This Lights, Camera, Action! series is designed as an informative starting point for creating professional dramatic arts performances through either film, stage play, radio show or puppet show. Each book contains an award winning script that is highly entertaining as well as topical. Comprehensive ideas and recommendations have been given throughout the series for making the most of these plays.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S There are four titles in this series:

Little Red Meets the Dingo Foreigners in Oztralia

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Can Anybody Hear Me? Goldisocks and the Three Koalas

Each book in the series contains a full script that can be performed as either a screen play, stage play, radio or puppet show. Because many of the production roles are similar for each of the performances above, this information has been kept in one section and should be followed for all forms of the play. Presenting the material in this manner, allows you to decide what options to go with for your production (e.g. film, stage, radio or puppet show).

Production Roles

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Many of the behind the scenes roles are similar in nature (e.g. sound effects, costume design) and can be applied to any type of performance. Specific roles (e.g. film editor for a film, stage manager for a stage play) have been given special mention where relevant.

©R eaa dyEdPubl i cat i ons Making Film This book contains very useful introductory notes on film production roles, storyboarding, camera shooting sequences, editing filmn andl much more. You •f or r evi ewshots,p ur p ose sao y• will note that the shooting sequences varies from the actual script so it is Stage Play

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recommended that you read the full script (see Page 37) before being able to understand the suggested shooting script (see Page 23).

Extensive guidelines for staging a play are included as well as a section on stage directions for organising the entrance and exits of cast members. Puppet Show and Radio Show Play

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Information is provided specific to producing the plays in this manner, however, the book mainly concentrates on requirements for film and stage play production. Much of this stage and film information can be applied to radio and puppet shows. There is much less work involved in putting on a radio play as there is no need for costumes or set design, lights, film etc. However, a thorough understanding of the script is an important part of preparation. This can be achieved by completing the student activity sheets on Pages 28-33. A radio play relies heavily on a director’s interpretation of the script and the actors’ interpretation of the characters.

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A puppet show is similar to a stage production with the exception that it’s the puppets who are seen by the audience rather than the actors, so directions for putting on a stage production should be followed. Activity Pages To allow students a better understanding of characterisation, photocopiable activity pages have been included. Ideally, these sheets should be used early on, once an initial read-through of the full script has occurred.

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Teachers’ Notes A Successful Production Begins with a Good Script

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Goldisocks and the Three Koalas is a play that touches on gender roles and expectations that can be placed on children to live out their parents’ dreams, regardless of whether it conflicts with their own dreams and talents. The play also deals with the pressures that can be put on children when decisions are made for them. It explores how they can lack a means of communicating their point view, while continuing to obey their parents wishes. Whether it’s too big, too small, too hard or too soft, communication is the key to making it “just right”.

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Half the battle of creating a production is the time-consuming task of writing a good script. An effective script should be clear and easy for the audience to follow and preferably have a solid message that will stay in the mind of the audience. Dialogue should flow and be natural and the characters should be interesting and memorable. Finally, it needs to be entertaining with bursts of energy to keep the pace exciting. This makes choosing a good script a much easier task than writing one.

Drama Why is drama so beneficial?

Drama is a great way to learn about human behaviour and, if delved into, can be quite complex with aspects of psychology being used to understand the characters portrayed. Understanding human behaviour is empowering as it allows students to better understand themselves and their peers, which in itself builds self-confidence. Drama also helps tremendously with communicating self-expression in a non-threatening way by enabling the actors to self examine their own feelings when portraying a character. Most actors are attracted to roles that they can relate to in one way or another.

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Readers

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Not everyone likes to perform in front of an audience, yet most enjoy watching performances and having participated in the production in some way can be very rewarding. Ideally, encourage engaging the talents of the whole class to work behind the scenes in one way or another.

Using Goldisocks and the Three Koalas in the classroom:

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Using the stage play as part of a reading program is a fun way to get students to enjoy reading. A read through would involve each student reading a section of the script, whether it is one line of dialogue or the action description. The script can then be read around the class and then continued from the first student down to the last again. In using this method, no set student plays a particular character role. Once students get through the first round, you’ll find some interesting voices will emerge! After the read through, work through the accompanying student activities: Analysing Characters/Character Profiles sheets

Radio Play

and the Story Comprehension Activity Sheets provided on Pages 2833.

Students can work in groups to create the most interesting voices for the characters and record them on CD to be presented as a radio play. This is a very good exercise in helping children express themselves via use of their voice. Those students, who do not like acting in any form, will still be needed to create the sound effects and music required for background noise.

Theatre Production

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Puppet Show

Students can work in groups with some being voice actors and others in charge of music, lights and sound effects. Puppets can be made by the students or dolls and stuffed animals can be turned into puppets and dressed accordingly.

For the more ambitious, and for those who have access to a digital film camera and editing software, an introduction into filmmaking has been included. Making a film is a lot more involved and time consuming and therefore the project can be done over the year or over three terms. Choosing a short script of around 30 minutes is sufficient. It is strongly recommended that you shoot the scenes in a blocked period of two or three days to keep with continuity. If you shoot it over weeks or months you will get all sorts of problems such as the actor’s hair growing, a pimple that wasn’t previously there and so on – the list is endless. If all the preparation has been done thoroughly prior to shooting, there should not be any problems with shooting the script in two days and allowing a third day for any re-shoots or scenes the director is not completely happy about.

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Then again, you may not want to take the film project too seriously, but simply use it as a means of experimenting with the camera, angles, using different directors and comparing how differently each one would shoot a scene. You may want to break students up into groups and allocate them a scene each for filming. Use different actors and allow everyone to take on different roles in the crew – after all, it is only an introduction to filmmaking. We all need to start somewhere. Playing around first allows you to get a good feel for it.

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Film Production

For more information on putting on a stage play, radio play, puppet show or making a film visit: www.jacquelinmelilli.com

Curriculum Links

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• New South Wales – Creative Arts Strands: Drama: DRAS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, DRAS 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4

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South Australia – Arts Strands: Arts Practice - 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3; Arts Analysis and Response – 2.4 Arts in Contexts – 2.6

Victoria – The Arts Strand: Performing Arts Sub-strand: Arts practice – ideas, skills, techniques and processes: 2.1, 3.1 Sub-strand: Responding to the arts – criticism, aesthetics and contexts – 2.2, 3.2

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Queensland – The Arts Strand: Drama; Level 2 Core: DR 2.1, DR 2.2, DR 2.3; Discretionary: DDR 2.4 Level 3 Core: DR 3.1, DR 3.2, DR 3.3 Western Australia – The Arts Strand: Communicating arts ideas; CAI 2, CAI 3 Strand: Using arts skills, techniques, technologies and processes; STP 2, STP 3 Strand: Responding, reflecting on and evaluating the arts; RRE 2, RRE 3, RRE 4 NT, ACT and Tas. (National Curriculum) – The Arts Strand: Drama Creating, Making and Presenting: Band B; Past and Present Contexts: Band B

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Production Roles The producer is responsible for raising funds, publicity, overseeing the budget and is overall in charge of the production. All decisions must be reported back to the producer. It is recommended that the teacher take this role with possibly an assistant producer to “learn the ropes”, especially where budgeting is concerned. A producer will need to draw up a budget with all the foreseen expenses listed and then calculate the cost of each ticket to recoup expenses and make a profit that may be set aside for the next production.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Director

Creates the vision of how the play/film is to be performed. Works as head of the production team to approve cast, costumes, set construction, lighting, sound, movement on stage/set, appearance of the stage/set, etc.

Assistant Director

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Producer

(Film) Carries out tasks set out by the director, such as organising casting calls and rehearsals; making sure the actors are ready to go on set; making sure everything runs smoothly and sorting out problems as they arise.

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(Theatre) Is the first to arrive at the theatre prior to a performance and the last to leave the theatre after a performance. A stage manager oversees all activities on the stage and is responsible for any problems that may arise during a performance. Prior to a performance, the stage manager thoroughly checks all scenery, props, costumes, lighting and sound to make sure everything is ready and in place for the performance. The stage manager arranges for the actors to be at the theatre at least an hour prior to performance and advises actors of “half hour curtain call”, “fifteen minute curtain call”, ”five minute curtain call” and finally advises the actors to take their places prior to calling “Curtain!”. The stage manager must also communicate with the lighting and sound directors and the ushers to make sure everything is ready prior to calling “curtain”.

Costume Designer

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Stage Manager

Chooses team members to help design costumes and make the necessary arrangements to obtain them. This may mean compiling a note to send home to parents with detailed information/drawings of what exactly is needed. Second hand clothing shops are an excellent place to find costumes, wigs and even props! You may also be able to get the co-operation of the Textiles and Design class to make costumes for the production.

o c . che e r o t r s uArtists per Make-Up s , Hair

Chooses team to help with putting on make-up, styling hair and wigs. A basic make-up kit should consist of: foundation (to suit character), powder, make-up pencils for brow and lips, brushes and sponges, make-up remover and hair spray. Most actors will already have these items and may prefer to bring their own make-up bag to rehearsals.

Set Designer

Chooses team to design the set as per the director’s instructions. This may be as simple as choosing class members who are talented artists to paint backdrops, on either butcher’s paper or suitable fabric to be hung as a background. Props can also be made from cardboard boxes, papier mâché, etc.

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Prop Assistant/s

Prompter/s

Need to organise props and familiarise themselves with the script to make sure props are in place when required during the performance. Must have replacement props organised in case any prop gets damaged or lost. Must be at every rehearsal.

Must be very familiar with the script and actions of actors. Responsible for prompting actors quietly from backstage if they forget their lines. Must be at every rehearsal.

r o e t s Bo r Lighting Director e p ok u S Sound Director

Fundraiser/s

Works with the director to create appropriate sound effects or music to accompany production. Special care must be taken to come in exactly on cue with music or sound effects. Must be very familiar with scripts and be at every rehearsal.

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Works with the director to create appropriate lighting and mood during the performance. The lighting director must be familiar with the script and be present at every rehearsal.

Funds may need to be raised depending on the scale of the production. A budget will need to be worked out and discussed between the director and producer. Playing Theatre Sports is a fun way to raise funds. For more information visit: www.jacquelinmelilli.com

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Stage Directions

It is good practice for the director to use the correct referrals for directions on stage. Refer to the diagram below and ensure everyone has a copy. A fun warm-up game prior to rehearsals is for the director to call out a section of the stage randomly and have the actors run to that section as quickly as possible.

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The back of the stage: UPPER STAGE RIGHT, UPPER STAGE CENTRE, UPPER STAGE LEFT

The front of the stage: (closest to the audience) DOWN STAGE RIGHT, DOWN STAGE CENTRE, DOWN STAGE LEFT

Note:

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The centre of the stage: CENTRE STAGE RIGHT, CENTRE STAGE, CENTRE STAGE LEFT

The director who is watching/directing the actors from the audience’s point of view must remember that his/her RIGHT is the actor’s LEFT hand side. So care must be taken when giving instructions to actors so as not to cause confusion.

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Extra Crew -

For Film Production Camera Operator/DOP

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An excellent exercise for the entire class to be involved in. Students may work in pairs or groups. Each group must have access to a computer with editing software installed and make up their own edited version of the production. You will find each version to be edited differently according to the student’s interpretation and talents. Let the audience be the judge as to whose version they prefer.

Lighting Director Sound Director

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(DOP=Directory of Photography) This may be one person or a team who takes turns in operating the camera. A DOP should be creative and work closely with the director in regards to using different angles to create a mood or sense of presence for the audience.

Must be aware of both interior and exterior lighting. Works with a crew.

Needs to be aware of sounds that may not be picked up by the camera’s microphone. They can still be recorded separately on the day of shooting and added later during editing. Sound director works with a crew.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Continuity Assistant •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Takes notes and photos (a digital camera is very handy) of every single take in filming so that continuity is kept between the different setups of the scene. For example, an actor may be eating a banana in one scene. If he/she has only taken one bite in the first take, it would look out of place if half the banana is gone in the final take. Or an actor may be wearing glasses in a scene and may forget to put them back on for the following scenes. A team of two people would be better – one to take notes and one to take photos. Notes should also be taken on camera angles, lighting, props and furniture, etc. A storyboard is a series of drawings of the scenes as they will be shot on film. Each scene is drawn in the camera angle in which it will be shot as discussed with the director. Every detail is drawn, including the cutaways (see Page 20) so that when the time comes to shoot the scene, everyone is clear on how it will be filmed and will know which angles and what effects/moods the director wants to create.

Storyboard Artists

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o c . che e r o t r s super Clapper

The two sticks that are struck together to mark a sync sound take at the commencement of each scene. It is helpful to have a small whiteboard detailing the scene and “Take” number held up in front of the camera when filming of the scene begins. Hitting a pen on the whiteboard can create the clapper sound needed. All this helps with editing later. A director will usually call “Rolling” to start the camera rolling, and then call “Mark it” to the person holding the clapper.

Dailies/Rushes

Someone will need to arrange for the day’s unedited work print of the film to be seen by the director and camera operator. This can be done on a television monitor to ensure that everything shot that day was successful and doesn’t need to be re-shot the following day.

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Where to Start

The teacher/producer will need to choose a suitable director. Both director and producer need to become very familiar with the script as they will be choosing the cast and crew and making all the major decisions whilst working closely together. The assistant director/ stage manager will also be closely involved.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Read Through

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Start with a read through of the script, allowing different students to read different roles until the director can decide whom to cast in each role. It is important for everyone to be present at the reading – even the crew will need to be very familiar with the script and the directions for sound and lighting given in the script. Choose a few of the crew to read the stage directions out loud during the read through. It is important for actors to understand the characters they are playing so as to avoid situations where actors play themselves or overact in an unnatural way. The Analysing Characters and Character Profiles worksheets (see Pages 28-31) will help develop an understanding of the roles and are very beneficial for the whole class to do after having read through the script a number of times. Allow students to choose which character they would like to analyse, making sure all characters are covered.

Character Research

Choose Cast and Crew © Re adyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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The producer can assist here by making sure that “friends” are not chosen for specific roles, and that the most suitable person for each role should be carefully selected. Actors play a very important part in the overall success of a production and therefore it is very important to choose the right actor for the role. Consideration needs to be given when casting that a daughter/son is not taller than her mother/father and if possible, an effort should be made to keep a balance with resemblances. Once the cast and crew have been chosen, the director should allow each person to do their job and bring their own special talent to the production. A director should not become a “control freak”. They should be flexible in some areas, yet remain firm when it comes to the final decision about how the production should be performed.

It is recommended that you select understudies for the cast. If someone is away or becomes sick or injured during a scheduled performance, it could jeopardise all the hard work that has gone into making the production. If you are working on a theatre production and you have a large class, you may consider splitting the group into two and having them perform on alternate nights.

o c . che e r o t r s super Rehearsals and Blocking

Actors: Once rehearsals begin the director can begin to block where he would like the actors to stand/move for each scene. For short plays, it is recommended that actors read their scripts for two rehearsals only. They should make an effort to remember their lines as soon as possible to allow for character development and freedom of movement without the hindrance of holding a script. From this point on, PROMPTERS are an important part of rehearsals and must be in tune with each of the actors on the stage so as not to cause long pauses when prompting!

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Storyboarding the Script r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

The director would have a vision of how he/she wants the story viewed by the audience which is where the use of “Close-up”, “Long Shots”, etc. comes in. If the director wants the audience to see a particular expression on an actor’s face, he/she would choose a close-up shot. If the director wants to emphasise an action, he/she would choose a longer/wider shot. Storyboarding all of these shots makes it clearer to the camera operator and crew involved on exactly how to set up each shot when filming begins. This saves valuable time further down the track when weather conditions or time limits can affect the shoot. See the illustrations on the following page for examples.

The StoryBoard

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For Film Production: The director and storyboard artists will need to work together to sort out how the shots will be filmed. As this is quite a time-consuming task, this process should begin at the same time as rehearsals. It would be a good idea to have the storyboard artists present at rehearsals so they can listen in to the director guiding the actors. They can then create the storyboard according to these instructions.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Picture 1. CLOSE-UP: Biker puts helmet on

Picture 3. MID SHOT: Profile - biker rides to screen right

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Picture 4. VERY LONG SHOT: Biker rides to screen right Picture 5. CLOSE-UP: Boot on pedal

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Picture 2. LONG SHOT: Biker rides towards camera, race banner in background

o c . che e r o t r s super Picture 6. CLOSE-UP: Exhaust pipe shooting flames

Picture 7. LONG SHOT: From rear, biker rides towards finish line Picture 8. CLOSE-UP: Biker’s head as he passes finish line flag

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LS Biker rides toward camera, race banner in background

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CU Biker puts helmet on

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• VLS Biker rides to screen right

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MS profile biker rides to screen right

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CU Exhaust pipe shooting flames

LS Biker rides away from camera

CU Biker in helmet

Illustration based on material from “Producing Videos: A complete guide” by Martha Mollison. Illustrator: Anthea Stead

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Theatre/Film Planning Props and Costumes

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Some costumes may need to be altered if they are to be used in a fight scene or a scene that requires a quick costume change. Velcro dots glued or sewn to fabric just behind buttons are excellent for a quick change or for fight scenes where the costume needs to be ripped. For a ripping scene, preprepare the costume by cutting the fabric where the rip should be and glue or sew Velcro dots in place. You’ll also get the added ripping sound of the Velcro when it is pulled apart.

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Actors should work with props, wigs and costumes as soon as possible so as to become familiar and comfortable with using or wearing them. If costumes are not ready, then rehearsing with similar clothing is helpful. The costume designer should be working behind the scenes during rehearsal time to prepare costumes and make sure they are clean, ironed and properly put away for the next rehearsal/performance. They should also be present during rehearsals to assist actors with costume changes.

With amateur productions it is best to keep things simple. If there are limitations with staging, then try to improvise by perhaps using freestanding lights or lamps and even a torch as a simple spotlight. Make sure you have new batteries in the torch and a spare torch handy (with new batteries) in case the inevitable happens and the torch dies mid-performance. If a proper stage is available then experimenting with the lights whilst actors are rehearsing is an advantage. Lighting is important, particularly if shooting a film, as bad lighting or the wrong use of coloured gels can make an actor’s face look splotchy, especially if heavy stage make-up is used.

Lighting

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On a stage, lights are already set in place. Learning to operate them is not difficult. For beginners, keeping things simple is best. If you have an experienced lighting director then the use of gels, spotlights and stroboscopic lights may be discussed with the director. Care must be taken if using stroboscopic lights during a performance as the constant flashing may cause some people to have epileptic fits. If using stroboscopic lights, a warning must be given in the performance program of their use. It is best to keep the use of stroboscopic lights to a minimum. Importantly, the lighting director should be present at every rehearsal.

If the performance space is small, a CD player can be used for recorded sound effects and/or music. Keep in mind that the audience must be able to hear it, so the sound person should position him/herself in view of the actors but remain out of view of the audience. If it is to be an open-air performance, the use of body microphones would be a big advantage. If not, stand up microphones can be placed down stage left and right at each corner with perhaps some microphones on short stands placed in front, down stage centre also. If performing on a stage, the sound director should be present at every rehearsal and be very familiar with the sound equipment so no technical problems arise during the performance. For filming, the use of body microphones is also highly recommended.

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o c . c e her r Set Design o t s super

Set design need not be expensive. For an amateur production, making simple backdrops is sufficient. For example, a backdrop can be made by joining pieces of butcher’s paper together and painting a background on it to suit the scene. This can be taped onto the wall. Another alternative that can easily be stored away and reused is painting a backdrop on calico that has been sewn together. Glue the top of the background onto a long roll such as what is used for roll down blinds and attach the roll to a pre-made A-frame or hang the backdrop from the ceiling if possible. If more than one background scene is required, they can easily be changed around between curtain calls. Furniture can be borrowed and moved around. If the scenes change from one room to another, simply throwing a cover over a lounge or chair can make it look different or, alternatively the furniture can be moved around. Filming is easier as the cast and crew can move to different locations, such as the kitchen or lounge room.

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Make-Up

HOT TIP GENERAL APPLICATION: The first step is applying the foundation with a colour to suit skin tone. Foundation should be applied to all exposed areas up to the hairline, around the ears and down the neck to the top of the costume. Then apply the rouge to the highest part of the cheekbone and blend it downwards. Eye shadow is applied first on the upper eyelid and then eyeliner is applied to the upper and lower lids to make the eyes appear bigger. Use a lip liner to trace the lips. For fuller lips trace just above the lip line and then colour in with lipstick. OLD PERSON: To create the look of an old person, apply a darker foundation starting first with a darker shade under the eyes and in the cheek hollows. A brown eye pencil can be used to draw fine lines around the mouth and eyes. Then apply the foundation. Brown shadow makes the eyes look old. Talcum powder combed through the hair will give a grey appearance if a wig is not available. Streaks with white mascara are also good.

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There are three types of theatre make-up: grease paint, pancake and crème stick. For small theatres and film, a more natural look is best when applying make-up. Heavily applied make-up with brighter shades is normally used for large theatre or open-air performances where the actor’s features need to be seen from a further distance. Mostly, make-up should be used sparingly and checked at dress rehearsal under the stage/set lighting so that any adjustments can be made.

Once the director is happy with the look of the make-up and it has been checked under the lights and through the camera (if filming), apply loose powder to the face to set the make-up. The loose powder also diminishes the “shiny” look. When performing, the heat radiating from the lights can make an actor perspire, so loose powder needs to be kept handy and re-applied when needed. (Theatre) As previously mentioned, the stage manager is the first to arrive at the theatre prior to a performance and the last to leave the theatre after a performance. He/she oversees all activities on the stage and is responsible for any problems that may arise during a performance. Prior to a performance, the stage manager thoroughly checks all scenery, props, costumes, lighting and sound to make sure everything is ready and in place for the performance.

Stage Manager’s Role

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If you are putting on a show for the public, you will need a publicity team to spread the word in advance. This can be done via use of posters, flyers, Internet newsletters, word of mouth, newspaper editorials, radio and possibly television spots. Create a buzz so that people become curious to see what all the fuss is about. Supply photos of the cast to newspapers and ask for interviews for newspapers, radio and television. Ticket sales should start at least two weeks prior to opening night.

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(For Film Productions) Editing can make or break your film. It is often overlooked when watching a film but editing is a very important part of telling a story. The editing process is something every student can have a go at. It is a lot of fun and fairly simple to learn. (See Editing a Film on Page 20 for more information.) Editing software for Apple Macs is called iMovie and is usually already installed on the Macintosh. Windows XP computers should come with a copy of Windows Movie Maker installed. For more details check:

Editing

iMovie: Windows Movie Maker:

www.apple.com/ilife/imovie www.windowsmoviemakers.net

Ushers

The stage manager will be in charge of ushers. Ushers are primarily there to serve the audience and make them feel welcome and comfortable. They are responsible for collecting tickets and guiding people to their seats promptly so that the show can start on time. Ushers will need to advise the audience about rules regarding flash photography and unauthorised filming of the show.

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Filming: Suggestion Notes If you have decided to film the production of Goldisocks and the Three Koalas the following notes can be used as a guide to filming techniques and suggestions for how best to approach the project. Keeping in mind that filming will usually take place in the school grounds, improvising will be needed to suit each situation. The indoor scenes can be set up on stage as they would in a theatre production. Outdoor scenes can be filmed in a suitable part of the school grounds.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Choice of Shots

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Filming is done out of sequence to the story, with all the indoor scenes filmed separately to the outdoor scenes. A Suggested Shooting Script has been provided on Page 23.

An important part of telling your story depends on the careful choice of shots. Because of the limits of the camera’s frame, an action shot would require enough distance for the viewers to see what is happening as a whole. For an emotional scene, a closer shot is preferred so the viewers can see the actor’s facial expressions. Camera shots and their abbreviations are described as follows:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Wide Shot (WS): Most opening scenes start with a wide shot such as a view of a particular landscape, building or crowd of people. Very Long Shot (VLS): Where the actor and his surroundings can be seen from a distance.

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Long Shot (LS): A full body shot of the actor from head to feet, fitting into the frame. Medium Long Shot (MLS): A shot of the actor’s head to thighs, fitting into the frame. Mid Shot (MS): A shot of the actor’s head to waist, fitting into the frame.

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Medium Close-Up (MCU): A shot of the actor’s head to chest, fitting into the frame. Close-Up (CU): A portrait shot of the actor, fitting into the frame.

Big Close-Up (BCU): A close-up of the actor’s face fitting into the frame. Extreme Close-Up (ECU): A shot of an object or particular part of an actor such as his/her mouth or eye, filling up the frame.

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Long Shot (LS)

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

Mid Shot (MS)

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Big Close-up (BCU)

Extreme Close-up (ECU)

ILLUSTRATION TAKEN FROM “PRODUCING VIDEOS: A COMPLETE GUIDE BY MARTHA MOLLISON ILLUSTRATOR: ANTHEA STEAD

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Using the Camera r o e t s Bo r e p ok The Tripod u S

The tripod is a very useful piece of equipment. It allows for height adjustment of the camera and avoids the jerky movements of hand holding the camera. It also allows for panning and tilting (see below). It is particularly important to become very familiar with how to set up the tripod so that the legs are secure and tightened before placing the camera onto it.

Moves Using Tripod

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For beginners, hand holding a camera is not recommended due to the difficulty of keeping the shot steady and preventing jerky movements when the operator attempts to walk to keep the action in shot. When setting up the camera it is very important to take into consideration whether the angle is one where the camera is looking down at the actors – making them seem smaller and inferior – or whether the camera is looking up at the actors – which may give the audience a sense of being inferior. Care should be taken by the camera operator who may have set the camera up to accommodate for his/her height rather than the effect required for the scene.

Panning describes moving the camera horizontally from right to left or left to right, to either show the distance between a person and object, or to follow an action. It is important to check that the tripod legs have been set up evenly or the panning may turn out slightly slanted.

Panning

Tilting occurs when moving the camera vertically, both up and down, to emphasise height or depth. For example, starting at a person’s feet then slowly tilting the camera upwards towards the head; emphasising the height of a building by tiliting the camera from bottom to top; or filming an action such as jumping from a parachute.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f or r evi ew pur posesonl y• Zooming Tilting

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Cameras have a zoom function that allows you to change the shot size from a long shot to a mid shot without having to physically move the camera and tripod. This action makes it easy to prepare for your next shot or you can zoom into an object or person whilst the camera is rolling. Zooming, however, can create problems later when editing, so be aware of the effect zooming might have during the filming process. The director may want the camera moved closer to the object or actor as opposed to zooming closer or further. If this is the case, a dolly is used which is a wheeled cart to which a tripod can be attached so that the camera can be moved smoothly backwards or forwards, or from left to right to change the angle of the shot. Improvise by using a trolley such as one that is used to carry an overhead projector. Make sure the wheels are well-oiled! Another idea is the use of a wheelchair. This however would mean that the camera operator would have to hand hold the camera which may work well for any walking shots where a bit of shakiness is not as noticeable.

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The camera’s microphone (or “mike” as it is usually referred to) picks up all sounds from all directions. This is ok if you’re filming indoors and you have some control over sound, but if you are filming outdoors the microphone will pick up all the ambient sounds such as birds, traffic in the distance, a dog barking and even the slightest bit of wind. Although it’s good to have these ambient sounds to give your film more realism, it can be a problem if the sounds ruin the mood and the actor’s voices cannot be heard.

Shotgun/gun mikes

These are called “gun” mikes because they are long and thin. They pick up sound from the front and can be used from a considerable distance. Gun mikes can be mounted on booms and then held high above the source of the sound so as not to be seen in the frame when filming.

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Body mikes

Body mikes are tiny microphones which can be clipped to the actor’s clothing or taped onto the body. Care needs to be taken when attaching them so that they are out of sight.

Sound

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u SLighting

Lighting for film is also different to a theatre production. If working indoors, any fluorescent lights are best turned off, as it is difficult for the camera to reproduce correct skin tones and colour balance. To keep things simple, lighting is about being aware of shadows which can either ruin the shot or enhance or create the mood you are looking for. Improvising can be done with the use of lamps. Light reflectors can be large pieces of white cardboard or the silver foil windscreen reflectors used in cars. These are used to reflect light that may cause shadows.

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Sound for film is different to a theatre production. Sound is normally recorded on location or on the set. If your sound equipment is limited you can use the camera’s microphone to separately record sounds or you can use a sound effects CD. It is also possible to download sound effects from the Internet. Check out:  www.filmsound.org/sound-effects/libraries.htm  soundfx.com

Shooting the Scenes

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Film scenes are shot out of sequence to the story for a number of reasons. One reason is e because ite helps withp continuity ifp all indoor scenes areo filmed in sequence followed by •f orr v i w u r o s e s n l y • any outdoor scenes or vice versa.

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For example, let’s say you have two different lounge room scenes to shoot which are at two different characters’ homes. Both homes would be decorated differently so rather than packing up and re-arranging the set a number of times to fit in with the sequence in the storyline, it is much easier to film ALL interior scenes in the one lounge room first and then the set can be re-arranged to portray the second character’s lounge room. This method saves time and reduces the chance of costly continuity mistakes, such as in the case where you may forget to include a piece of furniture or prop that was in an earlier scene, meaning that you would have to go back and re-shoot that scene.

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The same rule applies with outdoor scenes where control can be lost to the weather. If you are blessed with the exact type of weather that is required in the script, then shoot as much as possible whilst you are able to and make use of as much natural light as possible. An early start during the day is best, when you can make the most of natural lighting before it becomes too bright during the middle of the day. Brightness can cause harsh shadows and a lot more effort will be needed to balance out the light. The use of light reflectors will help here. Colours are also important with lighting. It is not advisable for actors to wear white as it is extremely reflective of light. Similarly, black or navy blue is very absorbent of light – add stripes or polka dots with these colours and the camera will be thrown off focus!

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Editing a Film

r o e t s Bo r e Editing Terms p ok u S Establishing Shots

Begins with a wide shot to allow the audience to become orientated with the surroundings. Mostly, the first shot in a film begins with an establishing shot, however, establishing shots can also be used further in the film where a location changes completely.

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A film is a story told within a time limit. The story may happen in a day or it could span over a few years. Through editing, time can be manipulated to cover a span of minutes, hours, days or years, all within a few shots! So shortening time, fine tuning and cutting out the bloopers are some of the major purposes of editing. Considering there would have been several takes taken for each scene, there will be a lot of unusable footage. A director and editor cannot afford to get attached to footage. A lot will end up on the cutting room floor, so to speak, no matter how much a director or editor may love that footage. If it doesn’t quite fit in or make sense in the whole picture, it must be removed. A scene which seems to drag on will need to be cut down. Keep only what you need to tell the story.

This is when an actor leaves the frame during a shot and re-enters it in a different scene. It’s a way of shortening the time span and cutting out the unnecessary bits such as a character leaving his house, getting into his car, driving to a new location and entering another building. For this to work when it is finally edited, the frame must be left clear on exiting and remain clear when entering, otherwise the transition will not be smooth.

Entering and Exiting

Cut-ins attention which missed in a a wider shot. Forn example, ©R ead yEwould dotherwise Pubeb l i c t i o sthere may be

Cut-ins are a closer look at something the director may want to bring to the audience’s

a midshot of a character speaking, followed by a cutaway shot of the character’s fingers crossed behind his/her back, followed by a shot of two characters shaking hands.

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Cutaways are snippets of film shot, which are relevant to the story. Cutaway scenes are mostly shot on location at the time of shooting the film. For example, the character may be in the bush, so a cutaway shot might be of a flowing river or a koala in a tree which can later be added to the longer shot when editing.

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Cutaways

Stock footage refers to footage that someone else has shot which will fit nicely into your scene, such as a shot of a waterfall which is not on location but may be needed in your scene.

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Although most cameras have inbuilt transitions such as fade in/fade out, it is best to refrain from adding transitions until editing the complete film. Depending on which editing software package (e.g. iMovie) you are using, the transition choices will depend on the director and editors’ decision as to which transition choice is most appropriate for each scene.

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This is when a shot fades to either black or white, leaving the screen blank. Fade to black is normally used on the last shot of the film to depict the ending. Fading out followed by a fade in to a new shot depicts the passing of time or change in location.

A dissolve is the term used when one shot fades away and another appears. It joins the two shots together by cross dissolving the footage. The speed of the dissolve is important. You want the dissolve in a chase scene to be quick compared to a dissolve in a waltz dance scene. The editor must always be aware of the mood of each scene.

Dissolve

The audio is the sound recorded with the footage. Your editing software will have audio tracks that allow you to manipulate the audio. You may decide to add music in the background at some point/s. In order for the music not to override the dialogue, you will need to adjust the music track to reduce the volume whilst the dialogue is spoken and then re-adjust as necessary.

Audio

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Producing a Radio Play

A radio play relies solely on a good script, dialogue, music and sound effects to capture an audience and enable them to visualise the story in their “mind’s eye”. Therefore, producing a radio play requires the chosen cast to develop their voices so as to be heard and understood. The voice is a powerful tool. The quality of the voice is dependant on tone, resonance, pitch, power and tempo. Sloppy pronunciation, mumbling or a monotonous droning voice are not acceptable.

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Timing when delivering lines should be well-rehearsed, yet seem spontaneous. Good technical assistance with music and sound effects is very important.

Script

Sift through the script and highlight where sound effects are needed. Select the sound technicians who will be in charge of operating the CD player. They must be present at every rehearsal with a back up technician.

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Most importantly, the director must be chosen carefully and should have a good ear for vocal expression by the actors allowing him/her to direct accordingly.

When preparing to produce a radio play, it is the actors’ voices that must be rehearsed and directed. Actors must learn to listen to themselves and train their ears to hear correct sounds that will enable them to pronounce and phrase the words correctly. This is where recording the dialogue becomes quite helpful. During every rehearsal, the dialogue should be recorded with the inclusion of the sound effects and then played back and discussed. Once the actors are comfortable with their lines and how to portray their character, you may want to proceed with the master recording. The use of an omni-directional microphone is best.

Rehearsals

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Sound effects •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Sound effects should be used sparingly and should support the story and suggested action. Too many sound effects may make the play difficult to produce and detract from the story. Sounds that must be timed precisely with the dialogue should be done manually, e.g. a knock on the door.

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Sound effects or music that serve as background or mood-setting should be pre-recorded on a blank CD in sequence to the script and marked according to its sound, such as: Track 1: Introduction music, Track 2: Typing on computer, etc. Make sure to leave long enough pauses between sound effects. The specially made soundtrack for the script can then be used at every rehearsal using a CD player or through the sound system to be used during the “true recording”. HOT TIP: Sound effect technicians should stick with using the same sound system they have been using during rehearsals. If a CD player was used throughout rehearsals, then changing to a bigger and better CD player or sound system at the time the ‘true recording’ is to take place, may result in failing the sound effects cues for the simple reason that the sound technician is not as familiar with the new equipment. Don’t make last minute equipment changes!

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Where to find sound effects: There are many sound effects CDs available for purchase or some can be downloaded from the Internet. Try: www.vca.unimelb.edu.au/production/html/sound.html

Converting Goldisocks and the Three Koalas Stage Play into a Radio Play. This can be done individually by each student and then notes are compared and discussed as a group. The script notes can be rewritten into the narrator’s dialogue and sound effects can be highlighted in different colours to depict either music or sounds needed. Extra sounds will be needed such as the clanging of pots and pans in the kitchen when Mama Koala is preparing breakfast and the sound of Baby Koala’s Gameboy when Goldisocks plays with it. The radio play version of Goldisocks and the Three Koalas is available at www.jacquelinmelilli.com

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Putting on a Puppet Show Puppet shows are fun and very simple to organise. A show can be as simple as using Barbie and Ken dolls in appropriate costumes and stuffed toy animals. Make sure the scale of the puppets is realistic. A stuffed dog shouldn’t be twice the size of the doll being used.

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Choose the cast who will be the “voice actors”. As they will be out of view of the audience, they will need to have well-projected voices. Secondly, choose the cast who will manipulate the puppets. You may have the cast both manipulate and speak the character roles. However, to enable good voice projection and not be inhibited by the restrictions of the puppet stage, it is best for voice actors to work separately offstage – in view of the puppets, yet out of view of the audience and possibly with the use of a microphone.

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Cast

A very simple puppet stage can be created using two ladders which support the painted backdrop. The painted backdrop can be made using a large piece of calico. Students can then paint the appropriate scenery on the backdrop and glue the top of the backdrop onto a large roller such as is used in pull down blinds. Screw some holes into the ladder and attach the backdrop. The backdrop is then rolled up ready to use. If there are different scenery changes, make a few different backdrops and unroll them between scenes.

Puppet Stage

An even better alternative (if possible) is to use old vinyl roll down blinds and design the scenery with crayons and paint. Have a hunt around second-hand shops or garage sales for old blinds. Include requests in school newsletters.

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Keep in mind the same things as you would for a theatre production although, for puppet shows, the lighting is best kept simple. If wanting to depict night time or to create a mood of tension, lights can be dimmed and a torch can be used as a spotlight.

Steps on and off with pull down blinds



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For: Goldisocks and the Three Koalas

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Scene 1

Opening Scene at Goldisocks' House (Lounge room) Establishing shot of Goldisocks' house from the exterior. You may be limited with shooting on the school grounds so during the editing process, it is suggested that a photograph of a house be slotted into the opening establishing shot. Searching the Internet for a photograph of the perfect house could be helpful here as you could simply download it and import it into your editing software program. Then do a fade out /fade in shot to the indoor scene of Goldilocks fussing over Goldisocks' appearance.

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Please note: The stageplay Goldisocks and the Three Koalas (on page 37) has five scenes. However, when converting a stageplay into a film script, scenes are broken down differently and therefore do not relate in any way to the stageplays scene numbers. The following suggested shooting sequence shows how the script could be shot using a total of 20 scenes. The director may however wish to break the scenes up even more into smaller scenes. IMPORTANT: For those who have never made a film before, you may want to start out with making a five or ten minute film first. If this is the case then use the suggested Shooting Script Sequence as a guide and take excerpts of the script and condense the story to five or ten minutes. Filming terminology has been used in the notes below. Refer to the filming notes on Page 20. At the end of each scene, a note for editing is included so you know where the scene will fit in your film.

Scene 3

Papa Koala Reading Newspaper

(Dining room) If the actors playing Papa Koala and Baby Koala are of similar heights, some tricks using camera angles can create the look of one being bigger than the other. For example, when shooting from Papa Koala’s POV (point of view), you can position the camera at a higher angle, looking down at Baby Koala and when shooting from Baby Koala’s POV, you can position the camera at a lower angle (closer to the floor) as if looking up at Papa Koala. In so doing, you will need to be careful with continuity. Take measurements of the camera’s height for both shots and record them for further use throughout the scenes. It is best to shoot all angles from Papa Koala’s POV in sequence and then repeat the shots from Baby Koala’s POV, so that you are not adjusting the camera each time. Edit Cut to: Scene 9

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Goldisocks and Harold at Home

(Lounge room) Although this is a short scene, it should be well rehearsed as Harold’s face is covered in shaving cream and is best shot in as few takes as possible to help with continuity. The continuity assistants will need to take careful notes in this scene and take photos with a digital camera to ensure the shaving cream is applied the same way for the following scenes where Harold and Goldilocks are searching in the bush for Goldisocks and when they enter the three koalas’ house. A little wear and tear is acceptable considering that they are running around in a frantic state!

Edit Cut to Scene 19 (Exterior). Ready-Ed Publications

Mama Koala Serving Breakfast (Dining room) Taking into consideration the different heights for Papa, Mama and Baby Koala, you will need a higher chair for Papa, a medium one for Mama and a small chair for Baby Koala so that when they are sitting at the table, Papa looks like he’s towering over the table, Mama is at the right height and Baby’s head and shoulder’s may be just visible over the table. Rather than have Mama Koala make trips to the kitchen, she could walk in with the breakfast bowls on a tray.

Edit Cut to Scene 17 23


Scene 5

Koalas Return and Find Baby Koala’s Broken Chair (Dining room) Make sure Baby Koala’s chair is a working prop that can easily and quickly be fixed by either screwing it back together or repositioning the leg. It is best to have two duplicate chairs – one which is stable for Baby Koala to sit on and the other simply a stunt double if you like!

Scene 8

Baby Koala Waking Up (Bedroom)

Edit Cut to: Scene 16

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Scene 6

Goldisocks Eats the Koalas’ Breakfast (Dining room) In this scene where Baby Koala’s chair breaks, care needs to be taken for the safety of the actor playing Goldisocks. The shot can be taken front on with the camera at the same level as Goldisocks sitting at the table. A mattress can be placed behind Goldisocks on the floor. When the time comes, Goldisocks can fall backwards onto the mattress and hold her legs up in the air for a few seconds. It would be easiest doing this stunt with a stool or backless chair. CUT then remove the mattress, replace the chair with the broken chair and shoot Goldisocks sprawled on the floor from a different angle that shows the broken chair. Suggested shots: From a high angle, standing on the table looking down at Goldisocks and the broken chair or from a side angle.

Baby Koala Getting Dressed (Bedroom) Mama Koala’s voice over will be added here in the editing process, however, make sure Baby Koala reacts to having heard her, before rushing out of the room.

Edit Cut to: Scene 4

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Edit Cut to: Scene 11

Scene 10

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Edit Cut to: Scene 2

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Goldisocks in the Koalas’ Bedroom (Bedroom) You’ll need to set up three different sized beds. This can be done using stage boxes if available or you may want to improvise with students’ desks covered in quilts. A few desks put together for Papa Koala’s bed, slightly smaller desks for Mama Koala and maybe some large cushions on the floor covered with a quilt wil do for Baby Koala’s bed.

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Goldisocks Enters the Koalas’ House (Interior) This should be a brief shot of Goldisocks entering through the front door and looking around before heading for the kitchen.

Edit Cut to: Scene 6

Koalas’ Find Goldisocks Asleep (Bedroom) Rather than do a wider shot of all the beds in this scene, it might be better to tighten the shot to frame each individual bed in relation to the dialogue spoken, so that Goldisocks is not seen sleeping until Baby Koala mentions it.

Edit Cut to: Scene 20 (with CUTAWAY SHOT of Goldilocks and Harold following Goldisocks’ footprints)

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Scene 12

Goldisocks and Harold Run into the Bedroom (Dining room) Begin with dialogue: GOLDILOCKS: That’s my baby! Get your claws off my Goldisocks!

Baby Koala and Mama Talking in the Kitchen (Bedroom) Again, keep in mind the height difference between Mama Koala and Baby Koala. When adjusting the camera height, remember that Mama Koala should be a little shorter than Papa Koala, so don’t use the same height adjustment as you did in the previous scene. Then again, if you want to avoid adjusting camera heights, you could have Mama Koala standing on a box. Just make sure the box is out of view of the camera shot. Then shoot the conversation from a side angle with a few closer shots from both actors’ POV.

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Edit Cut to: Scene 13 Continue Scene 12 until Edit Cut to: 14

Scene 13

Edit Cut to: Scene 3

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Scene 16

Baby Koala Song & Dance Routine (Bedroom) Care needs to be taken with continuity. If this scene takes more than one take, make sure all actors are positioned in exactly the same spot they were in prior to Baby Koala starting his routine. Photos with the digital camera come in handy here.

Scene 17

Koalas Leaving House/Goldisocks Enters

(Exterior) If you have used a photograph of the Koalas’ tree house, then that could be used again with a fade out/ fade in. Then get a tight shot of the Koala’s front door opening and dissolve into a back shot of them running into the bush. Then pan to Goldisocks hiding behind a tree. When the Koalas are out of shot, she runs towards the house/camera. Goldisocks will need to hold a still pose for a count of ten seconds to allow for an edit cut of her dialogue before she moves towards the house. When editing, the closer shot of her dialogue will be added between the two longer shots. Then shoot a closer shot of her with following dialogue: GOLDISOCKS: Something sure smells good in there. It looks like they’ll be gone for a while. I sure could use a rest. My feet are aching and I’m starving.

Scene 14

Goldisocks Soccer Ball Routine

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Edit Cut to: Scene 12

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Mama Koala Making Breakfast

(Establishing shot - kitchen) Again, try to find a photograph of a tree house using the Internet and import it into your editing software program. To establish the shot, you may want to try to zoom in to a tighter shot of the house/photograph and then join it with an exterior window shot of Mama Koala in the kitchen. Do a zoom in through the window and cross dissolve it with an interior shot from the same window angle to Mama Koala cooking breakfast.

Edit Cut to: Scene 8 (with CUTAWAY SHOT of Papa Koala reading the newspaper) Ready-Ed Publications

Goldisocks Decides to Run Away (Exterior) Goldisocks’ song and dance routine of Waltzing Matilda will need to be well rehearsed so that the timing of her tripping over her feet looks natural and not forced. The actor playing Goldisocks will need to practice some ball skills so she is comfortable managing the soccer ball.

Edit Cut to: Scene 15 25


Scene 19

Goldilocks and Harold Find Goldisocks’ Dress (Exterior) This is Goldilocks’ big chance to put on an award winning performance when she finds Goldisocks’ dress and throws a tantrum. This scene is a lot of fun. Creativity can be used with camera angles.

Edit Cut to: Scene 5

Scene 20

Goldilocks and Harold Hear Goldisocks Scream (Exterior) To establish that Goldilocks and Harold are close to the Koalas’ house, you will need to edit in a cutaway shot of the Koalas’ tree house with the audio of screams in the background, then cut to a shot of Goldilocks and Harold running towards the camera/tree house.

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Edit Cut to: Scene 12

Harold Shaving (bathroom)

Voice Overs

A shot of Harold shaving can be added if time and location permits, or simply leave it at Harold running into the lounge room with shaver in hand when Goldilocks calls out to him.

Mama Koala calling out: “Breakfast is ready!” can be recorded and edited into Scene 9. Screams from Goldisocks and the Koalas can be recorded and edited in Scene 11.

EDIT CUT TO: SCENE 2

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If there is more than one camera available for shooting, the director may want to consider assigning a camera operator to shoot all the cut-ins and cutaway shots. • Goldisocks’ boyish backpack.

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• Mama Koala stirring porridge. • Mama Koala’s muesli. • Papa Koala reading the newspaper in dining room.

• Papa Koala’s track shirt with “COACH” written on the back.

• Goldisocks’ butt squeezed into Baby Koala’s chair. • Baby Koala’s little spoon. • Baby Koala’s broken chair. • Mama Koala’s bed. • Baby Koala’s bed.

• Baby Koala’s Gameboy.

• Papa Koala’s porridge with spoon stuck in it. • Mama Koala’s muesli bowl covered with a serviette.

• Exterior window shot of Mama Koala preparing breakfast. Zoom in and dissolve to interior shot.

• Baby Koala’s empty bowl of Coco Plops.

• Baby Koala’s Coco Plops. (Use a specially made up cereal box by an arty student.)

• Mama Koala’s very ruffled bed.

• Goldisocks’ yellow socks and soccer boots. • Papa Koala’s big chair. • Papa Koala’s big spoon. • Mama Koala’s medium chair.

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• Baby Koala’s little chair.

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• Papa Koalas’ newspaper entitled “Koala News”.

• Baby Koala’s soccer boots.

• Mama Koala’s medium spoon.

• Papa Koala’s bed.

• Baby Koala’s Coco Plops.

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• Mama Koala’s hand spring.

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Cut-ins & Cutaway

• Papa Koala’s ruffled bed.

• Baby Koala’s bed with Goldisocks in it. • Goldilocks and Harold following Goldisocks' footprints with magnifying glass. • Harold’s magnifying glass. • Goldisocks’ dress lying on the ground.

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WORKSHEET

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u SStudent Worksheets:

Teachers’ Notes

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STUDENT

Knowing the character is an essential part of preparation for any sort of theatrical production. Understanding the script is another important step. Use the following student worksheets with your class as an introduction to the play.

© Read yEdPubl i cat i ons Character Profiles •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Story Comprehension This activity can be completed following initial read-throughs of the script.

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Students can complete a character analysis for EACH character of the play. Alternatively, they can choose to focus on only the character that they will be portraying. Hand out the Analysing Characters activities (sheets 1 and 2 on Pages 28-29) prior to the Character Profile sheets and read through as a class, using examples where possible. Make sure students use the most of the workspace given and encourage them to put as much description into their character analysis as possible.

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STUDENT

WORKSHEET

Analysing Characters - 1 Use the notes below to help you complete the character profiles on Pages 30-31.

r o e t s Bo r e Era born p o u k Mannerisms S

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Nationality

What country was the person born in? Does he/ she have an accent?

Examples include fidgeting, fiddling with hair, nail biting, cracking knuckles, nervous twitches, excessive blinking and so on.

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(This point can be left out if not applicable.) Examples are: A hippie born in the ’60s. If the character is older, e.g. a grandparent, find out roughly when he/she was born and study that era. Part of a person’s personality is reflected by the era he/she was born in and the beliefs and values at that time.

Family Background

Same questions may be asked about parents. Were his/her parents hippies? Workaholics? Strict? Easy going? Well-educated? Wealthy? Poor? Famous? Criminals? Did his/her parents divorce? One or both parents die? Was the character put in foster homes, raised in an orphanage or by close relatives? Does the character have siblings?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Physical Appearance •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Characteristic

Introverted , Extroverted

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Aggressive , Gentle

Attitudes and Beliefs

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Is the person young or old? Tall or short? Strong and muscular? Weak and sickly? Hunched over? Hairy? Toothless?

What is the character’s attitude to life? Does he/ she take life seriously or is he/she reckless? What is his/her attitude towards family, money, and social issues? What are the character’s personal beliefs? What is the character really passionate about?

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Nervous , Laidback

Good Points

Optimistic , Pessimistic Generous , Stingy Kind , Cruel

Does the character have any particular talents or skills? Does he/she take the time to help someone in need? Is he/she reliable?

Popular , Unpopular Hard worker , Lazy Leader , Follower Over reacts , Stays calm Bossy , Takes orders

Bad Points Is the character selfish or have an ego problem. Does he/she tend to run away from problems or pass the blame?

Honest , Sly 28

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STUDENT

WORKSHEET

Analysing Characters - 2 Use the notes below to help you complete the character profiles on Pages 30-31.

r o e t s Bo r Dress Codee p okto Ask Yourself Some Extra Questions u S

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A person’s hairstyle may also be influenced by the era they grew up in. Some people keep the same hairstyle they have always had as it gives them a sense of security. Once again, an extroverted person may have a radical hairstyle or high maintenance hair (bleach blonde, coloured, teased and sprayed). A job or occupation can also dictate hairstyles.

• What circumstances, conditions and events from the past are responsible for the present life of the character?

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Some extroverted people like to wear loud, unusual or revealing clothes. Introverted people may be more conservative. A person’s job or occupation may also dictate what he/she wears. For example, a businessman may wear suits whereas an artist may choose casual clothes.

• Does the character have strong ideas, opinions and feelings? Is the character easily swayed from these convictions?

• Are the character’s goals worthy or are they dishonest?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Has the character been greatly affected by •f o r r e v i e w p u r p osesonl y• his/her success or failure? Education

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Give details about his/her type of job, hobbies and interests if applicable.

• How have other characters been affected by one character’s success or failure?

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Is the character academic? Creative? Sporty? Welleducated? Entrepreneurial?

• How does this character feel about those who stand in his/her way?

Biggest Influences . te o c . che e r o t r s super Personal Goals

Who were the biggest influences in the character’s life? Was it a parent, sibling, relative, friend or possibly an outside source?

• What do you like or dislike about this character’s personality? • Are there strong motivations for what this character says and does?

What are the character’s personal goals and how does this influence his/her behavior? What lengths does the character take to achieve his/her goal/s?

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STUDENT

WORKSHEET

Character Profile A Complete the character profile and paste or draw a picture into the box.

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_____________________________________ _____________________________________

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Characteristics: ________________________

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Mannerisms: __________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

Family background: _____________________

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Age: _________________________________

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Era born: ______________________________

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Nationality: ___________________________

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Physical appearance: ___________________

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Attitudes and beliefs: ____________________

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Name: ________________________________

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STUDENT

WORKSHEET

Character Profile B Type of job: ____________________________

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Good points: ____________________________

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Bad points: _____________________________

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Hobbies and interests: ____________________

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Dress code: (include hairstyle, jewellery, etc.)

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Biggest influences: ______________________

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Education: _____________________________

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Personal goals: _________________________

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STUDENT

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Story Comprehension Activities

A

Read through the script of Goldisocks and the Three Koalas and complete the following.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1. Why do you think Goldisocks felt frustrated about having to wear a dress?

4. Why do you think Goldisocks kept a secret from her parents about playing soccer?

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2. Why do you think Goldisocks was feeling stressed out about the musical audition?

5. What decision did Goldisocks make instead of going to the audition and why? ___________________________________

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3. Why did Goldilocks and Harold put pressure on Goldisocks to take over Goldilocks’ performing role?

6. Can you think of a wiser decision Goldisocks could have made? ___________________________________

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STUDENT

WORKSHEET

Story Comprehension Activities

B

Read through the script of Goldisocks and the Three Koalas and complete the following.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

7. What pressure did Baby Koala have to deal with?

10.What did both parents learn about Goldisocks and Baby Koala that they never knew before?

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8. How was Goldisocks and Baby Koala’s problem solved?

11.Draw your favourite scene from the play.

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9. What lesson did the parents learn?

___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________

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About the Play

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Goldisocks and the Three Koalas An Australian Fairytale WRITTEN BY JACQUELIN MELILLI (©) 2001

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Coffs Jetty Memorial Theatre •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• FIRST PERFORMED AT FOR THE

Spring on Stage Theatre Festival 2001

Coffs Regional Conservatorium Drama Troupe

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DIRECTED BY JACQUELIN MELILLI

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BY THE

Winner of the Adjudicator’s Award 2001 . te o c . che e r o t r s super ADJUDICATOR - KATE FOY

Original Cast

Goldisocks ........................................................ Karli James Goldilocks ............................................. Laurinda Harradine Harold ................................................................. Tresc Bax Papa Koala.................................................. Adrian Marinic Mama Koala ...................................... Stephanie McFarlane Baby Koala .................................................. Alex Shellback

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Suggested Costumes r o e t and Props s Bo r e p o

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Costumes:

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Colourful dress with lots of frills and bows. Dress shoes. Soccer shirt and shorts worn under dress. Yellow socks and soccer boots. Large bag.

Goldilocks:

Blonde hair or wig (rolled up in a bun). Nose glasses. Oldfashioned dress. Beige stockings and sensible shoes.

Harold:

Trousers with belt and button shirt, handkerchief, black shoes.

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Goldisocks:

Papa Koala: Grey track suit with letters “COACH” sewn on the back, sport © Read yEears, dwhistle Pu b l i cat i ons shoes, koala on a string. Mama Koala: Grey track sports shoes, sweat band, ears. •f or r ev i e wsuit,p ur po se skoala on l y•

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Props:

•masculine doona •feminine doona •kids doona •three pillows •tablecloth •two lightweight trees •saucepan •wooden spoon •empty milk bottle •cereal box marked “Coco Plops” •table •Gameboy® •newspaper •shaving cream •soccer ball •three chairs large, medium, small •three bowls and three spoons (large, medium, small)

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Grey tights and skivvy, boxer shorts, pyjamas, soccer shirt, shorts, socks and boots, koala ears.

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Baby Koala:

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An Australian Fairytale Cast

Goldisocks ....................................... a tomboy, adventurous Goldilocks ................. Goldisocks’ mother – feminine, artistic Harold ............... Goldisocks’ father – dominant, authoritarian Papa Koala ................ soccer fanatic, dominant, authoritarian Mama Koala ......................................... health fanatic, sporty Baby Koala ................................................. fun loving, active

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r o e Goldisocks and the t s B r e oo p u k Three Koalas S

Setting the Scene

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Goldilocks is ready to retire from her fairytale career and has placed all her hopes in her daughter Goldisocks to follow in her footsteps. The problem is Goldisocks has her own dreams to play soccer. With the “Big Audition” coming up, the pressure is on for Goldisocks to perform, but having sneaked off to play soccer instead of going to her singing and dancing lessons, Goldisocks is in a bit of a jam. Her solution is to run away, with a rest stop at the three Koalas’ house, where Papa Koala just happens to be the Hot Shot Soccer Coach and Baby Koala surprises them all!

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Script

Setting: Downstage section of stage is set with artificial trees to portray

the outdoors. Centre and upper stage is set with furniture to portray Goldisocks/Koalas’ home. Furniture can be rearranged each time curtain is closed for outdoors scenes.

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Curtains open with Goldisocks and her parents standing centre stage. Goldilocks is fussing over Goldisocks’ appearance. Goldisocks is looking flustered. Harold is giving another one of his lectures.

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Scene One or eB st r Goldisocks:

I don’t want to wear this dress. It’s horrible!

Goldilocks:

Now, now dear. Don’t be like that. You look beautiful.

© Rea dyEdPubl i cat i ons Goldisocks, this may be the most important audition of i your You get thiss part we’ll rich and •f orr ev ewlife.p ur po esand on l ybe•

Harold:

Goldisocks:

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Harold:

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Goldilocks: Harold:

But we’re already famous.

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famous!

Correct! However, we need to take care of the rich side of things. Your mother is getting a little saggy and needs to retire.

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Sorry, dear, but you must face the facts. You’re no spring chicken anymore and the plastic surgery is costing us a fortune.

Goldilocks puts her hands to her face and wails. Ready-Ed Publications

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Go easy on her, Dad. She’s the best Goldilocks by far. I could never fill her shoes.

Harold:

Yes, well you did spoil everything by not being born with golden locks. The only way we’re going to pull off this GoldiSOCKS business is with a knockout performance. Your great grandmother started off playing Goldilocks. You were meant to carry on that tradition just like your grandmother and Goldilocks did. We’ll never pull it off. You’ll just have to wear a wig, there’s no way around it.

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Goldisocks:

(Interrupting) Harold, don’t start that again. It wasn’t her fault. If anyone’s to blame, it’s you. Mother warned © Re anot dy Eda P ubl i c at i ons me tomarry dark-haired man. Prince Charming had the fairest hair of all! What a dream he was! •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Mother tried so hard to match us up, but my foot was too big to fit that tiny glass slipper.

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Harold:

Goldilocks:

Goldisocks:

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Goldilocks:

No way!

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Goldisocks:

Ha, we all know what a porker he turned out to be! (Looking at Goldisocks) Grandma made up for you not having golden locks by knitting you a pair of yellow booties. You’ve worn yellow socks ever since.

o c . che e r o t r sfeet for a reason. Maybe, r That’s it! I s inherited your big upe I was meant to play soccer, not be an actress!

Harold:

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Nonsense. A pretty girl like you playing soccer. It’s out of the question! Now you listen to me young lady ... Ready-Ed Publications


Goldilocks:

(Interrupting) Let me handle this, dear. Remember your blood pressure. (Turning to Goldisocks) Goldisocks, how could you say a thing like that? Your father and I have spent every last dollar on dancing and singing lessons. A musical version of “GOLDILOCKS” is too good an opportunity to pass up. We need you to get this part or the bank will take away our house.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S to address the audience. Goldisocks turns Goldisocks:

There should be a law against pressuring children! (Turning back to Goldilocks) Ok Mother, I’ll go to the silly audition on one condition.

Goldilocks:

What’s that dear?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Goldisocks: You and Father have tos stay here and wait. I’ll be •f orr ev i e w p u r p o e s o n l y • much too nervous to perform with the both of you

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Harold:

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watching me. (Outraged) That is out of the question! We have everything riding on this audition.

o c . che e r o t r s supe r More pressure! How much can a girl stand?

Goldisocks addresses the audience again, throwing her hands up in the air. Goldisocks: Goldilocks:

Now Harold, let her go. We don’t want her getting nervous!

Goldisocks:

Thanks, Mum. I’m outta here!

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Goldisocks picks up her backpack and starts to make her way offstage. Goldilocks:

Good luck, dear. I mean, break a leg!

Harold:

What are you saying, woman! That’s the last thing we need. Are you trying to jinx the girl!

Goldilocks:

you ask me.

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Harold:

r o e t s B r Calme down, Harry, it’s just ano expression. p ok u S(Babbling) Oh, yes, well, a rather ridiculous one if

Centre curtains close. Behind curtains, furniture is rearranged for scene in Koalas’ house. Downstage is decorated with trees to indicate the outdoors.

©Scene Rea dyEdPubl i cat i ons Two •f o rr evi ewandpstops ur p osescentre. onl y • Goldisocks enters downstage Facing

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Goldisocks:

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the audience she begins to sing “WALTZING MATILDA”. She is off key and sounds terrible.

(Singing) WALTZING MATILDA, WALTZING MATILDA, WHO’LL COME A WALTZING MATILDA WITH MEEEE! (Looking distraught) Oh, dear, this is gonna be bad! (She attempts to tap dance) Toe, heel, toe, heel.

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She starts slowly at first and then builds up to a point where her feet get in the way and she trips over and falls to the ground. Goldisocks: 40

Bummer! Fine mess this has turned out to be. I don’t Ready-Ed Publications


know what I’m going to do. Goldisocks looks around making sure nobody is watching before taking off her dress. Underneath she is wearing her soccer outfit. From her bag, she takes out a pair of soccer boots, puts them on, and then rolls up her socks. During all this, she speaks her lines.

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r o e t s r Goldisocks: I’lle never be able to tellB Mum Dad that I’ve been oand p o secretly playing soccer instead k of going to those u S silly dance and singing lessons. They’ll be even

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angrier when I tell them that I spent all the money for lessons on bubble gum soccer cards. I can’t go back now. Dad is sure to have a heart attack. (Thinks a moment) I’ll have to run away.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Scene Three •f or r evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Centre curtain opens to reveal the Koalas’ home. Mama Koala is in the kitchen singing happily whilst preparing breakfast. She is wearing her gym wear, complete with headband and runners. Papa Koala is sitting at the table reading the newspaper. Papa Koala is wearing grey track pants and a long sleeved soccer shirt with “COACH” printed on the back. Baby Koala is still asleep in his bed. He wakes up, stretches and yawns. He is wearing cute baby pyjamas. Underneath he has on grey stockings and skivvy and boxer shorts. He is also wearing his soccer socks rolled down to make it quicker to get dressed later. A scrim can separate the beds from the rest of the stage. He walks over to where Mama Koala is making breakfast.

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Goldisocks takes a soccer ball out of her bag and exits downstage right whilst dribbling the ball, leaving behind her dress. Baby Koala:

Good morning, Mama. When will breakfast be ready?

Mama Koala:

Very soon, dear. Now, where’s my big Baby Koala kiss?

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Baby Koala:

Mama Koala:

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r o e t s B r e Baby Koala hesitates p before kissing Mama Koalao ono the cheek making u a big kissing sound. He then pulls a face and wipes k his lips on his S sleeve. Yuk! I’m getting too old for this, Mama. You’re cramping my style.

My, my, aren’t we in a fine mood this morning. Have you been upE alld night again reading those silly Famous © Re a d y P u b l i c a t i o n s Faces magazines?

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Mama Koala:

. t Baby Koala: e Mama Koala:

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They’re not silly. I’ll be famous one day, you’ll see. Then you’ll be sorry that you didn’t treat me like a prince.

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Baby Koala:

A prince is it? And what’s wrong with being a Koala?

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Oh Mama! You just don’t get it. I’m not just going to sit around and wait for extinction. I have goals! I want everybody to look up to me. Forget Prince, I’m going to be King! King of the soccer field is what your father thinks so don’t start upsetting him with all that silly talk about being a singer.

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Baby Koala:

A bit of support is all I’m asking for Mama. It’s tough enough out there in the big world.

Mama Koala:

Then stick to your father’s plan and you’ll be just fine. You’re getting all the support a kid could hope for. You should be counting your blessings.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Mama Koala:S You know that. His father had him working from the day he was out of the pouch. His dreams of playing But that’s Papa’s dream, not mine.

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Baby Koala:

soccer never came true. You know how much he loves coaching and watching you play. You’ve made him so happy. Don’t spoil things.

Baby Koala:

He never got to live his dream and neither will I. Am Id suppose to doP the same thing for mys son? © Rea yEd ub l i c at i on

. t Baby Koala:e Mama Koala:

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f orr ev i ew pur p osesthings, onl y• Mama• Koala: I wish you wouldn’t complicate dear. I’ve done everything I can to change his mind. If you feel so strongly about singing, then you’ll find a way to make it work for you. Show me your commitment and I’ll give you my support. Things will work out, you’ll see.

o c . che e r o t r sall around you. Seek and There are opportunities su per How can you be so sure?

you will find! Now, be off.

Baby Koala does his groovy dance walk over to where Papa Koala is reading the newspaper at the dining table.

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Baby Koala:

(Doing a rap dance imitation) Good mo, Papa. How’s it hanging?

Papa Koala:

(Still reading paper) Speak properly, son, you sound retarded. It looks like the Kangaroos have made it through to the World Cup finals. They beat the Tasmanian Devils, 7 - nil.

Papa Koala:

You’re going to have to start training extra hard from now on, son. No more pussy footing around. You have a very important game tomorrow against the Dingoes. They’re a tough bunch, just as determined as we are to make it through to the World Cup.

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Baby Koala:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok Sweet. u S

ad yEd Pu b l i c at i onow. nsI’ll have Baby Koala:© Re But Papa, I’m training as hard as I can no time for anything else if I train any harder. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Baby Koala:

Don’t be ridiculous. What else is there? Soccer is your life. Besides, you know your mother and I are depending on you to get this big contract after you’ve won the World Cup. We need to upgrade. This house is getting too small and cramped. I’m going to need an office.

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Papa Koala:

o c . c e But Papa. What happens if I don’t get the contract? her r o st on me. After all, I’m su You’re putting ap lot e of r pressure only a baby remember?

Papa Koala:

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No son of mine is going to fail. Why at your age I had already star ted work at my father’s eucalyptus plantation. I had it tough, not like the youth of today Ready-Ed Publications


sitting on their rumps, noses stuck to a Play Station®.. Baby Koala is looking away, rolling his eyes. Papa Koala:

Pay attention son!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok better go and Papa Koala: uIt’s almost time for breakfast. You’d S get dressed ready for training. We have a big day Baby Koala:

Yes, Papa.

today. Yes, Papa.

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Baby Koala:

Baby Koala goes back into his room and puts on his soccer training gear.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Baby Koala: There should ber ap law against children! I •f orr ev i ew pu o sespressuring onl y•

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Mama Koala:

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Breakfast is ready!

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don’t want to play soccer. I want to be a singer! (Puts his hands together in prayer) Big K in the sky, please send me an opportunity.

o c . che e r o t r s suKoala’s per Here’s Papa nice bowl of hot porridge with a

Baby Koala quickly finishes getting his boots and socks on whilst Mama Koala is serving the breakfast at the table. Mama Koala:

huge dollop of sweet honey and a handful of raisins.

Papa Koala rubs his hands together and licks his lips. Mama Koala goes back to the kitchen for the next bowl.

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Mama Koala:

And here’s my 99% fat free muesli with 25% more fruit and nuts. Naturally sweetened, of course!

Mama Koala makes another trip back to the kitchen for Baby Koala’s bowl.

This porridge is way too hot. This is the perfect time to go for a jog while it cools.

take his first bite when Papa Koala interrupts. Papa Koala:

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And last but not least is Baby Koala’s Coco Plops.

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r o e t s Bo r e pup in disgust. Baby Koalao She wrinkles her u nose runs over to his k seat, grabs his S spoon in anticipation, and opens his mouth wide to Mama Koala:

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Scene Four

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Baby Koala’s mouth snaps shut. Moaning, he drags himself out of his Re dyE dPu bl i c t i on s his chair. Papa© blows hisa trainer’s whistle, which is a hanging around neck and they all exit centre stage left. Mama is doing some loosening •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• up exercises as she goes. Goldisocks: Something sure smells good in there. It looks like

Meanwhile Goldisocks is seen hiding behind a tree, downstage right. She is watching the Koalas and waiting for them to exit. She sniffs the air, smelling the Koalas’ breakfasts.

o c . che e r o t r s super

they’ll be gone for a while. I sure could use a rest. My feet are aching and I’m starving.

She walks over to the breakfast table, sitting down in Papa Koala’s chair. 46

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Goldisocks:

Woah! This chair is way too big! Must be Papa Koala’s. Mmmm, wonder what’s for breakfast?

She looks into the bowl, picks up the spoon and makes a stab. The spoon stays standing in the bowl.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S She moves over to Mama Koala’s chair. Goldisocks:

(Wrinkling her nose in disgust) Spew! Porridge! No, thanks.

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Goldisocks:

Man, this is one uncomfortable chair. It feels like a spring is sticking into my butt.

She wriggles around and pulls out a hand spring (used to tone the upper arms). She itaside looking into Mama ©R etosses ady E dbefore Pub l i cat i on s Koala’s bowl and rolling her eyes.

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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You’ve got to be kidding! 99% fat free muesli with 25% more fruit and nuts. Naturally sweetened, of course. Mothers are all the same!

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Goldisocks:

She picks up Mama’s serviette and throws it over the bowl before moving over to Baby Koala’s seat. She squeezes to get into it.

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Goldisocks:

o c . ch Oh, boy, this one’s a bit squeezy! That’s one tiny e r er o toosh Baby got! st suKoala’s per

She looks into Baby Koala’s bowl and breaks into a big smile. Goldisocks:

Sick! Coco Plops! Now that’s food fit for a Queen! (Eating a spoonful) Mmmm. Just right!

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Goldisocks gobbles them all up, and just as she finishes, Baby Koala’s seat breaks sending her sprawling on the floor. Goldisocks:

Gee, I didn’t know Coco Plops were so fattening!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u so tired. I didn’t get a wink of sleep last night S I’m worrying about that silly audition. I think I’ll have a

While still sitting on the floor, she lets out a big yawn and stretches her arms over her head.

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Goldisocks:

little rest before moving on. Those Koalas shouldn’t be back for at least a half hour.

She walks over to the beds, upper stage and lies on Papa Koala’s bed. She lies there as stiff as a board.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Goldisocks: Give me a break, this bed is way too hard. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Goldisocks:

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She moves over to Mama Koala’s bed, tossing and turning, messing it all up. Uh uh, way too soft. I feel like I’m going to choke in all these frills.

. teto Baby Koala’s bed. o She moves over c . che e r o Goldisocks: Ahhh! This one’s just right! Way t r s to go Baby Koala! super She spots Baby Koala’s Gameboy.

Goldisocks: Cool, Koala Gameboy! She starts to play with it. It’s not long before she falls asleep. Lights off. Back curtains close. 48

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Scene Five Front stage lights come on. Goldilocks races on stage in a panic. (Yelling out) Harold! Come quick! I’ve just been on the phone with the director. I was dying to know how the audition went only to find out that Goldisocks never showed up!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Harold is heard yelling from offstage. Harold:

Aarggh!!!

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Goldilocks:

He races on stage. His face is covered in shaving cream with one side half shaved.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Harold: What do you mean she didn’t show up? She can’t •f orr ev e w Our pu r po seson on l yThis • is a doi that. lives depend this! catastrophe! Wait until I get my hands on her!

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Goldilocks:

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Harold paces the stage in an outrage, wringing his hands and mumbling under his breath. Calm down, remember your blood pressure. And is that all you can think about? Our poor baby could be lying in a ditch somewhere bleeding to death! Quick, we’ve got to find her.

o c . che e r o t r s super

She grabs hold of Harold’s suspenders and pulls him off stage. Curtains close. Goldilocks and Harold re-enter downstage. Harold still has shaving cream on his face and is carrying a magnifying glass looking for clues. They weave in and out of the trees until Harold spots Goldisocks' dress lying on the ground. Ready-Ed Publications

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Harold:

Look, I’ve found her dress!

Goldilocks:

(Devastated, she picks up the dress) Oh no, my poor little Goldisocks. All that’s left of her is her dress!

She bursts into tears, throws herself on the ground and proceeds to have a major tantrum with her hands thumping the ground and legs kicking wildly. Academy Award material.

Goldilocks stops for a moment. Goldilocks:

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Harold:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S(Shocked) Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle! That’s (Looking up at Harold) Why, thank you, dear.

© Re ady EdPubl i cat i ons You’re welcome. •continues f orr eher vi e w pur posesonl y• Goldilocks tantrum. Harold:

Goldisocks! I want my baby back!

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Harold:

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Goldilocks:

Get a grip woman! Those antics won’t bring her back.

o c . che e r o Wait a minute. Come and look at t r s this. Of all the nerve! super

Goldilocks composes herself. Harold points to something he has found on the ground. Harold: Goldilocks:

What is it?

Harold:

That girl has done it this time. I’m cutting off her allowance!

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Goldilocks:

But why, what have you found?

Harold:

Look at those footprints. She’s not dead! At least not yet! (He pounds his fist into his hand)

Goldilocks:

Those don’t look like her footprints. They have dents all over them.

Goldilocks:

You mean she’s been kidnapped by a soccer player? Oh my poor baby!

She starts to cry, loudly and dramatically. Harold:

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Harold:

r o e t s Bo r e p osoccer Exactly! That’s because they’re boots! u k S

No, you silly woman! She’s taken her dress off and © Rea dy Ed Pu bl i cat i ons put onher soccer boots.

•f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• You mean she’s wearing nothing but soccer boots?

Goldilocks:

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This is an outrage! I brought her up to be prim and proper. You’re right, you must cut off her allowance! She bursts into tears again, throwing Goldisocks' dress on the ground. Harold:

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Goldilocks:

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o c . che e r o t r s super

For goodness sakes, she’s not walking around in her underwear. She must have had her soccer clothes in her audition bag. You mean she was serious about wanting to play soccer? Oh, how could she do this to me? To think of the hours I spent making her all those beautiful dresses with those dainty frills and bows, only to have her toss them aside for SOCCER CLOTHES! 51


Harold:

(Irritated) Pull yourself together woman. Remember my blood pressure.

Goldilocks:

(Composes herself) Yes, of course dear.

Harold:

Come on. We’re going to follow these footprints. Just wait until I get my hands on that girl!

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Scene Six

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok off stage. Goldilocks picks upu Goldisocks' clothes and follows Harold S Curtain opens as the Koalas return onstage. They walk towards the breakfast table when Baby Koala notices his broken chair and lets out a loud wail.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Baby Koala: My chair is broken! •f orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• Baby Koala:

I didn’t do it!

. te Baby Koala:

You’ve been rocking on it again haven’t you?

Papa Koala:

Mama Koala:

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What have you done you naughty boy?

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Mama Koala:

o c . che e r o t r er pone You were s theu last tos leave this morning. Can’t No I haven’t. I didn’t break it!

you own up when you do something wrong.

Baby Koala wails even louder. Baby Koala: 52

But I really didn’t do it. Ready-Ed Publications


Papa Koala:

Fine, there will be no Play Station® for you today. You know how I feel about telling lies.

Baby Koala goes into a frenzy. Baby Koala:

(Wailing) Papa, please, not the Play Station®! I’m about to beat my record and get to the next level. (Falls on his knees in the prayer position) Please, Papa, not the Play Station®!

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Baby Koala:

two year old.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Papa Koala: Stop that nonsense right now. You’re behaving like a Sorry, Papa.(He sniffs and wipes his nose on his sleeve)

Papa picks the chair and pulls theu leg straight. He fiddles ©upR ea dy E dP bl i cat i on s around with it a minute.

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

The screw needed tightening that’s all. It’s all fixed. Now lets sit down and eat this delicious breakfast.

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Papa Koala:

They all sit down at the table. Papa Koala takes a close look into his bowl.

. te Papa Koala: Baby Koala:

o c . che e r o t r s super

Baby Koala, have you been tampering with my porridge? No, Papa.

Papa Koala:

Are you sure?

Baby Koala:

I’m positive! Why are you picking on me today? I didn’t do anything!

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Papa Koala:

Well, then why is my spoon sticking up in the middle of my porridge?

Mama looks at her bowl. Mama Koala:

It looks like you’ve been up to your old tricks again, Baby Koala. Why did you cover my bowl with the serviette?

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Baby Koala:

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r o e t s Bo r e p o u k Baby Koala letsS out a loud wail.

Somebody’s eaten ALL my Coco Plops. (Stands up indignantly) Call the police!

Papa & Mama Koala: Baby Koala!

Oh, come on, give me a break. © Re adyEdPubl i cat i ons You know I can’t move that fast! •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Baby Koala:

Mama Koala:

Oh, no! Has anything been stolen?

. te Papa Koala:

Yes, my Coco Plops.

Baby Koala:

Mama Koala:

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Something very strange is going on here. I think we’ve had an intruder.

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Papa Koala:

o c . che e r o t r s su r pe We’re coming with you.

It doesn’t look like it. I’m going to check the beds. I don’t want to be left out here alone.

The Koalas walk carefully towards the beds. Papa Koala: 54

It looks as if somebody has been sleeping in my bed. Ready-Ed Publications


Mama Koala:

Will you look at that! Somebody has been sleeping in my bed and they’ve messed it all up. The nerve of some people. You would think they would tidy up after themselves! I’m not a slave you know!

Goldilocks and Harold appear downstage. They are still following Goldisocks' footprints with the magnifying glass.

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r o e t s B r e ooin my bed! Baby Koala: Look, somebody IS SLEEPING p u k S Mama Koala screams. Goldisocks wakes up in a panic and also screams. Goldilocks and Harold hear the screams. There is a big commotion. Goldilocks:

That’s my baby! Get your claws off my Goldisocks!

Goldilocks and Harold run into the Koalas’ bedroom. Goldisocks © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons runs over and hides behind her mother.

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Who are you people? What are you doing in my house?

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Mama Koala looks at Harold’s half shaven face.

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Mama Koala: Harold:

Goldilocks:

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Papa Koala:

Be careful, dear, I think he has rabies.

o c . che e r o t r s r upe He hass nothing of the sort. We’re civilised people. I beg your pardon!

Goldilocks takes a handkerchief from Harold’s pocket and wipes away the shaving cream. She licks her finger to try and wipe away a dry bit. Harold shoos her away. Harold: Ready-Ed Publications

(To Goldilocks) That’s quite enough, thank you. 55


Harold:

(Turning to Goldisocks) Goldisocks, it looks like you have some explaining to do. Goldisocks bursts into tears. I just wanted to play soccer and you made me wear that horrible dress and you were forcing me to go to that audition and I just couldn’t go because I can’t really sing and dance because I spent all the money you gave me for lessons on soccer bubble gum cards. I knew how angry you would be so I had to run away. Then I saw that the Koalas were going for a jog and I was so tired and hungry and there was a delicious smell coming from their window so I thought I would just sneak in for a moment and the next thing I knew, I was asleep until a scream woke me up. Then I saw the Koalas and I screamed too and next thing you came running in.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Goldisocks:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Baby Koala: You forgot thep part about eating myo Coco Plops •f orr ev i ew ur po ses nl y •and Goldisocks:

Dobber!

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Goldilocks:

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Harold:

m . u

breaking my chair!

Stop that Goldisocks! You’re being very rude. You must excuse my daughter. She’s obviously not herself today.

o c . c e Goldisocks, for your appalling heryou must apologise r o t ushould behaviour.s You bes ashamed of yourself! per

Goldisocks:

I’m sorry.

Papa Koala:

That’s OK. No harm done really. So you want to play soccer, hey? Well I just so happen to be THE BEST soccer coach in this bush. I coach the Koalas. We’ve

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had ten straight wins and after winning tomorrow’s soccer game we’ll be playing in the World Cup for sure. We’re counting on Baby Koala to sign his first big contract. Baby Koala:

But I don’t want to play soccer. I want to be a singer.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Papa Koala: S How dare you say such nonsense. Are you trying to make a fool of me? Baby Koala bursts into tears. Baby Koala:

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Papa Koala is outraged.

I’m sorry Papa, but I really do want to be a singer.

That’s ridiculous. You can’t sing. © Rea dyEdPubl i cat i ons Baby • Koala: Yes I can, Papa. Ip practice alls the Watch! f orr ev i e wp ur ose otime. nl y • Papa Koala:

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Baby Koala:

. te Mama Koala: Goldisocks:

m . u

Baby Koala starts to sing and dance. Everyone watches, very impressed with him. Koalas do a dance, koalas having fun, koalas groove tonight, koalas groove tonight ... repeat ...

o c . che e r o t r s Can you sing “Waltzing sup er Hey, that’s pretty good. He gets it from me of course. Matilda”?

Baby Koala:

I’m an Aussie, aren’t I? (Starts singing)

Goldisocks:

I’ve got a brilliant idea. Baby Koala wants to sing and I want to play soccer. Couldn’t we just switch?

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There’s an audition coming up for the Blinky Bill musical. You would be perfect for the role, Baby Koala. Baby Koala: Mama Koala: Papa Koala:

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r o e t s Bo r e Have you two gone mad? p ok u SPapa Koala, could I please take Baby Koala’s place

Harold:

in soccer. I’m really very good!

Goldisocks, you’ve gone too far this time.

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Harold, maybe it’s us who have gone too far. We can’t make our children live our dreams. We’ve both © Re ady Ethe dtime PuGoldisocks bl i cat i on known from was as baby that she had no interest in show business. She wasn’t •f orr e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • meant to carry on after me. I mean, look at her. She’s even built differently. She’s not me, Harold and I would rather have her at home safe and happy than running away because she is miserable and misunderstood.

Harold:

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Mama Koala:

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Goldilocks:

What did I tell you about looking out for opportunities?

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Goldisocks:

I would?

o c . c e I have to agree. (Looking at Papa) William, you her r o tHe’s only been playing need to lets Baby Koala gos too. up er You’ve been watching Oprah again, haven’t you?

soccer to please you but enough is enough now, you must let him live his own dream.

Papa Koala:

See, what happens when women get together.

Baby Koala:

Please, Papa, just let me give it a try.

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No!

Baby Koala:

You need to ease up a little, Papa. I love you but you’re making things too hard on me.

Goldisocks:

Yeah, Dad, I feel the same. You’re too hard on me and Mum’s too soft. We need to find a way to make it just right! Please Mr. Koala, I’ve been waiting for an opportunity like this for so long, please don’t take it away from me. Let me show you what I can do.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Papa Koala:

Goldisocks runs over to pick up her soccer ball and does some fancy footwork. Everyone is surprised and impressed with her. Papa Koala:

A “popstar” Koala and a girl in an “all Koalas” team? This is sure to take the world by storm. We might just have here. (looking © Rea dy EhitdthePjackpot ubl i c at i onsat Harold and Goldilocks)

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

m . u

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Goldisocks' parents nod in approval. Papa Koala and Harold shake hands while Mama Koala and Goldilocks hug each other and Baby Koala and Goldisocks join hands and dance around in a circle. Baby Koala & Goldisocks: Yippee! Now we can all live happily ever after! Harold:

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Papa Koala:

o c .contract. ch Just as long as you get that r soccer e er o st super And you have to get that part in the audition.

Goldisocks and Baby Koala slap their hand over their forehead. Baby Koala & Goldisocks: Thank goodness for the ‘KIDS HELP LINE!’ FINAL CURTAIN Ready-Ed Publications

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Other Plays Also Available by Jacquelin Melilli Little Red Meets the Dingo

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

- Award Winner at the Spring on Stage Theatre Festival - 2001 (previously known as Twin Red Riding Hoods. Also available on film)

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Can Anybody Hear Me? Award Winner at the Spring on Stage Theatre Festival - 2002

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Little Red ignores her mother’s warnings about using the Internet Chat Rooms. Little does she know, the deceitful dingo, Din is planning his moves. When her mother drops out of yet another family gathering to put her career first, Little Red reacts by inviting Din to Granny’s birthday party with disastrous results. Little Red is taken hostage by Der the dopey dingo, whilst Din is making Granny sign over her fortune in exchange for Little Red. Does the woodchopper come to the rescue? Does Din get his just desserts? You bet! Cast of six - three females/three males. One Act. Approximately 45 minutes. (Published by Ready-Ed Publications 2005)

Amidst her parents arguing Sarah wants to be heard, instead she gets sent to her room. One magical night, Sarah’s toys come to life to help her sort out life’s difficult problems. Teddy fixes everything with cuddles, Barbie thinks looking beautiful is best, Rag Doll bakes delicious treats in times of stress, Ballerina focuses on a strict regiment of little food and plenty of dancing to fulfil her dreams, Clown laughs his way through everything and Mechanical Man tries to solve everyone’s problems or is he the cause of them? Cast of nine - five females/four males. Teddy and clown can be either male or female. One Act. Approximately 30 minutes. (Published by Ready-Ed Publications 2005)

Foreigners in Oztralia

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

An Australian farce set in the outback with Anita and Frederick Higginbotham, an upper crust couple from England, visiting the outback for a taste of the real Australia (as portrayed in the travel brochure). Bazza and Shazza, the layback, kindhearted couple are their hosts living out in the sticks. Having first touched down in Sydney amidst the duty free shops, Anita & Frederick are in for a real shock when the reality of outback living is introduced to them. Bazza and Shazza’s six kids educate Anita and Frederick about Australia’s native animals with some hilarious results. Cast of ten - three males/three females and four children (can be male or female). One Act. Approximately 30 minutes.(Published by Ready-Ed Publications 2005)

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Lost Child

o c . che e r o t r s super

A dark and shocking play centered around Jade, her friend Lexie, the undesirable and dangerous Tarik and Cass and the ill effects of drug addiction and the consequences attached. Jade, since losing her father at the age of ten, feels that she has also lost her identity. She numbs her pain by slowly self destructing, almost taking her best friend Lexie with her. Her younger sister, Skye is caught in the middle, bailing Jade out when things get tough. Cast of eight - six females/two males or four females/two males with voice overs. Two Acts. Approximately 1 hour. Script available from www.jacquelinmelilli.com

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Lights, Camera, Action Series: Goldisocks and the Three Koalas  

Each of the four titles in this innovative series contains an award-winning script that can be performed by primary or lower secondary stude...

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