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9T O 12 YEAR OLDS TO

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S TIC PROBLEM SOL THEMA VING THEMATIC SOLVING

By: Mar gar et Paterson Margar garet

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using © ReadyEd Publ i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pu r po sesonl y• TECHNOLOGY and ENTERPRISE

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Written by Margaret Paterson. Illustrated by Rod Jefferson. (© Ready-Ed Publications 1995) This edition published by Ready-Ed Publications (2010) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood Western Australia 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au

COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

ISBN 1 86397 144 7


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Contents Theme

A ctivity Activity

Introduction Universal Worksheets

Community

4 Working Drawings Modifications How Good Was Your Design? Evaluate Your Design Thematic Activity Page Clubhouse -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity All Ages Playground -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Desk Tidy -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Musical Instrument -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Bridging the Gap -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Marble Racetrack -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity All-Terrain Vehicle -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Shipwrecked -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Underwater Exploration -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Space Station -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Castles -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Siege Weapons: The Mantlet -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Siege Weapons: The Belfroi -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Siege Weapons: The Trebuchet -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Kites -Teachers’ Notes -Background Information -Student Activity Wayang Topeng: Masked Performance -Teachers’ Notes -Background Information -Student Activity Shadow Puppet Theatre -Teachers’ Notes -Student Activity Wayang Kulit: Shadow Puppet Theatre -Teachers’ Notes -Background Information -Student Activity

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Transport

The Ocean

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

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Recycling

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Asian Studies

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Outer Space

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36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

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Intr oduction Introduction What's This Book All About? This book consists of a collection of theme based activities from the Design and Technology learning area which is a key aspect of technology-related education. They are hands-on problem solving activities designed for students aged 9 - 12 years, working at Key Stages 2 and lower 3. The activities are based on a ‘Design, Make, Appraise’ model. Teachers’ notes are directly linked to ‘Investigate, Devise, Produce and Evaluate’ concepts from accepted student outcome statements. These concepts relate to the higher levels of learning in Bloom's Taxonomy, making the learning format excellent for all students including talented and gifted students.

r o e t s Bo r e pSo Good? ok u Why Are These Activities S

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These activities provide a meaningful context for the integration of knowledge and skills from across the curriculum.

They encourage informed design making, innovative yet practical solutions, flexibility and adaptability; all vital skills to equip our students for the challenges of the 21st century. These activities can be undertaken individually, in pairs or in small groups. They are an excellent avenue for the development of team work and cooperative learning.

Experience shows that these types of activities hold universal appeal, inspiring all types of learners, from the student with learning disabilities, to the reluctant learner, to talented and gifted students. All students are able to contribute and experience success at their own level.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Making Life Easier FFor or T eachers Teachers • f o r r e v i e w p(Page ur p seso nl y Universal worksheets on ‘Working Drawings’ 5), o ‘Modifications’ (Page 6) and• ‘Evaluation’ (Pages 7, 8) can be used with all activities.

Getting Started

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Teachers’ notes accompany each activity, providing details such as time and materials required, basic background information, hints, suggested lesson format, lists of additional resources and extension activities which relate across many areas of the curriculum. An excellent introduction to design and modification can be found in the Big Book Fred Makes a Table by Pat Edwards (Longman Cheshire Pty Ltd). It will help you to explain why it is important to plan first. (Students always want to go straight into the building.) The book also looks at the advantages of ongoing modification and should help you to introduce evaluation of the end product. Looney Tools by David Drew (Rigby Technology, Rigby Heinemann, Reed International Pty Ltd) is also a great introduction to the concepts of Design and Technology.

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If you are keen to stock up on materials and equipment, various Technology Education Centres and similar enterprises around the country sell great construction packs. It would also be useful to start a class collection of materials that are indicated as ‘required’ in the text - many of these will be available at minimal or no cost from dad’s garden shed or from helpful local businesses.

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Teac Working Drawingsh er

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Trim and glue your completed plans into your workbook for safekeeping.

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My Design

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Use a lead pencil and draw lightly to start off.

Materials Needed

Name:....................................

Working Drawings are the designs or plans from which you work to build your invention. They must: 1. Be accurately drawn. 2. Be carefully labelled. 3. List all the materials needed.

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Date needed

Things to get from home.

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Modifications Tea

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Use a lead pencil and draw lightly to start off. Trim and glue your completed plans into your workbook for safekeeping.

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Modifications to My Design

During the building or testing of your invention you may find that you wish to modify (change) your design in some way. This is a good rather than a bad thing as it shows that you are learning from experience. Remember that most products that we use are continually being improved (modified).

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Extra Materials Needed

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Evaluation Sheet (Key Stage 2)

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Ho w Good W as Y our Design? How Was Your

1. Did your invention do what it was supposed to do?............................................ What did it do well ? ...........................................................................................

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............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... What didn’t it do well? ........................................................................................

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Why? ......................................................................................................................

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2. Did you make any changes (modifications) to your plans? ................................ If so, what were the changes and why did you make them? ..............................

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Did the changes help your invention to work better? ......................................... •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Why? ......................................................................................................................

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3. How good were your plans?

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Not So Good

OK

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Good

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4. How good was your invention?

Not So Good

OK

Good

Brilliant

Brilliant

5. How could you make your invention even better? .............................................. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ...............................................................................................................................

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Evaluation Sheet (Key Stage 3)

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Ev aluate Y our Design Evaluate Your

1. Did your invention meet the criteria (requirements)? .......................................... I Which criteria did it meet? .................................................................................. ...........................................................................................................................

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........................................................................................................................... I Which criteria didn’t it meet? ..............................................................................

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........................................................................................................................... Why? ......................................................................................................................

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2. Did you make any modifications to your original plans? .....................................

I If so, what were they and why did you make them? ...........................................

........................................................................................................................... ...........................................................................................................................

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Why? ...................................................................................................................... •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• I Did the modifications help it to work better? .......................................................

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4. How good was your invention?

Not So Good

OK

Good

Brilliant

Not So Good

OK

Good

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3. How good were your plans?

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5. If you were to make an updated model of your invention what improvements would you make ?............................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... Page 8

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Thematic A ctivities Activities

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T eachers’ Notes Teachers’

Community

Clubhouse Time Required - 3 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials Models are best built using a medium-sized cardboard box as the framework of the building. Students can collect most of their own materials, although it is handy to have a class recycling box. Useful items include cereal and other medium-sized packaging boxes, smaller boxes such as cosmetics boxes, match and ice lolly sticks, clear cellophane, fabric, wallpaper and carpet scraps. You will need to give students access to craft knives, craft glue or glue gun, sticky tape, stapler and hole punch.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Suggested LessonS FFormat ormat

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(This activity is best completed in groups of two or three.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic and pose the challenge. Children should be required to consider design and construction elements before attempting any productions. 2. Brainstorm possible construction materials and building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum) 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCING. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Lesson 3 (40 minutes) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 1. Students complete the PRODUCTION of their model.

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2. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities. 3. Towards the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

Survey other students in your class to discover how many students spend some of their leisure time at particular sporting venues. Determine what type of clubhouse facilities are available at these venues and what facilities the students would like added. Present your findings to the class. List the benefits of a sporting club having separate clubhouse facilities for junior members. List the possible concerns that club officials may have with the idea. Work out solutions to these problems. Design a poster advertising the sporting club with its new junior clubhouse. The aim is to attract new junior and senior members.

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Clubhouse The Challenge

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Your local sporting club has given the younger members of the club an area at the back of the adult clubrooms on which to build their own clubhouse. Junior members have been asked to work in small groups to design and build a model clubhouse that will best suit the younger members’ needs.

Materials and Equipment

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Your model must be built mainly from recycled materials. You have access to the class recycling box and may also bring recycled materials from home.

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Your Job

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You also have access to consumables such as cardboard, craft glue and sticky tape, and tools such as ruler, compass, stapler, craft knife, hole punch and glue gun.

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Design and build a model clubhouse which: 1. Would be an enjoyable place for young club members to spend their time. (Include the type of furniture you would want); 2. Is a safe building with at least two windows and doors (exits).

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Teachers’ Notes

Community

All Ages Playgr ound Playground Time Required - 3 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials

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Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum)

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Models are best built in the confines of a small cardboard box. Students can collect most of their own materials, although it is handy to have a class recycling box. Useful items include drinking straws, ice lolly sticks, match sticks, bamboo skewers, lids and bottle tops of all sizes, cardboard, small boxes and plastic containers, egg cartons, paper clips and split pins, fishing line, string and wool. You will need to give students access to craft knives, craft glue or glue gun, sticky tape, stapler and hole punch. Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat (This activity is best completed in groups of two or three.) 1. INVESTIGATE topic and pose the challenge. It may be useful for groups to conduct a survey on favourite play equipment within the class, school or at home. 2. Brainstorm possible construction materials and building strategies. 3. Students use Working Drawing sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Lesson • 3 (40 minutes) f o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• 1. Students complete PRODUCTION of their model. 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCING. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available.

Extension

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2. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities. 3. Towards the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

Write a brief description of your model, listing the features and the age group each feature is designed for. Include a description of any safety features that you have incorporated. Write a short story about an adventure you might have on a visit to a playground like the one you have designed Write a letter to the editor of a local paper explaining why your area needs a playground like the one you have designed. Survey the class to see which are the most popular and least popular items in the model playgrounds that are being built. Graph your results.

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All Ages Playgr ound Playground The Challenge

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Provides safe, enjoyable and challenging activities for:

a. Infants;

b. Primary School Students; c. Secondary School Students;

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The local town council is to build an ‘All Ages Playground’. It is running a competition for the best design. You are required to produce a model playground which:

Materials and Equipment

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d. Adults.

Your model must be built from recycled materials. You have access to the class recycling box and may also bring recycled materials from home.

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You also have access to consumables such as craft glue and sticky tape and tools such as stapler, craft knife, hole punch and glue.

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Teachers’ Notes

Recycling

Desk T idy Tidy Time Required - 2 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials Students can collect most of their own materials, although it is handy to have a class recycling box containing items such as light and heavy card, small cardboard cylinders and boxes, as well as things such as stickers, cosmetics, greeting cards, paper, fabric or magazines for decoration. You will need to give students access to craft glue, sticky tape and possibly a stapler and hole punch.

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(This activity is best completed individually.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic, looking at the environmental problems of waste disposal and depleting resources. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm possible building materials and strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum) 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCING. 2. Students should test for stability and size as they go. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities. 5. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

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Test your invention for stability and capacity. How many pencils, pens, felt pens etc., can it hold without tipping? Can it hold scissors, eraser and ruler? What other items could it hold? Present your findings in a table. Design a poster advertising your product to other students. Include the name and price of your product and list its features.

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TOPICS - Solid Waste Disposal, Landfill, Resource Recovery and Recycling Microsoft Encarta CD-ROM Microsoft

Facts on Domestic and Industrial Pollutants Hugh Johnstone Gloucester Press London

What A Load of Rubbish: Rescue Your Household Waste Steve Skidmore Cassell Publishers Ltd London

The Young Green Consumer Guide John Elkington/Julia Hailes Victor Gollancz Ltd London

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Recycling

Desk T idy Tidy The Challenge

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It is the year 2029 and the earth is in an environmental crisis. There is a desperate lack of raw materials and waste disposal facilities have been overrun. A law has been passed requiring all non-essential items to be made from recycled materials. Students have no pencil cases but have recycled pencils which they keep tied together with scraps of cloth. Your teacher remembers a time when people had elaborate storage units to keep their pencils and other writing equipment tidy and has challenged you to design and build a ‘desk tidy’ from recycled materials.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • f omust rr ev i e wrecycled pumaterials. r pos es oaccess nl yto• Your model be built from You have the

Materials and Equipment

class recycling box and may also bring recycled materials from home.

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Design and build a Desk Tidy to store your writing equipment. It must: Store the equipment neatly and keep it readily accessible. Be able to sit on your desk without tipping over or taking up too much space. Be pleasing to look at.

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Teachers’ Notes

Recycling

Musical Instrument Time Required - 2 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials Students can collect most of their own materials, although it is handy to have a class recycling box. Useful items include drinking cans, tins and bottles; metal lids and bottle tops of all sizes; cloth, paper and cardboard; fishing line, string and wool, seed pods, sticks and pebbles.

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You will need to give students access to craft glue or sticky tape and possibly a stapler, glue gun and hole punch.

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(This activity is best completed individually or in pairs.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic and pose the challenge. It is useful to look at some simple musical instruments. Percussion instruments are most applicable to this activity. Less orthodox instruments such as cow bells or coconut maracas can spark new avenues of thought in children, but if no such instruments are available, more common instruments or even pictures will do. 2. Brainstorm possible construction materials and building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

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Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum) 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 3. Students who have successfully completed their instrument may go on with extension activities. 4. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

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Devise a TV or radio jingle featuring your instrument and promoting recycling. Plan a marketing (selling) campaign for your instrument. Name it, list its features, calculate cost price and selling price, target age group and advertising strategies.

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TOPICS - Solid Waste Disposal, Landfill, Resource Recovery and Recycling Microsoft Encarta CD-ROM Microsoft

Facts on Domestic and Industrial Pollutants Hugh Johnstone Gloucester Press London

What A Load of Rubbish: Rescue Your Household Waste Steve Skidmore Cassell Publishers Ltd London

The Young Green Consumer Guide John Elkington/Julia Hailes Victor Gollancz Ltd London

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Recycling

Musical Instrument The Challenge

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For Environment Day this year your class is to present an ‘environmental item’ for the school. It has been suggested that you design and construct an ‘environmentally friendly’ musical instrument from recycled materials, to accompany the item.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Your instrument must be built from recycled materials. You have access to the •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• class recycling box and may also bring recycled materials from home.

Materials and Equipment

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You also have limited access to consumables such as craft glue and sticky tape.

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Design and build a musical instrument to accompany your class item for Environment Day. It must:

Produce a pleasant sound; Be safe and easy to use; Be portable.

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T eachers’ Notes Teachers’

Transport

Bridging tthe he Gap Time Required - 2 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials Students can collect most of their own materials. If you don’t have easy access to bricks or large wooden blocks at your school, milk cartons make good supports. They can be weighted with sand for added stability. You will need to give students access to card, butchers paper or newspaper and sticky tape and Lego people for testing.

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(This activity is best completed in pairs.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic, looking at different types of bridges. You may also wish to look at tunnels. (See below for useful resources.) Discuss strength and stability in terms of structures such as triangles, lattices and arches; safety features such as rails and access to all, including wheelchairs. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm possible building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum) 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Provide Lego people to allow ongoing testing of the designs. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities. 5. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

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List types of bridges and types of vehicles that use bridges. List as many as you can. What would happen if bridges didn't exist? What could we use instead of bridges? Write a funny story about a land without bridges.

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Additional Resour ces Resources Bridges (Structure) Microsoft Encarta CD-ROM Microsoft

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Untransport: Function and Design David Drew Rigby Technology Reed Books

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Science Spirals -Towers and Bridges Julie Fitzpatrick Hamish Hamilton - London

Make It Work - Building Andrew Haslam / David Glover R D Press

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Transport

Bridging tthe he Gap The Challenge A four-lane motorway has been built between your school’s classrooms and the sports grounds. You need to design and build a model of an access-way to allow all students safe and easy access to the play areas.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok Materials and Equipment u S 3 strong, stable supports such as bricks or milk cartons; long strips of card, and sheets of newspaper or butchers’ paper; glue, sticky tape, pencil, ruler, scissors and string; Lego people for testing.

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You have access to:

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Build an overpass which:

Spans the four-lane motorway. (At least 50cm.) Allows all students to cross with safety and ease. Is strong enough to hold at least three Lego people at once.

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Teachers’ Notes

Transport

Marble Race T rack Track Time Required- 3 lessons of at least 40 minutes each. Materials Get the students to collect most of their own materials. Cardboard cylinders, scraps of hose and poly pipe are useful. The framework needs to be strong. Cardboard boxes are ideal. You will need to give students access to card, craft knives, craft glue and masking tape.

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(This activity is best completed in groups of two or three.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic of ‘transport’, concentrating on road, rail and pipeline. (Useful resources include Encarta, Transportation - Roads, Monorail and Pipelines and Transport Picturepedia.) With older students you can introduce concepts such as gravity, momentum, potential and kinetic energy. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm possible building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session. Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum) 1. Students assemble materials and begin using marbles to test their design as they build. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Lesson • 3 (40 minutes minimum) f o r r evi ew pur posesonl y• 1. Students complete PRODUCTION and testing of their design.

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2. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results. 3. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activity.

Run ten marble races using the same marbles in the same tracks. Record the results. Run ten more races with the marbles in the opposite tracks. Record and compare the results. Did one marble or one track win more often? Suggest reasons why this may have occurred. Market your design as a toy. Give it a name and price and decide what age range it is suitable for. Design a poster and jingle to advertise it.

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Resour ces Resources Transportation - Roads, Monorail and Pipelines Microsoft Encarta CD-ROM Microsoft

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Transport Picturepedia R D Press Reader’s Digest

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Transport

Name........................................

Marble Race T rack Track The Challenge

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Your job is to design and build a marble race track which: 1. Will allow two marbles to be raced against each other; 3. Makes the marbles travel uphill at least once.

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2. Has a start and a finish which shows the winning marble;

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You will need: a cardboard box or similar as a frame for your track;

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Materials and Equipment

light card, cardboard cylinders, and other recycled materials such as ‘poly’ pipe and hose;

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craft glue, craft knife, masking tape and scissors; marbles for testing.

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Teachers’ Notes

Transport

All-T errain V ehicle All-Terrain Vehicle A Challenging Activity! This activity is quite challenging and best undertaken by students experienced in problem solving and building. Students will tackle it with more success if allowed to work in pairs or small groups.

Time Required - 3 lessons of at least 40 minutes each. Materials and Equipment

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Get the students to collect most of their own materials. Build up a recycling box of useful items such as those listed on the student page. Provide materials such as light card, Plasticine, dowelling, split pins and paper clips. Give students access to craft glue, glue guns, craft knives and masking tape. Lego is also a suitable construction material for this activity if you have access to class sets.

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

Lesson 1 (minimum 40 minutes) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic of ‘transport’, concentrating on all-terrain vehicles. (Useful resources include The Colour Book of Transport by Robert Welsh.) You could also use an extract from a video such as Superbug. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm possible building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session. Lesson 2 (minimum of 40 minutes) 1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Set up a test area consisting of a shallow box with a layer of sand in one end and pebbles or blue metal in the other. (Don’t make the rocks too big. Keep them in scale with the models.) Place a ramp leading out of the box into a tub of water. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with the extension activities. Lesson 3 (40 minutes) 1. Students complete PRODUCTION and testing of their design. 2. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

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Extension

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Market your design. Give it a name, list its features and decide on a price. Design a poster and jingle to advertise it. Who do you think would buy it and how would they use it? Create a comic strip featuring your invention.

Resour ces Resources Transportation Microsoft Encarta CD-ROM

The Colour Book of Transport Robert Welsh Octopus Books Limited

Superbug - Wild One King of Video Rated G

The X-ray Picture Book of Fantastic Transport Machines Chris Oxlade Watts Books

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Transport

All-T errain V ehicle All-Terrain Vehicle The Island Hop R ace Race

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment

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Teac he r

You have been challenged to the inaugural race across a series of four islands. The terrain is open but rugged and there are few roads. You need to design a model of a vehicle which can negotiate loose sand, rocks and deep water so that you can enter the competition.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

You have access to: a recycling box containing things such as milk cartons, take-away containers, dowelling, drink can ring-pulls, ice lolly sticks, various size cotton reels and drink bottle lids; light card, Plasticine, paper clips, split pins;

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craft glue, craft knife, masking tape and scissors.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Remember the Requirements

Your All-Terrain Vehicle must be able to travel over: 1. Loose sand. 2. Rocks. 3. Deep water. (It must float!)

Note - propulsion may be provided by hand. (It can be pushed!)

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Teachers’ Notes

The Ocean

Shipwr ecked Shipwrecked T ime - 3 lessons of 40 minutes each. Time Materials

Students can collect most of their own materials. Recycled materials such as milk cartons, meat trays, margarine containers, straws, ice lolly sticks, string, rubber bands and scraps of material are useful. You need to supply Plasticine, craft glue or glue guns and sticky tape.

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Lesson 1 (minimum of 40 minutes)

Teac he r

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1. INVESTIGATE the topic. Extracts from Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (Macmillan Company) or Shipwrecked, (a video by Walt Disney Pictures) may be useful. You may look at issues such as flotation and propulsion. The Literacy Links Science Series on flotation and Marcia Vaughan’s Ships and Boats and Things That Float are also useful resources. 2. Pose the problem and brainstorm possible solutions. Students may work individually or in small groups. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for next session.

Lesson 2 (minimum of 40 minutes) 1. 2. 3. 4.

Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. Set up the testing area. (Tub and fan, Duplo person, water-bottle, ‘food’ blocks and towel.) Teacher supervises testing. Students watch or complete their boats. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Lesson 3

Extension A ctivities Activities

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Name the boat. List five things you learnt during this project. Describe what you enjoyed doing in this project. Make up a mime or play about your adventures on your boat. Write a TV or radio interview about your adventures on your boat. Write a story about your adventures on your boat. Research shipwrecks and present an oral or written report.

. te Additional Resour ces Resources

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1. Complete testing. 2. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with extension activities. 3. Students use the ‘How Good was your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Discuss the results.

o c . che e r o t r s super

How Things Work - Boats, Ships, Submarines and Other Floating Machines Ian Graham Kingfisher Books Grisewood and Dempsey Ltd

Ships, Boats and Things That Float (Big book format, middle school) Marcia Vaughan Harcourt Brace Javanovich

Shipwrecks -The Stories behind the Legends (Non-fiction, senior school) Diana Chase/Valerie Krants Macmillan Education

Shipwrecks-Time Capsules of the Deep (Non-fiction, middle school) John M. Kenny Bookshelf

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The Ocean

Shipwr ecked Shipwrecked The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment. You have:

a pocket knife (your scissors);

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

You are shipwrecked, all alone, on a tropical island. There is plenty of food and fresh water but no chance of rescue. You need to design and build a boat to get you back safely to civilisation.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons gluey sap from the trees (glue); •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

a large piece of cloth and a water-bottle (washed ashore after the shipwreck); sticky gum collected from the trees (Plasticine); vine ropes (string and sticky tape);

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Your Job

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lots of man-made rubbish washed up on the shore (choose from the recycling box or bring things from home).

o c . che e r o t r s super

Design and build a model boat that will: 1. Float while carrying you, your food and water safely. (A Duplo person, blocks and a tiny bottle of water will be used to test your model.) 2. Have some way of moving through the water. (A fan will be provided for testing.) 3. Provide protection from the weather. (Sun, wind and rain.)

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Teachers’ Notes

The Ocean

Underw ater Exploration Underwater A Challenging Activity!

This activity is quite challenging and best undertaken by students that have some experience in problem solving and building. Students will tackle it with more success if allowed to work in pairs or small groups.

Materials Students can collect most of their own materials. Recycled clear plastic containers such as small tubs, juice containers and bottled water containers are useful. They must be able to be sealed. Students will also need string and rubber bands, plus weights such as sand or marbles which can be placed inside the capsule or coins which can be taped to the outside to submerge the capsule. Bendable drinking straws are good for letting air in and out of the capsule. You need to supply plasticine, craft glue and electrical tape.

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Suggested LessonS FFormat ormat

ew i ev Pr

Lesson 1 (40 minutes)

1. INVESTIGATE the topic. Extracts from 20000 Leagues Under the Sea, Odell Down Under or Oceans Below may be useful. Examine issues such as flotation and buoyancy. The Literacy Links Science Series on flotation, Marcia Vaughan's Ships and Boats and Things that Float and Microsoft Encarta - Submarines are also useful resources. 2. Pose the problem and brainstorm the possible solutions. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for the next session.

Lesson 2 (At least an hour)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

1. 2. 3. 4.

Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. Set up the testing area. (Deep tub of water, Lego person and towel). Teacher supervises testing. Other students watch or complete their models. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 5. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with the extension activities.

Lesson 3

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Extension A ctivities Activities List five things you learnt during this project. Describe what you liked doing in this project. Research buoyancy and report your findings to the class. Name your invention. Write a newspaper report about your underwater discoveries. Create a comic strip adventure featuring your invention.

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1. Complete the testing of the models. 2. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design.

o c . Additional Resour ces c Resources e her r o t s super Ships, Boats and Things That Float (Big Book format, middle school) Marcia Vaughan Harcourt Brace Javanovich

Oceans Interactive CD-ROM Microsoft

Transport Picturepedia RD Press Reader's Digest

Explore the World of Mighty Oceans Susan Wells and Sebastian Quigley RD Press

Odell Down Under Interactive CD-ROM Ages 8 - 14 Odell Lake - Microsoft

Life in the Oceans (Big Book format) Dolcie Patellot Jacaranda Press

How Things Work - Boats, Ships, Submarines and Other Floating Machines Ian Graham Kingfisher Books Grisewood and Dempsey Ltd Page 26

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The Ocean

Underw ater Exploration Underwater The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

You are a scientist who is studying life under the ocean. You have been allocated a ship as a base but this does not allow you to carry out your studies beneath the surface. You need to design an underwater viewing capsule to take you beneath the surface of the ocean to complete your studies.

Materials and Equipment

Your company is an environmentally conscious, low budget organisation. Therefore your vessel must be made of environmentally safe materials, which are of a minimal cost and recycled wherever possible.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Basic materials (Plasticine, marbles, sand, string, •f orr e vi e wp u r p o s e s o n l y• rubber bands, electrical tape etc.)

You have access to: Scientific tools (scissors, craft knife, craft glue, etc.)

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Recycled materials (from home or from school.)

o c . che e r o t r s super

Design and build a model of an underwater viewing capsule that will allow you to study life under the ocean. Your capsule must:

1.

Be safe - watertight, with sufficient space and air for the occupant (a Lego person).

2.

Be able to be lowered underwater and brought to the surface.

3.

Allow a good view of ocean life.

Your model will be tested in a testing tank to check for these features.

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Teachers’ Notes

Outer Space

Space Station Time Required - 3 lessons of 40 minutes each. Materials Students can collect most of their own materials. A class recycling box can also be established which can be contributed to over time and shared by all. It helps tremendously whenever students forget to bring their own materials. Useful items for this activity include: small boxes, cylinders, take-away containers, paper, foil or plastic cups, plates and bowls, tin foil, black plastic, plastic and metal lids.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat (This activity is best completed in groups of 2 or 3.) Lesson 1 (40 minutes)

Teac he r

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum)

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1. INVESTIGATE the topic. See below for useful resources. Discuss possible future development in space. Ripley’s Believe it or Not! - Space Travel and Colonies by Ripley Books (Coward, McCann and Geoghegan) has some interesting ideas. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm the possible building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for the next session.

1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available.

Lesson 3 (40 minutes)

1. Students complete PRODUCTION. 2. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with extension activities. 3. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Demonstrate and discuss the results.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Extension• A ctivities Activities

Additional Resour ces Resources

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Name your Space Station. Write a submission to NASA outlining your Space Station’s features and possible future developments. Research the history of Space Stations. Design a futuristic poster advertising holidays on your Space Station. Write a science fiction adventure based on your Space Station.

Postcards From the Planets Big Book format Nelson

Space Exploration Encarta CD-ROM Microsoft

On the Shuttle - Eight Days in Space Barbara Bondor/OWL Greey De Pencier Books

First Facts - Space Donna Bailey Macmillan Children's Books

Space MAC/MPC CD Sumeria

Space in Motion Win/Mac CD-ROM Jasmine Multimedia

o c . che e r o t r s super

The Interactive Space Encyclopedia WIN CD Andromedia Interactive

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Outer Space

Space Station The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment

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Teac he r

You are a space prototype designer for NASA. Your current project is to design and build a model Space Station as the first stage of a future Space Colony.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons You also access tov consumables such as: •have f or r e i ew p ur posesonl y•

Your model must be built largely from recycled materials. You have access to the class recycling box and may also bring recycled materials from home.

Plus tools such as:

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Pencils, ruler, scissors, craft knife, glue gun, stapler and hole punch.

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Your Job

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Lightweight card and paper, silver, black and coloured paints. Craft glue, sticky tape, Plasticine, elastic bands, paper clips and string.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Build a model Space Station which incorporates the following features: Comfortable living quarters. A large greenhouse for food production. A laboratory/workshop. A shuttle docking pad.

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Teachers’ Notes

Discovering the Past

Castles Time Required - 3 lessons of at least 40 minutes. Materials Students can collect most of their own materials. Corrugated cardboard, cylinders and boxes make up the basics. Extras such as barbecue skewers, ice lolly sticks, toothpicks, and drinking straws are also useful. You need to supply Plasticine or papier mâché materials, light-weight card, craft glue or glue gun, craft knife, sticky tape, paints, needles and threads.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat Lesson 1

Teac he r

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1. INVESTIGATE the topic. Myths or fairy tales such as King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table, William Tell, Bluebeard and Sleeping Beauty are good ‘castle’ stories. Examine the history and structures of castles. Collins Eye Witness Guide - Castle (written by Christopher Gravett and published by Harper Collins) and The Time Traveller Book of Knights and Castles (written by Judy Hindley and published by Usbourne Publishing Ltd.) are useful texts. 2. Pose the challenge and brainstorm the possible building strategies. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. 4. Collect materials for the next session.

Lesson 2

1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 3. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with the extension activities.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Lesson 3 (40 minutes)

1. Students complete PRODUCTION. 2. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design.

Extension A ctivities Activities

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Additional Resour ces (Also see lesson 1 above) Resources Encarta Castles Microsoft CD-ROM

Castles - Craft Topics Rachel Wright Franklin Watts

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List five things that you learnt during this project. Describe what you liked doing in this project. Research the history of castles and make a presentation to the class. Design a newspaper advertisement offering your castle for sale or for rent. Write a myth set in your castle in medieval times. Name your castle. The Truth about Castles Gillian Clements Macmillan Children’s Books The Middle Ages Mike Corbishley Facts On File Inc.

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Discovering the Past

Castles The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

You are a Lord or Lady from the ‘middle ages’ and are under threat of attack by barbarians. You need to design and build a castle to protect you and your people from these attacks.

Materials and Equipment You will need: ruler, scissors, pencils, crayons;

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons cardboard, papier mâché and small boxes for the walls and buildings; •f o rorr e v i ew pur posesonl y• Plasticine, clay play dough;

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also useful are needles, thread, paper clips, ice lolly sticks, toothpicks, matchsticks, barbecue skewers, and drinking straws.

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Your Job

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craft knife, craft glue, sticky tape and paints;

o c . che e r o t r s super

Design and build a model castle which has: 1.

A high outer wall with turrets and battlements.

2.

A working drawbridge.

3.

A ‘keep’ to house your family safely during a siege. (N.B. A keep is a tower stronghold for the last retreat.)

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Teachers’ Notes

Discovering the Past

Siege W eapons : The Mantlet (mobile shield) Weapons Time Required - 2 lessons of at least an hour if possible. Materials Get the students to collect most of their own materials. The framework needs to be strong. You may wish to supply dowelling or ice lolly sticks for this. The wheels and axles can be made from dowelling and cotton reels or similar. You will need to give students access to craft glue or glue gun, craft knives, paper clips, string, sticky tape and cocktail sticks or match sticks.

r o e t s Bo r Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat e p ok u S Lesson 1

INVESTIGATE the topic. (See below for useful resources.) Pose the challenge and brainstorm the possible building strategies. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Collect materials for the next session.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1. 2. 3. 4.

Lesson 2

1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 3. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with extension activities. 4. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Discuss results.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Extension A ctivities Activities

Write instructions on how to use your invention. Research the history of fortification and present your findings to the class. Write a poem or limerick about siege warfare.

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The Time Traveller Book of Knights and Castles Judy Hindley Usbourne

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Castles Collins Eyewitness Guide Christopher Gravett HarperCollins Publishers

Castles Topic Books Susan Barker Macdonald Educational Ltd London

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Additional Resour ces Resources

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Discovering the Past

Siege W eapons - The Mantlet (Mobile Shield) Weapons The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You will need:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

You are Lord Godfrey’s most skilful craftsman. He is planning an attack on a nearby castle and has asked you to design a mantlet (mobile shield) which will protect his army while they mount the attack.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons craft glue, craft sticky tape and scissors. • f o rknife, r ev i ew pu r posesonl y• wood for the framework such as dowel or ice lolly sticks.

w ww Your Job

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Design and build a model mantlet (mobile shield) which:

m . u

‘wheels’ and an ‘axle’.

o c . che e r o t r s super

is strong enough to fend off counter-attacks;

can be easily wheeled into strategic positions;

protects at least three attackers while they fire bows and crossbows and approach the wall to climb over, or tunnel under, it.

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Teachers’ Notes

Discovering the Past

Siege W eapons : The Belfr oi (Siege T Weapons Belfroi Toower) Time Required - 3 lessons of ar ound 40 minutes each. around Materials Get the students to collect most of their own materials. The framework needs to be strong. You may wish to supply dowelling or ice lolly sticks for this. The wheels and axles can be made from dowelling and cotton reels or similar. You need to give children access to card, craft glue, craft knives, paper clips, string, sticky tape and cocktail sticks or matchsticks.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

Lesson 1 (40 minutes minimum)

Teac he r

INVESTIGATE the topic. (See below for useful resources.) Pose the challenge and brainstorm the possible building strategies. Students use the ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Collect materials for the next session.

Lesson 2 (40 minutes minimum)

ew i ev Pr

1. 2. 3. 4.

1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 3. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities.

Lesson 3 (30 minutes minimum)

1. Complete and test models. 2. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Discuss results.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Extension A ctivities Activities

List ten other inventions which use wheels. Research the history of the wheel and present your findings to the class. Design a poster advertising your invention. Create a cartoon strip about a castle siege, featuring your invention.

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Encarta Fortification and Siege Warfare Microsoft CD-ROM

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Castles - Craft Topics Rachel Wright Franklin Watts

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The Time Traveller Book of Knights and Castles Judy Hindley Usbourne

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Additional Resour ces Resources

o c . che e r o t r s super Castles Collins Eyewitness Guide Christopher Gravett Harper Collins Publishers

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Name........................................

Discovering the Past

Siege W eapons - The Belfr oi Weapons Belfroi (Siege T Toower) The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You will need: wood for the framework, such as dowelling or ice lolly sticks, and card to cover it;

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

You are Lord Godfrey’s most skilful craftsman. He is planning an attack on a nearby castle and has asked you to design a belfroi (siege tower) to use during the attack.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • f o rknife, r ev i ew pu r posesonl y• craft glue, craft sticky tape and scissors. ‘wheels’ and ‘axles’;

w ww Your Job

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cocktail sticks or matchsticks for a ladder;

o c . che e r o t r s super

Design and build a model belfroi (siege tower) which: is tall enough to allow easy access over the castle wall; can be wheeled up to the castle wall;

protects the attackers as they approach; is easy to climb.

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Discovering the Past

Teachers' Notes

Siege W eapons : The TTrrebuchet (Catapult) Weapons Time Required - 3 lessons of ar ound 40 minutes each. around Materials Students will need a strong base for the framework. You may wish to supply pine off-cuts or balsa wood for this. The firing arm can be made from dowel or pine off-cuts or simply use a pencil and ruler. Students can collect most of the other materials. Useful items include rubber bands, egg carton cups and matchboxes. You will need to give children access to craft glue, craft knives, paperclips, string, sticky tape and a table-tennis ball for testing.

r o e t s B r e oo Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat p u k S Lesson 1

Teac he r

INVESTIGATE the topic. (See below for useful resources.) Pose the challenge and brainstorm the possible building strategies. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Collect materials for the next session.

Lesson 2 (an hour if possible)

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1. 2. 3. 4.

1. Students assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Set up an area for students to test their models. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students who have successfully completed their model may go on with extension activities.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •Activities f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Extension A ctivities Lesson 3

1. Complete the testing of models. 2. At the end of the session students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Discuss results.

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Additional Resour ces Resources

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Encarta Fortification and Siege Warfare Microsoft CD-ROM

The Time Traveller Book of Knights and Castles Judy Hindley Usbourne

Castles - Craft Topics Rachel Wright Franklin Watts

Castles Collins Eyewitness Guide Christopher Gravett Harper Collins Publishers

Page 36

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List five other inventions which use levers. Research the history and use of levers and present your findings to the class. Design a poster advertising your invention. Create a cartoon strip about a castle siege, featuring your weapon.

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Name........................................

Discovering the Past

Siege W eapons - The T Weapons Trrebuchet (Catapult) The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You will need: wood for the framework, such as balsa wood;

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

You are Lord Godfrey’s most skilful craftsman. He is planning an attack on a nearby castle and has asked you to design a trebuchet (catapult) to use during the attack.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o rr ev i ew pur posesonl y• paperclips, string and rubber bands; dowelling or a pencil and ruler for the firing arm;

a matchbox or egg carton cup and a counterweight for the firing arm;

craft glue, craft knife, sticky tape and scissors;

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crumpled paper or a table-tennis ball for testing.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Your Job Design and build a model trebuchet (catapult) which: can fire a table-tennis ball at the castle; is strong enough to be fired repeatedly.

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Teachers’ Notes

Asian Studies

Kites Time Required - 3 lessons of around 40 minutes each. Materials and Equipment Teachers will need to collect most of the materials for this activity. The requirements are listed on the student page that follows. Bamboo from old blinds or barbecue skewers are useful for the frames although lightweight materials such as drinking straws, canes from straw brooms or even ‘green’ sticks which have been weighted down, all have good potential. The sail can be made of light weight art paper, brown wrapping paper, tissue or rice paper or even light weight cloth. Crepe paper is great to decorate the tail. The bridle and line can be made from poly/cotton or if a stronger line is required, ultra light fishing line can be used.

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Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

Lesson 1 (40 minutes) 1. INVESTIGATE the topic. (Read a short folktale such as the one on page 6 of Andre Thiebault’s Kites and Other Wind Machines. ) Also show pictures or examples of different types of kites. 2. Set the challenge and brainstorm ideas. Distribute ‘Background Information’ sheet which includes construction tips. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Lesson 3 (1 hour if possible)

Lesson 2 (1 hour if possible) 1. Assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Allow glue to dry thoroughly before testing.

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Extension A ctivities Activities

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1. Venture outside to test the kites. 2. Allow time for modifications and fine tuning of designs. 3. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Name your kite. Design a poster advertising your kite. Make up a rhyme or jingle to promote your product. Estimate the cost to make your kite, including your labour (time). Calculate a selling price which will give you some profit. Write a television commercial to sell your product. Perform it for the class. Research Asian kites and report your findings to the class.

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o c . che e r o t r s super Additional Resour ces Resources Kites and Other Wind Machines Andre Thiebault Sterling Publishing Co. Inc.

The Usbourne Book of Kites S. Mayes Usbourne Publishing Ltd

Flying Kites Ann Ratty/Lynne Suing Bookshelf

Kites David Bowden/Jenny Dibly Harcourt Brace Javanovich

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Asian Studies

Kites - Backgr ound Information Background Kite flying is of great importance to the culture of many Asian countries. Kites were traditionally used in religious ceremonies to attract the attention of the spirits but they are also valued for their artistic and decorative qualities. Kite flying is also an important national sport in many parts of Asia.

r o e t s B r e oo Examples of Asian Kites p u k S

Teac he r

Carp (fish) Kite Dragon Kite Winged Kite Ritual Kites (Kleng Phong)

Thailand - Combat Kites (Chula) Korea Name/Birth Date Kite Sri Lanka - Raven (bird) Kite

Construction T ips Tips

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Japan China Vietnam Cambodia -

For a kite to fly it needs to be: Lightweight but strong. Rigid and resistant to the wind. Symmetrical and well balanced. If your kite won’t fly you may need to adjust the bridle attachments to improve balance. The tail is important to balance the kite in the air so that it flies.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Ready-Ed Publications

Safety PPoint oint

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Kites can be given an Asian style with batik (wax or crayon resist) decorations, shapes or drawings of bamboo, dragons, birds or fish.

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Avoid ELECTROCUTION - Never fly kites near power lines or in electrical storms.

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Name........................................

Asian Studies

Kites The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Materials and Equipment You will need:

ruler, scissors, pencils and crayons;

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Teac he r

Your class is going to celebrate Asian studies with a kite flying day. You need to design and build an Asian-style kite for the celebrations.

craft glue, sticky tape, paper punch and paints; bamboo or cane for the frame; lightweight paper; thread and pulltops from drink cans or paperclips for the bridle.

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o c . che e r o t r YYour our Job s super Design a kite which:

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1.

Is Asian in style.

2.

Looks attractive.

3.

Will fly in a light wind or if you run with it.

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Teachers’ Notes

Asian Studies

Indonesian mask: (W yang T openg) (Wy Topeng) Time Required - This activity is a long term project and will take a minimum of 5 lessons of at least 40 minutes. Materials and Equipment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Teachers will need to collect most of the materials for this activity. The requirements are listed on the student page that follows. Balloons make an excellent mould, especially if not over-inflated (face size only). Hanging them upside down by the string to dry, gives a more face-like shape. A useful glue for papier mâché is made from flour and boiling water as it is cheap and easy to clean up. However, it doesn't keep well! Students can be asked to bring this glue from home, along with any materials for special features (e.g. fake jewels, horse hair).

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

Lesson 1 1. INVESTIGATE the topic. (Art of Indonesia by Tibor Brodrogi [Academy Editions] has excellent photographs. See below for examples of Indonesian stories.) Take care to use only Indonesian stories with Indonesian masks or offence may be taken. 2. Set the challenge and brainstorm ideas. Distribute ‘Background Information’ sheet which includes construction tips. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Lesson 2 (an hour if possible) 1. Assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION (Papier mâché base of 6 layers). 2. Allow at least 2 days for masks to dry. Lesson 3 1. Cut holes necessary for features such as eyes and mouth. (Power scissors are ideal for this. If these are not available use of craft knives must be carefully supervised or undertaken by an adult as considerable force may be necessary.) 2. Produce features such as the nose and lips. Neaten all raw edges with overlapping paper. 3. Allow at least 2 days to dry. Lesson 4 1. Smooth rough edges with sandpaper and paint mask. 2. Allow paint to dry before producing any additional details. Lesson 5 1. Complete PRODUCTION. Attach elastic to hold mask to face. 2. Varnish mask if desired and allow to dry. 3. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design.

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o c . che e r o t r s s r u e p Extension A ctivities Activities Work in a small group to make up a ‘mask’ play to perform to the class.

Resour ces (also see Lesson I above) Resources “The Story of Ramayana” in Indonesia Lisa Hill Harcourt Brace Javanovich

“Golden Cucumber and the Hermit” and other stories Favourite Stories - Indonesia Margurite Seik Heineman, Asia

Folktales From Asia Selected by Michael Collins Bookshelf Ready-Ed Publications

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Name........................................

Asian Studies

Way ang T openg - Masked Performance ayang Topeng Backgr ound Information Background ‘Wayang’ is Indonesian for performance and ‘topeng’ means mask. Therefore ‘wayang topeng’ means masked performance. Dancers wear masks and mime the traditional Indonesian stories to the accompaniment of the ‘gamelan’ (an orchestra of gongs and xylophones). The ‘dalang’ (showman) narrates the story. Masks in Asian culture have special significance to the lives and customs of the people. They are used in religious ceremonies often associated with the spirits of animals and gods. They are also used at times of celebration and festivity.

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Teac he r

Characters

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Wayang Topeng characters are based on the same characters as Wayang Kulit. They include gods, nobility, servants, villains and animals. Traditionally carved from wood, their character and even their mood is indicated by their features, colours and headdress. Noble characters have dark, white or gilt faces, refined features and elegant headdress. Villains are much less refined, with mostly red faces and coarse features.

Construct ion T ips Construction Tips

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Balloons make useful moulds but care must be taken not to over-inflate. Papier mâché is a useful technique for mask making and can be used in conjunction with other techniques. Moulds should be face size!

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Six layers is a good thickness for papier mâché. Any thinner is not strong enough and any thicker makes it too hard to cut out facial features. Traditionally only one facial feature is emphasized, (e.g. eyes or mouth).

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Features can be cut out, built on or pointed. Trimmings such as hair, beads and jewels may be attached.

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Name........................................

Asian Studies

Way ang T openg - Masked Performance ayang Topeng The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You will need:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Your class has been invited to perform an Asian masked play to celebrate Asian Studies Week but your school has no masks. You need to design and build a mask for the play.

papier mâché materials including paper strips, vaseline, a face sized mould or framework and plenty of glue;

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •scissors f ororr e v i ew pur posesonl y• power craft knife and sandpaper;

materials to form features ( paper pulp, cardboard, matchsticks, wool, string, beads etc.);

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Your mask must:

1. 2. 3.

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poster paints, elastic and varnish.

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Indicate the nature of its character by colour and features. Be able to be worn comfortably by the performer.

Be attractively and interestingly presented.

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Teachers’ Notes

Asian Studies

Shado w Puppet Theatr Shadow Theatree Before YYou ou Start This activity will provide the theatres necessary for testing the shadow puppets in the building activity that follows. It is most practical to do it in groups of about 5 students. However, you may prefer to construct a theatre yourself or assign one group the task while the others construct the puppets. These ‘set builders’ could go on to design the scenery or the music for the performances.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Time Required - as a ‘Design, Mak e, Appraise’ activity it will require a minimum Make, of 2 lessons of at least 40 minutes. Backgr ound Information Background

Teac he r

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Screens should be designed to sit on a desk top. Cover the desk with a sheet to screen the puppeteers. A proscenium (facade) may be added to the front of the screen to give it the character and appeal of a theatre.

Lighting

The screen needs to be back lit for the puppets to be visible. The rest of the room needs to be darkened. The light needs to be positioned between the puppeteers’ hands and the screen. A 60 watt study lamp with an adjustable neck can be clipped to the desk behind the screen. The cord should be taped safely out of the puppeteers’ way. It is also possible to light the screen with direct sunlight if the room is darkened except for one window directly behind the screen. The puppeteers need to crouch down to allow the light in without casting shadows themselves.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Materials• and Equipment f o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• Teachers will need to collect most of the materials for this activity. The requirements are listed on the student page that follows.

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat

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Lesson 1 1. INVESTIGATE the topic. (Fantastic Theatre by Judy Sierra [HW Wilson Company] is a particularly useful resource.) 2. Set the challenge and brainstorm ideas. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Lesson 2 1. Assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. It will be necessary to provide some simple shadow puppets to allow testing. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students use ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. Discuss the results.

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Extension Students could research Asian Shadow Puppets in preparation for designing their own puppet. Students could design scenery or music to accompany a production.

Resour ces Resources Fanfare for Puppets Ann Hogarth and Jan Bussell David and Charles Inc. Page 44

Art of Indonesia Tibor Bodrogi Academy Editions

Fantastic Theatre Judy Sierra The H W Wilson Company Ready-Ed Publications


Name........................................

Asian Studies

Way ang Kulit: Shado w Puppet Theatr Shadow Theatree ayang

The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You will need:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

You have been invited to perform a shadow puppet play (wayang kulit) but have no screen for the performance. You need to design and build a shadow puppet theatre so that the performance can go ahead.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons a large piece of semi-transparent material for the screen; (Lightweight art •orf o rr vi e wp u r posesonl y• paper a piece ofe white bedsheet will do.)

a rigid frame about 100 cm by 70 cm; (A large cardboard box is ideal for this.)

craft knife, glue and masking tape;

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a light source.

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Your Job

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card and curtain material to decorate the proscenium (theatre facade);

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Design and build a shadow puppet theatre that: 1. will give a clear outline of the puppet; 2. allows the puppet to be controlled without the puppeteer’s hands being visible; 3. looks attractive.

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Teachers’ Notes

Asian Studies

Shado w Puppets (W ay ang Kulit) Shadow (Way ayang Note - This activity is best undertaken after completing the ‘Shadow Puppet Screen’ Activity on the preceding pages, as this will provide a number of screens for the students to test their puppets on and use in the extension activities.

Required T ime - 3 lessons of at least 40 minutes each. Time Materials and Equipment

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

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Teachers will need to collect most of the materials for this activity. You will need: 1. Construction paper, lightweight cardboard, vinyl or hard plastic. ( Dark colours make a striking contrast with the screen.) 2. Wooden rod, 2-3 mm diameter and at least 30 cm long. (Thin dowelling or barbecue skewers with the points removed are ideal.) 3. Scissors are essential. Craft knives and hole punches are also desirable. 4. Craft glue, clear tape, waxed dental toss or string. Coloured tissue paper allows a lead-light effect to be created with the cutouts.

Suggested Lesson FFormat ormat Lesson 1

1. INVESTIGATE the topic. Useful resources include Folktales from Asia selected by Michael Collins [Bookshelf], Puppet by Carole Hooper [Harcourt Brace Javanovich] and Fantastic Theatre by Judy Sierra [H W Wilson Company] which has puppets and plays which can be used as examples. Making Puppets by Josie McKinnon [Magic Bean - In Fact Series, Era Publications Australia] uses the Big Book format to look at a variety of puppet building techniques, including shadow puppets. 2. Set the challenge and brainstorm ideas. Distribute ‘Background Information’ sheet which includes construction tips. 3. Students use ‘Working Drawings’ sheet to DEVISE their plan.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Lesson 2 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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1. Assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. Light coloured pencil or crayon will draw onto dark materials. Details drawn onto the puppet will not show on the screen unless cut out. 2. Set up the screens to allow testing of the puppets. 3. Students can make modifications to improve their design. Have the ‘Modifications’ sheet available. 4. Students who have successfully tested their model may go on with extension activities.

Lesson 3

. t e Extension A ctivities Activities

1. Complete PRODUCTION and testing of puppets. 2. Students use the ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design. 3. Early finishers may work on extension activities.

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Name your puppet. Describe the character and moods of your puppet. Research Asian Shadow Puppets and report your findings to your class. Work with a partner or in a small group to write a play starring your puppet. Use percussion instruments such as gongs and xylophones to create music and sound effects to accompany your play.

Additional Resour ces (also see Lesson 1 above) Resources Fanfare for Puppets Ann Hogarth and Jan Bussell David and Charles Inc. “The Story of Ramayana” in Indonesia Harcourt Brace Javanovich Page 46

Art of Indonesia Tibor Brodrogi Academy Editions

“Golden Cucumber and the Hermit” Favourite Stories - Indonesia Margurite Seik Heineman Asia

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Name........................................

Asian Studies

Way ang Kulit - Shado w Puppets ayang Shadow Backgr ound Information Background

Characters

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Wayang Kulit characters include gods, nobility, servants, villains and animals. The type of character and even their mood at that moment is indicated by their features and colours. Noble characters have dark, white or gilt faces, refined features, gracious posture and elegant, elongated necks. Villains are much less refined, with mostly red faces, coarse features and posture.

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Teac he r

‘Wayang’ is Indonesian for performance. Shadow puppets are traditionally made from leather. They are called ‘Wayang Kulit’ or literally skin or hide performance. The puppet showman is called the ‘Dalang’ and he is held in high regard as a man of great wisdom, almost like a priest. Wayang Kulit was traditionally a way of educating people in ethics, morals, art, politics and religion. In every story right would triumph and the message of the value of virtue was reinforced to the audience.

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Construction T ips Tips

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Draw the puppet in profile (side on) as this allows for more natural looking movement.

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Exaggerate important features and simplify the unimportant. (The eye is traditionally the most important feature. It is left until last and always cut out.) Moving parts must be cut separately, overlap well and look natural throughout their movement. Avoid long, thin features as these will curl or tear easily. Pivot points can be formed using an embroidery needle threaded with doubled, waxed dental floss. Use double knots and seal with a little craft glue. Puppets need a main supporting rod which extends well up into the puppet and at least 30 cm below the feet. A separate control rod is needed for each moving part.

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Name........................................

Asian Studies

Way ang Kulit ayang The Challenge

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Materials and Equipment You have:

scissors, hole punch, craft knife; construction paper, card, vinyl or plastic, barbecue skewers; craft glue, sticky tape, string, waxed dental floss, tissue paper.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Design and construct a shadow puppet that can be used in a play.

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Your Job

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Design and build a shadow puppet that: 1. Will give a clear and interesting silhouette (including cut outs). 2. Has one movable joint. 3. Can be operated from behind the screen without visible use of hands.

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Teachers’ Notes

Language Other Than English (L.O.T.E.)

Boar Boardd Game Time Required - 3 lessons of at least 1 hour each. Materials and Equipment. This activity needs little more than regular school art supplies, most of which the teacher will need to collect. The suggested requirements are listed on the student page that follows. Recycled boxes etc. are a good source of cardboard and the smaller ones are useful for packaging and storage of the games. Students may wish to bring in their own dice and novelty items such as ‘Kinder-surprises’ or other small plastic toys. Try not to let this get too competitive.

r o e t s Bo r Suggested Lesson FFormat ormate p ok u S Lesson 1 (1 hour minimum)

Teac he r

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1. INVESTIGATE the topic. (You may wish to look at or play some simple board games such as ‘Snakes and Ladders’.) 2. Brainstorm ideas. Good topics for a L.O.T.E. board game include simple counting games, time games similar to ‘What’s the time Mr Wolf?’, basic quiz games and shopping games. The level of background L.O.T.E. knowledge will control the complexity of the game. 3. The students must have access to basic resource material for the particular language. If they have been studying L.O.T.E. for some time their own work book will be a good start. For those interested in Indonesian a ‘Background Information’ sheet which may be useful has been provided (Page 50). 4. Students use ‘Working Drawing’ sheet to DEVISE their plan. Students may work alone or in small groups.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Lesson 3f (1o hour • rminimum) r evi ew pur posesonl y• Lesson 2 (I hour minimum)

1. Assemble materials and begin PRODUCTION. 2. Allow glue and paints to dry thoroughly before testing (playing).

1. Complete games and play to test them. You may wish to work with another class to trial the games. 2. Allow time for modifications and fine tuning of designs. 3. Students use ‘How Good Was Your Design?’ sheet to EVALUATE their design.

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Extension A ctivities - Remember to use your L.O .T .E. whenever you can! Activities L.O.T .T.E.

Name your game. Write out the rules for your game. Design packaging for your game. Estimate the cost to make your game, including your labour (time). Calculate a selling price which will give you some profit. Design a poster advertising your game. Write a television commercial to sell your product. Perform it to the class.

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Resour ces Resources

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Survival Indonesian A Mini-Course in Colloquial Indonesian Book, Cassettes and Reference Cards International Communications Pty Foreign Language Series Think and Talk French, German, Italian or Japanese MAC/MPC CD Hyperglot Ready-Ed Publications

“Bahasa Indonesian” in Indonesia Lisa Hill Harcourt Brace Javonovich

Lyric Language French MAC or Windows CD-ROM Compton's New Media

Ltd. Learn to Speak Series Japanese, French or Spanish MAC/WIN CD Hyperglot

Japanese Tutor For ages 10 - adult DOS CD Harcourt Brace Javonovich

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Language Other Than English (L.O.T.E.)

Backgr ound Information Background Bahasa Indonesian - The Indonesian Language Wor ds which may be useful for a boar d game ords board Mulai - start; Pulang - home (finish); Lempar lagi - throw again; Hilang giliran lose a turn; Maju 3 petak - advance 3 places; Mundar 5 petak - go back 5 places; Kembali ke 10 - return to 10. Ya - Yes Tidak - No Baiklah - Okay Saya - I, me, my Dan - And Besar - Big Kecil - Small

Greetings

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

- Good morning. [Daybreak until about 11.00 am.] - Good day. [Between 11.00 am and about 4.00 pm.] - Good afternoon. [Between 4.00 pm and sunset.] - Good evening or good night. [Between sunset and sunrise.] - Welcome. - Goodbye. [Until we meet again.]

Good Manners Apa kabar? - How are you? Pak - Mr Guru - Teacher Tolong - Please [help]

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Selamat pagi Selamat siang Selamat sore Selamat malam Selamat datang Sampai jumpah lagi

Baik - Good / well lbu - Mrs Murid - Student Terima Kasih - Thank you.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f oNumbers rr evi ew pur posesonl y• Nomor -Nomor: Nomor-Nomor:

. te Hari - Day

8 - delapan 9 - sembilan 10 - sepuluh 11 - sebelus 12 - dua belas 13 - tiga belas 14 - empat belas 15 - lima belas

16 - enam belas 17 - tujuh belas 18 - delapan belas 19 - sembilan belas 20 - dua puluh 31 - tiga puluh satu 100 - seratus 200 - dua ratus

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Hari Minggu - Sunday, Hari Ragu - Wednesday Hari Sabtu - Saturday. kemarin - yesterday.

Hari ini hari apa? - Today is what day? Hari Senin - Monday, Hari Selasa - Tuesday, Hari Kamis - Thursday, Hari Jumat - Friday, Hari ini - today, besok - tomorrow,

Berbelanja - Shopping Berapa harganya? - How much? Wah!Terlalu mahal - Wow! Too expensive! Rupiah - Indonesian money Seribu - 1000

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tawar-menawar - barter saya suka - I like dua ribu - 2000

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Language Other Than English (L.O.T.E.)

Name........................................

Build Y our oown wn Boar Your Boardd Game Boar d Game Competition Board

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Your school has chosen a Language Other Than English as a focus area and is running a major competition as a way of promoting the idea. Prizes will be awarded to the designers of the most interesting board games which can be used to aid the learning of L. O. T. E. The major winners will also have the opportunity to visit other schools to demonstrate their game.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ruler, and crayons; •scissors, f orpencils r ev i e w pur posesonl y•

Materials and Equipment You will need:

craft glue, sticky tape, paper punch and paints;

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items from the recycling box (or from home) such as small boxes, plastic counters or bottle tops;

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reference material to check the words that you use.

Your Job

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Design a board game which: 1. Uses and encourages further use of a Language Other Than English. 2. Is fun to play with two or more people. 3. Looks attractive.

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