Page 1

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


Library Activity Package: Transport Upper Primary Activity Book (BLM) © 2004 Ready-Ed Publications, Revised © 2009 Printed in Australia ISBN: 9781863975872

All websites referred to in this package can easily be accessed from the Ready-Ed website below:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

www.readyed.com.au/urls/thinking

Teac he r

Author: Sandy Tasker Cover Design: Shay Howard

ew i ev Pr

Acknowledgements: Clip art has been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and is used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. Cover images sourced for Communication and Technology resource book and activity book: i. Corel Corporation, 1600 Carling Ave, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8R7. ii. Additional images courtesy of IMSI’s Masterclips/MasterPhotos collection, 1895 Francisco Blvd, East San Rafael, CA 94901-5506 USA, website: www.imsisoft.com. Published by: Ready-Ed Publications PO Box 276 Greenwood WA 6023 www.readyed.com.au info@readyed.com.au

w ww

Copyright Notice

The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

. te

that that educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under Act.

o c . che e r o t r s super

The number of copies does not exceed the number reasonably required by the educational institution to satisfy its teaching purposes;

2.

Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

3.

Copies are not sold or lent;

4.

Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘ReadyEd Publications’.

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act. The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided

Page 2

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: info@copyright.com.au

Reproduction and Communication by others Except as otherwise permitted by this blackline master licence or under the Act (for example, any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address above.


Contents Transport: About This Package......................................................................................... 4 Task Card Information...................................................................................................... 5 Strategies for Creative Thinking....................................................................................... 6 Extension Ideas for the Classroom................................................................................... 8 Curriculum Links: Outcome Statements VIC, WA, National................................................................................................... 10 NSW, QLD, SA......................................................................................................... 12

r o e t s Bo r e Task Card Activities: p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

Task 1: Turning Back the Wheel of Time................................................................14 Task 2: On the Team.............................................................................................14 Task 3: Be a Leo...................................................................................................15 Task 4: Underground Secrets...............................................................................15 Task 5: Spare Parts...............................................................................................16 Task 6: It’s all in the Name....................................................................................16 Task 7: Buckles for Buses......................................................................................17 Task 8: I’m No Dummy!.........................................................................................17 Task 9: Shipshape.................................................................................................18 Task 10: Float or Fly..............................................................................................18 Task 11: In the Deep Blue.....................................................................................19 Task 12: Plane and Simple....................................................................................19 Task 13: A High-Flying Career...............................................................................20 Task 14: Stranded in the Snow.............................................................................20 Task 15: Animal Travels.........................................................................................21 Task 16: Rolling Along..........................................................................................21 Task 17: A New Sport on Wheels.........................................................................22 Task 18: Super Bike!.............................................................................................22 Task 19: Fly-sense to Drive...................................................................................23 Task 20: Aussie-naut.............................................................................................23

w ww

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Activity Checklist............................................................................................................. 24 Assessment Sheets.......................................................................................................... 25 Teacher Assessment 1: Sharing Information..................................................................... 26 Teacher Assessment 2: Written Information..................................................................... 27 Teacher Assessment 3: Design Evaluation........................................................................ 28 Teacher Assessment 4: Creativity..................................................................................... 29 Student Self-Assessment ................................................................................................ 30 Further Assessment Tools................................................................................................ 31

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 3


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

About the Library Activity Package This package is designed to be used in a number of ways: 1. As a learning centre for the classroom; 2. As a library resource package; 3. As a general resource package for a number of themes.

Transport – A Rationale For Study

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Since early civilisation, people have sought new ways to get from A to B. Nowadays, we have such a smorgasbord of choices that our destinations reach much further into the alphabet. Transport gives us the freedom to explore our world beyond the limits of our legs. Our lives are easier and more fulfilling because of transport. We don’t have to walk in the rain to school, we can get rushed to the hospital in an ambulance and even get rescued from a flood in a helicopter. We can enjoy food and technology that is shipped over from other countries. We can visit our aunt in France and go to Alice Springs on a holiday. The experience of transport is also commonly shared by most people, at least in developed or developing countries. It brings people together. From the invention of the wheel to the development of supersonic travel, the variety of transportation modes today can take us deep into the ocean, across rugged terrain and away to far distant planets. So why study transport? Looking at the types of transport available at each period in time helps us to understand the level of technology available, which tells us a lot about other aspects of that time. Through the study of transport, we can get a solid understanding of when, why and how our earth was explored, as we can only go as far as technology can take us, no matter how much further our desires go. Learning about transport can help us to understand how international partnerships were formed and how people used ideas and developments from other countries to improve their own designs. Finding out about transport is not just useful for studying travel and exploration. Trade, communication, international war and peace, scientific research and many other industries are all dependent on transport. Understanding transport can help us to be more responsible with our environment and with our own personal safety, especially if we know more about the alternative options that are available now or are being developed for the future. Transport plays a big role in our past, our present and our future – so let’s put the key into the ignition and shift into first gear for a drive down memory lane, then turn into the freeway of today, before we blast off into Tomorrowland.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s su Extension Ideas and Teaching Points per

Teaching ideas and relevant notes have been included where applicable on pages 8-9. Internet resources for the teacher are also listed on these pages as well as extension ideas for the classroom. All websites addresses referred to on these pages are easily accessible by visiting the online index pages for the Library Activity Package resources at the Ready-Ed Publications’ website (www.readyed.com.au/urls/thinking). See page 5 for more details about how this aspect of the series works. Please note that some URLs do not require www at the beginning of the address. Simply type them in as specified on the page or go to the ReadyEd website above. Page 4


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Task Card Information students are allowed time at the centre they know what areas they can cover.

Learning Outcomes

Charts containing relevant learning outcomes for all Australian states and territories are included on pages 10-13. This information allows teachers to measure students’ learning according to the subject area and particular strand. Each task has a related learning outcome at the bottom of the card and highlights the thinking skills incorporated into the activity.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Checklist

A checklist of activities has been provided on page 24 which allows students or the teacher to check off the activities as they are completed. This checklist can be photocopied onto A3 paper and displayed on the wall as part of the learning centre so that when

Cross Curriculum

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

The photocopiable activities in this book have been designed as task cards. Ideally, they can be copied onto card and laminated so as to be used several times. Alternatively, teachers can photocopy pages to make up activity booklets for each student. The activities are non-sequential although it is envisaged that students will have read the accompanying resource book before attempting the task cards. Website references have been included on the task cards although they are usually not essential for completing the activity. However, they often provide an excellent starting point and it is often easier than trying to locate relevant library books. See below for more information about the use of Internet references.

The activities in this series explore high interest themes across core subject areas such as Society and Environment, Technology, Science, English, Mathematics, Health and Physical Education. The themes provide a backdrop for creative thinking strategies and different learning styles.

Assessment © ReadyEdP ubnotes l i c at i ons Detailed and assessment proformas have been included at the end of the activities. (See pp 24-31.) •f orr evi ew pu r p osesonl y•

m . u

Updating of Internet References

w ww

It is now common knowledge that Internet sites disappear from time to time. While all of the sites included in this package were accessible at the time of publication, it is anticipated that many sites will move to a new location, modify their layout or disappear from the WWW completely.

. te

o c . c e her r www.readyed.com.au/urls/thinking o t s super

Ready-Ed Publications endeavours to check all sites on a regular basis and replaces any sites that have moved. In addition, attempts are made to locate missing sites that have relocated to another address. All website references in the Library Activity Package are clearly linked on our website at a specific location. The direct address for this section is: Ideally, it is hoped that teachers using this package will bookmark the above address so that students requiring links always have access to the latest link rather than an outdated one that may still appear on the task card some time after publication. By using the index students do not have to laboriously type in any URLs, greatly reducing the margin for error when trying to locate sites that have long and complicated addresses. The website indexes are clearly set out and easy for students to navigate. Should a broken link or a link that appears to have modified its layout be discovered, then please email fixlink@readyed.com.au with clear details of the topic and task card number. Please note that ALL links that appear in each of the five resource books are included on the above site and are clearly labelled.

Page 5


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Strategies for Creative Thinking The following creative thinking strategies are used in this book: Problem Reversal  State the problem in reverse. Change a positive statement into a negative one.  Try to define what something is NOT.  Figure out what everybody else is not doing.  Change the direction or location of your perspective.  Flip-flop results – think about achieving the opposite of what you want to achieve, e.g. “I want to increase my fitness. But how could I decrease my fitness?” Think about decreasing sales, failing a test etc.  Turn defeat into victory or victory into defeat, e.g. if I was stranded on the moon after a space shuttle problem, what good would come out of it? I might end up travelling through a worm-hole to another dimension. If I failed a maths test, what good would come out of it? I might focus on doing twice as well in my spelling test. Or I might start going to homework classes and meet new friends and so on.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Forced Analogies  The idea is to compare the problem with something else that has little or nothing in common, and gaining new insights as a result.  Examples, comparing companies and cows, transport systems and telephone networks, or your brain and a felt pen.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Morphological Analysis  This strategy explores the concept of devising new inventions, e.g. students could modify an existing object, such as a biro, lunch box or guitar by analysing its features and looking at alternatives.  List the attributes of the situation.  Below each attribute, place as many alternatives as you can think of.  When completed, make many random runs through the alternatives, picking up a different one from each column and assembling the combinations into entirely new forms of your original subject.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Applied Imagination  Use of prompting questions to elicit new ideas.  How could I adapt this? Modify, magnify, minimise, reverse, substitute, rearrange, combine and so on. The line of questioning needs to be specific to the topic.

Page 6

Mind Mapping  Mind Maps® are an excellent method for exploring creative thinking. Tony Buzan (www.buzan.com.au) pioneered the concept in 1970. The technique is an effective method of note-taking and useful for the generation of ideas by associations. Basically, the student starts in the centre of the page with the main idea, and works outward in all directions, producing a growing and organised structure composed of key words and key images, similar to a brainstorm but with more meaning. Mind Maps® can use imagery, colour and direction to illustrate a concept. Emotions and feeling about the particular theme can be given as well. Check for examples: www.mind-mapping. co.uk/mind-maps-examples.htm

m . u

w ww

Lateral Thinking  Looking at the problem in a different way, e.g. Aunty Annie is sitting knitting and three year old Jacob is upsetting his aunty by playing with the wool. One parent suggests putting Jacob into the playpen. The other parent suggests it might be a better idea to put Annie in the playpen to protect her from Jacob.


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Strategies for Creative Thinking Cognitive and Affective Skill Areas Imagination  Students usually only have control over their own thoughts and ideas. Encouraging students to develop their imagination allows them to pretend they are someone else or allows them to look at something from another angle, often exploring things beyond the ‘safe’ boundaries that they most often operate in. Risk Taking  Involves understanding that there can be many solutions to a problem and that one idea may be better than another, however, this does not mean that the original idea is no longer valid.  It is important to note that individual brainstorming acitivities usually produce a wider range of ideas than group brainstorming. Students feel less inhibited and less worried about other people’s opinions which allows them to be more freely creative. Importantly, group work should still be seen as a valuable learning tool as it does allow students to gather a certain perspective that they may not have considered on their own.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Fluency  Generating a number of ideas and then looking at the best option. This is based on the notion that the more ideas generated, the more chance of being original. Flexibility  Exploring a problem from a different perspective, e.g. through the eyes of someone else.  Addressing a situation from another point in time, or looking for a positive aspect rather than concentrating on the negative aspects (problem reversal). Originality  Thinking of new and innovative ideas to improve the functioning of objects.  Solving a range of problems by taking two old ideas and combining them to come up with something new. Elaboration  Expanding on an already existing idea or fact, perhaps adding a different slant. Curiosity  Answering the who, what, where, when and why about a particular idea or thing.

Relevant Websites:

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

Thinking Skills - www.teachers.ash.org.au/researchskills/thinking.htm Creative, Lateral, Logical Thinking - library.trinity.wa.edu.au/teaching/thinking. htm Creativity Tool Kit - www.directedcreativity.com/pages/ToolsImagine.html Mind Mapping - www.mind-map.com/ Teaching Thinking - www.teachingthinking.net/ Creative Thinking Techniques - www.virtualsalt.com/crebook2.htm Creative Quotations - www.creativequotations.com/ The Thinking Classroom - learnweb.harvard.edu/alps/thinking/intro.cfm Edward de Bono’s Resources - www.edwdebono.aust.com/debono/home.htm BubbleDome- www.bubbledome.com/bubbledome.asp?Action=Story

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Competitions and Projects for Schools:

Adam Spencer/University of Sydney Eureka Schools Prize for Lateral Thinking - www.amonline.net.au/eureka/lateral_thinking/index.cfm Odyssey of the Mind - www.odysseyofthemind.com/ Sustainable Living Project - www.sustainableliving.com.au/flash.htm Write Around Australia - www.nestle.com.au/writearound/ Tournament of Minds - www.tom.edu.au/

Page 7


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Extension Ideas for the Classroom

Some task card activities detailed in this book lend themselves to further exploration in the classroom. For these cards extension activities, relevant websites and key teaching points have been presented below. Task 1: Turning Back the Wheel of Time After students have worked on the concept of the wheel invention, they could spend time on either or both of the following:  What would have happened if the wheel was square? Write how our world would be different.  Aside from transport, think of as many OTHER uses for the wheel that you can. Draw or write them.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

Task 2: On the Team Students design a score-card for judges at a chariot race in Ancient Greece or Rome. Giddy-up to www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/circus.html and ireland.iol.ie/~coolmine/typ/romans/intro.html (Hippodrome), www.geocities.com/Athens/Stage/3591/chariotracing.html or www.pbs.org/empires/romans/life/life3b.html - Life in Roman Times - Chariot Racing. Task 5: Spare Parts The Model T Ford had many interesting accessories that could be bought for the car. Students can read about these in the resource book and then invent some of their own. Some earlier cars included a system to warn horses (still used on the roads) that they were coming. Design an amusing or creative way of alerting horses to a coming car. Check out the authentic spare parts list at: www.model-t-ford.org/mtfci_pubs/ford_acc_1916/ford_acc_1916.htm

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Task 6: It’s all in the Name Many new inventions also need a name. Tracing the origins of s words cano be n quite interesting and • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o e s l y • can often be done by looking in good dictionaries or on the Internet. Students can search for

m . u

the origins of transport words such as “bus”, coming from “omnibus”. Try www.dictionary.com (Type in a word, press “Look it up” and find the word origin at the bottom of the meaning list) and www.m-w.com - also provides word origins for some meanings found.

w ww

Task 7: Buckles for Buses Students can conduct further investigations on safety items and develop their own ideas. For example, students can decide where else (apart from inside cars) airbag safety systems can be used, or they could design a simple safety feature for our roads, similar to the cats’ eye. Check these sites for more information: www.carsdirect.com/features/safetyfeatures and www.ltsa.govt.nz/vehicle-safety/safer-car/ (A New Zealand site giving a summary of safety aspects when driving.)

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Task 11: In the Deep Blue After students have spent some time researching life in a submarine, they can devise a fitness program for passengers who spend long periods of time down there (imagining that some small gym equipment is available). Find out more about submarines at www.howstuffworks.com/ submarine.htm members.cox.net/danc3/sub_sim.htm is a humorous look at the life of a submariner. See if students can create an exercise program that breaks this monotony. Task 14: Stranded in the Snow Students can imagine that the dogsled dogs are able to rescue the stranded traveller. Write an interview with the heroic dog, including questions and answers. Read the story of a heroic dog named Balto at www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/sleddogs/balto.html or www.usanetwork.com/sports/iditarod/balto.html Page 8


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Extension Ideas for the Classroom Task 20: Aussie-naut The student who wins the “First Aussie Kid in Space” competition will need some interesting and healthy food to keep them strong and energetic whilst in orbit. Students are to design a “space menu” including descriptions and drawings of how meals are consumed (e.g. food in tubes, magnetic cutlery, drinking bags with straws and so on). Visit the NASA website to research the types of space food available today, at: spacelink.nasa.gov/ (Search: Space food) Read about how the Chinese tailor-made their food at www.cnn.com (Search: Chinese space food) and do the same by creating a typically “Aussie” space menu.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

♦ Design a “dream car”.

ew i ev Pr

Other Activities – If the activity cards are not enough, try these extras: ♦ Research transport records and make up a miniature records book, e.g. fastest train, biggest cruise ship, and so on. Visit www.guinnessworldrecords.com/ and type in the transport record that you would like to find out about.

♦ Write an alternative version of events for if the Titanic DID listen to warnings about the ice (see Transport resource book). Visit www.keyflux.com, www.titanic.com to find out more about the disaster.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ♦ Research a helicopter rescue and write a news article about it. Go• to lifesaver.1earth.net/ (Missions) or u www.nrhelirescue.com.au read about f orr evi e wp r posesoton l y •the

♦ Write a letter from a relative of a Titanic passenger complaining about the lack of safety features on board the ship (see resource book).

rescue efforts of two Australian helicopter rescue services.

. te

♦ Draw a cartoon about a blimp encountering a UFO.

m . u

w ww

♦ Make a booklet for dogsled drivers (mushers), including a labelled diagram of a dogsled, vocabulary used when sledding and tips on how to look after your dogs (see resource book). Check out www.pbs.org (Search: Dogsledding - Dogsledding 101) to find out about the parts of a dogsled. Check out the extra activities at: www.geocities.com/Athens/Atrium/5924/iditarod/iditarodunit.htm if you enjoy this topic.

o c . che e r o t r s super

♦ Imagine that time travel DOES exist and you are able to go back in time and change ONE thing. Either write a story or draw a flow diagram about what happens when one event is changed.

Page 9


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements

* NB: Victorian Teachers: The SOSE outcomes have been numbered in the order in which they appear in the curriculum documents.

Activities Task 1

WA

The Ar ts: Visual Arts 3. 1, Technology: Information 3. 2

The Ar ts: Communic ating Arts Ideas (C AI) 3, Technology & Enter pr ise (T&E): I 3. 1, 3. 2

The Ar ts: Visual Arts, Band B, Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising, Information, Band B

Na t i o n a l Cu r r i c u l u m

English: R (Reading) 3. 4, The Ar ts: C AI 3

English: Reading & Viewing 3. 8a, The Ar ts: Visual Arts, Band B

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

English: Reading 3. 5b, The Ar ts: Visual Arts 3. 1

Teac he r

Task 2

V IC

Task 3

Technology: Materials & Movement (MM) 3. 2

T&E: TP 3. 1

Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising, Band B

Task 4

English: Reading 3. 5b, Writing 3. 9

English: R 3. 4, W 3. 2

English: Reading & Viewing 3. 8a, Writing 3. 9

Task 6

TE &E:d M 3.P 1, Su cieb ncel :i Tet ch no olon gy:s Materials, © Readyc a i NPM 3 Band B, Science: N ato uran l &l Py roc es• sed •f orr evi ew pur poses Materials (NPM) 3. 10 Technology: MM 3. 2

English: Reading 3. 5b, 3. 8a, Writing 3. 11

w ww

. te

English: R 3. 3, 3. 4, W 3. 3

English: Reading & Viewing 3. 8a & b, Writing 3. 11

m . u

Task 5

Task 7

Health & Physical Health & Physical Education (HPE): Health Education (HPE): of Individuals and Conc epts for a Healthy Populations (HIP) 3. 1, Lifestyle (CHL) 3, English: English: Speaking & SL 3. 1 Listening 3. 1

Health & Physical Education (HPE): Safety 3. 12, English: Speaking & Listening 3. 1

Task 8

English: Reading 3. 5b, Writing 3. 9

English: R 3. 4, W 3. 2

English: Reading & Viewing 3. 8a, Writing 3. 9

Task 9

Mathematics: Measurement, Time 3. 1, HPE: Movement & Physic al Ac tivity (MP) 3. 2

Mathematics: M 3. 4a, HPE: CHL3, Interpersonal Skills (IS) 3

Mathematics: Measurement (Time) 3. 21, HPE: Physic al Ac tivity 3. 6

Page 10

o c . che e r o t r s super


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements Activities

V IC

WA

Na t i o n a l Cu r r i c u l u m

Technology: MM 3. 2

Science: NPM 3

Science: NPM 3. 10

Task 11

HPE: HIP 3. 1

HPE: CHL 3, IS 3

HPE: Physic al Ac tivity 3. 6, Health of Individuals 3. 11

Task 12

Science: Physic al Sc ienc e Science: Investigating Science: Working (PS) 3. 2 Sc ientific ally (IS) 3. 1 - 3. 3, Sc ientific ally (WS) 3. 13 3. 16, NPM 3. 11 NPM 3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Task 10

Task 13

Studies of Society & Envir onment (SOSE): Resourc es (R) 3. 1

Society & Envir onment (S&E): R 3. 3

Society & Envir onment (S&E): Resourc es (R) 3. 11

Task 14

Technology: MM 3. 2, English: Writing 3. 9

Science: NPM 3, English: W 3. 1

Science: NPM 3. 10, English: Writing 3. 9

Science: LL 3, English: W Science: Life & Living © ReadyE ubl i cat 3. 2dP (Li L)o 3. 9n , s English: Writing 3. 10 • f orr evi ewS&Ep ur posesSo nl y• Task 16 SOSE: R 3. 2, 3. 3 : R 3. 3 &E: Resourc es 3. 11, Task 15

Science: Biologic al Sc ienc e (BS) 3. 1

3. 12 HPE: MP 3. 2, SOSE: R 3. 3

w ww

Task 18

Technology: MM 3. 2

. te

HPE: Skills for Physic al Ac tivity (SPA) 3. 2, S&E: R 3. 2

HPE: Physic al Ac tivity 3. 6, S&E: Resourc es 3. 12

Science: NPM 3, T&E: TP 3. 1

Science: NPM 3. 10, Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising Band B

m . u

Task 17

o c . che e r o t r s super

Task 19

HPE: IP 3. 1, English: Writing 3. 9

HPE: CHL 3, English: W 3. 2

HPE: Safety 3. 12, English: Writing 3. 10

Task 20

English: Speaking & Listening 3. 1

English: SL 3. 1a

English: Speaking & Listening 3. 1

Page 11


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements NS W

A c ti vi ti es

Ar ts: Visual Arts 3, Science & Technology (S&T): IC S3. 2

Task 2

English: RS 3. 5, 3. 6, Ar ts: Visual Arts 3

The Ar ts: Visual Arts 3. 1, Technology: INF 3. 2

SA Ar ts: Arts Prac tic e 3. 1, Design & Technology: Designing 3. 3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

English: Reading & English: Texts & Contexts Viewing Cu3. 2, The Ar ts: (Texts) 3. 3 Strategies Visual Arts 3. 1 3. 11, Ar ts: Arts Prac tic e 3. 1

Task 3

S&T: PS S3. 5, DM S3. 8

Task 4

English: RS 3. 5, 3. 6, WS English: Reading & 3. 9 Viewing Cu3. 2, Writing & Shaping Cu3. 3, Op 3. 3

English: Texts41. 5 3. 3

Task 5

S&T: PS S3. 5

Technology: MAT 3. 1, Science: Natural & Proc essed Materials (NPM) 3. 3

Design & Technology: Designing 3. 2, Making 3. 5

3. 13

Viewing Op 3. 2, Cr 3. 2, Writing & Shaping Op 3. 3, Cr 3. 3

3. 8

Health & Physical Education (PDHPE): Safe Living (SL) S3. 13, English: TS 3. 1

Health & Physical Education (HPE): Promoting the Health of Individuals and Communities (PHIC) 3. 3, English: Speaking & Listening Cu 3. 1

Health & Physical Education (HPE): Health of Individuals & Communities (HIC) 3. 7

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • ew seEs l Englf iso h: Rr S 3r . 6,e Wv S i Englisp h: Ru eadr inp g &o nglo ish:n Lan gy uag• e 3. 7,

w ww

Task 7

. te

Task 8

Page 12

Design & Technology: Designing 3. 2, 3. 3

m . u

Task 6

Technology: TP 3. 1

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Task 1

QLD

o c . che e r o t r s super

English: RS 3. 6, WS 3. 9

English: Reading & English: Strategies 3. 11, Viewing Cu 3. 2, Writing & Texts 3. 4, 3. 12 Shaping Cu3. 3 Cu 3. 3


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements NS W

A c ti vi ti es

QLD

SA

Mathematics: Measurement 3. 7, PDHPE: Ac tive Lifestyle (AL) S3. 6

Mathematics: Mathematics: Measurement (M) 3. 2, Measurement 3. 4 HPE: Developing Conc epts & Skills for Physic al Ac tivity (SPA) 3. 4

Task 10

S&T: PP S3. 4, PS S 3. 5

Science: NPM 3. 2

Teac he r

Task 9

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Science: Matter 3. 7, Design & Technology: Critiq uing 3. 1

PDHPE: Problem Solving HPE: PHIC 3. 1, 3. 5, SPA (PS) S3. 5, AL S3. 6 3. 4

HPE: Physic al Ac tivity 3. 2

Task 12

S&T: INV S3. 7

Science: NPM 3. 2, 3. 3 D3. 4

Science: Matter 3. 7

Task 13

Human Society & Envir onment (HSIE): SSS3. 7

SOSE: SRP 3. 2

Society & Envir onment (S&E): Soc ial Systems 3

ew i ev Pr

Task 11

Science: NPM 3. 3, Science: Matter 3. 7, © ReadyP a EE ngd lish: W ritiu ng b Cu l 3i . 3c Et ngi lio sh: n Texs ts 3. 4 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 15 S&T: LT S3. 3 Science: Life & Living (LL) Science: Life Systems 3. 6,

Task 16

S&T: PS S3. 5, English: WS 3. 9

HSIE: SS S 3. 7

w ww

3. 3

English: Texts 3. 4

SOSE: SRP 3. 2

S&E: Soc ial Systems 3

HPE: Physic al Ac tivity 3. 2

m . u

Task 14

Task 17

PDHPE: PS S3. 5, AL S3. 6

HPE: SPA 3. 4

Task 18

S&T: PS S3. 5, DM S3. 8

Science: NPM 3. 3, Technology: TP 3. 1

Design & Technology: Designing 3. 3, Making 3. 4, 3. 5

Task 19

PDHPE: SL S3. 13, English: W S3. 9

HPE: PHIC 3. 3, English: Writing Cu 3. 3

HPE: HIC 3. 7, English: Texts 3. 4

Task 20

English: TS 3. 1

English: Speaking & Listening Cu 3. 1

English: Texts 3. 2

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 13


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 1: Turning Back the Wheel of Time Materials: Paper, pen, scissors. Task: The wheel was a very important invention, but do we REALLY know how it was discovered?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

 On a sheet of paper, write down as many ideas you can think of for how the wheel was invented. These can be funny or serious – be as creative as you like.

 Choose your favourite and make it into a cartoon

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

drawing with a caption. Present it on a wheel-shaped piece of paper and colour your cartoon in.

Extra: Imagine that you are the inventor of the wheel. You need to develop an advertising campaign to promote your new idea. Write a plan that shows all your ideas for showing people how good your invention is. Remember this was a long time before cars and engines were invented.

Related Outcome: Students will consider alternatives for how a simple but important object was invented or discovered and look at ways that they can market their idea. Creative Thinking Skill: Flexibility, Originality, Imagination. Subject Areas: Technology - Design Process, The Arts - Visual Arts.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 2: On the Team

w ww

. te

m . u

Materials: Paper, pen, coloured markers and pencils, Internet access (optional), Transport resource book.

Task: Read up on the life of chariot racers from Ancient Greece or Rome. Imagine that you are a “drafter” who picks new team members for the “Red” chariot racing team.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Make a poster that lists all of the “essential” skills that you want in the new team members. You will need to think about the type of racers you want in your team. Will they need to be brave? Fit? Good with horses? Colour your poster and add a slogan that will attract the best new racers in the area.

Remember: You are looking for your team to be at the top by the end of the season. Extra! Find out more about chariot racing at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chariot_racing Related Outcome: Students will, based upon research, consider what is required to make a good chariot racer Creative Thinking Skill: Applied Imagination. Subject Areas: English - Reading, The Arts - Visual Arts.

Page 14


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 3: Be a Leo Materials: Paper and pencils, Transport resource book, relevant books and Internet access (optional). Task: Leonardo da Vinci drew many ideas for transport machines. His detailed sketches showed how these machines actually worked and many of his ideas were ahead of his time. Explore some of Leonardo’s machine sketches at: library.thinkquest.org/3044/ and check out: www.mos.org/leonardo/

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

Imagine that YOU are a famous inventor. Make a sketch for a transport machine that you would like to see being used in the future. Make sure to include labels and notes on how your machine works. Remember that you can be as impossible as you like, many people laughed at Leonardo’s ideas, which seemed impossible at the time.

Leonardo wrote backwards, some say to make his ideas harder to copy. You may like to use a small mirror to write your notes backwards too!

Related Outcome: Students will explore ideas for an imaginary transport machine in the fashion of Leonardo da Vinci. Creative Thinking Skill: Originality. Subject Areas: Technology - Design Process.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Task 4: Underground Secrets

Materials: Pen, paper, Transport resource book, Internet access.

You may also like to visit this informative website: http://underground-history.co.uk/front.php

. te

m . u

w ww

Background: Read the section in the resource book on the many underground train stations that are abandoned when they no longer need to be used.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Task: Imagine that you have a series of abandoned underground stations in your home town. The Board of Transport is offering a reward to the person that comes up with the best ideas for how to use these old stations. What will you use them for?

 Write a list or draw pictures showing all of your ideas for how the underground stations can be used.  Include a letter to the Board of Transport, explaining your ideas. Related Outcome: Students will explore a range of options for alternative uses of an area. Creative Thinking Skill: Fluency, Imagination. Subject Areas: English - Reading, Writing.

Page 15


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 5: Spare Parts Materials: Books on cars, paper, pen. Task: What would happen if you changed parts of a car to come up with a new machine? Using a large sheet of paper, make up a table like the one shown below. Write down all the parts of a car and then, underneath, list all of the ALTERNATIVES that you can think of that could exist instead of the original part. Some of the columns have been started to give you some ideas.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Go down the list and pick your favourite alternative for each column. Draw the machine with all the “new” parts.

Wheels Headlights Indicators Windows Think of more… springs candles hand signals round portholes walking feet glow worms

Related Outcome: Students will consider alternative features for the regular parts of a car. Creative Thinking Skill: Flexibility, Imagination. Subject Areas: Technology - Materials, Science.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 6: It’s all in the Name

w ww

Task: Early cars made by the Ford company were named after letters of the alphabet, like the famous “Model T” Ford. Visit www.cybersteering.com/trimain/history/names.html for a brief history of the names of some car companies.

. te

m . u

Materials: Paper, pen, dictionary, newspaper, thesaurus.

o c . che e r o t r s super

With the huge number of cars on the market today, names have become a lot more creative, with cars named after stars, fast animals and words with interesting meanings, e.g. Astra, Jaguar, Prelude. Look through the “car” section of a weekend paper and list all of the different names of cars that are for sale. Find out more about the car names by looking up the meaning of their name in a dictionary.

Now use the dictionary and thesaurus to create a list of names that YOU would use for a new range of cars. Choose your five favourite names and include a short description of a car that matches its name. Present your ideas by writing an advertisement for each of your newly named cars, using the newspaper as a guide for setting out each advertisement. Related Outcome: Students explore words and find patterns or similarities by investigating meanings for car names. Creative Thinking Skill: Research, Imagination. Subject Areas: English - Reading, Writing.

Page 16


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 7: Buckles for Buses Materials: Pen, paper. Tasks: Seatbelts have been found to be highly effective in saving lives of car passengers. Although a few buses have seatbelts, many still don’t. Do you think that seatbelts should become compulsory in all buses?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Write some notes “for” having seatbelts on buses, then make a list of ideas “against” seatbelts on buses. Which side do you agree with the most?

Teac he r

Think about things that will affect your answer such as: The size of buses, ; The types of injuries that occur in accidents; The number of passengers that get on and off; How the rule will be encouraged; What will happen to passengers that have to stand?

ew i ev Pr

• • • • •

You could even find some classmates to have a debate about this topic. Related Outcome: Students consider both points of view in a safety issue. Creative Thinking Skill: Flexibility, Logical Thinking, Risk Taking. Subject Areas: Health & Physical Education - Safety, English - Speaking & Listening.

Materials: Transport resource book, Internet access (optional) pen, pencil.

w ww

Task: What would life be like as a crash test dummy? Read all about their job in the resource book and perhaps do some other research if you can.

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 8: I’m No Dummy!

Click to here: www.howstuffworks.com/crash-test6.htm Imagine that you are a child in a “family” of crash test dummies that works seven days a week, testing cars in a testing room. One day, you decide that enough is enough and you write to the car manufacturers to ask for a change.

o c . che e r o t r s super

What kinds of things are you going to complain about? ♦ Your work, your “home”; ♦ The way you are treated; ♦ Where you would rather be; ♦ What would life be like as a fashion mannequin or a dummy in a museum display; ♦ How you are going to ask to for better conditions. Make sure your letter has a ”smashing” impact! Related Outcome: Students analyse and express a situation from a different point of view. Creative Thinking Skill: Curiosity, Imagination. Subject Areas: English - Reading, Writing.

Page 17


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 9: Shipshape Materials: Paper, pen, Internet access, coloured pens and markers. Task: Have you ever been on a cruise ship, or would you like to? Many cruise ships today are designed especially for families and have a huge range of activities to choose from. The ships are so big that you can do almost anything on board.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

www.cruisemates.com/articles/teen/ is a site that looks at cruise ship activities through the eyes of children and teenagers.

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

A new cruise ship has just been built and there is a competition for school students to see who can design the best activity program for kids aged 6 -12. The prize is a family cruise where you get to experience all your own ideas. To enter the competition, you need to plan a day’s timetable for each age group:

6 – 8 year olds

9 – 10 year olds

11 – 12 year olds

Present each timetable as a colourful brochure, ready to send in and win.

Related Outcome: Students organise their original ideas into a structured time-table for three age groups. Creative Thinking Skill: Originality, Planning. Subject Areas: Maths - Measurement (Time), Health & Physical Education - Physical Activity.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 10: Float or Fly?

m . u

Materials: Transport resource book, Internet access, paper, pen.

w ww

Task: Could you imagine what it is like sinking in a submarine or cruising through the air in a blimp?

. te

These two machines actually have a lot in common with each other.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Check out the information in the resource book and make up a comparison chart to look at the similarities and differences between the two. Extend your knowledge by searching for these vessels on www.howstuffworks.com Here are some ideas to get you started:

Feature

Blimp

Sumbarine

Shape Way of rising and falling Invention

Related Outcome: Students compare and contrast two modes of transport by analysing features of each. Creative Thinking Skill: Forced Analogy. Subject Areas: Science - Natural & Processed Materials.

Page 18


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 11: In the Deep Blue Materials: Paper, pen, Internet access. Task: Life in a submarine would be very different to the life you live normally. Take a look at: americanhistory.si.edu/subs/operating/aboard/ or www.enquirer.com/editions/2000/08/18/loc_submarine_life_full.html

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

♦ Imagine that you and your family decide to spend six months travelling around the world in a submarine, only surfacing for supplies when you need them.

Teac he r

♦ List all of the things that you will miss during your time at sea.

Related Outcome: Students will compare their daily life to the life on a submarine. Creative Thinking Skill: Fluency, Elaboration. Subject Areas: Health & Physical Education – Physical Activity/Leisure.

ew i ev Pr

♦ For each item on the list, write how you would adapt or change the submarine so that you don’t miss that thing anymore. For example, you may miss your pet dog. An adaption you could make may be to put a satellite link-up camera where your dog is being looked after so that you can see what he is getting up to each day.

Materials: Paper, card, scissors, pencils, other art/ technology materials.

w ww

Task: Inventors have to use “trial and error” to find out what works the best. How are your invention skills?

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 12: Plane and Simple

Use a design that you know to make a simple paper plane. Test it in an open area. Decide what makes a good “flight”, e.g. flying straight, staying in the air the longest, flying the furthest and so on.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Now use paper, card and other materials to make changes to the original design. Only make one change at a time so that you can see clearly what makes the plane fly better. You should end up with a range of five or six planes, each with one different feature, such as being made of card, having shorter wings, having a weight placed on the nose, etc. Design a trial so that you can work out what features make a paper plane fly the best.

Related Outcome: Students will use scientific trialing to work out which design changes make a paper plane fly the best. Creative Thinking Skill: Flexibility, Design. Subject Areas: Science – Working Scientifically, Natural & Processed Materials.

Page 19


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 13: A High-Flying Career Materials: Paper, pen, Transport resource book, Internet access. Task: Would you like to have a career in the sky? Read all about the jobs of the pilot, the flight attendant and the air traffic controller, and choose your favourite.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Fly over to this site for some handy information: www.khake.com/page41.html (Although American, this site offers a detailed description of many jobs in the flight industry.)

ew i ev Pr

 In 200 words or less describe why you might want to do this job and why you would be good at it.

 Design a uniform that you might like to wear in this job (it does not need to look like the normal uniforms that you see in these jobs) and draw yourself in this uniform underneath your 200 word description.

Related Outcome: Students explain why they would be suited to a certain occupation by reacting to their own skills and ideas. Creative Thinking Skill: Curiosity, Risk Taking. Subject Areas: Society & Environment – Resources.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Task 14: Stranded in the Snow Materials: Paper, pen, Internet access (optional).

What do you do? You have these items with you:

. te

 A beanie  Six red dog bowls  A chocolate bar  A blanket  A book  Some hot tea in a thermos  Some matches  A packet of birthday balloons

m . u

w ww

Task: You and your dogs have been dog-sledding for hours, when suddenly you realise that you are LOST!

o c . che e r o t r s super

Write a story of your survival. Use the above items in a creative way throughout your story. Find some tips at www.cmc.org/cmc/sfty_srv.html – or take the snow survival quiz at http://www.quibblo.com/quiz/2HRhxT/Survival-quiz-Arctic-v1 Related Outcome: Students will explore imaginative ways to use everyday objects in an emergency situation. Creative Thinking Skill: Flexibility, Imagination. Subject Areas: Science – Natural & Processed Materials, English – Writing.

Page 20


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 15: Animal Travels Materials: Books, Internet, paper, pen, Internet access (optional). Task: Throughout time, animals have been used to test transportation and conduct experiments during travel. Animals were the first passengers in a hot air balloon and a dog was sent into space before it was considered fit for man. Even today, space shuttles have creatures such as ants, spiders and worms on them to carry out experiments.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

These websites should be helpful: 1. www.spacetoday.org/Astronauts/Animals/Dogs.html 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animals_in_space  Make sure you also have a place for people to sign the petition.

ew i ev Pr

Pretend you are from the RSPCA and make a petition for people to sign against forcing animals to travel like this. In your petition you need to include some factual information, perhaps some shocking or sad stories if you can find any (like the story of Laika, the first dog in space).

Related Outcome: Students will research to find out factual information and design a petition including this information. Creative Thinking Skill: Risk Taking. Subject Areas: Science – Life & Living, English – Writing.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Task 16: Rolling Along

w ww

Task: Roller skates or in-line skates are a fun way to get around. But what if they were used in people’s jobs as well?

. te

♦ Make a list of all the jobs that you can think of where skates COULD be used.

m . u

Materials: Paper, pen, Internet access (optional).

o c . che e r o t r s super

♦ Choose one that you like the best and draw a cartoon strip showing how the skates could be used in this person’s job throughout the day. ♦ Think about the benefits as well as any problems that may occur. Discuss.

♦ If this job really existed, what questions would you ask to find out about their day?

Related Outcome: Students will consider a range of alternatives for using skates as a mode of transport in a work setting. Creative Thinking Skill: Fluency, Originality. Subject Areas: Society & Environment/HSIE – Resources.

Page 21


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 17: A New Sport on Wheels Materials: Paper, pen, coloured pencils, Internet access (optional). Task: Have you ever heard of kite skating? This sport uses parachute-shaped kites to pull people along on inline skates or special boards. It is one of many sports that have developed from combining the ideas of two more traditional sports. Find out more at: www.kiteskating.com

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Why don’t you have a go at creating a new skate sport? Using roller skates, inline skates or skateboards, make a Mind Map® that looks at different sports that you can combine with skating to make a new sport.

ew i ev Pr

Branching out from each idea, make a few notes on how the sport might work and what rules and equipment may be required. With your favourite idea, make a brochure that advertises your new sport, inviting people to come and watch a demonstration and join your new club.

Related Outcome: Students will combine two existing ideas to create a new, original idea, which they will “promote”. Creative Thinking Skill: Originality. Subject Areas: Health & Physical Education – Physical Activity.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Task 18: Super Bike!

m . u

Materials: Paper, pencils, Internet access (optional).

w ww

Task: Can you improve the everyday bike? What special features would YOU add? Using a picture of an ordinary bike, copy the basic design onto a sheet of paper. Alternatively, check out this website: www.webmountainbike.com/bikil.html

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Now for the fun part:

• Make any additions you like to improve the design. • You might wish to make it faster, more comfortable, more interesting, or easier to ride. • Add and label all of the extra parts, making sure it is clear what each part does and how it improves the bike. • Colour in your final design and include an attractive border for display.

Related Outcome: Students will improve on an existing design by adding original features of their own. Creative Thinking Skill: Elaboration, Originality. Subject Areas: Science - Natural & Processed Materials, Technology – Design Process.

Page 22


Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 19: Fly-sense to Drive Materials: Paper, pen, coloured pencils and markers, Internet access (optional). Task: Many people have been working on the concept of the flying car for years now, but what will happen when it becomes a reality? Check out some pros and cons at these websites: http://www.gizmowatch.com/entry/top-ten-flying-cars/ and www.moller.com

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Advantages and Disadvantages

Jot down some pointers that might solve some of the disadvantages.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Make two lists for the future of flying cars:

Use all of your ideas to make into a booklet that can be given to young people that get their fly-driver’s licence. This booklet will contain tips and hints to keep them safe in the air. Include diagrams and make your booklet look colourful and appealing. Related Outcome: Students will consider both positive and negative outcomes of an idea for the future. Creative Thinking Skill: Complexity, Curiosity Subject Areas: Health & Physical Education – Safety, English – Writing.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 20: Aussie-naut

w ww

Task: Space travel has made its way to Australian shores, and to celebrate the first Aussie launch, the Australian Space Commission is giving the chance for one lucky person to be “The First Aussie Kid in Space”.

. te

m . u

Materials: Paper, pen.

o c . che e r o t r s super

A nationwide competition is being held. You need to write a speech explaining why YOU should be the one chosen to go into space.

 Make sure your speech is funny and creative – you need to capture the attention

of the judges!

 Write down all your ideas first and then develop them into a three minute speech.  You might even like to have a class competition and vote on the winning entry. Related Outcome: Students will develop a short speech related to a specific , imaginary topic. Creative Thinking Skill: Risk Taking, Originality. Subject Areas: English – Speaking & Listening.

Page 23


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Activity Checklist

Ac tivity Na me

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Student Names

Photocopy this sheet onto A3 paper and display in learning centre. Students check off the sheets as they complete them.

T1: Turning Bac k the Wheel of Time T2: On the Team

T3: Be a Leo

T4: Underground Sec rets

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

T5: Spare Parts

T6: It's all in the Name T7: Buc kles for Buses T8: I'm No Dummy! T9: Ship Shape

w ww

T11: In the Deep Blue T12: Plane and Simple

. te

T13: A High-Flying Career

T14: Stranded in the Snow T15: Animal Travels T16: Rolling Along

o c . che e r o t r s super

T. 17: A New Sport on Wheels T18: Super Bike! T19: Fly-sense to Drive T20: Aussie-naut

Page 24

m . u

T10: Float or Fly?


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Assessment and Evaluation Evaluation and assessment complete the model for any learning experience. It is often difficult to assess creativity as many students need the right outlet for their learning. Some students will perform better with oral presentations, some will shine in class discussions, others will display initiative in the design process while many will demonstrate their understanding through written assignments.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

These are only a sample of the questions that need to be addressed at the evaluation stage:

Teac he r

Did the student demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills?

ew i ev Pr

 Did the student communicate effectively in written form?  Did the student communicate effectively in oral presentations?  Did the student demonstrate proficiency in appropriate technologies?  Did the student reflect on his/her performance?

Critical thinking includes the ability to evaluate, compare, analyse, detect bias, distinguish fact from opinion, see causal connections, draw conclusions and form effective arguments. Creative thinking, also an important element of effective thinking skills, involves the ability to challenge assumptions and think outside rigid mental sets.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Assessment Sheets

    

Sharing Information Written Information Design Evaluation Creative Thinking Evaluation Student Self-Assessment

. te

m . u

w ww

Pages 26-30 contain assessment forms to be used at the teacher’s discretion. The forms have been tailored to particular activities and have been categorised as follows:

o c . che e r o t r s super

The students should be encouraged to complete a self-assessment form as they complete each activity (e.g. set them up in a box as part of the learning centre). Teachers can then use these forms to help them assess the students’ understanding of the learning process.

Page 25


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Teacher Assessment 1: Sharing Information  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require oral presentation or group reporting.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Sharing Information: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her learning experience with the class? Oral Presentation: • Was the audience interested in the presentation? • Was note use kept to a minimum?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Was the• presentation entertaining? f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Did the student read out their work? • Was the presentation informative?

• Did the student understand their role as a group member?

w ww

• Did the student dominate the group learning process? • Did the student encourage the participation of other group members?

. te

m . u

Group Work: • Did the student contribute to the group’s overall performance?

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Was the group effective in achieving the task?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Page 26


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Teacher Assessment 2: Written Information  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require written accounts and assignments.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Displaying Information: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her learning experience with the class? Presentation: • Was the layout eye-catching? • Were appropriate materials used to enhance presentation? (e.g. images/drawings)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

Research Skills: • Did the student grasp the main concept of the task?

w ww

• Has the student shown evidence of library or multimedia research?

. te

• Has the student demonstrated proficiency in using the Internet as a research tool?

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Did the student proofread their work? •student f or r e vi ew pu po sesonl y• • Has the shown flair and imagination inr their work? • Was the work referenced appropriately?

o c . che e r o t r s super

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Page 27


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Teacher Assessment 3: Design Evaluation  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require students to participate in the design process.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Design Evaluation: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her design experience with the class?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

Designing, Making and Appraising • Did the student generate ideas for meeting requirements? • Did the student experiment with practical methods to achieve the task?

NO

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Has the student shown flair and imagination in their work? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Did the student justify his/her design? • Did the student choose practical resources?

• Did the student demonstrate initiative and creativity?

• Did the student critically evaluate his/her design?

w ww

• Did the student explore all attributes of the design?

m . u

• Did the student discuss strengths/weaknesses of his/her design? • Did the student analyse how well the task requirements were met?

. te

Reflection: • Did the student examine their design in terms of meeting the task requirements?

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Did the student suggest modifications to the design? • Did the student explain how their design works?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Page 28


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Teacher Assessment 4: Creativity  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate student creativity and thinking skills.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Creative Thinking Evaluation: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her work with the class? Cognitive and Affective Skills: • Fluency - Did the student generate a number of ideas?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Originality - Were new and innovative ideas drawn upon? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Elaboration - Did the student expand on already existing ideas? • Flexibility - Did the student look at the problem from another perspective?

• Curiosity - Did the student seek out answers and facts?

m . u

• Imagination - Did students venture beyond the “safe” boundaries?

w ww

• Risk Taking - Did the student explore a number of solutions to the problem? Reflection: • Did the student adequately explain his/her Mind Map® activities?

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Did the student reflect on his/her work and suggest changes?

• Did the student show competency in using the creative thinking strategies (e.g. Forced Analogies, Problem Reversal and so on)?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Page 29


Teachers’ Notes: Transport on the Move

Student Self-Assessment

 Complete this sheet at the conclusion after completing each of the task cards.

Name:..................................Task Card: .................................... Explain in your own words what the task was asking:_ __________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

________________________________________________________________________________ What strategies did you use to complete the task?______________________________________

Teac he r

________________________________________________________________________________

ew i ev Pr

________________________________________________________________________________ How did you share your learning experience with the class?_____________________________

________________________________________________________________________________ The aspect you enjoyed most about this activity was: (Give reasons.)______________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ________________________________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ________________________________________________________________________________ The part you liked least about this task was: __________________________________________

How could you have improved your learning experience?________________________________

m . u

________________________________________________________________________________

I enjoyed this task.

I learnt new things during this task.

I enjoy sharing my work with the class. I feel my work could be improved.

This task gave me something to think about. I was unsure of what this task required. I would like to research this task further. I was satisfied with my end result.

Page 30

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

o c . che e r o t r s super

Read the following statements and then colour the appropriate circle.

Agree

. te

Think About ...

Strongly agree

w ww

________________________________________________________________________________


Further Assessment Tools Online Creativity Tests and Resources Creativity Assessment Index www.creativelearning.com/Assess/

Crayola.com - The Power of Creativity www.crayola.com/parents/powercreativity/quizes/print_teachers.cfm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Smarter Kids.com www.smarterkids.com/

Teac he r

Six Thinking Hats www.edwarddebonofoundation.com/ Creativity in Young Children - ERIC Digest www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed306008.html

References:

ew i ev Pr

Fostering Academic Creativity in Gifted Students www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content/academic_creativity.html

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

m . u

Torrance, E. P. (1977). CREATIVITY in the Classroom. Washington, DC: National Education Association.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Page 31


Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

w ww

. te

Page 32

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Transport On The Move: Activity Book (BLM)  

From horses to highways and ships to shuttles, transport has continually developed to reach destinations with increasing speed, comfort and...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you