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Library Activity Package: Super Space Upper Primary Activity Book (BLM) © 2004 Ready-Ed Publications, Revised © 2009 Printed in Australia ISBN: 9781863975889

All websites referred to in this package can easily be accessed from the Ready-Ed website below:

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www.readyed.com.au/urls/thinking

Acknowledgements: i. Clip art has been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and is used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. ii. IMSI’s Masterclips/MasterPhotos collection, 1895 Francisco Blvd, East San Rafael, CA 94901-5506 USA, website: www.imsisoft.com iii. Corel Corporation, 1600 Carling Ave, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8R7. iv. © NASA, Great Images in NASA (GRIN) Sourced from: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ Published by: Ready-Ed Publications PO Box 276 Greenwood WA 6023 www.readyed.com.au info@readyed.com.au

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Author: Jane Bourke Cover Design: Shay Howard

Copyright Notice

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The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

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that that educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under Act. For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: info@copyright.com.au

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The number of copies does not exceed the number reasonably required by the educational institution to satisfy its teaching purposes;

2.

Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

3.

Copies are not sold or lent;

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Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘ReadyEd Publications’.

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act. The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided

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Reproduction and Communication by others Except as otherwise permitted by this blackline master licence or under the Act (for example, any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address above.


Contents Space & Astronomy: About This Package........................................................................ 4 Task Card Information...................................................................................................... 5 Strategies for Creative Thinking....................................................................................... 6 Extension Ideas for the Classroom................................................................................... 8 Curriculum Links: Outcome Statements VIC, WA, National................................................................................................... 10 NSW, QLD, SA......................................................................................................... 12

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Task 1 - Spaced Out.....................................................................................................................14 Task 2 - Even More Spaced Out!................................................................................................14 Task 3 - Moon Mining . .................................................................................................................15 Task 4 - Design a Planetary Lander...............................................................................................15 Task 5 - An Astronomical Discovery...........................................................................................16 Task 6 - The Big Bang and Other Heavy Concepts...................................................................16 Task 7 - Sister Solar System..........................................................................................................17 Task 8 - Venus - The Evening Star................................................................................................17 Task 9 - Destination Mars.............................................................................................................18 Task 10 - Hubble Trouble.............................................................................................................18 Task 11 - Design a Mars Mobile...................................................................................................19 Task 12 - Strange Space Scenarios.............................................................................................19 Task 13 - Space Talk: Planet X .....................................................................................................20 Task 14 - The Mathematics of Meteors.......................................................................................20 Task 15 - Diorama: Planets in Orbit..............................................................................................21 Task 16 - Close Encounters of a Martian Kind..........................................................................21 Task 17 - Comets Vs Tadpoles.....................................................................................................22 Task 18 - Down to Earth!..............................................................................................................22 Task 19 - Stranded in Space........................................................................................................23 Task 20 - A Space Time Capsule ...............................................................................................23

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Activity Checklist............................................................................................................. 24 Assessment Sheets.......................................................................................................... 25 Teacher Assessment 1: Sharing Information..................................................................... 26 Teacher Assessment 2: Written Information..................................................................... 27 Teacher Assessment 3: Design Evaluation........................................................................ 28 Teacher Assessment 4: Creativity..................................................................................... 29 Student Self-Assessment ................................................................................................ 30 Further Assessment Tools................................................................................................ 31

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

About the Library Activity Package This package is designed to be used in a number of ways: 1. As a learning centre for the classroom; 2. As a library resource package; 3. As a general resource package for a number of themes.

Super Space – A Rationale For Study

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Every day there is a new discovery made in space. It may be that a new star in a distant galaxy is found, or it may be that a planet is found to have fossilised remains of early life. All of these discoveries are significant and they allow scientists and researchers to make sense of our planet, our solar system and our universe.

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Space and Astronomy have always been exciting topics to work with in the classroom. With advances in technology, the study of astronomy has become more popular than ever and with events such as Halley’s comet, the close encounter with Mars and the space shuttle tragedies, the topic is current and often in the news.

The content of this learning package focuses on the astronomy and physical aspect of our universe. While many advances have been made in space exploration, the library resource book has not attempted to cover the entire history of the space race or the development of the space stations. Instead it has provided a brief overview which will act as a starting point for further research in these areas. These related topics can be dealt with while exploring this learning package and many of the task cards involve research into areas such as:

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♦ The need to learn about space; ♦ Space station research; ♦ Artificial satellites and their uses; ♦ The effect of zero gravity on the human body; ♦ The studies carried out in space that concern animals and plants; ♦ The daily life of a space station worker/researcher; ♦ The idea of setting up a human colony on the Moon or Mars; ♦ The development of spacecraft; ♦ The cost of human tragedies; ♦ Space discoveries and their implications for humans.

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Teaching ideas and relevant notes have been included where applicable on pages 8-9. Internet resources for the teacher are also listed on these pages as well as extension ideas for the classroom. All websites addresses referred to on these pages are easily accessible by visiting the online index pages for the Library Activity Package resources at the Ready-Ed Publications’ website (www.readyed.com.au/urls/thinking). See page 5 for more details about how this aspect of the series works. Please note that some URLs do not require www at the beginning of the address. Simply type them in as specified on the page or go to the ReadyEd website above. Page 4


Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Task Card Information students are allowed time at the centre they know what areas they can cover.

Learning Outcomes

Charts containing relevant learning outcomes for all Australian states and territories are included on pages 10-13. This information allows teachers to measure students’ learning according to the subject area and particular strand. Each task has a related learning outcome at the bottom of the card and highlights the thinking skills incorporated into the activity.

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Checklist

A checklist of activities has been provided on page 24 which allows students or the teacher to check off the activities as they are completed. This checklist can be photocopied onto A3 paper and displayed on the wall as part of the learning centre so that when

Cross Curriculum

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The photocopiable activities in this book have been designed as task cards. Ideally, they can be copied onto card and laminated so as to be used several times. Alternatively, teachers can photocopy pages to make up activity booklets for each student. The activities are non-sequential although it is envisaged that students will have read the accompanying resource book before attempting the task cards. Website references have been included on the task cards although they are usually not essential for completing the activity. However, they often provide an excellent starting point and it is often easier than trying to locate relevant library books. See below for more information about the use of Internet references.

The activities in this series explore high interest themes across core subject areas such as Society and Environment, Technology, Science, English, Mathematics, Health and Physical Education. The themes provide a backdrop for creative thinking strategies and different learning styles.

Assessment © ReadyEdP ubnotes l i c at i ons Detailed and assessment proformas have been included at the end of the activities. (See 24-31.) •f orr evi ew puppr p osesonl y•

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Updating of Internet References

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It is now common knowledge that Internet sites disappear from time to time. While all of the sites included in this package were accessible at the time of publication, it is anticipated that many sites will move to a new location, modify their layout or disappear from the WWW completely.

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Ready-Ed Publications endeavours to check all sites on a regular basis and replaces any sites that have moved. In addition, attempts are made to locate missing sites that have relocated to another address. All website references in the Library Activity Package are clearly linked on our website at a specific location. The direct address for this section is: Ideally, it is hoped that teachers using this package will bookmark the above address so that students requiring links always have access to the latest link rather than an outdated one that may still appear on the task card some time after publication. By using the index students do not have to laboriously type in any URLs, greatly reducing the margin for error when trying to locate sites that have long and complicated addresses. The website indexes are clearly set out and easy for students to navigate. Should a broken link or a link that appears to have modified its layout be discovered, then please email fixlink@readyed.com.au with clear details of the topic and task card number. Please note that ALL links that appear in each of the five resource books are included on the above site and are clearly labelled.

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Strategies for Creative Thinking The following creative thinking strategies are used in this book: Problem Reversal  State the problem in reverse. Change a positive statement into a negative one.  Try to define what something is NOT.  Figure out what everybody else is not doing.  Change the direction or location of your perspective.  Flip-flop results – think about achieving the opposite of what you want to achieve, e.g. “I want to increase my fitness. But how could I decrease my fitness?” Think about decreasing sales, failing a test etc.  Turn defeat into victory or victory into defeat, e.g. if I was stranded on the moon after a space shuttle problem, what good would come out of it? I might end up travelling through a worm-hole to another dimension. If I failed a maths test, what good would come out of it? I might focus on doing twice as well in my spelling test. Or I might start going to homework classes and meet new friends and so on.

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Forced Analogies  The idea is to compare the problem with something else that has little or nothing in common, and gaining new insights as a result.  Examples, comparing companies and cows, transport systems and telephone networks, or your brain and a felt pen.

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Morphological Analysis  This strategy explores the concept of devising new inventions, e.g. students could modify an existing object, such as a biro, lunch box or guitar by analysing its features and looking at alternatives.  List the attributes of the situation.  Below each attribute, place as many alternatives as you can think of.  When completed, make many random runs through the alternatives, picking up a different one from each column and assembling the combinations into entirely new forms of your original subject.

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Applied Imagination  Use of prompting questions to elicit new ideas.  How could I adapt this? Modify, magnify, minimise, reverse, substitute, rearrange, combine and so on. The line of questioning needs to be specific to the topic.

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Mind Mapping  Mind Maps® are an excellent method for exploring creative thinking. Tony Buzan (www.buzan.com.au) pioneered the concept in 1970. The technique is an effective method of note-taking and useful for the generation of ideas by associations. Basically, the student starts in the centre of the page with the main idea, and works outward in all directions, producing a growing and organised structure composed of key words and key images, similar to a brainstorm but with more meaning. Mind Maps® can use imagery, colour and direction to illustrate a concept. Emotions and feeling about the particular theme can be given as well. Check for examples: www.mind-mapping. co.uk/mind-maps-examples.htm

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Lateral Thinking  Looking at the problem in a different way, e.g. Aunty Annie is sitting knitting and three year old Jacob is upsetting his aunty by playing with the wool. One parent suggests putting Jacob into the playpen. The other parent suggests it might be a better idea to put Annie in the playpen to protect her from Jacob.


Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Strategies for Creative Thinking Cognitive and Affective Skill Areas Imagination  Students usually only have control over their own thoughts and ideas. Encouraging students to develop their imagination allows them to pretend they are someone else or allows them to look at something from another angle, often exploring things beyond the ‘safe’ boundaries that they most often operate in. Risk Taking  Involves understanding that there can be many solutions to a problem and that one idea may be better than another, however, this does not mean that the original idea is no longer valid.  It is important to note that individual brainstorming acitivities usually produce a wider range of ideas than group brainstorming. Students feel less inhibited and less worried about other people’s opinions which allows them to be more freely creative. Importantly, group work should still be seen as a valuable learning tool as it does allow students to gather a certain perspective that they may not have considered on their own.

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Fluency  Generating a number of ideas and then looking at the best option. This is based on the notion that the more ideas generated, the more chance of being original. Flexibility  Exploring a problem from a different perspective, e.g. through the eyes of someone else.  Addressing a situation from another point in time, or looking for a positive aspect rather than concentrating on the negative aspects (problem reversal). Originality  Thinking of new and innovative ideas to improve the functioning of objects.  Solving a range of problems by taking two old ideas and combining them to come up with something new. Elaboration  Expanding on an already existing idea or fact, perhaps adding a different slant. Curiosity  Answering the who, what, where, when and why about a particular idea or thing.

Relevant Websites:

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Thinking Skills - www.teachers.ash.org.au/researchskills/thinking.htm Creative, Lateral, Logical Thinking - library.trinity.wa.edu.au/teaching/thinking. htm Creativity Tool Kit - www.directedcreativity.com/pages/ToolsImagine.html Mind Mapping - www.mind-map.com/ Teaching Thinking - www.teachingthinking.net/ Creative Thinking Techniques - www.virtualsalt.com/crebook2.htm Creative Quotations - www.creativequotations.com/ The Thinking Classroom - learnweb.harvard.edu/alps/thinking/intro.cfm Edward de Bono’s Resources - www.edwdebono.aust.com/debono/home.htm BubbleDome- www.bubbledome.com/bubbledome.asp?Action=Story

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Competitions and Projects for Schools:

Adam Spencer/University of Sydney Eureka Schools Prize for Lateral Thinking - www.amonline.net.au/eureka/lateral_thinking/index.cfm Odyssey of the Mind - www.odysseyofthemind.com/ Sustainable Living Project - www.sustainableliving.com.au/flash.htm Write Around Australia - www.nestle.com.au/writearound/ Tournament of Minds - www.tom.edu.au/

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Extension Ideas for the Classroom Some task card activities detailed in this book lend themselves to further exploration in the classroom. For these cards extension activities, relevant websites and key teaching points have been presented below. Task 5: An Astronomical Discovery • Galileo proved that all planets revolved around the Sun and not Earth. Copernicus had already suggested this but Galileo was the first to use a telescope and to prove this theory. If possible, provide some materials for students so that they can explain what they would have seen through their telescope (from the perspective of Galileo). Students will need balls of different sizes to represent the Sun, planets and the Moon. Can be used with the diorama activity (Task 16). Task 6: The Big Bang and Other Heavy Concepts • Students could use this theory as the basis for a class debate. There is an excellent movie called Contact (© Warner Bros, 1997) that has an amazing space sequence at the beginning of the film. While the rest of the film may not be entirely suitable, the first five minutes would provide an excellent introduction to any program of study concerning space. Task 7: Sister Solar System • Students to design a sister solar system that contains a habitable planet. This website provides a starting point: quest.arc.nasa.gov/projects/astrobiology/ astroventure/avhome.html Task 9: Destination Mars • This site: library.thinkquest.org/C003763 contains information on weightlessness, exercising in space and bone demineralisation. • Students to make a list of all the things they would not be able to do if they took part in this mission, e.g. running, showering, and so on. Task 10: Hubble Trouble • Internet access is essential for this activity. Detailed information about the Hubble’s lack of Earth images can be found here: hubblesite.org/reference_desk/faq/ As a class or in small groups, construct a Hand-Held Hubble. You will need to supply some specific materials for this task. This website has details: hubblesite. org/fun_.and._games/hand-held_hubble/

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Tasks 1 and 2: Mind Map Spaced Out and Even More Spaced Out • Demonstrate some Mind Map examples on the board.(See www.graphic.org/links. html) • Display Mind Maps around the room. Ask students to discuss their Mind Maps in small groups, explaining what they mean by certain aspects. Compare the differences between each Mind Map. • Discuss the reasons for the differences when students are essentially making a Mind Map about the same subject. Encourage the students to discuss how people have different perceptions about real objects. Task 3: Moon Mining • Discuss how groups that live and work in isolation often develop their own subculture. • Students can create a set of slang words and terms for Moon workers. • Ask students to brainstorm the idea of “Moon Cities” in the year 3000. • Write a diary entry entitled 24 Hours on the Moon. • Like Antarctica, the Moon can never be claimed by any one country. Write a Moon Treaty that you think should be signed by all nations of the world. Task 4: Telescope Technology • Students can build their own telescope. They will need two different sized magnifying glasses and a sheet of printed paper, such as newspaper or wrapping paper. • Instructions: Students hold the larger magnifying glass between themselves and the paper. The image of the print will appear blurred. They then place the second magnifying glass between their eye and the first magnifying glass. Moving the second glass forward or backward, they will notice that the print comes into sharp focus and will also notice that the print appears larger and upside down. • Make a Hand-Held Hubble: hubblesite.org/ fun_.and._games/hand-held_hubble/

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Extension Ideas for the Classroom • Ask students to have a go at fusing two words together to make a new word with its own meaning. • For example, meteorbit (meteor and orbit): the orbit of a meteor. Task 14: The Mathematics of Meteors • Brainstorm a list of all the mathematical concepts that are used in astronomy. • Discuss asteroids and the concept of trajectories and orbits. A trajectory is the path of a projectile or other moving body through space. • Students can (using the Internet as a research tool) explore the possibility of an asteroid crashing into Earth. Topics for further research: • Shoemaker-Levy Collision with Jupiter (1994). • Asteroid that hit Mexico approximately 65 millions years ago (Dinosaur extinction theory). Task 15: Diorama: Planets in Orbit • Students can work in partners/small groups for this task which will possibly require more than two lessons. Provide an extensive selection of materials from the science store room. Task 16: Close Encounters of a Martian Kind • Make up a class book with all students’ Martian portraits. Compare the differences. Count how many of the portraits are green! Discuss why people naturally assume Martians are green. Task 17: Comets Vs Tadpoles • In small groups, students to discuss their findings to see what new insights evolved. Task 18: Down to Earth! • Students can read their perspectives to the class. Task 19: Stranded in Space! • Students to compare brainstorms to discuss the positive outcomes that may arise. Task 20: Space Time Capsule • As a whole class, create a real time capsule with photos, stories and so on. Set a date in the future to open the time capsule. A ten year school reunion might be a good idea.

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Tasks 11: Design a Mars Mobile • If possible allow the children access to some relevant spacecraft sites. mars.jpl.nasa.gov/MPF/mpf/rover.html Rover Sojourner mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msp98/lander/fact.html Polar Lander Fact Sheet mars.jpl.nasa.gov/funzone_flash.html Mars Exploration (requires Flash Plug-in) • Encourage originality and functionality. • Using equipment and materials from the science store room, students can make miniature models of their design. Task 12: Strange Space Scenarios • Students can choose to write extensively on the one topic rather than writing briefly on each one. • Students to use the topics as a backdrop for a short play. • Students can create an explosion chart to show the ripple effect that may occur should one of the “scenarios” be true. For example, children write “Gold on Mars” in the middle of an A3 page. They then write down some ideas that immediately spring to mind such as the effect on Earth, the idea of mining Mars, the argument over ownership, the impact on the Martian surface, the value of Mars’ gold on Earth. Once they have come up with a range of sub-headings, these can then be further dealt with one by one. Each sub-heading is further categorised until there is an extensive chart of all the possible implications of this scenario. Ideally, all the headings should include some reference to what the effect will be for the student. Students can then see how a large scale decision can impact on individuals. • For information on Time Travel: www.pbs. org/wgbh/nova/time/ Task 13: Space Talk: Planet X • Conduct a class debate using the topic: “There is no Planet X in our solar system”. • Students can create a space glossary of the jargon that astronomers may use. Allow the children to create their own words and space “slang” - the more humorous the better.

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements

* NB: Victorian Teachers: The SOSE outcomes have been numbered in the order in which they appear in the curriculum documents.

Activities

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Science: Earth & Space Sciences (ES) 4.2, Mathematics: Space 3.5

Task 2

Science: ES 4.2, Mathematics: Space 3.5

Science: EB 3, EB 4, Mathematics: S 3.1, 3.2

Science: Earth & Beyond (EB) 2.3, 3.3, 4.3, Mathematics: Space 3.7a, 3.7b, 3.10

Task 3

SOSE: Place & Space (PS) 3.3, Resources (R) 3.3, Science: ES 4.2, English: Texts 3.9

Society & Environment (S&E): R 3.2, PS 3.2, 3.3, Science: EB 3, IS 3, English: W 3.1

Science: Earth & Beyond (EB) 3.2, 4.3, Natural & Processed Materials (NPM) 3.12, Working Scientifically (WS) 3.18, Society & Environment (S&E): Resources (R) 3.10, 4.10, English: Writing (W) 3.10

Task 4

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • f orr evi ew pur poses onl y• Science: ES 4.2, SOSE: S&E: TCC 3.1, Science: Science: EB 3.3, 4.3,

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Science: ES 4.2, Technology: Systems 4.2

Technology & Enterprise (T&E): TP 3.2 (Devising), Science: EB 3, NPM 3, IS 3

Science: WS 3.17, Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising Band B

Time, Continuity & Change (TCC) 3.3, English: Texts 3.9

EB 4, English: W 3.1

S&E: Time, Continuity & Change (TCC) 3.1a, English: W 3.10

Science: ES 4.2, SOSE: TCC 3.2

S&E: TCC 3.1, ICP 3.1, Science: EB 3, IS 3

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3, S&E: Investigation, Communication & Participation (ICP): 3.17, TCC 3.1a & b

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Task 6

Science: Earth & Beyond (EB) 2.3, 3.3, 4.3, Mathematics: Space 3.7a, 3.7b

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Task 5

Science: EB 3, EB 4, Mathematics: S 3.1, 3.2

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Task 1

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Task 7

Science: ES 4.2, English: Texts 3.9, Mathematics: Space 3.3, Measurement 3.1

Science: EB 3, IS 3, English: W 3.1, Mathematics: M 3.1, S 3.2

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3, WS 3.17, English: W 3.10, Mathematics: Measurement 3.19, Space 3.8

Task 8

Science: ES 4.2

Science: EB 3

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3

Task 9

Science: ES 4.2, Technology: Information 4.2, English: Texts 3.9

Science: EB 3, IS 3, T&E: I Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 3.1, English: W 3.1 4.3, WS 3.13, Technology: Information Band B, English: W 3.10

Task 10

Science: ES 4.2, Technology: Information 4.2

Science: EB 3, IS 3 T&E: TP 3.3

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Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3, WS 3.17


Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements Activities

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Science: ES 4.2, Science: T&E: TP 3.2, Science: EB ES 4.2, Technology: 3, IS 3.1 Materials 4.1

Task 12

Science: ES 4.2, English: Texts 3.9

Science: EB 3, IS 3.1 English: W 3.1

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3, WS 3.17, English: W 3.10,

Task 13

Science: ES 4.2, English: Texts 3.9, Speaking & Listening (SL) 3.2

Science: EB 3, English: W 3.1, SL 3.3

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, 4.3, English: W 3.1, SL 3.2

Task 14

Mathematics: Space 3.3, Measurement 3.4 Science: ES 4.2, Technology: Information 4.2

Mathematics: M 3.3, S 3.1 Science: EB 3, IS 3, T&E: I 3.1

Mathematics: Measurement 3.19, Space 3.8, Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, WS 4.13, Technology: Information Band B

Task 15

Task 16

Science: WS 3.17, EB 4.1, Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising Band B

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Task 11

Science: EB 3.3, 4.1, © ReadyEdPubl i cat i o ns 4.3, Technology: Designing, Making & Band •f orr evi ew pur posesAppraising onl y •B Science: ES 4.2, Science: T&E: TP 3.1, TP 3.2, ES 4.2, Technology: Science: EB 3 Systems 4.2

Task 17

Science: ES 4.2, BS 3.2

Science: IS 3.1, EB 3, LL 3 Science: EB 4.3, WS 3.17, LL 3.8

Task 18

SOSE: PS 3.1, Science: ES 4.2, English: Texts 3.9, The Arts: Visual Arts 3.1

English: W 3.1, The Arts: CAI 3 STP 3, Science: EB 3, S&E: PS 3.1

Science: EB 4.3, S&E: PS 3.4, English: W 3.10, The Arts: Visual Arts Band B

Task 19

English: Texts 3.9, Science: ES 4.2, BS 3.1, Technology: Information 4.2

English: W 3.1, Science: EB 3 LL 3, T&E: I 3.1

Science: EB 4.1, 4.3, LL 3.8, English: W 3.10, Technology: Information Band B

Task 20

SOSE: TCC 3.2, 3.3, Science: ES 4.2, Technology: Information 4.2, Materials 4.1, English: Texts 3.9

S&E: TCC 3.1, English: W Science: EB 4.1, 4.3, WS 3.1, Science: EB 3, IS 3.1, 3.14, S&E: TCC 3.1 a & T&E: TP 3.1, 3.2 b, English: W 3.10, Technology: Designing, Making & Appraising, Information Band B

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Science: EB 4.1, 4.3, Life & Living (LL) 3.8, The Arts: Visual Arts Band B

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Science: LL 3, EB 3, The Arts: CAI 3, STP 3

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Science: ES 4.2, Biological Science (BS) 3.1, 3.2, The Arts: Visual Arts 3.1

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements Activities

NSW Human Society & Its Environment (HSIE): CUS3.3, ENS3.5

Task 2

HSIE: ENS3.6, CUS3.1

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Task 1

Q LD SOSE: Place & Space (PS) 3.1, 3.5 Culture & Identity (CI) 3.1, 3.3

SA Society & Environment (S&E): Place, Space & Environment (PSE) 3.4, 3.5, Societies & Culture (SC) 3.7

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S SOSE: PS 3.4, Time, Continuity & Change (TCC) 3.3

S&E: PSE 3.4, Time Continuity & Change (TCC) 3.1, 3.2

HSIE: ENS3.6, SSS3.7, SOSE: PS 3.3, Systems, Science & Tech: IC S3.2, Resources & Power (SRP) DM S3.8, LT S3.3 3.1 ICP 3; Science: Science & Society (SS) 3.3, Life & Living (LL) 3.3

S&E: PSE 3.5, Science: Earth & Space (ES) 3.1, Life Systems (LS) 3.5

Task 4

Science & Tech: IC S3.2, Technology: TP 3.1, TP DM S3.8, PP S3.4, PS 3.2, Science: Natural & S3.5 Processed Materials (NPM) D3.4

Design & Technology: Critiquing 3.1, Designing 3.2, Science: ES 2.4

Task 5

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Task 3

© ReadySOSE: Ed Publ i ca t i ons PS 3.1, TCC 3.2 S&E: PSE 3.4, TCC 3.1, English: Cu3.2, Cu3.3 •f orr evi ew pur pose3.2, sonl y• English: Texts & Contexts HSIE: ENS3.5, CCS3.1, English: WS2.10, WS3.10

3.3, 3.4

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HSIE: ENS3.6, CCS2.2, Science & Tech: INV S3.7, LT S3.3, PP S3.4

Task 7

SOSE: PS 3.1 Science: ES 3.1, 3.2, LS Science: LL 3.1, Energy & 3.6, Change (EC) 2.2, Earth & S&E: PSE 3.6 Beyond (EB) 3.3

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Task 6

HSIE: ENS3.5, SSS3.7, SOSE: PS 3.4, SRP 3.3 SSS3.8, English: Cu3.3 English: WS2.10, Science: SS 2.3 WS3.10, Science & Tech: INV S3.7, PP S3.4

S&E: PSE 3.5, Social Systems (SS) 3.10, Science: ES 3.1, English: Texts 3.3

Task 8

HSIE: CCS3.1, ENS3.5, SOSE: TCC 3.2, PS 3.5, English: WS2.10, TS1.3, English: Cu3.1

S&E: PSE 3.5, TCC 3.1, 3.2, English: Language 3.6

Task 9

HSIE: CCS3.1, ENS3.6, English: WS2.10, Science & Tech: INV S3.7

SOSE: PS 3.1, Technology: INF 3.2, English: Cu3.3

S&E: PSE 3.4, 3.5, TCC 3.2 Design & Technology: Critiquing 2.1, English: Strategies 3.11

Task 10

HSIE: CUS3.4, English: WS2.10,

English: Cu3.3, Op3.3, SOSE: CI 3.3

English: Texts 3.4, Language 3.5, S&E: SC 3.7

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Curriculum Links to Outcome Statements Activities

NSW

SA

Q LD

Science & Tech: INV S3.7, DM S3.8

Task 12

HSIE: CUS3.4, CCS3.1, ENS3.6, English: WS2.10

English: W 2.1,3.1 ; SOSE: SRP 3.1, PS 3.5, Science: EB 3.3

English: Texts 3.4, S&E: TCC 3.2, PSE 3.4, CS 3.7

Task 13

English: WS2.10

English: Cu3.3, Op3.3

English: Texts 3.4, Language 3.5,

Task 14

HSIE: SSS3.7, ENS3.5, English: WS2.10, Science & Tech: INV S3.7, DM S3.8, PP S3.4

SOSE: PS 3.1, SRP 3.1, Technology: TP 3.1, 3.2, Science: EB 3.3

S&E: PSE 3.4, 3.5, Design & Technology: Crtiquing 3.1, Designing 3.3, Science: ES 3.1, Energy Systems 2.3, 3.3

Task 15

Science & Tech: INV S3.7, DM S3.8

Technology: TP 3.2, 3.4, Design & Technology: Science: EB 3.2, D3.4 Critiquing 3.1, Designing 3.3, Science: ES 3.2

Technology: TP 3.1, TP 3.2, Science: LL 2.3

Design & Technology: Designing 3.2, 3.3, Science: Essential Learnings - Thinking, Communication

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Task 11

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons f or r ev ew pu p oses onl Task 16 • Science & Tech: LT i S3.3 Science: LLr 3, SOSE: Science: LSy 3.5• NSS 3.1

Science & Tech: INV S3.7, IS S3.2

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Task 18

Technology: INF 3.2 Science: IS 3.1

Design & Technology: Crtiquing 1.1, Science: LS 2.5

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Task 17

The Arts: Visual Arts English: Cu3.3, The S3.1, Arts: STP 3 English: WS2.10, Science: LL 3.1, 3.3 Science & Tech: LT S3.3

English: Texts 3.4, The Arts: Arts Practice 3.2, Science: LS 3.5

Task 19

English: WS2.10, English: W 3.1, Science: Science & Tech: IC S3.2, EB 3.2 LL 3.1, S&E: PS HSIE: SSS2.7, ENS2.6 3.1, R 3.1, Technology: INF 3.2

English: Science: ES 3.1, LL 3.5, S&E: PSE 3.4, Design & Technology: Critiquing 1.1

Task 20

HSIE: CCS3.1, ENS2.6, CUS2.3 Maths: Space 3.1, English: WS2.10, Science & Tech: DM S3.8

S&E: PSE 3.5, SC 3.7, TCC 3.1, English: Texts 3.4, Mathematics: Space Level 3, Science: ES 3.1, LS 3.5, Design & Technology: Designing 3.3

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 1: Spaced Out

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Materials: Super Space resource book, A3 or butchers’ paper, library books, encyclopedias, pen, paper, coloured markers. Task: To create a Mind Map with the solar system as the central focus. Have a go at trying to put things in perspective. You may find that you need several pieces of paper for this activity as you have run out of “space”. You may also find that you want to make Earth quite small so as to fit the other larger bodies into your map. The idea is not to draw things exactly to scale, but to give some idea about the relative size of celestial bodies. Plot the following headings onto your Mind Map and write a few “new” facts underneath. Be sure to choose facts that you did not know before. The Sun The Moon The Nine Planets Show how the planets are connected and display the objects roughly to scale. For example, make sure Earth is about the same size as Mars and that Jupiter is about 11 times larger. Challenge: Explain your Mind Map to the class. Related Outcome: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the spatial concepts of the universe. Creative Thinking Skills: Brainstorming, Visual Imagery. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Mathematics - Space.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 2: Even More Spaced Out!

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Task: Reflect on the mind map that you created for Task Card 1. Remembering that the Sun is only a mere star in our galaxy, try to show how big the universe is by drawing things to an approximate scale, for example, draw the sun as a very small object.

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Materials: World Atlas, Super Space resource book, pen, A3 or butchers’ paper, WWW, library books, encyclopedias, paper, coloured markers.

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It is hard to imagine the universe in terms of size. Build on from your Mind Map from Task Card 1 to include the solar system (including the Sun and the nine planets) as just one tiny part of the Milky Way Galaxy. Remember that there are billions and billions of stars just like our Sun. You don’t have to draw them all!! Try to show the relative size of our solar system by comparing it to the size of the universe.

Write all over your Mind Map to demonstrate your understanding of what the universe is made up of. Link sections together in an interesting way using different words and ideas. Related Outcome: Students will explain the position of the solar system in the universe and use their ideas to make comparisons. They will attempt to link their ideas together. Creative Thinking Skills: Information Retrieval, Visual Imagery, Imagination, Mind Mapping. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Mathematics - Space.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 3: Moon Mining Materials: Super Space resource book, WWW, library books, encyclopedias, pen, paper. Task: Some countries have discussed the possibility of mining the Moon to extract valuable minerals beneath the surface. Flick forward in time to the year 2100. As head of Moon Minerals Research, you have been asked for your opinions on this concept. Decide how you feel about this idea and then justify your reasoning about what should be conducted on the Moon in the way of commercial industry.

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• Clearly state the aim of your research program. Justify your reasons for your chosen area of interest. • List the costs involved. • Outline the possible consequences of the mining: a) for humans on Earth; b) on the environmental impact on the Moon; and c) the rehabilitation of the Moon’s surface. • State who you think should be responsible for overseeing this project. For example, should there be representatives from each of the countries that are selected to work on the project, or should whoever gets there be allowed to mine whatever they like as long as they have the equipment? Related Outcome: Students will justify their position on mining the Moon for commercial gain. Creative Thinking Skills: Applied Imagination, Scientific Method. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Society & Environment/HSIE - Resources, Place & Space.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 4: Telescope Technology Materials: Paper, pencil, eraser, Internet access, encyclopedias. lens length style

lens diameter

eyepiece material

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Website: science.howstuffworks.com/telescope.htm

Task: Visit the website above and learn about the parts of a telecope. Using a sheet of paper like the one above, list all the attributes of a basic telescope. You can add more complex factors once you understand how a basic refractor telescope works. Below each attribute decide how you could modify or add to one or more of the features to improve the overall design of the telescope. Complete the following:

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Discuss how your modification will work. Explain what your telescope will be best suited for. Give reasons. If possible make a basic telescope using two magnifying glasses. Modify your design to improve your model. Think of a name for your design.

Related Outcome: Students will improve on an existing invention by examining individual attributes of an object. Creative Thinking Skills: Morphological Analysis, Attribute Listing, Creativity. Subject Areas: Technology, Science - Earth & Beyond, Working Scientifically.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 5: An Astronomical Discovery Materials: Super Space resource book, library books, encyclopedias, pen, paper. Task: Write an account from the point of view of Italian astronomer, Galileo Galilei. Setting the Scene: The year is 1609 and you have just become the first person to use a telescope to view the night sky. You have made one or two amazing discoveries. Your Task: To convince the rest of the world, including other great scientists and astronomers of the time, that the basic principles of space are not what people have been thinking.

First of all, provide a detailed outline of your discoveries. Base these discoveries on true facts that you have researched. Explain how you will convey your ideas and theories to the rest of the world. Remember: The year is 1609 and there is no Internet, no television and no photography! You will have to be very clever in explaining your beliefs. How will your news travel around the world?

You may like to use 3D models using material to demonstrate your ideas.

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Related Outcome: Students will attempt to explain a scientific theory based on the perspective of an early astronomer, using the communication means of the time. Creative Thinking Skills: Applied Imagination, Logical Reasoning. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, English - Writing, Society & Environment - Time, Continuity & Change.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 6: The Big Bang and Other Heavy Concepts!

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Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen, library books, Internet access (optional). Task: Many scientists believe that the universe started with a big explosion approximately 10 million years ago. According to this theory, the explosion sent matter flying in all directions, which went on to form planets, stars and nebulae. So what happened in the universe before the big bang? Write down what you think existed. Brainstorm your ideas with a partner. Give your opinions on the following: ♦ Do you believe the Big Bang theory? What other theories do people suggest? ♦ Do you think the universe will end with a big bang? Why? Why not? ♦ What do you think will happen in another 10 million years time? ♦ Where will all the matter go? ♦ Do you think Earth will eventually be sucked into a black hole? ♦ Do you think there is another solar system somewhere out there, with another planet just like Earth? Do you think there is another universe out there? ♦ Do you think the universe is expanding or shrinking? Back up your answers with some real facts based on your reading.

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Related Outcome: Students will explore the origins of the universe, understanding in the process that there may be more than one theory. Creative Thinking Skills: Logical Reasoning, Hypothesising, Creativity, Fluency. Subject Areas: Society & Environment - Investigation, Communication & Participation, Science - Earth & Beyond.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 7: Sister Solar System Materials: Super Space resource book, Internet access (optional), library books, encyclopedias, pen, paper. Task: Your name is Telly Skope and you have just discovered a solar system similar to ours existing in another galaxy far far away.

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 Explain how you discovered this solar system,

(e.g, radiowaves, alien visit, telescope images);

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 How was this system formed and what “star nebula” was it created from?  Make a table to show all the ways that this system is similar to our solar system.  Draw a 2D model of this system, showing the orbital paths of the planets.  How many light-years away is this system? How many astronomical units (AU)?  Discuss in detail what you know about this solar system (e.g. planets, location, sun, life forms).  Is it possible to travel to this system? (E.g. experiment with the fourth dimension of time perhaps.)  What impact will this discovery have on Earthlings? Related Outcome: Students will hypothesise about the existence of another solar system. Creative Thinking Skills: Applied Imagination, Creativity, Morphological Analysis. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, English - Creative Writing, Mathematics - Measurement, Space.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Materials: Super Space resource book, encyclopedias, pen, paper, coloured markers.

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Task: Venus is often described as Earth’s sister planet. Brainstorm all the ways in which Venus is similar to Earth.

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Make sure you address these features: temperature climate orbit rotation length of day/night/year surface

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Task 8: Venus - The Evening Star

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Extra: • Find out about the goddess Venus. • Why is Earth the only planet not named after a Roman or Greek God? • Make a list of the spacecraft that have ventured past Venus. • Find Venus in the night sky - it’s usually the first light you’ll see. Related Outcome: Students will complare two planets on a number of levels. Creative Thinking Skills: Brainstorming, Imagination, Elaboration. Subject Areas: Science - Earth and Beyond.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 9: Destination Mars Materials: Super Space resource book, A3 sheet of paper, coloured markers, pens. Task: Congratulations! You’ve been selected for the first human mission to Mars. Much preparation has to take place and the trip is scheduled for the year 2018. You must complete the following in order to ensure your place on the Mars Express.

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 Brainstorm a list of all the preparation factors that will need to be taken into account.  Estimate the amount of time it will take to travel to Mars and back. You will be spending approximately two months on the red planet.  What will you be studying while you are there? Provide an overview of your scientific research.  What will the possible impact be on your body? Find out the effect zero-gravity will have on your bones and demineralisation.  What special training will you need to undergo?  What equipment will be needed to walk on Mars? How much will you weigh on Mars? Related Outcome: a) Students will comprehend the level of planning that must go into a space journey; b) Students will understand that humans must adapt to different environments in order to survive. Creative Thinking Skills: Brainstorming, Flexibility, Creativity. Subject Areas: Science, Technology.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 10: Hubble Trouble

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Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen, Internet access (essential). Background: The Hubble Space Telescope orbits above Earth and is appoximately the size of

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a school bus. You have been asked to investigate a matter regarding the Hubble images. This problem has been concerning students around the world.

Task 1: Find out why the Hubble Space Telescope cannot take pictures of Earth. Include a detailed explanation. To explain your findings, you may like to create a 3D model of Earth and the telescope and other celestial bodies such as the Moon and Sun. Your teacher has instructions on how to make a ‘Hand Held Hubble’.

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Task 2: You have been asked to select ten images for a poster that will go into a time capsule.

The poster will commemorate the Hubble Space Program and you will need to choose your photos carefully. Choose images that truly represent what you think the Hubble Space Telescope is all about. Include at least one photo of the actual telescope. The remaining photos should be important images that the Hubble has produced. Write a paragraph outlining the reasons why you selected each image. Print out a copy of each image and create a draft for your poster.

Starting Points: Check out the details of the Hubble Space Telescope: www.stsci.edu/hst and hubblesite.org Related Outcome: Students will identify some of the major astronomical discoveries that have been made with 20th Century technology. Creative Thinking Skills: Brainstorming, Creativity, Elaboration. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Technology.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 11: Design a Mars Mobile Materials: Super Space resource book, Internet access, library books, encyclopedias, large sheets of butcher’s paper or A3 paper, pen, coloured markers. Background: Conduct some research about the surface and atmosphere of Mars. Research some of the landers that have travelled on the surface such as the Pathfinder and the Mars Polar Lander. Use the websites listed in the resource book.

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speed size

smoothness fuel consumption/economy

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Task: Find a website that contains the specifications for one of these vehicles.  Modify the specifications to improve the design. Draw a large diagram of the design and carefully label the changes you will make. Include a detailed guide as to what the improvements will do to the overall performance of your Mars mobile.  Compile a new “specifications” list that will highlight the individual features of the modified vehicle. Give details about how many people can travel in the vehicle and what the vehicle will use as energy. You should make notes under the following headings: aerodynamics comfort

Related Outcomes: a) Students will examine attributes of a machine and explore ways to modify one or more aspects in an attempt to improve the overall design; b) Students explore innovative designs that are suited to a particular environment. Creative Thinking Skills: Attribute Listing, Applied Imagination. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Technology.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 12: Strange Space Scenarios Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen, your creative brain.

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Task: Write a paragraph or two in response to each of the following scenarios. Include what you think might happen. Be creative and discuss your writing with a partner. ♦ What if the Moon stopped moving in its orbit? ♦ What if aliens from Venus landed in your backyard tomorrow? ♦ What if the Sun started cooling at the rate of 1°Celsius a year? ♦ What if telescopes had never been invented? ♦ What if Earth started to crumble and smaller planets (with life) formed out of the remains? ♦ What if it was possible to travel to another galaxy via time travel? Look up worm holes! ♦ What if Earth started spinning in the reverse direction? ♦ What if all the planets lined up next to each other? ♦ What if the Sun disappeared altogether? ♦ What if the Moon really was made of cheese? ♦ What if gold was discovered on Mars? ♦ What if there really was a Planet of the Apes?

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Related Outcome: Students will discuss possible alternatives to actual facts. Creative Thinking Skills: Curiosity, Imagination, Logical Thinking, Problem Solving. Subject Areas: English - Writing, Science - Earth & Beyond.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 13: Space Talk: Planet X Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen. Task: Create a five minute dialogue or short script between two astronomers of the future. Include in your dialogue a discussion about the possibility of a tenth planet in our solar system - Planet X. You may like to focus on one of these aspects:

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the actual discovery of Planet X; the search for extraterrestrial intelligence on Planet X; the invention of new space technology that allowed the discovery; the possibility of travelling to Planet X; deciding on a name for Planet X.

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♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Add some space jargon to your writing. Don’t forget to include a short glossary at the end of your script to explain the jargon. Challenge: Perform your play with a friend for the rest of the class.

Related Outcome: Students will understand that people who work in a common field may devise a set of terms relevant to their field of study. Creative Thinking Skills: Word Play, Originality. Subject Areas: English - Writing, Speaking; Science - Earth & Beyond.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 14: The Mathematics of Meteors Task: In partners, take turns to experiment with the meteor activity on the Questacon website listed above. Write down your predictions for ten possible meteor strikes. Give the details for each of the strikes you have predicted:

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Materials: Basketball (Earth), assortment of balls to represent meteors of different sizes, Internet access (essential). WWW link - www.questacon.edu.au/html/meteor_strike.html

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Size smallest 2nd smallest

Prediction achieve orbit collision

Were your predictions correct? Write up your findings.

Extra: Calculate the angle at which a meteor is scheduled to hit a planet. Think of a way to represent your findings in 3D form. Related Outcome: Students will understand that an object’s orbit and trajectory are influenced by a number of factors. Creative Thinking Skills: Elaboration, Originality, Imagination, Risk Taking. Subject Areas: Maths - Measurement, Shape & Space, Science - Earth & Beyond, Technology.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 15: Diorama: Planets in Orbit

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Task: Working in pairs, recreate a model of the solar system showing the relative size of the planets and their orbital plane. Use strong wire to show the path of orbit around the Sun. Show how other planets paths intersect these orbits.

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Materials: Super Space resource book, balls and spheres of varying sizes (e.g. ping pong balls, ball bearings, marbles, sponge balls). Diorama - large box, electrical tape, sticky tape, strong wire, paperclips, Blu-tac, coloured markers, paper, glue, cork, pins.

• Your diorama should be carefully planned on paper first. Once you have your design, decide what materials you will need. • Make notes about the length of each planet’s orbit, both in terms of distance and also in time. Order the orbits in a logical way but remember – you have to explain the reasoning behind your order.

Related Outcome: Students will select appropriate materials to design and make 3D models depicting the orbits and orbital planes of planets around the Sun. Creative Thinking Skills: Originality, Imagination, Risk Taking. Subject Areas: Science - Earth & Beyond, Technology & Design.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 16: Close Encounters of a Martian Kind. Materials: Super Space resource book, Internet access (optional), paper, pen.

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Task: Read about the physical features of Mars, including the temperature, atmosphere, surface, resources and processes that are thought to occur on Mars. Imagine that Mars was able to sustain some kind of life form. Describe what you think such a life form would need to possess in the way of physical and behavioural adaptations.

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For example, Martians would need to be able to withstand extremely cold temperatures. What physical features might their bodies have (i.e. thick layer of blubber and heavy fur) to protect them from the cold? Think about some of the other adaptations a life form would need to exist on Mars.

 Draw a Martian based on the features you think they might need. Now compare your drawing with that of a classmate. Work together to create the ULTIMATE MARTIAN.  Extra - Imagine certain features have been developed over time. Draw how you think a Martian from 1 million years ago could have looked based on your current “model”. Check out: quest.arc.nasa.gov/projects/astrobiology/astroventure/avhome.html Related Outcomes: a) Students will look at a given problem then brainstorm to solve the problem; b) Students will understand that living things develop adaptations over time to survive in a harsh environment. Creative Thinking Skills: Brainstorming, Logical Reasoning, Morphological Analysis. Subject Areas: Science - Living Things, Earth & Beyond.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 17: Comets Vs Tadpoles Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen. Task: Using the method of “forced analogy”, compare those tiny cute amphibians to the fascinating celestial objects that brighten the sky as they pass by the Sun.

Comet

Tadpole

• has a tail • changes in form over time

• contains no life

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On one sheet of paper write down ALL the features that you can think of to describe a comet. Now take another sheet of paper and look at each feature of a tadpole and see how you can relate it to a comet. Include physical features, behavioural features and visual features.

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E.g. A comet greatly changes its physical appearance throughout its life stages and so does a tadpole.

Extension: Now, choose another two objects that are relevant to space. Conduct a forced analogy on them and other common objects and explain your findings to the class. Can’t think? Then try these: The Sun Vs the Sahara Desert, The Moon Vs cheese, Earth Vs an ant nest. Related Outcome: Students will compare two different objects (one living, one non-living,) in order to gain new insights. Creative Thinking Skills: Forced Analogy, Attribute Listing. Subject Areas: Science - Living Things, Earth & Beyond.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 18: Down to Earth!

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About You: • Briefly describe yourself and state your normal celestial residence. Include details such as your physical appearance, habits, needs and wants. • Write down some major events that have happened in your life so far. Your Journey to Earth: • How did you arrive at planet Earth? Who have you come with? • What are your reasons for visiting? Your Perspectives of Earth: • You have arrived on Earth for the very first time. Describe where you are and what you make of it. Remember you are viewing Earth as an outsider. • How is Earth different to your home? Be specific. Task 2: Create an artwork depicting your portrait as an alien. You may wish to make a montage, collage, painting or stencil. It is entirely up to you how you will express yourself as an alien. You can use any of the art materials supplied by your teacher. Your artwork should not take longer than 45 minutes to complete so use your time wisely. Materials: Crepe paper, pipe cleaners, paints and dyes, brushes, glue, stiff card, markers, scissors.

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Related Outcome: a. Students will write a recount through another perspective; b) Students will express themselves artistically in a given time frame, using a selection of materials. Creative Thinking Skills: Forced Analogy, Imagination, Curiosity. Subject Areas: English - Writing, Society & Environment - Place & Space, The Arts, Science.

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Creative Thinking: Task Cards

Task 19: Stranded in Space! Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen, library books. The Scene: You are a researcher and have been sent to the International Space Station for two months. Your role was to study plant growth in space and your main focus was to fertilise pumpkin seeds in space and observe the changes in their form. All contact was lost with Mission Control during a freak meteor shower.

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Your Task: a. Describe in detail your position and lifestyle on the Space Station. b. Explain what you will do from here on in, in terms of survival. Assume that you have no means of communication with the outside world, yet you have two other technicians with you. There are possibly other methods for communicating on other parts of the space station that you are not familiar with. Problem Reversal: Brainstorm the ways in which this problem (being stranded in space) could have a positive outcome! Extra: Write up your scientific findings about pumpkin seed fertilisation.

Related Outcome: Students will problem solve a situation, viewing the problem from a number of perspectives. Creative Thinking Skills: Imagination, Flexibility, Problem Reversal. Subject Areas: English - Writing, Science - Earth & Beyond, Technology.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Task 20: Space Time Capsule

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Task 1: Create a time capsule to be buried in an iron trunk several metres below the surface of Mars. Their is no specific date scheduled for the opening of the capsule. Historians are hoping to leave it there for thousands, even millions of years.

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Materials: Super Space resource book, paper, pen.

On an A4 sheet of paper, provide a detailed list of what should be placed inside the time capsule. Try to include details of the latest research in a number of fields, e.g. biology, meteorology, geology, medicine and so on.

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Discuss other things that you think should be included in the space time capsule and give your reasons for EACH item. Task 2: Fast forward to the future. Explain where you are in time and how you have managed to come across the space time capsule. • •

What are your reactions? What is going on around you on Mars at this point in time?

Related Outcome: a) Students will discuss the features of a proposed time capsule, planning the materials that are to be included and providing a justification for each item; b) Students will understand the importance of artefacts from the past. Creative Thinking Skills: Curiosity, Imagination, Risk Taking. Subject Areas: English, Society & Environment/HSIE - Time, Continuity & Change, Science, Technology.

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Activity Checklist

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Student Names

Photocopy this sheet onto A3 paper and display in learning centre. Students check off the sheets as they complete them.

Ac tivity Name

T1: Spaced Out

T2: Even More Spaced Out!

T3: Moon Mining

T4: Telescope Technology

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons orr evi ew pur posesonl y• T6: The Big • Bangf Theory

T5: An Astronomical Discovery

T7: Sister Solar System

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T9: Destination Mars T10: Hubble Trouble

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T11: Design a Mars Mobile

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T12: Strange Space Scenarios T13: Space Talk: Planet X T14: The Maths of Meteors T15: Diorama: Orbits T16: Close Encounters T17: Comets Vs Tadpoles T18: Down to Earth! T.19: Stranded in Space! T20: Space Time Capsule Page 24

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T8: Venus - The Evening Star


Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Assessment and Evaluation Evaluation and assessment complete the model for any learning experience. It is often difficult to assess creativity as many students need the right outlet for their learning. Some students will perform better with oral presentations, some will shine in class discussions, others will display initiative in the design process while many will demonstrate their understanding through written assignments.

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These are only a sample of the questions that need to be addressed at the evaluation stage:

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Did the student demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills?

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 Did the student communicate effectively in written form?  Did the student communicate effectively in oral presentations?  Did the student demonstrate proficiency in appropriate technologies?  Did the student reflect on his/her performance?

Critical thinking includes the ability to evaluate, compare, analyse, detect bias, distinguish fact from opinion, see causal connections, draw conclusions and form effective arguments. Creative thinking, also an important element of effective thinking skills, involves the ability to challenge assumptions and think outside rigid mental sets.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • f orr evi e w pur posesonl y• Assessment Sheets

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    

Sharing Information Written Information Design Evaluation Creative Thinking Evaluation Student Self-Assessment

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Pages 26-30 contain assessment forms to be used at the teacher’s discretion. The forms have been tailored to particular activities and have been categorised as follows:

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The students should be encouraged to complete a self-assessment form as they complete each activity (e.g. set them up in a box as part of the learning centre). Teachers can then use these forms to help them assess the students’ understanding of the learning process.

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Teacher Assessment 1: Sharing Information  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require oral presentation or group reporting.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

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Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Sharing Information: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her learning experience with the class? Oral Presentation: • Was the audience interested in the presentation? • Was note use kept to a minimum?

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_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Was the presentation entertaining? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Did the student read out their work? • Was the presentation informative?

• Did the student understand their role as a group member?

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• Did the student dominate the group learning process? • Did the student encourage the participation of other group members?

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Group Work: • Did the student contribute to the group’s overall performance?

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• Was the group effective in achieving the task?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Teacher Assessment 2: Written Information  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require written accounts and assignments.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

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Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Displaying Information: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her learning experience with the class? Presentation: • Was the layout eye-catching? • Were appropriate materials used to enhance presentation? (e.g. images/drawings)

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_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

Research Skills: • Did the student grasp the main concept of the task?

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• Has the student shown evidence of library or multimedia research? • Has the student demonstrated proficiency in using the Internet as a research tool?

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Did the student proofread their work? •student f or r e vi ew puinr po sesonl y• • Has the shown flair and imagination their work? • Was the work referenced appropriately?

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Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Teacher Assessment 3: Design Evaluation  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate the task cards that require students to participate in the design process.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

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Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Design Evaluation: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her design experience with the class?

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_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

Designing, Making and Appraising • Did the student generate ideas for meeting requirements? • Did the student experiment with practical methods to achieve the task?

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Has the student shown flair and imagination in their work? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Did the student justify his/her design? • Did the student choose practical resources?

• Did the student demonstrate initiative and creativity?

• Did the student critically evaluate his/her design?

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• Did the student explore all attributes of the design?

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• Did the student discuss strengths/weaknesses of his/her design? • Did the student analyse how well the task requirements were met?

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Reflection: • Did the student examine their design in terms of meeting the task requirements?

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• Did the student suggest modifications to the design? • Did the student explain how their design works?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Teacher Assessment 4: Creativity  This assessment proforma is designed to evaluate student creativity and thinking skills.

Student Name:........................Task Card: ....................................

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Did the student understand the task?______________________________________________ What creative thinking strategies did he/she employ to complete the task?______________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Creative Thinking Evaluation: Did the student demonstrate confidence in sharing his/her work with the class? Cognitive and Affective Skills: • Fluency - Did the student generate a number of ideas?

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_____________________________________________________________________________ YES

NO

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Originality - Were new and innovative ideas drawn upon? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Elaboration - Did the student expand on already existing ideas? • Flexibility - Did the student look at the problem from another perspective?

• Curiosity - Did the student seek out answers and facts?

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• Imagination - Did students venture beyond the “safe” boundaries?

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• Risk Taking - Did the student explore a number of solutions to the problem? Reflection: • Did the student adequately explain his/her mind-map activities?

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• Did the student reflect on his/her work and suggest changes?

• Did the student show competency in using the creative thinking strategies (e.g. Forced Analogies, Problem Reversal and so on)?

Extra comments:________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Teachers’ Notes: Super Space

Student Self-Assessment

 Complete this sheet at the conclusion after completing each of the task cards.

Name:..................................Task Card: .................................... Explain in your own words what the task was asking:_ __________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

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________________________________________________________________________________ What strategies did you use to complete the task?______________________________________

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________________________________________________________________________________ How did you share your learning experience with the class?_____________________________

________________________________________________________________________________ The aspect you enjoyed most about this activity was: (Give reasons.)______________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ________________________________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ________________________________________________________________________________ The part you liked least about this task was: __________________________________________

How could you have improved your learning experience?________________________________

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I enjoyed this task.

I learnt new things during this task.

I enjoy sharing my work with the class. I feel my work could be improved.

This task gave me something to think about. I was unsure of what this task required. I would like to research this task further. I was satisfied with my end result.

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Strongly Disagree

Disagree

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Read the following statements and then colour the appropriate circle.

Agree

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Think About ...

Strongly agree

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Further Assessment Tools

Online Creativity Tests and Resources Creativity Assessment Index www.creativelearning.com/Assess/

Crayola.com - The Power of Creativity www.crayola.com/parents/powercreativity/quizes/print_teachers.cfm

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Smarter Kids.com www.smarterkids.com/

Six Thinking Hats www.edwarddebonofoundation.com/

Creativity in Young Children - ERIC Digest www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed306008.html

References:

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Fostering Academic Creativity in Gifted Students www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content/academic_creativity.html

Torrance, E. P. (1977). CREATIVITY in the Classroom. Washington, DC: National Education Association.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Super Space: Activity Book (BLM)