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Integrated Themes for 4-8 Year Olds

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Revised edition. Written by Pam Portman. © Ready-Ed Publications - 2007 Originally published by Ready-Ed Publications (1993) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood Western Australia 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au

COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

ISBN 1 86397 714 7


Integrated Themes for 4 - 8 Year Olds

From the Author

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Over the years I have developed an integrated thematic approach to teaching. During that time, working in schools and child care centres, I have been approached by colleagues needing ideas for resources in various subject areas or asking for copies of my programs. So this is for you! All of these programs are tried and tested. They will provide you with a means for planning programs using an integrated thematic approach, and keep your students interested throughout the day, because there are no stops and starts at lesson change time. With a little practice one lesson will flow into the next effortlessly. This book is also a springboard for your own ideas which mine may generate. Although the sequence suggested worked well for me you may choose to differ as you please, or omit some altogether. I found that, with a few modifications, the activities can be used for 4 to 8 year olds. Remember, they are suggestions, not a rigid format.

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Warning! This book is not for the faint-hearted. Dare to be different – use your own ideas for timetabling, but be sure to allocate sufficient time for each subject area during the week or fortnight. Don’t be afraid to drop your ideas for the day’s schedule to follow through a child’s special interest if it appeals to the students and it is relevant.

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Use the method of programming with which you feel most comfortable. I have discovered some principals are averse to innovations but always remember, you are the one who will be working from your programs. A word of caution, with a few years of relief teaching under my belt; DO check that a stranger could walk into your classroom, should you be sick for several days or even weeks, and be able to understand your programs so the theme continues as if you were there. Now it’s up to you. Best wishes. Enjoy yourselves and your students.

Pam Portman

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Contents From the Author ................................ 2

Section 3: Water

Contents ............................................ 3

For the Teacher ................................. 21

Introduction ....................................... 4

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Sinkers and Floaters ......................... 23 Jumbled Loot.................................... 24

Section 1: Land Care

Trees and Food .................................. 7 Trees Help Us .................................... 8

Wooden Things .................................. 9 Home in the Soil .............................. 10 Animals Help Us............................... 11 Food Maths ...................................... 12

Polluting Our Water ......................... 26 Using Water ..................................... 27

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For the Teacher ................................ 5-6

Riddles .............................................. 25

Jelly Words ....................................... 28

Making Jelly ...................................... 29 Section 3: Record Sheet - Concepts .... 30 Section 3: Record Sheet - Skills ........... 31

© ReadyEdPSection ubl i c a t i o n s 4: Noise Pollution Section 1: Record Sheet 14 •f orr evi ew pur ptheoTeacher ses onl y•32 For ................................. Products Maths ................................ 13 - Concepts ....

Section 1: Record Sheet - Skills ........... 15

Annoying Noises - 1 ......................... 33

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Section 2: Air For the Teacher ................................. 16

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The Wind ......................................... 17

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Annoying Noises - 2 ......................... 34

Section 5: Conservation

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Section 1 - Record Sheet ................. 18

Pollution ........................................... 18 Air is All Around ............................... 19

Section 2: Record Sheet ................... 20

For the Teacher ................................. 35 Home Helpers ................................. 37 Dinosaur Maths ................................ 38 What a Jumble .................................. 39 Section 5: Record Sheet ................... 40

Section 6: Recycling For the Teacher ................................. 41 Section 6: Record Sheet ................... 43 3


Introduction From birth children begin interacting with their environment. Even young children can learn about the environment and how to play their part in its care and conservation. Naturally, you need to keep the concepts simple for younger children.

The minute you start the first discussion on the environment you can start evaluating students’ knowledge of the topic.

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Learning Outcomes The students will:

• Demonstrate an awareness of how

people interact with the environment; how this can be an adverse interaction and how we can play a part in conservation through a variety of activities;

Formative evaluation should begin at this stage and continue throughout the program. Knowledge and understandings and skills can be evaluated during discussions, practical activities and written work.

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Evaluation

The summative (final) evaluation should be only a small part of the evaluation. This time is often stressful for the children who have to work their way through test after test, and for the teacher who has to make and record the results of all these tests. This need not be!

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

learned skills and learn new skills.

General Concepts

• Everything we do has an effect on our

environment.

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• People have caused pollution and

other problems which have had an adverse effect on the environment.

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• It is possible to reverse the damage to

the environment but everyone must co-operate and we must act now.

• The effects of miscare are influencing

the health and welfare of people worldwide.

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Use anecdotal recording throughout the program plus a checklist of the concepts and the skills you are planning to teach and/or consolidate. Then the summative evaluation will be the icing on the cake when you hopefully discover how far each child has progressed.

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• Practise and consolidate previously

Use sheets for this section of evaluation similar to those used throughout the program. Include discussions and even drama, gardening activities and art and craft as part of your evaluation. Even games have a place here – those which involve classifying are ideal. For younger children sorting boxes which contain a variety of material could prove very useful here.


For the Teacher

Section 1:

‰ Introduction The key word here is simplicity. If your message is informative yet simple you’ll have a room of little “greenies” in no time.

Land Care • Plants, animals and humans sometimes have to adapt to changes in the environment. People often modify their environment.

The students will: • demonstrate an appreciation of the adverse results of people’s interaction with the environment, the ways in which this occurred and the ways in which we can rectify the problem. Evident through participation in discussions and practical activities, satisfactory completion of written work and a positive change in their own behaviour;

• There are many small animals in the soil which are essential if the soil is to remain healthy. • Changes to the environment may endanger the continuing existence of many plants and animals. Farms are a source of food and clothing for both city and country dwellers.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S ‰ Learning Outcomes

• Trees provide us with many items we need to survive.

• People are now realising that we have performed actions in the past which have had an adverse effect on the environment but that we still have time to change this.

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• Trees and plants are many different sizes with different foliage.

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• practise and consolidate previously learned skills and learn new skills in all subject areas while completing practical and written activities.

• Trees and plants are living things which grow in many different places.

• Trees and plants provide us with food. • Seeds produce new plants.

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‰ Specific Concepts

The natural environment includes land, trees, plants and animals.

• We share our environment with trees, plants and animals which need healthy soil to stay alive.

• We all have a responsibility to maintain the land in a healthy condition. • Pollution affects us as well as the trees, plants and animals.

• All plants need food, water and light. • Animals are living things that make their homes in many places. Animals need food, water, air and shelter to survive. • Soil is composed of tiny pieces of stone. • We use our five senses to identify a variety of natural substances.

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‰ Activity Suggestions • Let the children smash or rub two soft rocks together to produce soil. The colours of this can be compared and contrasted with samples of soil from the playground. • Borrow a video or picture pack which shows the effects of land degradation and pollution. Explain how farmers cleared the land in order to grow crops and/or graze animals, the problems this caused (salination, etc. ), the effect of these problems on the soil and plants, and current re-afforestation programs in which many farmers are participating.

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• Visit www.global-garden.com.au/gardenkids_grow3.htm for ideas on growing things in the classroom/school grounds.

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• Discuss ways in which townspeople destroy the soil – use chemicals (weed killers, fertilisers, etc.), pollution and littering, and the effects of these on the soil. • Go for a walk in the local community and collect litter. Use this to make a wall mural.

• Identify foods we eat which are grown in the soil and on trees. Discuss the importance of fruits and vegetables in our diet and what could happen if we were unable to grow these.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •the f o rr ev i e w ur p se on l y• • Discuss clothes we wear that are p produced byo plants ands animals. Compare

• Discuss the conditions which cause extinction of animals and ways in which this can be avoided. (See the “Animals” book in this series for more suggestions). pure wool, cotton and leather with synthetic fibres.

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• Collect and trace around a variety of leaves on graph paper. These can be used for non-arbitary measurement of area, coloured or painted, cut out and used for a display. • Grow some seeds. Let the children record the changes which occur.

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• Alfalfa or cress can be eaten with lunch, as can nasturtiums.

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• When growing seeds, grow one or two samples in the dark, and do not water some at various stages in their growth. Compare with those which were watered and grown in a sunny position. • Identify the food eaten by animals which provide us with food. Discuss what would happen if the soil did not produce food for these animals. • Put flowers, preferably white, into coloured waters to observe the capillary process. Compare with the way trees and plants get water and nutrition from the soil. Check out for a wealth of lesson plans and ideas: www.teacherplanet.com/resource/environment.php NB. Conservation may be handled here or as a “finale” to the program. See separate section. 6


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Section 1

Land Care

Trees and Food

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Draw the foods that we get from trees on the tree below. Draw the foods which grow in the soil around the bottom of the tree.

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Section 1

Land Care

Trees Help Us

Write the missing words in this tree story.

r o e t s B r e oo Apples, pears, oranges ____________ p u k plums are just some of the fruits. S Our wooden furniture comes ____________ trees and so do many doors.

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Lots of our fruits and nuts grow on trees.

Trees ____________ home to many animals ____________ insects.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Some, like birds and spiders, ____________ their homes in •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• the branches.

live on the ground ____________ the tree.

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____________

Trees also provide shade ____________ hot summer days.

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Draw a picture of your favourite tree here.

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Section 1

Land Care

Wooden Things

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Colour in the pictures of things which are made of wood. Put a cross on the things which are not made of wood.

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On the back of this sheet draw three more things you can see in the classroom which are made of wood. 9


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Section 1

Land Care

Home in the Soil

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Finish the maze to find the homes of each of these animals who live in the soil. In each shape draw a picture of the animal in its home in the soil.

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Section 1

Land Care

Animals Help Us

Match the food and clothes to the plant or animal from which each comes.

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Word List

•t-shirt

•banana

•strawberry

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •shoes •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

•glass of milk

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•egg

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Section 1

Land Care

Food Maths

• How many pieces of food on r o e t s Bo this kebab? r e p ofood. ______ pieces ofk u S • How many pieces would be

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Use the pictures to help you work out these maths problems.

left if 3 pieces were eaten? ______ pieces of food.

• How many eggs in the carton?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ______ eggs. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Mother uses 3 eggs to make a cake. How many are left?

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______ eggs.

o c .cup? this che • How many chips inr e o r st s ______ r upechips.

• If Sue and Tony share them how many will they each have? ______ chips.

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Section 1

Land Care

Products Maths

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• How many shoes? ______ shoes. • How many pairs of shoes? ______ pairs.

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Use the pictures to help you work out these maths problems.

• How many seeds? ______ seeds © ReadyEd Publ i cat i ons • If each seed produces 2 flowers, •f orr evi ew phow ur p os esonl y• many flowers?

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______ flowers. • If each seed produces 3 flowers, how many flowers? ______ flowers.

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Land Care

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• Use of five senses

• Animals need food, water, shelter

• Plants need food, water, light

• Seeds produce new plants

• Trees, plants, animals living things

• Trees - source of food, wood items

• Farms - source of food/ clothing

• Soil animals - function

• Man’s modification of the environment

• Plant/animal adaption

• Sharing the environment

• Environment - plants and animals

environment (pollution, etc.)

• Our effect on the

For the Teacher

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Section 1 - Record Sheet

Concepts


Land Care

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• Individual activities

• Initiates new personal activities

• Reads more on topic for interest

• Stories, etc.

• Sheets

• Completion of written work

• Participation - practical sessions

• Demonstrates correct dramatic interpretations

• Makes relevant contributions

• Participates in discussions

For the Teacher

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Section 1 - Record Sheet

Skills

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For the Teacher

Section 2:

‰ Introduction It is possible to explain the concept of the greenhouse effect to young children in such a way that the children understand and are not confused. Again the message is – keep it simple.

Air ‰ Activity Suggestions • Pieces of white card, smeared with Vaseline, should be placed around the school and grounds. Some could be taken home by students and left exposed to the air for one week, then examined for evidence of air pollution – smoke, car exhaust fumes, etc. • Discuss the additional invisible causes of air pollution, propellant chemicals from aerosol spray cans, etc. • Explain the ozone layer in simple terms, the hole in the layer over Antarctica and the function of the layer – to filter UV rays from the sun and “hold” warm air within the earth’s atmosphere. The times of year when the hole is largest (September to December) and the effects of this on the earth could also be discussed. • Older children could extend this concept to the effects of the deterioration of the ozone layer on farm crops and other plants and the effect of this for humans, birds and other animals. • If you know someone who is an asthmatic or has severe allergies caused by air-borne pollutants, have them talk to the children about what exacerbates their condition and what happens to them when they suffer an asthma attack or allergic reaction. • If possible borrow a collection of stuffed birds from your museum or a collection of prints of various species of birds and discuss the ways in which their beaks have adapted to the kind of food they eat, and their feet have adapted to their environment.

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The students will: • demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which we abuse the air and the effects of this abuse on ourselves and the environment, through participation in discussions and practical activities and completion of written work;

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S ‰ Learning Outcomes

through these activities.

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‰ Specific Concepts

• Air is all around us.

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• Wind is moving air.

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• Birds are animals and living things.

• Our actions can have an adverse effect on our environment, including the air, birds, other animals and ourselves. • Birds adapt to their environment.

• We can play a part in creating and maintaining a healthy environment.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • practise and consolidate previously •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• learned skills and learn new skills


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Section 2

Air

The Wind

“We cannot see the wind but we can see what it does.”

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Look at the pictures below, then draw what happens when the wind blows on what is shown in each picture.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Section 2

Air

Pollution

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Show the ways in which the things in these pictures pollute the air.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


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Section 2

Air

Air is All Around

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Put a circle around each of the things below which has air inside it.

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Air

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• Makes relevant contributions

• Completion of worksheets

• Reads additional relevant materials

• Writing on topic

• Participation in discussions

• Dramatic interpretations

• Bird adaptations

• Effect of our actions on the environment

• Birds are living things

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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w ww

20 • Air/wind

For the Teacher

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Teac he r

Section 3 - Record Sheet

Concepts and Skills


For the Teacher

Section 3:

Water

‰ Introduction There is a considerable scope for a wide variety of activities in all subject areas in this topic. In fact, the problem may be knowing when to stop.

Teac he r

The students will:

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok ‰ Learning Outcomes u S

• demonstrate their understanding of the sources, uses, inhabitants of water, the water cycle, our interaction with water and the ways in which water can be changed, through participation in discussions and a variety of practical activities and completion of written work with at least 80% accuracy; • practise and consolidate previously learned skills and learn new skills through a variety of activities.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f or evi ew ur posesonl y• • Water forms anr essential part of thep environment; ‰ Specific Concepts

• Water does not have any fixed shape; • Objects can float or sink in water;

• People can live and/or work in the water;

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• Some animals live in water;

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• Water can be changed by changes in temperature or the addition of other substances;

o c . c e her r ‰ Internet Resources o t s super

• People’s interaction with the marine environment can be beneficial or adverse.

www.water-ed.org/kids.asp - Water Education www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/teachers_k-3.html - K-3 Teacher Ideas www.westernwater.com.au/education/ - Western Water www.westernwater.com.au/education/games/index.asp - Water Games www.wetpaper.com.au/kids&water/front.html - Kids and Water www.ncc.nsw.gov.au/environment/eco_education/water_for_kids Lesson Ideas

21


‰ Activity Suggestions • Try to organise a visit to the beach, river, a lake, pond or farm dam and examine the animals which live in this environment and the type of plants which grow there. • Explore pouring and buoyancy activities. www.atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/Sink_or_Float_-_Buoyancy/ index.shtml

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Freeze water in ice-cube trays, pour the ice-cubes into a metal bowl and have the children see what happens to the bowl. • Make class or individual books about the above activities.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Make and eat different coloured jellies.

• The jelly activity is rich in language and could be used for sessions on adjectives, synonyms, antonyms (using all the senses) and sequencing. • Add various substances to water to change the colour and consistency.

• Soak material squares in water then dry in various places to find where they dry fastest. Leave some squares rolled up and compare with others which were laid flat or hung up to dry.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Make your own water cycle. Place a box of seedlings on a table. Place al metal • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n y• tray about 35cms above the seedlings, supported to ensure it doesn’t fall. Place • Put equal amounts of water (small quantity) in a glass and a shallow bowl. Leave for a week or more to see which dries up first.

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w ww

ice (crushed) on top of the tray. Place a kettle or flask of water over a heat source so steam is directed at the area between the seedlings and tray. You can demonstrate evaporation and condensation in this way and explain the water cycle simply to the children.

• Record the weather on a large chart. Examine cloud formations and the weather associated with them. Encourage the children to predict the weather for the next day. Also encourage them to listen to the weather forecast on the radio or television.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

• Discuss seasonal changes in the weather and the effect these have on the food we eat, clothes we wear and games we play. Discuss the effect of seasonal change on plants and animals. • Identify the type of jobs which occur on, under or near water.

• Include one or two lessons on water safety – on the beach, at the pool or dam, by the lake, on boats. • Discuss activities such as fishing, whaling, etc. and the effect indiscriminate use of these can have on the environment. Talk about the ways in which we can pollute the water if we are careless.

22


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Section 3

Water

Sinkers and Floaters

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Circle the objects that sink.

Draw© fourR things which when placed ino water. ead yEfloat dP ubl i cat i ns

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m . u

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te o Draw four things which sink when placed in. water. c che e r o r st super

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Section 3

Water

Jumbled Loot

Unjumble these words which show things pirates might steal. (Choose your words from these: rings, jewels, gold, rubies, treasure, silver, coins.)

tearrues

____________

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Teac he r

dolg

r o e t s Bo r e p o u k ____________ S

lewjes ____________ © Re adyEdPubl i cat i ons grins

____________

w ww

____________

velsir

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nocis

busier

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•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . c e her r ____________ o t s super ____________


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Section 3

Water

Riddles

Looking from his lighthouse the lighthouse keeper might see these things.

Teac he r

• A seabird. ___ ___ ___ ___

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r o e t s B r e oo • An expanse ofp water. u k ___ ___S ___

• Large sea animal. ____© ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Re ady Ed P____ ubl i cat i ons

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

• The water that covers the earth. ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

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• Form of transport. ___ ___ ___ ___

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Section 3

Water

Polluting Our Water

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw six things which can pollute the water.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Section 3

Water

Using Water

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S •At home

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

We use water in many ways. Draw four ways we use water.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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•At school

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•At play

•Outside

o c . che e r o t r s super

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Section 3

Water

Jelly Words

Write a synonym for these words we use to describe jelly. see-through delicious

r o e t s Bo r ____________________ e p ok u S ____________________

wet

____________________

Now write an antonym for these words. wet

____________________

soft

____________________

melt

____________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

wobbly

____________________

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons cold ____________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Section 3

Water

Making Jelly

Do you remember how to make jelly?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Colour in these picture, then cut them out and put them in the correct order for making a jelly.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

29


Water

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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ew i ev Pr

w ww

30

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Water safety

• Water uses

• Water sources

• Weather

• Water cycle

• Effects of pollution

• Marine life

• People - live/work on water

• Changing water

• Floating/sinking

• Water - no fixed shape

• Water - part of the environment

For the Teacher

m . u

Teac he r

Section 3 - Record Sheet

Concepts


Water

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Problem solving

• Participates in practical work

• Describing/ communicating

• Measuring

• Conservation

• Pouring

• Writing

• Completion of worksheets

• Reads more on topic

• Use of dramatic interpretation

• Makes relevant contributions

• Participates in discussions

For the Teacher

o c . che e r o t r s super

m . u

Teac he r

Section 3 - Record Sheet

Skills

31


For the Teacher

Section 4: Noise Pollution

‰ Introduction This section about noise pollution, although brief, should be included as it is an insidious form of pollution which can affect our health and well being.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

‰ Learning Outcomes The students will:

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

• demonstrate an understanding of the cause of noise pollution through participation in discussions; • practise and consolidate previously learned skills through a variety of activities.

‰ Specific Concepts

• Noise pollution can be caused by individuals, groups or machinery. • Noise pollution can affect both our health and sense of well-being.

© Re adyEdPubl i cat i ons ‰ Suggested Activities

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Listen to sounds in and near the classroom, identify them as loud or soft sounds.

w ww

• Have the children repeat the listening activity: 1. At home 2. In their community

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m . u

• Discuss how the children feel when exposed to high levels of noise. Explain that noise pollution not only causes stress but can also cause permanent damage to the ears.

• Discuss the sources of noise pollution in these areas. Extend to industry.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask the children how they would solve the problems in each area. Try and keep their solutions practicable. Explain how many states/countries have restrictions on the hours during which noisy machinery and crowd activities (pop groups, etc.) can occur, that people using noisy machinery can wear special ear plugs, and cars and machinery can often be modified to reduce the noise level.

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Section 4

Noise Pollution

Annoying Noises 1

Both at home and at school there are noises that annoy people. Sometimes you get so used to them that you forget they are happening, like loud lawn mowers or barking dogs.

Teac he r

•At Home

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r o e t s B r e othing In each space p draw and name the noisy that annoys o k you or youru family the most. S •At School

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Section 4

Noise Pollution

Annoying Noises 2

You will often hear loud noises when you are walking in the street – traffic, machinery, building noises and so on.

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In the picture there are five things that can cause loud, annoying noise. Name them in the space below.

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3. _______________________________________________ 4. _______________________________________________ 5. _______________________________________________ 34


For the Teacher

Section 5: Conservation

‰ Introduction This is a very green area so if you are not a “greenie” you may need to do a little reading before you handle it. You know the children in your charge and how much information they can absorb but even very young children can appreciate that there are alternatives to chemicals and that we can all play a part, no matter how young.

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‰ Learning Outcomes

The students will:

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This is a further opportunity to evaluate the extent of the children’s understanding of the concepts studied in each of the previous topics.

• demonstrate their understanding of the concept of conservation of the environment through participation in discussions and other practical activities and completion of the given worksheets;

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ‰• Specific Concepts f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• practise and consolidate previously learned skills and learn new skills while completing a variety of activities in all subject areas.

• People have polluted the environment and caused problems for the land, air, sea, plants and animals.

‰ Activity Suggestions

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• Everyone can help to prevent further pollution and degradation by caring for the environment and educating others.

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• Explain in simple terms, the effects of some chemicals on the environment (land, sea and air) and its inhabitants including people, and plant life. • Explain that federal and state governments, local council and authorities in other countries are now working on the problem.

• Share a meal which involves cooking. When the dishes are washed leave the water to go cold. Discuss what people usually do with this water and the effect pouring greasy water down the drain could have on the sewerage system. Elicit alternatives from the children. • Discuss the effects of detergents containing phosphates and/or optical whiteners on the environment. Compare these detergents with those that are environmentally friendly. Wash tea towels and compare the results. • Try out some environmentally safe weed and insect killers around the school but be sure to explain that each insect has a specific task and by killing them we can 35


upset their ecosystem. Thus, weed and insect killers can have an adverse effect on the environment. • Introduce the children to organic gardening by growing a few flowers and vegetables. If no garden area is available, use old tyres filled with soil (‘Compost’ is dealt with in the ‘Recycling’ section.) • Teach the children some songs about caring for the environment. Mike Blake has a wide range of short, snappy songs which appeal to children. Try local music shops or the K.A.B.C.

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• Discuss the ways in which we can save electricity at school and in the home.

• Get involved in a tree-planting session in your local community.

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Teac he r

• Have pots of mint, basil and lavender in the classroom to deter flies and mosquitoes. • Encourage children to study weather conditions and how this can help prevent pollution, e.g. bonfires and barbecues on an overcast day can cause smog.

• Examine the conditions on the other planets in our solar systems so the children understand we could not live there, as we do on earth, without special modifications.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Encourage the children to use water sparingly. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Write a class book on environmental tips. Sell it to parents, then buy a plant with • Encourage children to walk to the places where they enjoy recreational activities rather than asking mum or dad to take them in the car, or catch a bus.

your profits.

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‰ Internet Resources www.kidsforsavingearth.org/ www.amsa.gov.au/Marine_Environment_Protection/ Educational_resources_and_information/Kids/

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• Points to consider with older children: - Smog can damage millions of crops each year. - Millions of fish die each year from water pollution. - Many people become ill when exposed to organo-chlorines used by local councils to kill weeds or by pest exterminators. - Oil spills from tankers are increasing. - In Tokyo, traffic police have to take an oxygen break every half hour. - One car with an inefficient exhaust driven one block uses the oxygen one hundred people need to live for one month. - Every minute of every day the equivalent of 43 football fields of trees are destroyed.


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Section 5

Conservation

Home Helpers

r o e t s Bo r 1. __________________________ e p ok u S 2. __________________________

1. __________________________

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Look at these environmentally friendly things we can use around the home. List two uses for each of them.

2. __________________________ © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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1. __________________________ 2. __________________________

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1. __________________________ 2. __________________________

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Section 5

Conservation

Dinosaur Maths

Can you follow these directions?

r o e t s Bo r 1st e p ok u 2.Draw a hatS on the the sixth dinosaur.

3.Put some mittens on the fourth dinosaur

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Teac he r

1.Colour the third dinosaur red.

4.Give the second © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons dinosaur some boots.

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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6.Colour the first dinosaur green.

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5.Colour the fifth dinosaur blue.

. tseventh 7.Give the e o c . dinosaur a redc tail. e her r o t s s r u e p 8.Colour the fourth dinosaur blue. 9.Colour the eighth dinosaur yellow.

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Section 5

Conservation

What a Jumble

Here are some jumbled words of things we can use about the home and school to keep our environment healthy.

Teac he r •laibs

__________________________

•opas

__________________________

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r o e t s Bo r e Write the correct words in the spaces. p o u k (The words are written below to give you a clue.) S

© Rea dyEdPubl i cat i ons •momnaia __________________________

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

•givenra

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•tmin

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•vendelar

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ammonia, soap, basil, mint, lavender, vinegar

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Conservation

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

o c . che e r o t r s super • Writing

• Completion of worksheets

• Role-play

• Participates in practical activities

• Makes relevant contributions

• Participates in discussions

• Careful use of resources

• Caring for water alternatives

• Caring for air alternatives

• Caring for the land alternatives

For the Teacher

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Section 5 - Record Sheet

Concepts and Skills


For the Teacher

Section 6:

Recycling

‰ Introduction This aspect of the program has received so much publicity in recent years you are bound to have lots of ideas of your own. However, resources are always useful and perhaps one or two items may be new to you.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Outcomes ‰ Learning

The students will:

• demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which recycling can preserve our natural resources through participation in discussions and practical activities and completion of worksheets with at least 80% accuracy; • practise and consolidate previously learned skills and learn new skills in various subject areas by participating in a variety of activities.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ‰• Specific Concepts f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Many items can be recycled in order to preserve natural resources.

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• Many industries use only recyclable items.

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‰ Activity Suggestions

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• Recycling can be done by the individual, the family, the school, the community, or industry.

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• Surely every school must now be involved in recycling aluminium cans, glass and paper, but don’t forget the plastics too. • Make compost for the school gardens from the children’s fruit scraps, dust from the vacuum cleaners, grass cuttings, leaves, etc.

• Use both sides and every centimetre of space on paper. The reverse of discarded worksheets can be used for drafts for writing before being placed in the recycling bin. • Teachers can use lots of scrap materials for storage purposes in the classroom, e.g. take-away containers from restaurants, ice-cream cartons. Wine casks can be cut down to hold papers, magazines and cards for independent learning centres.

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• Large cartons/boxes which hold washers, fridges and televisions can be utilised as cubbies, caves, a private reading corner and much more. • Various sized plastic containers can be used for water pouring activities. • Cardboard boxes, cellophane, foil wrappers, egg cartons, wool and material scraps, used greeting cards and gift wrap, plastic containers and much, much more can be used for craft activities.

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• Encourage children to make a “recycling box” at home for craft activities. • Musical instruments galore can be produced from scrap materials.

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• Older children could write to their local council requesting verge-side collections of paper, glass and plastics for the sake of those who cannot take them to collection points with ease. Some councils do it already. Why not all?

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• Children could also write to local shops and offices asking them to become involved in recycling their waste. • Take advantage of off-cuts from printers and furniture makers in your community.

• Try and visit companies that use recycled materials to produce new items, e.g. home insulation from newspapers, new plastic bottles from used plastic containers, builders who use building materials from demolished buildings, furniture makers who use old floor boards, etc. to make tables and other furniture.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Make some recycled paper. www.recyclezone.org.uk/az_makepaper.aspx • f o rr e vi ew pur posesonl y• Worksheets

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• Make a display of recycled products (stationery, toilet rolls, serviettes, plastic bottles, glass bottles and so on) for children, and their parents, to examine.

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No sheets are included for this section as the children would be better employed making things from “junk” and alternative cleaners.

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Check out these sites for recycling ideas:

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atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/Recycling/ - Teacher Theme pages

www.theteachersguide.com/Recyclinglessonplans.htm - Lesson Ideas ollierecycles.com.au/aus/html/glass.html

edtech.kennesaw.edu/web/recycle.html - Links Page

recyclingnearyou.com.au/education/do-something.cfm www.teacherplanet.com/resource/earthday.php www.teacherplanet.com/resource/environment.php

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Recycling

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S • Writing

• Participates in practical activities

• Makes relevant contributions

• Participates in discussions

• Alternatives: the industry

• Alternatives: the community

• Alternatives: the school

• Alternatives: the family

• Recycling: the industry

• Recycling: the community

• Recycling: the school

• Recycling: the family

For the Teacher

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Section 5 - Record Sheet

Concepts and Skills

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Integrated Themes Series: Environment  

This series is designed for thematic programming in the junior classroom or pre-primary centre. Photocopiable activities are spread across t...

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