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Integrated Themes for 4-8 Year Olds

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Revised edition. Written by Pam Portman. © Ready-Ed Publications - 2007 Originally published by Ready-Ed Publications (1993) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood Western Australia 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au

COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

ISBN 1 86397 713 9


Integrated Themes for 4 - 8 Year Olds

From the Author

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Over the years I have developed an integrated thematic approach to teaching. During that time, working in schools and child care centres, I have been approached by colleagues needing ideas for resources in various subject areas or asking for copies of my programs. So this is for you! All of these programs are tried and tested. They will provide you with a means for planning programs using an integrated thematic approach, and keep your students interested throughout the day, because there are no stops and starts at lesson change time. With a little practice one lesson will flow into the next effortlessly. This book is also a springboard for your own ideas which mine may generate. Although the sequence suggested worked well for me you may choose to differ as you please, or omit some altogether. I found that, with a few modifications, the activities can be used for 4 to 8 year olds. Remember, they are suggestions, not a rigid format.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Warning! This book is not for the faint-hearted. Dare to be different – use your own ideas for timetabling, but be sure to allocate sufficient time for each subject area during the week or fortnight. Don’t be afraid to drop your ideas for the day’s schedule to follow through a child’s special interest if it appeals to the students and it is relevant.

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Use the method of programming with which you feel most comfortable. I have discovered some principals are averse to innovations but always remember, you are the one who will be working from your programs. A word of caution, with a few years of relief teaching under my belt; DO check that a stranger could walk into your classroom, should you be sick for several days or even weeks, and be able to understand your programs so the theme continues as if you were there.

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Now it’s up to you. Best wishes. Enjoy yourselves and your students.

Pam Portman

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Contents Introduction ...................................... 4

Section 3: Public Holidays

Calendar of Special Days ................... 5

For the Teacher ................................ 29

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The Australian Flag .......................... 30

Section 1: Easter

Making a New Town ....................... 31

For the Teacher .................................. 7

Children’s Work Long Ago .............. 32

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Easter ................................................ 8

Section 4: Other Cultural Festivals

Scrambled Easter Words ................. 10

Chinese New Year

Mend the Egg .................................. 11

For the Teacher .......................... 33-34

The Chicken and the Egg ................ 12

Chinese Lantern .............................. 35

Easter Word Search ........................ 13

Other Festivals .......................... 36-37

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Easter Eggs ........................................ 9

Section 5: Other Celebrations © R e a d y E d P ubl i cat i ons For the Teacher .......................... 14-17 For the Teacher ................................ 38 Word• Search Work ................................... 39 f o................................... rr evi ew18puMum’s r po se sonl y• Section 2: Christmas

For the Teacher ................................ 40

Christmas List ................................. 20

Know Your Books and Authors ...... 41

Christmas Antonyms ....................... 21

For the Teacher .......................... 42-43

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A ‘Chruzzle’ .................................... 22 The Christmas Story ....................... 23

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Christmas Jumble ............................ 24

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Christmas Acrostic .......................... 19

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An A-Z Christmas ........................... 25 Decorate the Boomers ................... 26 Christmas Mindbenders .................. 27

Christmas Gifts ................................ 28

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Introduction Special Note

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It is with some trepidation that I present this topic. So many festivals change their name and/or date over the years, a few take on a controversial nature and others may appear irrelevant. However, I believe it is important that children understand why we have public holidays and acquire a basic global perspective, particularly in our multicultural society, from an early age. All that is needed, in many cases, is a brief mention during morning news, perhaps a story and/or a worksheet or two. A great deal will depend on the multi-cultural nature of your class. Some special days may be omitted – the choice is yours. In some cases a specific date has been included, sometimes only the month in which the festival occurs and a small group is included at the end of the Miscellaneous Section.

©Learning ReadOutcome yEdPubl i cat i ons General

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

General Concepts

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• The children will demonstrate an awareness of why we celebrate special days and times through participation in discussions and practical activities.

• Just as we celebrate special anniversaries within our families, so countries, cultures, religious groups, states, towns and even neighbourhoods also celebrate special times with festivals of many kinds.

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• Some festivals are held on the same date every year, while others may change from year to year. • All people do not celebrate the same festivals.

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Calendar of Special Days ‰ January -

New Year’s Day Epiphany/Twelfth Night Australia Day Chinese New Year – (Jan/Feb) (see “Festivals in Other Cultures”)

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‰ February

3 - Boy Scouts’ Founder’s Day (Baden-Powell) 14 - St. Valentine’s Day (v) - Shrove Tuesday The day before Lent commences, housewives make pancakes to use up ingredients which could not be used during Lent. (v) - Mardi Gras In some countries a festival allows the people an opportunity for merry-making before Lent begins. (v) - Ash Wednesday Lent commences (v) - Muharram (Islamic Faith) First day of Islamic New Year

‰ April

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1 6 26 (v)

before the donkey carrying Jesus into Jerusalem. A week during which the conflict between Jesus and the Jewish elders increased, culminating in His arrest and crucifixion.

(v) - Easter (March/April) (see “Easter”) 1 - All’s Fool’s Day - Buddha’s Birthday (Japan) 7 - World Health Day Why not make and share a healthy lunch and have a health and fitness/sport afternoon? 21 - Queen’s Birthday 23 - St George’s Day Patron Saint of England Read the story of St. George and the Dragon. 25 - Anzac Day (see “Public Holidays”)

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‰ March

‰ May

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1 - May Day 8 - World Red Cross Day Invite a member of the Red Cross society to talk about their work around the world. Activity sheets are available from the Society. (v) - Mothers’ Day – 2nd Sunday. (see “Other Celebrations”) 23 - Birth of Buddha (China & Vietnam)

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1 - St David’s Day Patron Saint of Wales - Labor Day (see “Public Holidays”) 17 - St. Patrick’s Day Patron Saint of Ireland (v) - Palm Sunday Start of Holy Week. People laid palm fronds on the dusty road

(v) Date varies each year 5


‰ June 5 - World Environment Day (see “Other Celebrations”) (v) - Arbor Day (see “Other Celebrations”)

4 - American Independence Day

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(v) - Ramadan & Eid ul-Fitr (see “Other Cultural Festivals”)

‰ September

(v) - Fathers’ Day–1st Sunday (see “Other Celebrations”) 8 - World Literacy Day Hold a prose and poetry competition with books as prizes. Read selections from a variety of books. (v) - Yom Kippur (see “Other Cultural Festivals”)

‰ November

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok August u S

‰ July

‰

in countries where there is war or famine or where only the rich are educated. Identify students who were born in other countries. Invite migrant parents to talk about their childhood in their native country. 30 - St David’s Day Patron Saint of Wales Examine the Union Jack, explain how it is made up of the flags of Saints George, David and Andrew (i.e. England, Wales and Scotland). 31 - Halloween (see “Other Cultural Festivals”) (v) - Diwali – October/ November (see “Other Cultural Festivals”)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

2 - Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday (India) 4 - World Animal Day Discuss care of pets, endangered species. (v) - Blessing of the Fleet 23 - United Nations Day Discuss the work of the United Nations Organisation, and a united world. (v) - Universal Children’s Day 4th Wednesday in October. Discuss children in other countries, consider those living

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‰ December

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‰ October

5 - Guy Fawkes’ Night Commemorates Guy Fawkes’ attempt to blow up the British Houses of Parliament. Appropriately celebrated with fireworks displays. Read L. Pender’s ‘Barnaby and the Rocket’. (v) - Melbourne Cup –1st Tuesday 11 - Remembrance Day

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(v) - Hanukkah/Chanukah (see “Other Cultural Festivals”)

25 - Christmas Day (see “Christmas”)

Also included in the “Other Celebrations” section: -

NAIDOC Week Children’s Book Week Agricultural Shows Arts Festivals


For the Teacher

Section 1:

Easter

‰ Introduction

In Christian times the week preceding Easter is called Holy Week, commencing on Palm Sunday (see Calendar Notes). On the Thursday, Jesus and his disciples retired to an upper room to celebrate what came to be known as the Last Supper. At this time Jesus tried to prepare his disciples for the days ahead. They then went to the Garden of Gethsemane to pray. It was here that Jesus was arrested and taken before Pontius Pilate and King Herod.

To represent that used for Jesus’ crucifixion.

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Other Easter Symbols

r o e t s BoThe Cross: r e p ok u S

Although the Easter celebrations are public holidays, the week preceding could be used to cover the topic. The children need to understand that this festival originated in pre-Christian times in the northern hemisphere where Easter occurs at the beginning of Spring. The first festivals were in honour of the Goddess of Spring, Eostre. Special cakes were baked – today’s hot cross bun – a cross was added in Christian times. Eggs were a sign of new life. Flowers such as daffodils, tulips and crocuses were regarded as harbingers of spring. Perhaps one has to experience the long, cold winters to appreciate these early festivities.

Lamb:

Jesus was referred to as the Lamb of God. Lambs were sacrificed as part of the Jewish festival of the Passover which was being celebrated at that time. A symbol of new life.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesLights, onl y • Candles:

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On the next day (Good Friday) he was crucified on the hill named Golgotha. His body was laid in a tomb and a huge boulder placed at the entrance, guarded by soldiers as the authorities were afraid Jesus’ followers would try and steal the body. It is important to note that crucifixion was common at that time. Saturday was the Jewish Sabbath which Jesus’ disciples and followers spent in prayer. Remember this was a traumatic period for them, as they had hoped to see Jesus as their King and free themselves of Roman rule.

Jesus referred to Himself as the Light of the World. A Paschal candle is lit at Passover services from which all the other candles in the synagogue were lit. These are taken home to light candles there.

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Early on the Sunday the women went to the tomb to prepare the body for burial, only to discover the boulder rolled aside and the body gone. They ran to tell the disciples who went to see for themselves. At this time Jesus showed himself to Mary Magdalene, to reassure her, and later to his disciples and followers various times prior to his ascension.

Countries and various sections of the Orthodox Church (Greek, Russian, Serbian) celebrate Easter in many different ways, not necessarily at the same time.

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Easter ‰ Activity Suggestions • Make a collection of posters and pictures of Easter symbols – eggs, chickens, rabbits, candles, special Easter foods and activities.

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• Explain the Easter story in simple terms.

• Organise an Easter bonnet parade.

• Decorate blown eggs in a variety of ways – dye, paint, cover with lace, braid, etc., give them human faces, hair, etc. • Bake and eat hot cross buns.

• Sing “Hot Cross Buns”, “Lord of the Dance”, and “Santa Claus is Coming to Town”, substituting Easter Bunny for Santa Claus. • Draw a large candle on heavy card, make concentric circles around the frame, fill the circles with crumpled crepe paper, using a deep orange for the centre circle and gradually paler shades of orange and yellow for the other circles.

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• Make Easter baskets, add a pom-pom chicken.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

• Make chickens and/or rabbits from dough and bake.

Internet Resources

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www.readyed.com.au/urls/easter.html - Ready-Ed Easter Links Page en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter - Wikipedia Article www.easterbunnys.net/easteraroundtheworld.htm - Easter Around the World www.holidays.net/easter/ - Easter on the Net www.kidsdomain.com/craft/_Easter.html - Easter Craft resources.kaboose.com/games/easter.html - Easter Games akidsheart.com/holidays/easter/egames.htm - More Easter Games www.kidsites.org/search/primary/events_celebrations/easter/ index.html - Easter Links www.kidsturncentral.com/holidays/easter.htm - Easter Fun www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/easter/stories.html - Easter Stories

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Section 1

Easter

Easter Eggs

There are ten easter eggs. Colour in the eggs following these instructions.

r o e t s Bo r e 1. Colour thep 1st and ok u 10th eggs S orange. 2. Draw blue stars on the 5th egg. 3. Draw green circles on the 3rd, 6th and 9th eggs.

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Instructions

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 4.• Draw yellow f o r r evi ew pur posesonl y• triangles on the 7th

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5. Colour the 2nd, 4th and 8th eggs red.

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egg.

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Section 1

Easter

Scrambled Easter Words

Can you unscramble these words? Write the correct spelling beside each word, then write the words in alphabetical order. balm

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tenbon

r o e t s B r e oo ______________ 1. ______________ p u k S______________ 2. ______________

nicheck

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3. ______________

geg

______________

4. ______________

5. l ______________ © R______________ eadyEdPub i cat i ons •f or______________ r evi ew pur p6.o______________ sesonl y• ancled snub

______________

7. ______________

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______________

8. ______________

srocs

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astere

. te ______________ 9. ______________ o c . che e nynub ______________ 10. _____________ r o t r s super froswel

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Section 1

Easter

Mend the Egg

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Colour in the puzzle pieces, cut out and paste on a piece of paper to make an egg.

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Section 1

Easter

The Chicken and the Egg

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Colour in the chicken and the egg. Cut out and paste the egg around the rounded edges and place on a piece of paper. Cut out the chicken which should be able to pop into the egg.

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Section 1

Easter

Easter Word Search

Find the words below in the puzzle.

•Easter

r o e t s Bo r e p o u k •chocolateS •hot cross buns •cross •eggs

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•happy

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •card bi gwi p eur apo s s te e o rn sl •f orr ev e s yt•h

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•lamb

•autumn

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•bonnet

•chicken •spring •bunny •flowers

o n c g u c e n e o a l i h g t h p o d p l y r i s u o e n p s e n p c h m s f y g t a n s k y n p s o a n l o u a e b c r e l dc f i . ch b o n n e t o r le h j d es o t pe o er qu w pr cs e a w l o d r o y o a t m u n s y l f h w k g b e c l f v c a r d b c r o s

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For the Teacher

Section 2:

Chri stmas

‰ The Origins of Christmas Traditions There are many stories explaining the origins of Christmas symbols and traditions. Here are a few suitable for young children.

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• There are gift-bringers other than Santa. They include the Christ-child, often a young girl with long fair hair, dressed in white with gold wings and a crown of lighted candles. She appears on Christmas Eve on behalf of the Baby Christ, who was about to be born.

continuing life throughout the long, cold winter. The first decorated tree was introduced to Britain by Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s consort. The story goes that a poor woman decorated a tree with hand-made decorations. During the night spiders spun their webs throughout the tree which, reflected by the light, shone like tinsel.

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• Saint Nicholas: Believed to be a fourth Century Bishop who secretly threw coins down the chimney for poor, unmarried girls to use for their dowry. The story goes that the coins fell into the girls’ stockings, which were hanging up to dry near the fire, which is why some children still hang up a stocking on Christmas Eve.

• Gifts: Exchanged as early as the feast of Saturnalia, in early Rome. In Christian times gifts represent those given to Jesus by the three wise men and later, of course, the money given by Saint Nicholas.

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• The tree: In pagan times, in the Northern Hemisphere, bonfires were lit, representing the hidden sun. Our trees, covered first in candles and today, in lights, look like bonfires. Branches from evergreen trees were taken into the caves as a symbol of 14

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• Kris Kringle (Norway): reputedly the elf whose responsibilities include the building of Santa’s sleigh, and who invented the magic dust which enables the sleigh to run smoothly and quietly over roofs. Befana (Italy) and Baboushka (Russia) were old women who refused to accompany the Wise Men and/or refused hospitality to the Holy Family (stories are confusing) and now wander the world, leaving gifts for children, searching for the Baby.

• Holly and mistletoe: Used to decorate homes in the northern hemisphere where greenery is scarce in winter. However, kissing under the mistletoe was an early fertility rite and mistletoe is never used in churches.

• Carols: Some were originally dances, the participants singing as they danced to music provided by flutes. Human voices eventually replaced the flute and led to the tradition of ‘wassailing’, or going from house to house and singing carols. Some carols were written as hymns. • Bon-bons or crackers: Originally wrapped sugared almonds. Thomas Smith, an Englishman, added riddles and love messages and, later, saltpeter strips for the snap.


Christmas ‰ Christmas Around the World ‰ Greetings: French

r o e t s Bo r e p ok ‰ Sweity Mikolaj’s u S Feast Day (Poland) – Joyeux Noel

Italian

– Buon Natale

German

greeted by the mayor and children who leave carrots in clogs for Sinterklass’ white horse, which are exchanged for presents and a funny poem.

– Froliche Weihnachten

Dutch

– Felis Navidad

– Zalig Christougena

Maori

– He Mere Kirihimete

Chinese

– Kang His Hsin Nien

Japanese

– Meri Kurisumasu

Vietnamese

– Le Nudi En

– DECEMBER 6TH

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Spanish

Sweity Mikolaj leaves small surprise gifts hidden under children’s pillows.

‰ Christmas Eve

Note: Some nations celebrate the Nativity on December 24 and 25 but gifts are exchanged on a different day.

– DECEMBER 24TH

German families hang an evergreen wreath, with four candles, in the home. The first candle is lit on Advent Sunday, the second and third on the following Sundays and the fourth on Christmas Eve. Their gifts are brought by an angel, who is never seen by the children.

reminder of his birthplace.

In Poland the people fast all day and feast © ReadyEdP ubl i cat i ons at night, when a vacant chair is placed at head of the table for the Christ child. ‰• German Tradition f orr evi ew puthe r p ses l y Straw o is scattered ono then table as • a

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In Norway, church bells are rung at 4pm, a custom called Rine in Julen, “Ringing in Christmas”. In Britain, America and Australia Santa visits every home to leave presents for the children.

o c ‰ Christmas . Day che e r o t r s supe r ‰ Epiphany

‰ St. Barbara’s Day

– DECEMBER 4TH

Many European markets sell cherry branches which are placed in water in a warm place. If they blossom on Christmas Eve, good fortune is assured.

‰ Sinterklass Eve (Holland) – DECEMBER 5TH

– DECEMBER 25TH

(Twelfth Night) – JANUARY 6TH The arrival of the Wise Men at the stable in Bethlehem. Italian families receive their gifts from La Befana.

Sinterklass arrives in Amsterdam to be 15


Christmas ‰ Activity Suggestions • Discuss the various anniversaries celebrated by the children, their families and communities, the ways in which they celebrate, the types of food they eat and presents they give.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Make a diorama of the Christmas scene. • A collection of posters, photographs and/or pictures with a Christmas theme is a wise investment as these can be used to motivate discussions, picture talks and writing. The teacher’s magazine, Classroom, is a good source, as are the Ashton Scholastic topic books and some magazines. The Women’s Weekly has provided me with many pictures with an Australian theme, often humorous. Mounted and laminated, these still look good after many years’ use.

- Collect reproductions of oldfashioned Christmas cards and make a display of these; and a selection of modern cards.

ew i ev Pr

• Read a version of the Christmas story with which you feel comfortable. Discuss the background setting – politics, geography, climate, etc. – in simple terms.

Teac he r

• The children can make decorations for the classroom, gift wrap and cards.

- Collect used cards, gift wrap, remnants of material, lace, ribbons, wool, etc. from friends and parents.

Place the necessary materials in an activity centre for early finishers to use, as well as in art/craft and writing lessons.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Gifts for families can also be made inp art/craft lessons. •f orr evi ew pur os esonl y•

-

16

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• Explain the meaning of Advent. Use an Advent calendar in the classroom for the last few weeks of term.

• Discuss ways in which the children can use their time, at school and home, so that waiting for Christmas is an enjoyable experience. Some ways in which they can help their teachers and families are decorating their classrooms and homes, helping with cooking and other special preparations, making gifts.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Sample Collection Christmas celebrations around the world Christmas food Traditional and modern Santas with children Trees and gifts Candles, holly, mistletoe, cones, yule log, stockings and other decorations The Nativity scene

• Make snowflake and stained glass window designs for classroom windows.


Christmas ‰ Activity Suggestions • After a discussion on the origins of such Christmas symbols as candles, stars, holly, etc. the children can make headbands with one symbol, painted and sprinkled with glitter, to wear for the class party.

• Use Miyoshi’s Christmas Lamb to motivate the children’s art work with coloured chalks and black paper and Robbins’ Baboushka and the Three Kings for crayons and grease proof paper work.

• Prepare the food for the Christmas party in the classroom, using mathematics wherever possible – weighing, measuring, rolling, cooking times, etc.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• The children can decorate a folder in which to store completed work which is not used for display. Older children can be encouraged to produce their own Christmas project (see worksheet).

• Make napkin rings, using sections of cardboard rolls, painted and decorated, which the children can use for the Christmas party, plus enough for each family member so they can also be used at home on Christmas Day.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

• Teach the children several carols and Christmas songs. Organise a visit to a hospital or home for the elderly to entertain the patients/residents and a family carols by torchlight gettogether, a safer alternative for young children.

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• Invite grandparents to talk about their childhood Christmases.

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• Discuss the reason why some Christmas cards and pictures show winter scenes and carols and songs speak of snow. Relate this to the different activities in each hemisphere. Read and discuss “Christmas in New Zealand” in The First Margaret Mahy Story Book.

• Have all special events (carols by torchlight, party, etc.) over by the end of the penultimate day of term. The children can bring their own games and toys for the final morning while the Christmas decorations are cleared away.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Internet Resources Christmas Around the World websites: www.santas.net/aroundtheworld.htm northpole.net/world.htm www.the-north-pole.com/around www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/xmas/around.html - Kids Domain 17


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Section 2

Christmas

Word Search

Can you find these Christmas words in the word search? •cards •cake

•tree

•Noel

•Santa

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

•stars

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •gift •f orr e vi e s m iw s p eur l pdos ne ao cnl ayp•

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•party

•chimney

. t •carols e

•stocking •candles •manger •Christmas 18

a r d o n k e y u o n a r s c a k e l r g h a t a p a r t y e r c h r i s t m a o c . r s o e o d l te a m ch r e o t r t r s eu ep l r ose f e a e r a z n s l o i f p s t o c k i n g s a a s l h c h i m n e

r e l s a n t a y

m . u

•donkey


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas Acrostic

Write a word beginning with each of the letters in CHRISTMAS. Use words with a Christmas flavour.

r o e t s Bo r e ________________________ p ok u ________________________ S

C ________________________ H I

________________________

S ________________________ T ________________________ M ________________________

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Teac he r

R

A ________________________ © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

S ________________________

Do the same with these words.

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T ______________________ T ______________________ R ______________________ O ______________________

. te ______________________ o S ______________________ c . che e ______________________ r o t r s super

E ______________________ Y ______________________ E

S

Try some more of your own with these words. candle holly lamb 19


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas List

Mother was so busy she tore up the list she had made of things to do and buy. Can you help her by drawing lines between the two halves of each word or phrase?

ents

cards

ations invitations

ings

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

bake

r o e t s B r e o decor pres stock post party p o u k S cake

Add to the list five more things which she has to buy. 1. ________________________ © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. ________________________

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4. ________________________ 5. ________________________

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3. ________________________

o c . che 1. _______________________________________________ e r o t r s super 2. _______________________________________________ Now write five things you can do to help.

3. _______________________________________________ 4. _______________________________________________ 5. _______________________________________________ 20


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas Antonyms

Write the opposites of these words. hot happy

give

r o e t s Bo r e p ok ________________________ u S ________________________

________________________

baby

________________________

top

________________________

working

________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

sun

________________________

night

________________________

wet

________________________

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m . u

©R eadyEdPubl i cat i ons ________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

whisper

Now use three of the words to write sentences about Christmas.

. te o __________________________________________________ c . c e her r __________________________________________________ o t s super __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________

21


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Section 2

Christmas

A ‘Chruzzle’

Here is a Christmas puzzle for you to solve. 1. You may find presents in this:

r o e t s B r e oo Many peoplep light these on Christmas Eve: u k ___ ___ ___ ___ L ___ ___ S ___ ___ ___ C ___ ___ ___ ___

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

2. 3.

A busy time for this jolly man: ___ ___ ___ ___ A

4.

Decorate this with lights and tinsel: ___ ___ E ___

5.

Send these to family and friends: C ___ ___ ___ ___

6.

Usually topped with icing and decorated:

7.

•f o rwet r ev e wto p ur os es on l y• Cold and buti fun play in:p ___ N ___ ___

8.

Christmas songs: ___ ___ R ___ ___ ___

9.

A prickly decoration: ___ ___ L ___ ___

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a dyEdPubl i cat i ons ___© A R ___e ___

10. Exchanged on Christmas Day: ___ ___ F ___ ___

. Can you t make e up some more words like Chruzzle o c . (Christmas Puzzle) to trick your friends? e che r o t r s super ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ 22


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Section 2

Christmas

The Christmas Story

Fill in the missing words. Jesus was born a long time ago in Bethlehem.

r o e t s Bo r e p , but were visiting theok did not live __________ u S city __________ register their names.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

His mother and father, Mary ________ Joseph,

They were __________ after their long journey and __________ not find anywhere to stay.

__________ last an inn-keeper allowed them ___________

©hisR ead yEdPub l i cat i ons sleep in stable with __________ animals.

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

When Jesus was born _________ gently placed him in the

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__________ on the straw there.

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In __________ fields outside the city, shepherds caring for their sheep when __________ angels told them the good

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o c . e They ran into c Bethlehem to __________ the tiny baby. her r o st super __________.

A few _________ later Mary, Joseph and the __________ Jesus were also visited __________ Three Wise Men or Kings, who __________ Jesus gifts of gold, frankincense __________ myrhh. 23


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas Jumble

Re-arrange the letters to make Christmas words. Write the correct word underneath the Christmas cracker. NASTA SART r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

DARCS

EACK

TEER

TIFGS

TRYAP

STOY

LHOLY

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

SCANDEL

. te

BALM

SCARLO

24

STICKONG

m . u

They were easy! See how you go with these! GERMAN

o c . che NEDOKY e r CAIRTOONDES o t r s super STRAMICHS

SWON


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Section 2

Christmas

An A-Z Christmas

Put these words in alphabetical order. Santa 1. ________________ cake tree donkey

5. ________________

gift

6. ________________

party

7. ________________

holly

8. ________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

manger

r o e t s B r e oo 3. p ________________ u k S4. ________________ 2. ________________

w ww

Think carefully about these. carols 1. ________________ cards

2. ________________

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9. a ________________ © Re dyEdPubl i cat i ons baby 10. _______________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• lamb

3. ________________ . te 4. ________________ Christmas o c . ch e candles 5. ________________ r e o t r s super stocking 6. ________________ chimney

star

7. ________________

sheep

8. ________________

shepherd

9. ________________

snow

10. _______________ 25


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Section 2

Christmas

Decorate the Boomers

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

26

m . u

Teac he r w ww

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ew i ev Pr

What to do 1. Draw a party hat on the first (1st) and fifth (5th) kangaroos. 2. Put a streamer round the third (3rd), sixth (6th) and ninth (9th) kangaroos. ©tenth ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 3. Give the (10th) kangaroo a •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• sack of presents. 4. Draw a blanket on the fourth (4th) and seventh (7th) kangaroos. 5. Draw a star above the second (2nd) and eighth (8th) kangaroos.

o c . che e r o t r s super


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas Mindbenders

Read the stories below, and place your answers in the box. 1. Mother bought 3 presents each for John and Jim and one for father. How many presents did she buy altogether?

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p o Presents = + u k S 2. On Christmas Day, Grandmother and Grandfather, Uncle

Bob, Aunty Rose and their three children came to lunch. How many people shared lunch with Mum, Dad, Jack and Jill?

+

=

People

3. Uncle Bob, Aunty Rose and their three children left after © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons lunch. How many people were left?

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• -

=

People

w ww

m . u

4. Dad, Grandfather, Jack and Jill went for a walk before tea. How many people were left at home? People = . te o c 5. After tea, Grandmother and Grandfather went home. How . c e r many people h were left? er o t s super

-

=

People

On the other side of this page draw a picture of everyone eating lunch. Label the people with their names. You will have to think of names for Uncle Bob’s children. 27


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Section 2

Christmas

Christmas Gifts

Here are instructions for two gifts you could make for a friend. Side 1

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

Jumping George Draw Jumping George on both sides of a card. 1.On one side draw George standing still, arms by his side and legs fairly close together. (See side 1.) 2.On the other side draw George with his arms Side 2 up and legs out. (See side 2.) 3.Fix the card to a pencil. 4.To set George in motion, revolve the pencil © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons back and forth between your palms.

w ww

Ojos de Dios (Eye of God) 1.Cross two sticks. 2.Bind them with crisscrossed wool, wrapped several times over. 3.Form the diamond by wrapping the wool once around each arm of the cross. Vary the colours as you go. 4.Tie tassles to the ends of the sticks.

. te

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1.

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For the Teacher

Section 3: Public Holidays

‰ Australia Day This is the time when we celebrate Captain Arthur Phillip’s arrival in Australia with the first fleet. Although this special day occurs during the holidays many schools have a day set aside near the beginning of the school year to celebrate this important event.

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Younger children can be told that, before this date, Aboriginal Australians lived here, but there were no cities or towns, only bushland. Some explorers sailed around the coast and a few landed on the coast. Many places were named after early explorers and members of the first fleet. Explain the meaning of the Australian flag. Compare with your state flag. Tell the children that the flags are flown on government buildings, some private buildings, schools and some private homes. The flag should always be flown on Australia Day, Commonwealth Day, Anzac Day, the State’s Foundation Day, United Nations Day and Remembrance Day. Explain the meaning of the flag flown at half-mast.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• Labor Day

Explain how difficult times were for early settlers and that some of them were convicts.

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Explain to the children that in the early days of Australian settlement, people worked long hours for very little pay. The sick, widowed and unemployed did not receive government financial assistance. Schools were only for the rich.

In 1856, Melbourne workers refused to word more than eight hours per day. They triumphantly carried their banner, bearing the words, “8 hours pay, 8 hours recreation, 8 hours rest”.

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Discuss the importance of a balanced work, rest and play lifestyle.

Explain simply that this is the day when we remember those Australians and New Zealanders who died while fighting at Gallipoli, but we also include those who died in all wars, in special ceremonies around the country. Tell the story of Private Simpson and his donkey. Bake Anzac biscuits as a class project, explain their origin, i.e. inclusion in the parcels sent to soldiers. www.awm.gov.au/encyclopedia/anzac/biscuit/recipe.htm - Anzac Biscuit Recipe 29


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Section 3

Public Holdays

The Australian Flag

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Colour in the Australian flag using the correct colours.

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Section 3

Public Holdays

Making a New Town

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Below is a map of an uninhabited country. Pretend you are an early settler and must build a town. Design a legend for symbols you use.

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Children’s Work Long Ago

Section 3

Public Holdays

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In the boxes below draw four jobs you may have had if you were born long ago.

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For the Teacher

Section 4:

Other Cultural Festivals

‰ Chinese New Year

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This is a wonderful festival of colour and tradition, the most important festival of the year to the Chinese. Chinese legend tells that, in the 5th century B.C., Buddha invited all the animals to visit him. Sadly, most animals ignored the invitation. Only twelve accepted and they arrived in this order: the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig. As a sign of gratitude Buddha offered each animal a year which would be his alone throughout time. The year would carry the animal’s name and express his personality traits, which would be found in all people born in that year. Even today many Chinese take this into account in their choice of marriage and business partners, friends, career and every aspect of www.holymtn.com/astrology/year.htm their lives. Check out There are other considerations for the Chinese: Yin and Yang types and the five elements (water, fire, wood, metal and earth) to which each year is joined, but these need not be taken into account with young children.

Below is a list of years attributed to the animals and the most common traits. The Rat – 1984; 1996 The Horse – 1990; 2002 •Intuitive •creative •inventive,

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •Cheerful •well-liked •wise •impatient •adventurous •charming •jealous, •angered f orr evi ew pu•garrulous r posesonl y• •easily The Ox – 1985; 1997

The Goat – 1991, 2003

The Tiger – 1986; 1998

The Monkey – 1992; 2004

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•Artistic •intelligent •gentle •timid •pessimistic.

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•Patient •eccentric •gentle •dextrous •quiet

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•Ambitious •talented •conservative •steady •tasteful

The Dragon – 1988; 2000

•Healthy •energetic •short-tempered •stubborn •honest •courageous •exacting •anxious

The Snake – 1989; 2001

•Clever •intelligent •inventive •organised

•Enthusiastic •brave •a little eccentric •meditative •private

•Honest •sincere •critical •loyal •stubborn •calm

The Pig – 1995; 2007 •Strong-minded •persistent •gallant •polite

•Attractive •vain •wise •helpful •meditative 33


Chinese New Year ‰ Activity Suggestions The Chinese New Year festival is celebrated over a 15 day period. The house is thoroughly cleaned to chase away evil spirits before New Year’s Eve. Considerable emphasis is placed on the family, including parents-in-law, the ancestors and gods. Celebrations include banquets, lion and dragon dances, dragon boat races, the exchanging of gifts and the making and giving of lanterns.

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• Use pictures of Chinese art, food, clothing and symbols to introduce this festival.

• Tell the story of Buddha’s invitation and his gift to the animals. Discuss the year/s in which the children were born and the present year. • Make a collage picture of the animal whose year is beginning.

• If you are fortunate enough to live in an area where a dragon boat race is held, do try and watch this colourful event, which originated 2000 years ago when a Chinese poet, Mee Ho, drowned himself and many boats paddled out to try and save him.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o r ev i ewmeal.pur posesonl y• • Prepare and eat ar simple Chinese • Read Arlene Mosel’s Tikki Tikki Tembo or a Chinese dragon story.

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• Invite a Chinese member of the community to talk about their special celebration.

. te Internet Resources o c . che e r o t r s super www.chinapage.com/newyear.html - China Page

www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/chinesenewyear/ - Art/Crafts

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_New_Year - Wikipedia Article

www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/chineseny.html - Kids Domain

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Section 4

Chinese

Chinese Lantern

Colour in the lantern using red, orange and yellow. Cut out carefully. Fold in half, cut along the dotted lines, open out. Paste the two short ends together. Add the handle.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

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Other Festivals

For the Teacher

‰ Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr This is an important Muslim festival. Muslims follow the Islamic faith. “Islam” means submission to the will of God (Allah). Mohammed was their prophet, to whom was given the tenets of their faith, which he wrote down. This book is known as The Koran.

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There are five duties the Muslim must fulfil, the five pillars of Islam, one of which is fasting the daylight hours of Ramadan. The others are the prayer, “there is only one God (Allah) and Mohammed is his prophet”, praying in the proper manner at the specified times each day (sunrise, noon, mid-afternoon, sunset and at night), the giving of Zakat (a percentage of one’s income for the poor), and at least one pilgrimage to Mecca.

The Koran gives a code of behaviour and influences family life, business, which foods can be eaten, education, law and politics.

Eid ul-Fitr means “the festival of breaking the fast” and immediately follows Ramadan. It lasts three days and commences with the sighting of the new moon. After a light meal the people visit the mosque to give thanks for a successful fast. They apologise to family and friends for any pain they may have unknowingly given and ask for forgiveness. They donate their Zakat ul-Fitr (the gift of fast-breaking), usually the equivalent of the cost of one meal for each family member. Gifts are exchanged and the festivities commence. New clothes, bought specially for the occasion, are worn.

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Other special words: Bairan – the custom of exchanging sugar sweets. Eid Murabak - Happy Festival

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‰ Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

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This is a Jewish festival, believed to be the holiest day of the year. The people fast throughout the day, which is spent in prayer. Jews believe this is the day when they are judged by God and their names written in the Book of Life.

‰ Diwali

This is a Hindu festival which lasts for 3-5 days, occurring at the end of the monsoon season. The word literally means “a row of lights”. Every possible place around the home (doorsteps, balconies, roof tops and courtyards) is decorated with divas (clay lamps), candles and electric light. It commemorates the return from exile of Rama and his wife, Sita, to the throne. Hindus believe Rama is the supreme god, Vishnu, in human form. He is the model of loyalty and honour and Sita the model of loving devotion. 36


The lights represent the conquest of good over evil, as light conquers darkness. Hindu gods are believed to have a male and female aspect. Lakshmi is the female aspect of the god Vishnu and is the goddess of good fortune. She is also honoured at this time. This is a happy festival of rejoicing, song and dance, family gatherings and the wearing of new clothes. The house is cleaned and gifts are exchanged.

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This is a Jewish festival which celebrates the victory of early Jews over their Greek oppressors. During Greek rule the Jewish temple had been defiled and, following their victory, Judah, the Jewish leader, ordered the temple be thoroughly cleaned and the Menorah, the temple candlestick which was supposed to burn continually, be relit. Only enough oil for one day was available, but it stayed alight for eight days. This was considered a sign of the victory of good over evil.

Today all Jewish synagogues and households have a Menorah. This holds eight candles, plus the shammash or helper candle and is kindled at sunset and placed in the window. Jewish law states that no-one must read or work by the light of the Menorah (the holy light), hence the reason for the shammash. Anyone who was obliged to read or work after dark claimed they were using the latter.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Games are played during the festival, one of which usess ae four-sided trundle, dreidel, • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s o n l y • or top. Your students can play this game.

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* They should sit in a circle around a bowl. Each child should have an equal number of nuts or counters, one of which is placed in the bowl from each player.

* The trundle, which is spun in turn by each player has one of each of the letters, N,G,H and S, on each side. These stand for Nes Gadol Hayah Sham (the great miracle happened there).

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* In the game they stand for:

Nicht – no nuts/counters are taken

Ganz – the child who spun this takes all the nuts/counters in the bowl. All other players place one nut/counter in the bowl. Haleb – half the nuts/counters are taken from the bowl. Shtell – the player puts another nut/counter into the bowl. The game continues until one player has all the nuts/counters or they are all in the bowl.

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For the Teacher

Section 6: Other Celebrations

‰ Mother’s Day

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• Discuss the work that mothers do. Even mothers who are paid employment have work they do around the home and in the community. • Discuss ways in which the children can help at home. • Invite mothers and grandmothers who help at school in a voluntary capacity to afternoon tea with the children. • Write poems and/or acrostics about mothers. • Make Mother’s Day cards. • Grow plants using 2-litre soft drink bottles as terrariums. • Collect roses, lavender and other fragrant flowers several weeks earlier, dry them and make up potpourri sachets. • Cover glass bottles with torn pieces of crepe paper. • Wrap string around a tin covered in adhesive for a pen holder.

© RDay eadyEdPubl i cat i ons ‰ Father’s

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• Discuss the work your students’ fathers do, particularly unpaid employment around the home and in the community, and the ways in which children can help them. • Read stories about fathers. akidsheart.com/holidays/fday/dadmain.htm www.apples4theteacher.com/holidays/fathers-day/index.html • Follow up the story with a discussion of special times or activities which your students share with their fathers. • If any of your students’ fathers are active P & C members or help at the school in any way, show your appreciation by sending a thank you card signed by all the children. • Dramatise short stories or events from books, allowing groups of children to improvise or write their own scripts. • Take advantage of community-organised events or invite the community into your school.

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Internet Resources familycrafts.about.com/cs/holidays/l/blspecdays.htm - Craft Ideas www.holidayinsights.com/world/ - Special Days Around the World www.google.com/Top/Kids_and_Teens/People_and_Society/ Holidays_and_Special_Days/ - Google Links www.earthcalendar.net/index.php - Earth Calendar 38


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Section 6

Other

Celebrations

Mum’s Work

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Draw pictures of the jobs your mother does. If you think you could help draw yourself in the picture too.

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For the Teacher

Other Celebrations

‰ World Environment Day

• Discuss the ways in which we use trees – for buildings, furniture, food, shade, playing – and the animals which live in and under trees.

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An ideal opportunity to introduce a global perspective into your classroom.

• Discuss ways in which Third World environments could be destroyed – logging, mining or “unsuitable” farming. This might include growing crops for fodder for animals in developed countries in areas where the indigenous people originally lived and worked the land for sustenance or using hybrid seeds from developed countries rather than the non-hybrid ones originally used. The former require expensive fertilisers and pesticides, and their success rate over a prolonged period is reduced.

• Check out the Arbor Day Teachers’ Resource page. There are lesson ideas and stories galore. www.teacherplanet.com/ resource/arbor.php

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• View a video which shows a diversity of environments. You can turn the volume down and provide your own narration.

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‰ Arbor Day

• Discuss the reason why forests are cleared or culled and the alternatives to this process.

There are other suggestions and activity sheets in my book, The Environment.

www.arborday.org/ © ReadyEdPu bl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pu r posesonl y• ‰ Children’s Book Week

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• Group of older children can make board or card games which feature events from their favourite book/s.

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• Make a large collage of plants and animals.

www.unep.org/wed/2007/english/

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• Explain the purpose of Earth Summit conferences, how pollution in one place can affect the whole planet and encourage the children to suggest ways in which all countries could work together to care for the flora, fauna and all people of the planet.

Each year this special week has a theme. Here are a few general suggestions.

• Play charades, using book titles.

• Play Hangman, using authors, book titles or well-known characters. www.cbc.org.au/bookweek.htm


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Section 6

Other

Celebrations

Know Your Books and Authors

Find these authors in the word search.

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•Potter

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L B E H L O O D A H L P E R U Y C H I G I U R A •Ormerod W A T T K L R E T T O P © Rea yEd ca i oCns Id D M AP Hu Ybl Li Lt K W C •Ahlberg Si M Gp Hu Tr Nos Ce Sso Tn Hl S• E •f orr ev ew p y V C H L R J A F R I B N •Hutchins N A R B Y N Q U O N I M O R M E R O D Y W S T U •Lewis E L A R O M M D S P I F •Carle D G I L R U M A D P . te HT ES W T F A E I Cc EoF Y . •Edwards c e Ce K A I N S Do RrA W D E h •Salmon

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Other Celebrations ‰ NAIDOC Week • Display photos of Aboriginal arts, crafts, homes, food, people. • Take this opportunity to introduce your children to the rich array of Aboriginal arts, crafts and literature. Visit an exhibition.

Apart from the Royal Agricultural shows in capital cities, there are many smaller country shows.

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• Discuss the stories. Have the children write their own stories about the origin of flora, fauna or natural phenomena.

• Try and visit the show most convenient to your school, not for the side shows, rides and show bags but to help your students appreciate the contribution farmers make to our country. • A collection of pictures of modern farm machinery and alternatives used in the past, and pictures of old and new farming methods will help the children understand the different methods.

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• Read one Aboriginal legend each day – What Made Tiddalik Laugh, The Rainbow Serpent, How The Crow Became Black, Brolga the Dancer, How the Sun Was Made, Where the Frost Comes From, The Black Swans.

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‰ Agricultural Shows

• Discuss how modern machinery and methods have helped the farmer. • Identify the secondary and tertiary industries associated with farming.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Discuss the foods we eat which come from animals •f orr evi ew pur pfarm os esandocrops. nl y•

• Invite an Aboriginal dance group to your school. • Make bark paintings.

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• Make and eat damper. • Make a woven basket (as below and right).

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1. Draw 2 circles on pieces of card.

2. Have the children draw an Aboriginal design on the inner circle. 3. Cut into the outer circle as shown.

4. Weave natural materials, or wool, in and out of the slots in the outer circle.

• Make a large collage of the rainbow serpent, pasting paper scraps, material pieces, etc. in earth colours inside the line of the serpents. www.naidoc.org.au/ 42

There are more ideas and activity sheets in the Farm Animals section the Animals book in this series.

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• Invite an Aboriginal person into the classroom to explain the Dreamtime and the Aborigines’ relationship to the earth.


‰ Arts Festivals If the Arts Festival in your region occurs during the school holidays, chick if there are smaller festivals during school term. If not, stage your own school arts festival. • Older children can present a play for younger children, parents and the community.

• Involve the whole community.

‰ Halloween

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• All year levels could present different forms of dance, song and music.

• Include, also, local children’s leisure and recreation groups to make your show a success. • Hold your festival at the end of the school year as an alternative to the boring old school concert.

This is a controversial topic and you will have to bide by the parents’ and principal’s decision. However, forget the scary stories and the American hype of trick or treat and concentrate on the fun of this festival.

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• Include a display of school-produced art, crafts and literature.

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• Stage exhibitions of children’s work, drama, music, etc. using a special theme.

Halloween is the night before All Saint’s Day and was a pagan festival in the northern hemisphere, where it occurs in autumn, so apples, nuts and pumpkins were used in the celebrations. Fires were lit to scare away witches and evil spirits.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Play apple-bobbing. Children, holding • f o r r e v i e w p u r p osesonl y• their hands behind their back, try to • Involve the whole community.

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‰ Children’s Day or Week

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Some states have their own Children’s Week.

remove small apples from a bucket of water using only their mouths and teeth.

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• Arrange events over a week rather than trying to present everything on the one day.

• Remove the centre from a pumpkin, cut eyes, nose and mouth into the shell to make a Jack o’Lantern. Burn a small candle inside.

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Do take advantage of these or plan your own. • Make your aim an appreciation of children.

• Work with other schools in your area. This gives children the opportunity to work co-operatively with students at schools other than their own. This should improve inter-school relationships beyond the competitiveness of sports carnivals.

• Make pumpkin scones or soup. • Sow the pumpkin seeds.

• Read the big book, In A Dark, Dark Forest. Write a class alternative, e.g. In a sunny, sunny garden. Young children will love ‘The Little Orange House’ from Jean Stangl’s Paper Stories. www.dcrafts.com/orangehouse.htm

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Integrated Themes Series: Celebrations  

This series is designed for thematic programming in the junior classroom or pre-primary centre. Photocopiable activities are spread across t...

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