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Viewing Activities

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(F or Ages 10+) (For

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Written by Fiona Raynes. Illustrated by Terry Allen. © Ready-Ed Publications - 2003. Published by Ready-Ed Publications (2003) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood W.A. 6024 COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution. ISBN 1 86397 561 6


Introduction This activity book has been collated for use in the middle primary school. The material is stimulating and humorous and easily used by the teacher and student alike. Worksheets have been designed for classroom use, as homework activities and also to aid relieving staff.

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Based on related student outcome statements, most sheets aim to complement the Viewing component of the English curriculum. They provide teachers with a range of practical activities for

included.

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investigating both written and visual material. Aspects of other English strands have also been

Worksheets are non sequential and may be used in any order the teacher chooses. They

incorporate a wide variety of texts including an advertisement, comic strip, rebus puzzle and map, plus a range of related activities.

Š ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons For ease of use, most worksheets are stand-alone, while some require students to explore other •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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familiar texts such as a television program or library book of their choice.

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Most sheets are designed for students working alone, however some are suitable for small group work. Feedback between the teacher, student and other members of the class is encouraged.

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Where relevant, teacher notes have been included along with references to suitable web sites.

Answers have been provided in most cases, however a number of questions are open-ended, encouraging students to think laterally and form their own opinions.

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Contents

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Introduction 2 Teachers’ Points for Activity Pages 4 Links to Viewing Outcome Statements 6 Rapunzel’s Shampoo 7 Rapunzel’s Shampoo: Activity 8 Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble 9 Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble: Activity 10 Can You Follow Instructions? Activity 11 Comic Strip 12 Comic Strip: Activity 13 The History Detective 1 - Top Secret 14 The History Detective 2 - Elizabethan Crossword: Activity 15 The History Detective 3: Activity 16 E-mail 17 E-mail: Activity 18 Fancy Dress Invitation 19 Fancy Dress: Activity 20 Film Review 21 Film Review: Activity 22 One Fine Day ... 23 One Fine Day: Activity 24 Craft Time With Madam Zelda (1) 25 Craft Time With Madam Zelda (2) 26 Groovy Grid Work 27 Groovy Grid: Activity 28 Life On You 29 Life On You: Activity 30 My Super Hero 31 My Super Hero: Activity 32 A Short Play 33 A Short Play: Activity 34 Rebus Puzzles 35 Rebus Puzzles: Activity 36 Parent Newsletter 37 Parent Newsletter: Activity 38 School Rules 39 School Rules: Activity 40 Soccer News - George Grabs Goals for Goannas 41 Soccer News: Activity 42 Terrific Tuatara 43 Terrific Tuatara: Activity 44 Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit: Instructions 45 Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit: Activity 46 What’s That You’re Watching?: Activity 47 Wildlife Park 48 Wildlife Park: Activity 49 Top Secret: Activity 50 Your Lucky Day: Activity 51 What’s That You’re Looking At?: Activity 52 Mystery Photos: Activity 53 CD Cover: Activity 54-55 CD Templates 56 Answers 57

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Teaching Points for Activity Pages Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble (Page 10) A couple of web sites worth looking at are www.maxpages.com/fghogwarts/Apothecary and www.channel4.com/ science/microsites/S/spellbinder While trying to make gold, alchemists discovered methods such as distillation and condensation and some chemical elements that modern chemists are familiar with. Today it is possible to transmute elements using a particle accelerator but it’s also very expensive. Students may like to use different weights in their own recipes e.g. a grain, a scruple, a drachm, an ounce, or a dram. Early finishers may wish to try encrypting their recipes, as some alchemists did to prevent others from copying.

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Can You Follow Instructions? (Page 12)

Works best if you pretend it’s a real test - total silence, time limit, no looking at others’ work, etc.

Craft Time With Madam Zelda (Page 26)

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Comic Strip (Page 14) Students need to bring to class a comic strip from either a newspaper or magazine to be able to complete this activity. Students will each need a clean sheet of A4 paper. Show them how to turn it into a square by folding it diagonally and cutting off the remaining rectangle. Stress that folds should be made accurately and crisply. Remind students to tick the boxes as they complete each step. Some students may have their own way of using these fortune catchers - you may wish to ask for demonstrations. In America they are called ‘cootie catchers’ (cooties are head lice). Children pretend to snap them through each other’s hair before playing the game. I have recently been told that in some Australian schools, cooties are boy/girl ‘germs’!

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To play: 1 Ask your partner “Which colour do you want?” (e.g. red) 2 Spell the colour aloud, open and close the model at the same time, e.g. R E D spells red. 3 Ask ‘Which number do you want?’ Open and close the catcher at the same time. 4 The partner looks at the numbers on show and chooses one, e.g. 5. 5 Counting aloud, open and close the catcher that number of times, e.g. 1-2-3-4-5. 6 Repeat step 3, 4 and 5. 7 Open up the flap and read out what is written under the number.

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Beryl Grahams has used the fortune catcher as an art form - her clever ideas could easily be adapted for the classroom. Visit www.sunderland.ac.uk/~asObgr/coot/about.htm to see some of her works displayed at various galleries. This site also has extra information about the history of these fortune catchers and other children’s games. Students can also use fortune catchers to design their own quizzes. Replace the numbers with questions and write the answers under the flaps. (Do not repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 above if you wish to use them this way.)

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What’s That You’re Watching? (Page 29) Photocopy yesterday’s TV guide onto the back of the work sheet. Groovy Grid Work (Page 30)

As the final result reads “your name, is simply the best, better than all the rest” make sure you collect these completed sheets. Pin them to your wall for all your colleagues to see them, or save them to read when you’ve had a bad day.

A Short Play (Page 36) Whether you like it or not, text messaging is here to stay and many students will already be familiar with its unique language. Students may wish to perform their modified plays for the class.

Rebus Puzzles (Page 38) If your students enjoy these, draw one on the board for a daily challenge. www.rozies.com/Zzzz/Ringers/Pages/warmup1.html has a number of puzzles to get you started.

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Teaching Points for Activity Pages Parent Newsletter (Page 40) The whole motto is a bit of a tongue twister: “Never trouble trouble, till trouble troubles you. It only doubles trouble, and troubles others too.” Students may like to practise it and see who can say it the fastest. School Rules (Page 42) See how long your class can follow Dr McNastie’s rules. Discuss what would happen if there were no rules at all. Who makes the rules for the country?

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Terrific Tuatara (Page 46)

Tuataras are well adapted to the New Zealand climate. They are most active when their body temperature is between 12 - 17°C. Students may like to touch a beaker of water at this temperature to feel how cold these animals really are. The Kiwi Conservation Club has a student friendly fact sheet at www.kcc.org.nz/animals/Tuatara.htm

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Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit (Page 48)

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You may wish to link this with the “Can you follow instructions?” Ask students why they think some people have difficulty following instructions? Can the layout of the instruction sheet make things easier? Do pictures help? Explain that sometimes instructions sheets become difficult to understand if they have been translated from another language.

Wildlife Park (Page 50)

Before students calculate the entry price make sure they realise that a family ticket means 2 adults plus up to three children.

Top Secret (Page 52)

Students must choose a book they have never read before to complete this exercise. Students should not open the books before making their selection. You may wish to include a reporting back session to discuss their findings. Discuss the expression “you can’t judge a book by its cover” both literally and metaphorically.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Your Lucky Day •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

(Page 53) This is a homework exercise. Make sure students pick a fictional style program from within the children’s viewing timeslot.

What’s That You’re Looking At? (Page 52)

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Use a couple of interesting magazine photos to highlight things that they might include in their own descriptions e.g. body language of people, position of objects, computer manipulation of pictures, camera angles, etc. This exercise could be extended by asking students to write a story to accompany their photo, for example explaining what happened before it was taken or what happened immediately after.

Mystery Photos (Page 53) Ask your colleagues to help you build up a small collection of approximately 6 - 10 mystery photos. Aim for interesting pictures showing a variety of activities, lots of detail and taken at different times, e.g. a colleagues wedding , family picnic, birthday party, overseas holiday, an old class photo. For safety, place each photo in a plastic sheet protector and tape it to the desk, or use good photocopies. Number each photo. Use a stop watch or a kitchen timer to limit the amount of time spent on each photo - 3 minutes should be ample. Students may work in small groups or individually. If more than 6 photos are used, have the students draw extra boxes on the back of the worksheet prior to starting. Don’t forget to debrief the class afterwards by revealing the origins of the photos.

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CD Cover (Page 54) This exercise is suitable for small groups. Each group will need a variety of CD covers to compare, e.g. music aimed at different age groups. If students bring the covers to class, suggest that they leave the CDs at home and write their name on a scrap of paper placed inside. Remind students to study the artwork on the cover and not what is written although they may wish to comment on the font style used. Use examples to discuss some of the ‘clues’ students may notice e.g. colours and images used on the cover of a preschool music disc would be different to those used on a game for teenagers. The worksheet could also be used as a homework exercise.

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Links to Viewing Outcome Statements A related outcome is included at the base of each activity page. The activities are linked to the following strands below. General Outcome: Viewing - Students view a wide range of visual texts with purpose, understanding and critical awareness. A wide range of texts, covering both real and imaginary experiences are provided, to which students can respond..

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Victoria ENGLISH

Strand: Reading

Aspects of Language 2.6 (a) and (b)

Linguistic Structures and Features 2.7 (a) and 2.7 (b)

New South Wales ENGLISH Sub-strand: Reading and Viewing Texts - RS 2.5, RS 1.6 Strand: Learning About Reading - RS 2.7, RS 2.8

South Australia

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Texts 2.5 (a) and (b)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Queensland ENGLISH

Strand: Texts and Contexts - 2.3, 3.3

ENGLISH

Western Australia

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ENGLISH Strand: Viewing V2

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Sub-strand: Reading and Viewing - Cultural 2.2, Critical 2.2

. te Curriculum (Australian) o National c . che e r o t r s super Use of Texts V 1; Contextual Understanding V 2

Convention V 2.3; Process and Strategies V 2.4

ENGLISH

Strand: Reading and Viewing Level 2

Texts 2.5; Contextual Understanding 2.6;

Linguistic Structures and Features 2.7; Strategies 2.8a. Strand: Viewing V 2

New Zealand ENGLISH - Achievement Objectives Strand: Visual Language and Viewing Level 2 Viewing, Exploring Language, Thinking Critically.

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Rapunzel’s Shampoo Another bad hair day?

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hy not take a tip from Rapunzel and be amazed by Crowning Glory, a sensational new shampoo’ n’ conditioner. Specially formulated with organically grown flowers and sweetly perfumed herbs, this magical product prevents knotting, matting and unsightly split ends. It smells great too. “I used to wake up every morning with a tangled frizzy mop. By the time I had combed and brushed the brittle mess into any sort of order, all the handsome princes had ridden right by.”

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New product

“Since I started using Crowning Glory my hair is always so soft, silky and manageable - just like a true fairy tale princess’ should be. Now, I have so many gorgeous admirers I don’t know who to choose.”

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Crowning Glory can make all your dreams come true.

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also available.

Related Outcome Students identify some of the techniques used to design an advertisement, then combine this knowledge with their imagination to create their own.

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Rapunzel’s Shampoo Complete the picture of Rapunzel before she tried Crowning Glory. Draw what you think her hair may have looked like. A number of adjectives have been used to describe Rapunzel’s hair. List them below.

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Hair after:

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Hair before:

Use your own adjectives to describe what you think this product would smell like. ______________________________________________________________ This advertisement contains many different fonts. How many different

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _________________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

types can you count and why are so many used? _______________________

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Pretend you are an advertising guru. Use your imagination to create an eye-catching advertisement for another fantasy character. Your character may be from a book, a film or from a program you watch on TV. Plan your advertisement here - your teacher will give you a clean piece of paper for your final creation. Name of character: _______________________________________________

o c . Type of product: c _________________________________________________ e her r o _________________________________________________________________ t s s r u e p How will I make it standout? _______________________________________ e.g. Darth Vader

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e.g. sore throat lozenges

e.g. bright colours.

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Information to be included: ________________________________________ e.g. price. List of adjectives I can use to describe the product and the character:

____________________________________________________________________________

Related Outcome Students identify some of the techniques used to design an advertisement, then combine this knowledge with their imagination to create their own.

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Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble ... undreds of years ago alchemists were collecting ingredients for secret potions. One of their wishes was to create a recipe to transmute (change) cheap metals such as lead and copper into

gold.

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They experimented with many different ingredients. Some were easily found, for example leaves, water, milk, cobwebs and beetles. Others, such as moss from ancient gravestones, quicksilver (mercury) and crocodile teeth were harder to obtain. Urine, newts’ eyes, bats’ blood and old ear wax were disgusting. ‘Vampires’ fangs, fairies’ tears and dragons’ livers* could be added for that special touch. Sometimes the alchemists would write their recipes in code to prevent others from copying them. Magical symbols and special chants were also used. The alchemists never succeeded in their quest for making gold but they did discover many techniques and new substances that modern chemists still use today. Here is one recipe for making gold (unfortunately it didn’t work!)

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METHOD Beat the first 3 ingredients together. Carefully pour the mixture into a small cauldron and heat until the mixture starts to froth and bubble. Slowly add the horn, pinch by pinch, and stir clockwise twice. When the mixture begins to glow, add the feathers and the coins, one at a time. Remove from the heat and when the smoke clears you will find what you are after.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

INGREDIENTS A brain from a small dog (still warm) 2 teaspoons of droppings from a pet white mouse A large dollop of fresh snail slime 1 pennyweight of unicorn horn (finely ground) 3 yellow feathers from the crest of a cockatoo A dozen copper coins

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* This is use of “artistic licence”. Ask your teacher what this means. Related Outcome Students recall details from a short text on alchemy and invent their own recipe to create gold.

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Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble ... Many years ago, ______________ tried to ____________ cheap metals into ____________. They never managed but modern ___________ are still using some of their other discoveries today.

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List two ingredients from the recipe that would be relatively easy and hard to obtain. Easy Hard ___________________

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What is a cauldron? _________________________________________________

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What does clockwise mean? _________________________________________

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• __________________________________________________________________

What do you think you would have found once the smoke had cleared?

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Here are some tools you might use:

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Concoct your own recipe for creating gold. Try to use a range of real mortar crucible and imaginary ingredients. and pestle

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Related Outcome Students recall details from a short text on alchemy and invent their own recipe to create gold.

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Can You Follow Instructions? Take this simple test to see how good you are at following instructions. Work as quickly and as neatly as you can. Read through all the steps before you start. Put your name in the top left hand corner of this sheet. Underline your name. Write your date of birth in this box. Put an X in the centre of the first circle drawn here.

Draw a square around the second circle. Write your age in the third circle. Draw a smiley face in the fourth circle. Under the heading write: Sure can! Write “Is cool” underneath your name. Draw a love heart in this box. Write down the day of the week at the lower left hand corner. Close your eyes and quietly say the alphabet. Write down what 2 times 50 equals here. Pretend to sneeze then say “excuse me”. Draw a line under your answer to question 14. Write down your favourite colour here. Call out your teacher’s name when you reach this question. Draw a zigzag to the edge of the page. If you are the first one to get this far, shout out “I’m nearly finished”. Cross out the vowels in the word elephant. Check back over your answers to see if they are correct. Now that you have read this through, do only question 2 on this list and sit quietly. Stand up and give your paper to the teacher so that it can be marked. Record your final score below. Final Score

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Related Outcome Students take a quick quiz to reinforce the importance of reading instructions carefully.

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Comic Strip Excuses, excuses!

“Why I didn’t hand in my homework”

“On Monday, you told me your father had accidentally taken it to work.”

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by Stephan Nonsense

“On Tuesday, the wind had whisked it away.”

© ReadyEdPu bl i cat i ons “On Wednesday, it had been stolen by robbers.” •f orr evi ew pur po sesonl y•

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“Today, I asked you to bring your parents to school. Where are they? “

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“On Thursday, your baby sister had been sick on it.”

them Miss.”

Stephan explains why he hasn’t washed for a week.

Related Outcome Students compare the design of comic strips and then create their own.

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Comic Strip Find another comic strip and paste it on the back of your page. Compare the two comic strips. Do they use speech bubbles, are they the same length, are they both drawn in black and white?

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List features that the two comic strips have in common and list how they differ. ___________________________

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___________________________

___________________________

___________________________

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Things that are different

Use the boxes below to design your own comic strip.

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Things in common

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons You• don’t have much room to write sor you wills need to o think f o rr ev i ew pu po es ncarefully l y•about

It may be Stephan’s next list of excuses or you may like to develop an idea of your own.

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what you plan to put in each box. Use speech bubbles.

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Related Outcome Students compare the design of comic strips and then create their own.

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Top Secret

The History Detective 1 Subject: Alias: Occupation: Lived: Parents: Siblings:

Queen Elizabeth the First The Virgin Queen, Good Queen Bess, Gloriana, Q.E.I. Queen of England from 1558 - 1603. 1533 -1603 Father = King Henry VIII, Mother = Ann Boleyn (Father had her mother beheaded when Elizabeth was only 2 years old.) Older sister Mary (Bloody Mary), younger brother Edward VI

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Distinguishing features (see attached photo)

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Dress: Owns over 2000 elaborate and heavily jewelled dresses. Most have large ruffs at the neck. Hair: Naturally red hair but may be wearing one of her 80 wigs. Makeup: Lots worn. Thick white-lead foundation (very toxic and damaging to the skin), red lips and cheeks. ‘Veins’ painted on her skin with blue dye to make her appear even fairer. Jewellery: Loves jewels, especially pearls. Used on her gowns and in her hair. First person in England to wear a wristwatch. Teeth: Rotten, due to poor dental hygiene and eating too much sugar. May have rags stuffed in her mouth to make her cheeks Wig look plump where her teeth are missing. Smell: Like most people of her time, Ruff she’s not keen on washing! ]

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•Clever and well educated. Speaks at least five languages including Latin, Pearls French and Italian. •Main enemy is Spain - especially since her warships beat the Spanish Armada. •Spinster (she never married). •Needs 300 carts to move her luggage from palace to palace. •Enjoys meat stew, bread and beer for breakfast. •Afraid of mice and very superstitious. •Executed her cousin (Mary Queen of Scots).

]

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Other important information:

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Related Outcome Students use a file on Queen Elizabeth 1 to solve a crossword puzzle and design an Elizabethan insult.

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The History Detective 2 Elizabethan Crossword .

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CROSSWORD CLUES

ACROSS

DOWN

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2. A woman who has never married. . t eof her skin. o 3. The colour 4. She ruled this country. c . c 9. Likely colour of her teeth. 5. She was afraide of these animals. hedrink. r o t r 11. Elizabeth’s breakfast 6. Her father, King s _________ VIII. super 1. She had about 80 of these.

12. Name of subject.

7. One of the languages she could speak.

13. Subject has been dead about

8. Another word for “Also known as”.

______ hundred years.

9. Head chopped off.

14. Used to fill out her cheeks.

10. Worn around the neck of her dress.

15. Her favourite jewels.

16. The colour of her hair.

Related Outcome Students use a file on Queen Elizabeth 1 to solve a crossword puzzle and design an Elizabethan insult.

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The History Detective 3

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According to gossip, Elizabeth I used to spit and swear. While spitting and swearing are not permitted in your school, your teacher has given you permission to throw a few Elizabethan insults around.

Choose one phrase from each list below.

baa © ReadyEdP u b l i c i o n s rnat c l h e lumpis hed ge-p d hug e in a r b il ger• io o •f orr e i e w p u r p o s e s l y g n y bv n u m p -mu eas m gg le g

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Now join all three together and write an insult for your: • Best friend:

___________________________________________________

• Worst enemy: ___________________________________________________ • ___________ ___________________________________________________ (Your own choice - but remember teachers have very long memories!) Related Outcome Students use a file on Queen Elizabeth 1 to solve a crossword puzzle and design an Elizabethan insult.

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E-mail Use the e-mail below to answer the questions on page 18. Untitled - Message 0Send Print From:

Attach

Reply

Delete

Address Book

Toby@happyschool.com

To:

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Cc: Subject:

Saturday 5 October

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Sent:

What’s knew with you?

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Deer Jordan,

It was grate to get your e-mail and here what you’ve bean doing. I’m

pleesed you liked the joke book i sent you for you’re birthday. have you herd these:

What did Rudolph wont for christmas? a pony sleigh station. Š ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons * what do you do if a monstre rolls his eyes at you. Just pick •f o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• them up and role them back. *

*

Whats the diffrence beetwen a maggot and a cockroach! cockroaches crunch moor wen you eat them.

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Wot do you find in a cleen nose? Fingre prints.

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*

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My teacher told me the last to jokes - hes reely cool. Sometimes he

wheres sunglases in the class becase he says were so brite.

Mum sed you may bee coming for a visit in the holidays - i can’t weight to sea you. Rite back soon You’re freind Toby

Related Outcome Students recognise common symbols used in e-mail and use their spelling and editing skills to correct a letter.

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E-mail Use the email on page 17 to complete the following: Match up the following icons with their meanings.

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Attach Reply Delete

Address book

0 

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Print

Who sent this letter? _____________________________________________

Š ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Who has it been sent to? _________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• What date was it sent? ___________________________________________

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There is nothing written in the CC box. What does CC mean and when would you use it? _______________________________________________

Toby needs to fix up a number of things before he sends this letter.

o c . che e r o t r s swords er pused Watch out for spelling mistakes, u incorrectly and punctuation

He would normally use his computer’s proofreading tools to do this. Use your proofreading skills to correct Toby’s work. Circle the mistakes and write your corrections in the space above the word. errors. (Hint: There is at least one error on every line.) Find out your school’s e-mail address:_____________________________ Research: What is a computer virus? How can you make sure that your computer doesn’t catch one? Write your findings on the back of this sheet or a separate piece of paper. Related Outcome Students recognise common symbols used in e-mail and use their spelling and editing skills to correct a letter.

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Fancy Dress Invitation

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Please come to my

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red tights, your undies on the outside of your shorts and fly round the garden in a flowing cape, overcoming evil and championing the good? Ever felt the need to wrap yourself from head to foot in a roll of soft white toilet paper and pretend you’ve been disturbed from your Egyptian tomb? Ever had a sudden desire to put a tin bucket on your head and hold up banks? Well now’s your chance . . .

FANCY DRESS PARTY. © ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ebruary Date: Saturday 15th F February •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Time: 3 - 6 p.m.

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Place: My house

Please wear a costume that starts with the first letter* of your name. There will be prizes for the most imaginative, outrageous and bizarre outfits. Hope you can come and join in the fun.

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Your friend 12345678901234567890123456 Rosina 12345678901234567890123456

12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 RSVP: ph. 50211638 by 12 Feb. 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 ps. * Xavier, my mother said you 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456 12345678901234567890123456

can use the second

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Related Outcome Students use the information found in a birthday invitation to complete a short cloze activity and identify common abbreviations. Students use their own knowledge to solve a puzzle.

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Fancy Dress Invitation Use the invitation on page 19 to complete the following: The party will be held from ______ to ______ on ___________________ at ___________________ . Some children have already decided what they are going to wear. Use the clues to discover their costumes. The first one has been done for you.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S small child

Brittany Grace

baby

__________________

ET GP

__________________ __________________

Shane

serpent

__________________

Wayne Paulo

abracadabra sea robber

__________________ __________________

Jake

writes for newspapers _______________

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Alice Diana

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spectre

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons There are ar number ofi abbreviations inp this invitation. Write down what • f o r e v e w p u r o s e s o n l y • they mean (you may need to use a dictionary to help you).

What would you wear? ______________________________________________

RSVP - _________________________ ps. - _____________________________

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p.m. - __________________________ ph. - _____________________________ Use your dictionary skills to discover the meaning of the following.

ATM - ____________________ NB - ______________________ . te BO - _____________________ WWW - ___________________ o c . CD - _____________________ VIP - ______________________ ch e r er o t PTO - ____________________ E.g. s _____________________ super Find 3 more abbreviations and write down their meanings. 1.__________________________________________________ 2.__________________________________________________ 3.__________________________________________________ Related Outcome Students use the information found in a birthday invitation to complete a short cloze activity and identify common abbreviations. Students use their own knowledge to solve a puzzle.

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Film Review RA TING GUIDE RATING *Save your money **OK if it’s raining ***Great movie

E

“My Sister’s in LLove” ove”

****Do not miss it

Reviewed by Hugh Didwot.

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verything is going well for Sam (Nick Trick) until new neighbours move in. Overnight, his clever, fun-loving sister Sophie (played by the always gorgeous Brittany Bon Bon) seems to morph into a pouting, perfumed dreamer, who spends half her life sighing over the boy next door and the other half preening in front of the bathroom mirror in case he catches sight of her. This sudden change wouldn’t be a problem except Sophie is the brains behind Sam’s upcoming entry in the National Robotics Championship. If he wins he will be able to use the prize money to send his ailing pet dog Snowball (Prince Sebastian Woofalot IV) to an animal specialist and have him cloned. Far fetched, but it’s that kind of film.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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The love interest, Simon (in reality, teen heart-throb Brad Le Beau), appears totally bemused by all the attention, preferring skateboarding and computer games to Sophie’s charms. However Sam, not sure if his sister will recover in time for the competition, joins forces with Simon’s dog-loving younger sister (Rosie Primrose), also called Sam, short for Samantha. Hope you are following things so far. Together the two Sams scheme to sabotage any chance of romance. This is when the fun starts. The two younger siblings cause chaos on a grand scale. A chemistry set is used to create teeth-staining orange juice, perfume that makes its wearer smell like a blocked drain and bubble gum that causes a serious flatulence problem. One of the best scenes involves the love struck, gum chewing Sophie unknowingly applying a lip numbing gloss before a romantic meeting with her swain. All she can do while gazing into his eyes is dribble, mumble and ...

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How does the film end? Is the canine copied or does true love finally blossom? I’m not telling. You will have to grab your popcorn and get down to your local cinema and find out. RATING ****

CLASSIFICATION PG

TIME: 120 MINS.

Related Outcome Students recall information from a film review, distinguish between the actors and the characters they play, match words with meanings and use their imagination to predict a possible ending.

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Film Review Use the film review on page 21 to complete the following. The name of the film is ______________________________________ . It was reviewed by __________________ who gave it a rating of ________________. It lasts for __________ hours and has a

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classification of __________.

Nick Trick

Snowball

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The Stars - Who’s Who. In the spaces write in either the name of the actor or the character they play.

Rosie Primrose

© ReadyE dPubl i cat i ons “Simon” “Sophie” Match up the following words in the text with their best meanings. • f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (You may need a dictionary to help you.)

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morph confusion cloned change bemused boyfriend sabotage puzzled chaos copied flatulence destroy swain sick ailing I’m too polite to say. There are many different types of film, e.g. mystery, romance, science fiction, horror, comedy and adventure.

o c . che e r o t r s subeste r Which type do you think wouldp describe this film? ______________ _____________________________________________________________

The reviewer hasn’t told you the ending. Describe what you think happens. _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Related Outcome Students recall information from a film review, distinguish between the actors and the characters they play, match words with meanings and use their imagination to predict a possible ending.

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One Fine Day ...

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t was a fine day, it was a wonderful day, it was a perfect day. The sky was blue, the sun was shining and there wasn’t a cloud to be seen.

We were all out in the garden. Well, all except dad. He was hiding in his shed. He disappeared shortly after he’d heard mum’s plans to redesign the vegetable garden.

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Cheryl was sitting in an old deck chair painting her toenails with a sickly pink polish called Romantic Rose. “Dream on spotty,” I thought.

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Grover was snoozing nearby. Her little doggy feet moving in time with her little doggy dreams and her nose gently twitching whenever a new smell wafted by on the gentle breeze. It wasn’t just the birds that were singing today, my mum was too. She’s quite a good singer really but I think her choice of song often lets her down. Today’s pick was some ancient tribal chant passed down from generation to generation. Mum was using secateurs to do some serious damage to a large rambling shrub. As each branch fell she’d add her own little twist to the tune. “You’ve gotta stop and smell the roses” she warbled (lop) “oh yeah”. “You’ve gotta stop and smell the roses” (chop) “hey baby”. Sometimes, if the branch was particularly difficult to get through she sounded something like this. “Yooooooo’ve gottaaaaaa ssssssssstop n’ smeeeeeeeeeeeel the roooooooooses” (crunch) (sigh) “uh huh”. Actually the tune wasn’t that bad, in fact it was quite catchy in a strange sort of way.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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I left mum massacring what was left standing of the vegetation and wandered down towards the veggie patch thinking of the video I was planning to watch tonight. My best friend Alex said “The Revenge of Dracula Part 7” was the best one yet, with heaps of action and gore. Leaning against the fence was the old scarecrow Cheryl and I had built two years ago. It was destined for the tip as part of the new look garden, “So” I hissed in my best vampire voice “I shall have my revenge.” “You are doomed.” “I’m going to suck your blood until you are nothing but an empty shell of a scarecrow but first I’m going to stop and smell the roses.” With my arms outstretched I swooped down onto the closest flowers and inhaled deeply. Not bad. I sniffed another, then another. “There is no escape,” I cried between sniffs. Then it happened. On my last sniff I realised that Dracula’s snout had not been the only thing enjoying the scented bloom. I had sucked an unidentified creature up into my nose. Ahhhhhhhhhhhh!

o c . che e r o t r s super

Related Outcome Students use their creative skills to continue a story line.

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One Fine Day ... Read the “One Fine Day” story and then explain: • What will happen next? • Will the unidentified creature make it out alive or will it end up living, growing and reproducing somewhere deep within my body?

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• Will Cheryl dial 000 and fall in love with the doctor who saves my life? • Will dad have been in his shed secretly working on an invention for just such an accident? • Will Grover continue to sleep through all the drama? Use your imagination to continue the story.

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• Will mum use her voice to vibrate the creature to smithereens?

_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

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o c _________________________________________________________________ . c e her r _________________________________________________________________ o t s s r u e p _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Related Outcome Students use their creative skills to continue a story line.

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Craft Time with Madam Zelda (1) Forget crystal balls, palm readings and checking your tea leaves, today you will be making your very own fortune catcher to help you discover what the future has in store.

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These little origami models are made all over the world and are called Chatterboxes, Gadalotschka, Spalapp, Cocotee en papier, Nebo Peklo and Cootie Catchers depending on where you live.

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• What do you call them? ___________________________________________ Today you will be using them to tell fortunes, but they also have other uses. People have used them as tests, with questions and answers written on the flaps and also as invitations to birthdays and weddings. Beryl Graham has even used them as forms of art. You can see her amazing work on the World Wide Web. Your teacher has the address. Before you start construction, you must write out your list of eight predictions, e.g. You have a secret admirer, great wealth is coming your way, beware of vampires ...

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

1 _________________________________________________________________

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2 _________________________________________________________________ 3 _________________________________________________________________

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o c . che 5 _________________________________________________________________ e r o t r s super 6 _________________________________________________________________ 4 _________________________________________________________________

7 _________________________________________________________________ 8 _________________________________________________________________

Related Outcome Students follow a detailed set of visual and written instructions to make a paper model that is fun to play with.

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Craft Time with Madam Zelda (2) Follow the instructions carefully. Fold the paper accurately and press firmly along the fold lines. Tick the circle when you have finished each step.

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You will need: a square piece of paper and coloured pens/pencils.

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P

c. Turn the paper over so that the folded sides are face down. .

P

d. Fold all 4 corners towards the centre of the square again. 2

1

e. Number the small triangles (1-8).

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8

Carefully slide your 2 thumbs and 2 forefingers into the four pockets beneath the coloured squares. Move your thumbs and fingers so that they are next to each other. The fortuneteller should fold in and look like this. Once you have finished your “fortune teller” your teacher will demonstrate how to use it.

o c . f. Lift up each large c e r triangular flap. Write h your e o t r s super “fortunes” on the 8 small triangles beneath. 7

4

5

6



1

2

3

8

Close all four flaps.

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numbers are facing upwards. Fold it in half horizontally again.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i on s ‰ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• P j. Turn the paper so that the

P

i. Hold the paper in front of you. Fold it in half vertically. Unfold. Fold it horizontally. Unfold.

„

b. Fold each corner towards the centre of the square.

P

‰

P

h. Colour each small square a different colour.

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diagonally across to the other. Unfold. Repeat with the other corners.

P

‰

P a. Fold one corner

g. Turn the paper over.

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4

6

5

Related Outcome Students follow a detailed set of visual and written instructions to make a paper model that is fun to play with.

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Groovy Grid Work a

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1

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Related Outcome Students follow a series of written instructions involving grid co-ordinates.

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Groovy Grid Work Use the grid on page 27. Complete the following. 1.

Starting from the top left hand corner use a pencil to lightly number each column (a - j) and each row (1 - 20).

2.

Use your coloured pencils to draw a fancy border around the outside of the grid.

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3.

Write your first name across Row 17.

4.

Write today’s date across Row 20 (e.g. 15/5/03).

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

G A I D M

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11. Write your teacher’s surname across Row 2. E P H Y N

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(6,f), (7,e), (9,d), (9,g), (12,f), (13,e), (15,g) (5,f) (6,e), (10,e), (12,e) (5,h) (10,g), (15,f)

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(15,e) (10,f ), (11,d) (4,e), (5,d), (15,d) (15,h) (5,e)

10. Write your surname across Row 18.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

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• Use one letter per square for the following instructions. • Use the co-ordinates provided to fill in the letters on the grid. • If co-ordinates have not been provided, try to centre the words across the row.

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17. Write your teacher’s title, e.g. Mrs, Mr, Dr, across Row 1. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

R L T S B

(9,h), (13,d) (5,g), (11,e), (11,f) (6,d), (7,g), (9,e), (9,f), (10,d), (12,d), (13,g) (4,f), (5,c), (7,f), (13,f), (15,c) (7,d), (9,c) Related Outcome Students follow a series of written instructions involving grid co-ordinates.

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“Life On You” By Dr Willie Catchit

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arning - the following article on parasitology may put you off your lunch. Read it at your peril.

number of people who have ever lived - that’s a lot of bacteria and it’s lucky they are so small! Some bacteria in your mouth change sugars into a cavity-causing acid which can make you unpopular with your dentist - while others are “good guys” and actually help keep disease away.

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You’ve probably heard about blood sucking fleas and killer leeches, tape worms like ribbons and bedbugs that bite you while you sleep. You’ve probably thought being inhabited by other creatures only happened to people who didn’t take personal hygiene seriously and only washed when forced to by complaining family members, disgruntled classmates and offended neighbours - but read on.

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eyelashes and in the oil glands near your nose. These little eight-legged creatures spend their days feasting on your body’s secretions and eating dead skin cells. All the washing in the world will not remove them but since they cause no harm, just enjoy their company.

If you are unlucky, your head may be the proud residence of a family of head lice. Many people have a visit from these little insects at sometime during their lives. Easily spread and well adapted, with six legs specially designed to hold onto your hair, they can be very reluctant to move house once settled. Their eggs are glued in place with special cement and when the babies hatch, dinner is served on your scalp.

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Even healthy people play host to hundreds of creepy crawlies. These are born, live out their lives and die, often without being noticed at all. Some are visible to the human eye but many are not.

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In your mouth, microscopic teeth amoeba (pronounced ah-me-bah) are busily hoovering up bacteria and the cereal or toast that your tooth brush missed this morning. Amoeba are single celled animals that look like tiny blobs of jelly.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o You t r s may all scratch now! super Next week: “Plants

At this very moment two different species of mite (relatives of spiders) call your face home. They live in the hair follicles of your

that live on your feet” .

You have as many bacteria on you as the

Related Outcome Students will read a factual article about micro-organisms found on human skin which forms the basis for an acrostic puzzle.

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“Life On You” Use the information found in Dr Catchit’s article to identify each creature,e.g. a mite, and provide their address, e.g. your mouth.

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Name: _________________________

Address: _______________________

Address: _______________________

Address: _______________________

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Name: _________________________

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Name: _________________________

Use a dictionary to find out what PARASITOLOGY means, and then use the clues below to complete the following acrostic puzzle. 1. __ P __ __ __ __ __ 2. __ A __ __ __ __ 3. __ __ __ __ R __ 4. __ __ A __ __ 5. __ __ S __ __ __ __ 6. I __ __ __ __ __ __ 7. __ __ __ __ __ T 8. __ __ __ __ O __ __ __ __ __ __ 9. __ __ L __ __ __ __ __ __ 10. __ O __ __ __ __ __ __ __ 11. __ __ __ __ __ G __ 12. __ Y __ __ __ __ __

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

1 Related to mites. 2 A hole in your tooth. 3 Some bacteria use these to make the above. 4 Where baby head lice go to dine. 5 Means you can see it with your eye. 6 Head lice belong to this group of animals. 7 A special type of glue used to attach eggs. 8 So small you need a microscope to see it. 9 Unhappy about doing something. 10 Holes where your hair comes out. 11 These little animals like to bite at night. 12 Another word for cleanliness. Use your research skills to find more about the plants and animals that live on you.

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Related Outcome Students will read a factual article about micro-organisms found on human skin which forms the basis for an acrostic puzzle.

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M

My Super Hero y super hero can’t leap tall buildings, He doesn’t like heights, He doesn’t like leaping, Except when my friends come round and he wants to show off.

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My super hero doesn’t wear a cape, Or his jocks outside his trousers. He wears runners, cargo shorts, T-shirt and sunnies.

My super hero doesn’t have teeth like the keys on my keyboard. His are slightly cream, Sightly crooked. The bristles on his chin scratch when he kisses you. My super hero drives an old blue van. It smokes slightly going down hill, but there aren’t any flames, And he always stops for red lights, And for pedestrians.

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My super hero doesn’t fight villains, Or wrestle with crocodiles. He works hard in his office, And he talks about fish.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

My super hero likes looking in rock pools, tomato sauce sandwiches, bike rides, books about space. He likes soccer, robots, dogs but not spiders, reading the newspaper, and me. My hero.

Related Outcome Students make inferences about the subject of a poem and recognise and compare the traits of fantasy and real life characters.

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My Super Hero Read the “My Super Hero” poem and complete the following: Who do you think the author of this poem is writing about? ______________________________________________________________

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Why do you think the author thinks this person is a super hero? ______________________________________________________________ List 3 things this super hero doesn’t do and 3 things he does.

• __________________________

• ____________________________

• __________________________

• ____________________________

• __________________________

• ____________________________

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Does do

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Doesn’t do

This poem doesn’t rhyme, (it’s not supposed to) but there is a pattern to it. All the verses start with “My super hero” and most are four lines long.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Think of someone you know, e.g. someone in your family, your best friend, or even your teacher, and have a go at writing a similar poem about them. Start by making a list of characteristics and traits that a fictional (made-up) character might have. Then do the same for the person you are going to write about. Real person:

• _____________________________

• ______________________________

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E.g. fairy godmother

E.g. grandma

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Fictional person:

• ______________________________ . t eand traits: ________ Characteristics and traits: o Characteristics c . c e her • ______________________________ r • _____________________________ o t s s r u e p • _____________________________ • ______________________________ • _____________________________ E.g. hair like corn silk, strong as an ox.

E.g. it’s going to a humorous story about a family of vampires on holiday in France.

• _____________________________

• ______________________________

• _____________________________

• ______________________________

Use a separate piece of paper to write out your poem. Don’t forget to include an illustration. Related Outcome Students make inferences about the subject of a poem and recognise and compare the traits of fantasy and real life characters.

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A Short Play Grandma is doing a crossword. A child is reading. Mobile phone rings.

Child: That’s my phone. (Picks up phone and looks at it.) Dad’s sent me a text message. He’s picking me up in half an hour.

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Grandma: He’s picking me up some wholemeal flour? I don’t think I need any, dear. I only use white for baking. I could do with some eggs though if he’s at the supermarket and perhaps more milk.

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Child: (loudly and clearly) No, he is coming to get me in half an hour.

Grandma: That’s perfect. Sorry darling, you know I’m a little bit deaf. This text messaging is a great idea. I could do with something like that because I can’t always hear what people are saying.

Child: (loudly) It’s really easy to use. I don’t even have to type in the whole word. Look, I can use letters and numbers to make up sentences. (Picks up paper and pen and writes) H A N D means “have a nice day” and I space LUV space U means “I love you”.

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Grandma: (smiling) I love you too. It’s a bit like a cross between a foreign language and a puzzle isn’t it. I was always good at languages at school. (Speaks with a French accent.) French was my favourite cherie, I was tres bonne. (giggles) Child: You’re good at puzzles too so you should be able to pick it up fast. Try these (spells out) U space R space Q L and IM space gr8.

. tethinks and then smiles.) Yes, we are. This is fun.oLet’s try the Grandma: (writes, c real thing and send one back to your Dad. I know ... (Picks e up. the phone then ch r er o stops and stares at it.) Whoops. t s super

Child: (looks puzzled) What’s the matter Grandma? Can’t you think of something to write? Grandma: No, it’s not that sweetie. I can’t see the buttons on the phone! (Both laugh.) Related Outcome Working in small groups, students consider various aspects of play writing including organisational features of a script. They understand that texts can be produced and written in different ways.

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A Short Play Part 1: Read through the play on page 33 with a partner and complete the following. This play could be set at Grandma’s house, on a train or even at the beach since no details have been provided. Where do you think it could be set? _______________________________________________________________

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The author also hasn’t said what the actors will be wearing. What do you think they will look like? Child: __________________________________________________________ Grandma: ______________________________________________________ What other props (equipment) will be needed for this play? ____________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

What words did Grandma confuse with “half an hour”? ________________ _______________________________________________________________

• • • •

List the 4 messages the child wrote for Grandma and their meanings. Message Meaning _____________________________ • ______________________________ _____________________________ • ______________________________ _____________________________ • ______________________________ _____________________________ • ______________________________

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Using different styles of typing font makes it easier for the actors to follow to follow the play. Explain which words in the play are underlined. ____________________________________________

. tewords in the play are written in italics. Explain which o c . che ____________________________________________ e r o t r s super

Part 2: Read through the play again but this time alter something. A character may be changed or even added, e.g. Grandma becomes Grandad or Grandma now has a parrot which repeats bits of the conversation. Experiment with the sound of your voice and also what is said. “Half an hour” could be confused with a “broken old shower, a bouquet of spring flowers or some magical powers”. Perhaps Grandma learnt Italian at school. Practise your new improved play and be prepared to perform it. Rewrite the new script on a separate piece of paper.

Related Outcome Working in small groups, students consider various aspects of play writing including organisational features of a script. They understand that texts can be produced and written in different ways.

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Rebus Puzzles A rebus is something that is used to represent a word or a sentence. A rebus can be made up of pictures, letters and numbers. It can also be a mixture of all three.

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We still use rebuses today.

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Picture rebuses have been used throughout history since early man used them to tell stories on the walls of caves. Some written languages such as Egyptian hieroglyphs and Chinese pictographs are based on pictures.

Sometimes they are easy to decipher (work out), e.g. road signs and sometimes they aren’t, e.g. puzzles. U

C

?

=

Can you see well?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pu r posesonl y• = cat

Sometimes the pictures used show the actual thing

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=

I

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Sometimes the sounds of the picture makeup the words.

Some rebuses involve adding or subtracting a letter from a picture to make another word.

. teRE + = rebus o c . che e In some rebus puzzles only letters and numbers are r used. The way these are o r arranged may be part of the puzzle. st s uper Head Heels

=

head over heels

Funny Funny Words Words Words Words = Too (2) funny for (4) words Related Outcome Students learn about rebuses and then think laterally to solve a series of puzzles.

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Rebus Puzzles Now that you know what a rebus is, have a go at the following. U

this

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work

ME

T

+

SM

+

T S,

+

?

..,rs,t, ,v ,w ,x... are ,v,w ,w,x...

very

Your

AI

T

what

SH

+

had

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If

HE

.

2

© eadythe Ed ub i ca t i ons swers H R H P Dl + •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• of

the

the

.

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Test yourself by deciphering these words and phrases.

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in

Arrest You’re

man board

Bad Bad

____________

____________

___________

. te o ____________ ____________ ___________ c . c e herBan ana st r Millio1n o super Merepeat Good Good be be true

____________________

(7-8) Excellent

(5-6) Average

He Get Get Get Get everything

_____________________ SCORE

(3-4) Ok for a beginner

(0-2)Whoops!

Related Outcome Students learn about rebuses and then think laterally to solve a series of puzzles.

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Parent Newsletter 27 High Street, Grumbleweed. Ph 29630424 Monday 1st April

Grumbleweed Primary School

Congratulations: To Claude Bottom for winning second prize in the National Primary School Writing Competition. His story was entitled “Chased by a Werewolf”. Well done, Claude.

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School Disco: On the 8th of April, 6-8 p.m., a disco will be held in the hall. Money raised will go towards new play equipment. Students are encouraged to join in the dancing and games. Entry is $4.00. Chips, drinks and lolly bags will be available.

From the canteen: Please note the new prices for the following items: 300ml plain milk $0.95 600ml plain milk $1.35 300ml flavoured milk $1.60 600ml flavoured milk $2.20 Mrs Della Katessen (supervisor).

School Uniform Reminder In keeping with our motto (see school badge), all students are required to wear the correct uniform. Children must wear brown shoes, a white sun hat, ankle length socks - one red, one green, regulation blue and yellow spotted T-shirt. Girls - knee length, orange and purple checked skirt. Boys - knee length, orange and purple striped shorts. In cooler weather black gloves are permitted.

School Choir: Every Tuesday lunchtime. Please bring along a list of songs you would like to sing this term.

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Clothing shop hours: Mon - Thurs 9.00 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. Fri. - closed.

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Book orders: Catalogues for the book club were sent home last week. Please return your order and payment to Mrs Linda Hand in the school office by Friday.

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To give away urgently: Mr Rod Dent’s Year 4 class is seeking homes for a dozen baby mice after their pets Susan and Sarah became parents over the weekend. Snake owners need not apply. Thought for the week: Never trouble trouble ‘till trouble troubles you.

Related Outcome Students recall facts from a school newsletter.

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Parent Newsletter Use the school newsletter on page 37 to help you with the following: The name of the school is _____________________________________ .

2.

Its motto is “ ________________________________________________ ”.

3.

The newsletter was sent out on the _________________ .

4.

Book orders are to be given to _____________________ in the _______________________ by _____________________ .

5.

The disco will be held on the ______________ in the ______________ and will run from _____________ to _____________ p.m. It costs _____________ to get in.

6.

_______________________________ wrote “Chased by a Werewolf”.

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1.

7.

The clothing shop is shut on _______________________ .

8.

A large chocolate milk from the canteen costs ___________________ .

9.

The choir meets every ________________ lunchtime.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 10. Year 4 has twelve ________________ to give away. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• If you could choose one piece of new play equipment for the school

what would you choose? __________________________________________

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_________________________________________________________________ What 3 songs would you like to hear the school choir sing?

. te • _________________________________ o c . che e • _________________________________ r o t r s super • _________________________________ What do you think the “Thought for the week” means? ____________________ __________________________________ __________________________________

Draw either a boy or a girl in their school uniform.

Related Outcome Students recall facts from a school newsletter.

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School Rules 1. 2.

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Pupils will refer to their teachers as “Sir” or “Ma’am”. Pupils must stand when an adult enters or leaves the classroom. Permission to be seated will be given by their teacher.

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3.

Pupils will stand up to answer questions and wait quietly for permission to speak.

4.

Clothes must be clean and tidy at all times. Jewellry is not permitted. Girls must wear their hair tied back with string or plain ribbons.

5.

Pupils must sit and stand with straight backs.

6.

Pupils must use their right hand for writing. Those children using their left will be punished.

7. Girls will study cooking and needlework. Boys © R ad yEdand Pmetalwork. ubl i cat i ons wille study woodwork 8. Boys and girls will line up in separate rows, •f or r evi ew pur posesonl y• the smallest at the front, the tallest at the back. 9.

Prizes will be awarded for regular attendance.

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10. Pupils will remain silent unless spoken to by an adult.

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11. Pupils will not raise their hand unless given permission. 12. Pupils will not ask questions.

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13. Pupils who play truant are late for class, behave badly or whose work is untidy or not up to standard will be caned.

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14. Talkers and fidgeters and those counting on their fingers will be punished. 15. Children infected with fleas, nits or contagious diseases are not permitted to attend this establishment.

Dr McNastie, BEd, MSc, PhD (Principal)

Related Outcome Students use their own knowledge and experience to provide opinions on school rules of the past.

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School Rules So, how would you get on at Dr McNastie’s establishment? Carefully read the school rules on page 39 and complete the following.

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Place a tick in the box that sounds like you. T No problem, my present teacher insists I follow rules just like these. In fact, I think he / she helped write them. T Mmmmm, I’d be OK except for rules number_____________. T Whoooah, count me out. Correspondence school sounds like a much better idea. This list of rules is based upon those that were in use one hundred years ago. Some of them may be familiar to your parents and grandparents (who I’m sure aren’t quite that old). There may even be a couple of rules still used at your school today. Are there any rules on this list that you think are sensible? Explain why.

_____________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o rr v i ew plist ur pdisagree oses nl y• Choose one ofe the rules on this you witho and explain why.

_____________________________________________________________

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Dr McNastie didn’t ask anyone for their ideas when making up these rules. Who makes up the rules in your class / school?

. te o _______________________________________ c . cyoure e Write down 3 of h class / school rules that r o t r s super are not on this list. • ______________________________________ • ______________________________________ • ______________________________________

Research Time: Show this list to your parents and grandparents. Ask them if they had to follow any of these rules. Related Outcome Students use their own knowledge and experience to provide opinions on school rules of the past.

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George Grabs Goals for Goannas By Ann Onymous

D

“Team rivalry is there but in a nice way. You hear about clubs where parents and players are so fiercely competitive it’s nasty.”

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The whole game was absolutely riveting, with the Goannas playing a strong first half and an even better second. “The Bandicoots’ gave it their best, but the Goannas proved the stronger players on the day,” acknowledged Bandicoot’s coach Percy Veere. “We will be spending more time on strategy at our next training session.”

“Both the Goannas and Bandicoots have a great attitude to their sport they know that in the long run, it’s only just a game,” commented another supporter.

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ee Fence, team manager of the Grumbleweed Goannas under tens mixed soccer team, hailed her team’s 8 - 4 victory over the Bongo Bandicoots on Saturday a huge success and hoped that this winning streak would continue for the rest of the season.

This opinion was also mirrored by the spectators, a mixture of family and friends. Everyone commiserated when a goal was missed and cheered when one was scored - regardless of what team they had come to support.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons “Player of the Match” was awarded to •f orr evi ew puthe r p oses on l y• Goannas’ George Dude, who

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But according to those watching, both teams are winners when it comes to sportsmanship.

scored the first goal shortly after the whistle blew. A relative newcomer to the game, George showed his amazing ball handling skills, scoring half of his team’s goals during the match. “This lad will go far,” declared team coach Ben Danstretch. “It’s hard to believe that when he started playing he sometimes had trouble just kicking the ball! He just demonstrates what practice and determination can do.”

“It’s wonderful to . te o c . che e r o t r s super see the boys and girls working hard but still having fun” one bystander remarked.

George’s team members all agree. “He’s a terrific guy, both on and off the field,” voiced one. “And we can’t wait for next week’s match.”

Related Outcome Students recall details from an article written by a sports reporter, consider words which can be used to replace ‘said’, and give their own views about sportsmanship.

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Soccer News Read the soccer report on page 41 than complete the following. • Name the two soccer teams:_______________________________________ • How many goals were scored altogether? ___________________________

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• When was the game held? _________________________________________ Draw a line to match up the people with their jobs. “Player of the Match”

Dee Fence

Goannas’ coach

Percy Veere

Sports writer

Ben Danstretch

Bandicoots’ coach

George Dude

Goannas’ manager

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Ann Onymous

This sports reporter has used a number of different verbs (doing words) instead of “said”. Can you find them?

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acknowledged

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joked

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Can you think of 5 more words that could have been used instead?

o c . c e her mean to you? r What does good sportsmanship ______________________ o t s super _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

Challenge Time: Make up a catchy newspaper headline (it doesn’t have to be a sporting one), which includes your name, e.g. Terrific Tim touches tail of Tasmanian Tiger today. ________________________________________________________________________ Related Outcome Students recall details from an article written by a sports reporter, consider words which can be used to replace ‘said’, and give their own views about sportsmanship.

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Terrific Tuatara

A

long time ago, just before my sister was born, my mother worked at Otago Museum in Dunedin. She took care of all the live animals on display.

One of her jobs was to breed flies to feed to the frogs and mantids. “I used to mix up a type of milky jelly and place it in the bottom of a special cloth covered bucket. Then I added half a dozen flies and placed the container in a warm cupboard. Soon the jelly was crawling with hundreds of fat white maggots,” Mum said.

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“Ewww, that’s gross,” groaned my sister, who was pretending not to listen.

“Then what Mum?” I asked.

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“Eventually the maggots would turn into pupae and the pupae into a thick mass of buzzing flies,” mum said. My sister made a face.

“Then I’d carefully untie the knot in the top of the cloth and use a special vacuum cleaner to suck a few flies into a jar. The jar went into the fridge for a while. I didn’t want to kill the flies - just slow them down so that I could pick them up and drop them into the animal’s tanks. The heat from the lights quickly warmed them up and dinner was served!” explained Mum. “I also looked after two large black axolotls but one of them died. It became so swollen it looked like a diver in a movie when someone has pumped in too much air”.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• I think my mother enjoys shocking my sister.

“That’s disgusting,” wailed my sibling. “The other axolotl survived so perhaps it was just a faulty amphibian,” Mum said wistfully.

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Mum went on, “Most animals at the museum were replaceable but the baby tuatara wasn’t. It was on an “endangered species” list. It lived in a purpose-built enclosure with a fan and a heat lamp to keep it at the right temperature. It burrowed in the soil and under the plants. It even had a little pond. Everyday I had to record exactly what it had eaten and every month it had to be weighed and measured. I had to write a report about its progress - including how many times it had been to the toilet!” My sister looked pained again.

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“One morning, shortly after I started working at the museum, I found the tuatara sitting very still by the pond, incredibly still. I felt sick. Anything but the tuatara, I sobbed. My heart was in my throat. I reached out and touched it with one finger. It was stone cold.” My sister’s eyes widened and her jaw dropped. “Oh Mum,” she whispered, “You killed the tuatara”. “No, it was OK,” said Mum laughing. “I suddenly remembered that they are very cold reptiles. But I was worried for a bit!” she said giving me a wink.

Related Outcome Students use the information found in the narrative to compile a set of instructions and draw a plan. They use their own knowledge and research skills to classify animals and discover more about the world around them.

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Terrific Tuatara Read about Tuataras on page 43 and complete the following. In what city did mum used to work?

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Mark it on the map.

Amphibian

Mammal

Insect

Animals: tuatara, mantid, axolotl, fly, mum, frog,

Reptile

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Place the animals listed below into the correct boxes.

Use the information in the story to explain how to breed flies hygienically. Number each step as if you were writing a recipe.

© 1:ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ______________________________________________________________ Step ______________________________________________________________ • f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ______________________________________________________________

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In the box, draw a picture or a plan of what you imagine the tuatara enclosure looked like. (Remember to include all the

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. t etuatara eventually joined others o The baby c . in Invercargill’s tuatarium. Mark c e hmapr r Invercargill on the e of New Zealand t o s super above.

things mentioned in the story.)

(You may need an atlas to help you.)

Extra: Tuataras are amazing creatures. They were around when dinosaurs ruled the earth over 200 million years ago. They have a third eye and temperature can affect whether they hatch as a male or a female! Use your research skills to discover more interesting facts about tuataras. Create a fact file on a separate sheet of paper. Draw a tuatara to illustrate your work. Related Outcome Students use the information found in the narrative to compile a set of instructions and draw a plan. They use their own knowledge and research skills to classify animals and discover more about the world around them.

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Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit Congratulations on being the new owner of Big Bob. When you turn the game on for the first time you will hear a short birthday tune and Big Bob will hop onto the screen.

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Setting the clock: Press mode to enter

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clock mode. Press enter for 2 seconds to enter clock set mode. The clock will start flashing. Set the current time by using left key to increase the hour and right key to increase the minutes. Press enter again to set the time.

How to play: Just like a real rabbit Big Bob needs love and attention to stay

happy and healthy. His ears will cross to alert you if he needs something. Care for him by using the left and right keys to light up the activity icons around the outside of the screen. To choose the activity press ‘Enter’. ENTER

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons thef right keyr to keep himw happy ap special treat. • or e vi e pwith ur os esonl y• Enter: Press enter to choose activity.

Feeding: Choose the left key to select healthy food to help him grow. Choose Sleep: When Bob needs to sleep select this icon to turn the light off. Don’t forget to turn it back on when he wakes.

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Exercise: Select this icon to make a flying carrot appear on the screen. Use the right and left keys to make Bob chase it. The faster you press, the higher Bob will hop. He has 20 seconds to catch it.

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Doctor: If Bob gets sick, select this activity to take him to the Doctor.

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Cleaning: You must clean up Bob’s droppings or he will become ill. Use this icon whenever you see droppings on the screen.

Score: Use this to check Bob’s age, weight, health and happiness and rate your ability as an owner.

Game Over: When Bob dies, either from old age or bad health, he will turn into an angel. The game is over and your final score as an owner will be displayed. (Use the restart button on the back of the unit to begin a new game). Related Outcome Students interpret a set of instructions about operating a virtual toy.

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Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit Read the instructions for the Virtual Rabbit on page 45. Grandad has just bought himself a virtual pet. “It will help keep my mind active and it’s so much cleaner than the real thing” you hear him telling your mother. Unfortunately, Grandad has forgotten where he has left his glasses (again!) and so has trouble reading the instructions. While your mother searches for them you agree to help Grandad out.

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2.

Bob has crossed his ears. What does this mean?

3.

______________________________________________________________ Bob appears to be sleeping. Circle the icon Grandad should press.

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Explain what will happen when Grandad turns the game on for the first time. __________________________________________________________

4.

5.

6.

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Grandad presses this Name three things he might see on the screen if he uses : a) The right key _________________________________________________ b) The left key __________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• When should Grandad press these icons?

tell him? _______________________ What 5 things will pressing this ______________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

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___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

7.

You know when daylight saving changes, Grandad will have lost his glasses (again!) and you will have to reset the clock for him. Number the following steps so that they are in the correct order.

. te o T The clock will start flashing. c . c key to increase the minutes. e T Use the right r toe enter clock mode. o T Press modeh t r s sup r thee hour. T Use the left key to increase T Press enter again to set the time. T Press enter for 2 seconds to enter clock set mode.

8.

How will Grandad know when the game is over?____________________ _____________________________________________________________

9.

What kind of pet owner do you think Grandad will be? _______________ _____________________________________________________________ Related Outcome Students interpret a set of instructions about operating a virtual toy.

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What’s That You’re Watching? You will need a copy of the TV guide to complete the following. 1 . Would you find it difficult to live without television? ___________________ 2 . Like most things, watching TV has its good and bad points. List 2 reasons why you think watching TV is good for you and 2 reasons why it isn’t.

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Good: _______________________

Bad: __________________________

Good: _______________________

Bad: __________________________

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Use a copy of yesterday’s TV guide to answer the following questions:

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1 . List the names of the TV channels: ________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

2 . Would it have been possible to watch TV non-stop for 24 hours or was there a break in transmission? ____________________________________ 3 . Different typing fonts are often used to make TV guides easier to read. How many font types can you see on the guide? ____________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Different channels show similar types of programs at similar times. Use •f or r ev ew u r p oses on l y • coloured pencils toi help youp find the screening patterns by circling (Ignore the advertisements.)

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similar types of programs with the same colour, e.g. circle all the news broadcasts in red. Complete the table below.

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General time slot _________________ _________________ _________________

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Program Children’s programs: The evening news: Talk shows:

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5 . Extra information about the programs is given using symbols. Find the meaning for these: C ______________ G _______________ B / W _____________ Find the symbol for these: P arental guidance ____ Subtitles ________ Repeat ____________ 6. What other information can you find in your guide that hasn’t been mentioned? _____________________________________________________ 7. Use the guide to calculate how much time you spent watching TV yesterday. Grand total = _________________________________________ Related Outcome Students explore the organisational features of a TV guide, including the use of common abbreviations. They discover how programs are grouped to suit different audiences and give their opinions on positive and negative aspects of TV viewing.

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Wildlife Park Pricelist

Adult . . . $ 14.00 Children (5 - 14 years) . . . $ 6.00 Family (2 adults + 3 children) . . . $ 35.00

Seniors Preschoolers Groups (10+)

. . . $ 12.00 . . . FREE . . . 10 % discount

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Entrance

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Serval cats Birds Spider monkeys Reptiles Farmyard animals Lions Giraffe Rhino Cheetah

10.30 a.m. 11.00 a.m. 11.30 a.m. 12.00 a.m. 1.15 p.m. 2.30 p.m. 2.00 p.m. 3.30 p.m. 3.45 p.m.

African wild dog

4.00 p.m.

10 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. daily. (Closed Christmas Day.)

Related Outcome Students use visual symbols and written information to plan a visit to a wildlife park.

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Wildlife Park Study the Wildlife Park pamphlet and use it to complete the following. Your family want to visit the Wildlife Park. Write down the members of your group and calculate how much it will cost to get in. ______________________ __________________________________________________________________

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Everyone has agreed that they want to: • Watch the farmyard animals, reptiles, lions, giraffes and cheetahs be fed; • Have a picnic lunch; • Visit the adventure playground; • Have an ice-cream. Everyone has also agreed that you should plan the day! Before you start make sure you know what these signs mean.

_____________________________________________________________ __________________________

_____________________________

___________________________

_____________________________

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Wildlife Park itinerary prepared by: ____________________________________

(*You must include everything the group wants to do. You may also visit things they have not mentioned. Record each activity and its time.)

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Activity

Draw circles around the things on the map that you will visit. Number the circles to show the order in which you will visit them. Related Outcome Students use visual symbols and written information to plan a visit to a wildlife park.

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Top Secret Message to: The Book Detective Create a dossier on a book you have never read then pass the information on to Secret Agent ________________________ . Write your teacher’s name here.

Important: do not read the book yet.

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This book first caught my attention because:

(E.g. I’ve read one before by the same author.) _________________________________

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Initial observations on the outside. Record:

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The title of the book:_____________________________________________

The name of the author:__________________________________________ The name of the illustrator: _______________________________________

Whether this is a fiction or non fiction book: _________________________ What the cover design suggests about the book’s contents:

E.g. it’s a humorous story about a family of vampires on holiday in France.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Extra information I have discovered on the cover: ____________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ______________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

Open the book

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Flip through the book but do not read it. Record:

The name of the publisher: _______________________________________

When and where the book was published: __________________________

. te o c What you think of the illustrations? _________________________________ . che e r o t Extra information I have discovered inside: _________________________ r s s r u e p ______________________________________________________________ How long you think it will take to read this book. _____________________

NOW go ahead and read the first few pages. Conclusion: (Tick the box that applies.)

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So far, so good - I’m keen to see what happens next. Mmmmm, it’s OK - I’ll read a bit more and then decide. Bad choice - I’m going back to look for a better one. Related Outcome Students discover that it is possible to learn much about a book prior to reading the main text.

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Your Lucky Day __, ______ _ _ _ _ _ _ if you Dear grateful e b I would let atch would ________ w t of r ______ today as pa hey V T . k s r T kid homewo ey will r e h / th his or omised r p the dog rn e v ed ha fe u t r re p o wash u ______ in _ _ . _____ privilege is th r fo ____ _____ _ _ s d r Rega ) (teacher

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Well, you would never have believed it possible. Your teacher is actually telling you to watch TV tonight - and not just a boring old documentary about Irish rivers but one of your favourite kids’ programs.

Choose a TV program not based on fact and complete this sheet. You will need to get information before, during and after the program.

Name of the program: ______________________________________________

What time does it start? _____________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons How• often isr it on? f o r evi ew pur posesonl y•

How long does it last for? ___________________________________________

(E.g. Every day.) ________________________________________________________

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Where can you find information about the all the people who helped produce the program (E.g. Writer, sound recordist, cartoonists.) ________________ _______________________________________________________________ Describe the main character/s in the story: __________________________ _______________________________________________________________

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o c . ch e Explain how likely you think the events are to happen and why? _________ r e o r st super _______________________________________________________________

Where was the story set? (E.g. In a castle in medieval England.) ________________ __________________________________________________________________________

Apart from speaking what other sounds were used and when? (E.g. Spooky music during the scary parts.) _________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________ Use the back of this page to briefly explain what happened in the _______ program. You can use pictures and diagrams to help if you wish. Related Outcome Students examine a TV program in detail and then recount and consider what they have seen. Students are aware that visual texts are normally produced by the co-operation of many people.

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What’s That You’re Looking At?

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Look through a newspaper or a magazine for an interesting photo. Cut it out and glue it onto the space below. (You may want to draw a frame around it.)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ________________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

I find this picture interesting because: ________________________________

Imagine you had to describe the photo to someone who was blind. Write exactly what you would say. Give as much detail as possible and explain:

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What is happening? _______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

. Where itt was etaken and how you know: o c . c e her r ________________________________________________________________ o t s super ________________________________________________________________

(E.g. Somewhere warm because I can see palm trees in the background.)

When it was taken and how you know:

(E.g. A long time ago because the people are wearing old fashioned clothes.)

________________________________________________________________ Other important information ________________________________________ (E.g. It’s a black and white photo.) __________________________________________________________________________ 52

Related Outcome Using a photo of their choice, students detail the information they can glean from the image.

Ready-Ed Publications


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Mystery Photos You’ve always secretly imagined that with your brains you’d make a pretty cool detective - spotting elusive clues and solving crimes where others before you have failed. To help you on your road to fame and glory, your teacher has arranged a selection of numbered photos around the room for you to peruse (look at). You have five minutes to look at each one and record your findings.

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Examine each photo carefully and take a guess about what it is of, who is in it, where it was taken and when it was taken. Any extra information you can discover should also be included. Write the information below.

(PS. It’s much better to say you noticed your teacher got their good looks from their mum, rather than “Oh, your dad’s got enormous elephant ears too”!)

Photo: ____________________

Photo: ____________________

What: _____________________

What: _____________________

© ReadyEdPWho: ubl i cat i ons ______________________ Where: ____________________ •f orr evi ew pur pose sonl y• Where: ____________________

Who: ______________________

When: _____________________

Photo: ____________________

Photo: ____________________

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When: _____________________

What: _____________________

Who: ______________________

Who: ______________________

Where: ____________________

Where: ____________________

What: _____________________

What: _____________________

Who: ______________________

Who: ______________________

Where: ____________________

Where: ____________________

When: _____________________

When: _____________________

What: _____________________

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o c . When: _____________________ When: _____________________ che e r o t r s____________________ supe r Photo: Photo: ____________________

Related Outcome Using a photo of their choice, students detail the information they can glean from the image.

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CD Cover People use CDs (compact discs) everyday. Write down 3 different uses of CDs.

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Look at the selection of CD covers in front of you.

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The picture on the front of a CD cover has been carefully designed. It can tell you a lot about what’s on the disc even before you play it. Without reading the writing on the back or inside the cover, sort your discs into at least 3 different categories. For example: computer games, educational resources and music; OR children’s, teenage and classical music.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons What• clues did pick upw fromp the one the to f o ryou r e vi e upictures r pos scovers onl yhelp •you

sort the discs? _____________________________________________________

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Choose one disc from three of your groups and complete the following table.

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Title of disc

Category

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

e.g.

Clues

(not written)

Related Outcome Students compare and contrast the artwork used on various CD covers and then use this knowledge to design their own.

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Ready-Ed Publications


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CD Cover Use the CD template below to design your own CD cover and disc label. What category will your CD fit into? ___________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

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How will your design show this? ______________________________________

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_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

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CD front cover template

Related Outcome Students compare and contrast the artwork used on various CD covers and then use this knowledge to design their own.

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CD TEMPLATES

CD spine

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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CD back cover template

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Related Outcome Students compare and contrast the artwork used on various CD covers and then use this knowledge to design their own.

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Answers

Rapunzel’s Shampoo Page 7, 8

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Hair before: tangled, frizzy, mop. Hair after: soft, silky, manageable. Students own answers about the product’s smell. Number of font types - 5 Different types of font are used to help make certain sections of the advertisement stand out.

Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble Page 9, 10

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Alchemists, transmute (or change), gold, chemists. Easy = mouse droppings, snail slime, copper coins. Hard = dog’s brain, unicorn horn, cockatoo crest feathers. Cauldron = small cooking pot. Clockwise = direction the hands move on a clock. Students’ own answers.

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- If followed correctly, the student should only write their name in the top left hand corner of the sheet.

Comic Strip Page 12,13

- Answers will vary.

History Detective: Elizabethan Crossword Page 14, 15 - Across

E-mail Page 17, 18

1. 3. 9. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

wigs White Black Beer Elizabeth Four Rags Pearls

- Down

2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 16.

Spinster England Mice Henry French Alias Beheaded Ruff Red

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Can You Follow Instructions? Page 11

0Send Print Attach Reply Delete Address Book - Letter sent by Toby. Sent to Jordan. Sent on Saturday 5th October. - Cc = carbon copy. Used when you want to send the same letter to someone else at the same time.

Š ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• From: Toby To: Jordan Sent: Saturday 5 October Subject: What’s new with you?

Dear Jordan, It was great to get your e-mail and hear what you’ve been doing. I’m pleased you liked the joke book I sent you for your birthday. Have you heard these?

Fancy Dress Invitation Page 19, 20

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What did Rudolph want for Christmas? A pony sleigh station. What do you do if a monster rolls his eyes at you? Just pick them up and roll them back. What do you find in a clean nose? Finger prints. What’s the difference between a maggot and a cockroach? Cockroaches crunch more when you eat them. My teacher told me the last two jokes - he’s really cool. Sometimes he wears sunglasses in the class because he says we’re so bright. Mum said you may be coming for a visit in the holidays - I can’t wait to see you. Write back soon Your friend Toby

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o c . che e r o t r s super - 3 to 6 p.m. on Sunday 14th February at 1 Letspretend Rd., Grumbleweed. - Grace = ghost, Alice = alien, Diana = Dr, Shane = snake, Wayne = wizard, Paulo = pirate, Jake = journalist. - Choice should start with the first letter of the student’s name. - RSVP = respondez s’il vous plait (French) please reply, PS = postscriptum (Latin) something written after. pm = post meridiem (Latin) Afternoon, ph. = phone. - ATM = automatic teller machine NB = nota bene (Latin) note well BO = body odour WWW = World Wide Web (internet) CD = compact disc VIP = very important person PTO = please turn over. E.g. = exempli gratia (Latin) for example. - Student’s own examples

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Answers Film Review Page 22

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“My Sister’s In Love.” Hugh Didwot, ****. 2 hours (120 minutes), PG. Sam = Nick Trick, Sophie = Brittany Bon Bon, Snowball = Prince Sebastian Woofalot IV, Simon = Brad Le Beau, Samantha = Rosie Primrose. - morph = change, cloned = copied, bemused = puzzled, sabotage = destroy, chaos = confusion, flatulence = I’m too polite to say, swain = boyfriend, ailing = sick. - Best described as a comedy. - Students’ own thoughts on possible ending.

One Fine Day Page 24

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Groovy Grid Page 28

Instructions - should read: name of teacher; is simply the best; Better than all the rest; Signed: Student’s name, Today’s date.

1 spiders 7 cement

My Super Hero Page 32

A Short Play Page 34

2 cavity 3 sugars 8 microscopic 9 reluctant

4 scalp 10 follicles

5 visible 11 bedbugs

6 insects 12 hygiene

- The author has probably written about their father but it could also be a grandfather, older brother, uncle, etc. - The ‘super hero’ is a special person to the author. They enjoy doing things together. - A range of answers may be given, e.g. he doesn’t leap tall buildings, doesn’t like heights and doesn’t like leaping. He does stop for pedestrians and red lights and works hard in his office. - Student’s own ideas on setting. - Student’s own ideas on dress. - Props = mobile phone, crossword puzzle, reading book, paper, pen. - “Some wholemeal flour.” - HAND = have a nice day, I LUV U = I love you, U R QL = you are cool, IM gr8 = I’m great. - Underlined words = the character speaking the words. - Italics = actions of the character.

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Life On You Page 30

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

- The puzzle reads, “If you can work out what this means then you are very smart. Your teacher had to look at the answers in the back of the book.” - You’re under arrest, Man overboard, Too bad, One in a million, Banana split, Repeat after me, Too good to be true, He forgets everything.

Parent Newsletter Page 38

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School Rules Page 40 Soccer News Page 42

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Grumbleweed Primary School “Dare to be different.” Monday 1st April (April Fools Day) Mrs Linda Hand in the school office by Friday. 8th April in the hall. It will run from 6-8 p.m. It costs $4.00. Claude Bottom. Friday. $2.20 Tuesday Baby mice. Student’s own choice of play equipment. Student’s own choice of songs. Thought for the week = don’t go looking for trouble but if you do have problems then you need to try and sort them out.

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Rebus Puzzles Page 36

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Grumbleweed Goannas and the Bongo Bandicoots. 8 + 4 = 12 goals scored altogether. Game was held last Saturday. Ann Onymous = sports writer, Dee Fence = Goannas’ manager, Percy Veere = Bandicoots’ coach, Ben Danstretch = Goanna’s coach, George Dude = player of the match. - Said = acknowledged, remarked, commented, declared, voiced. - Students’ own answers.

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Answers Terrific Tuatara Page 44

- Dunedin. - Amphibian = frog + axolotl. Mammal = mum. Insects = mantid, fly. Reptile = tuatara. - 1 mix up milky jelly 2 place jelly in bottom of a cloth covered bucket. 3 add flies 4 Place in warm cupboard.

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- Granddad will hear a tune and Big Bob will hop onto the screen. - Crossed ears = Bob needs something. - Press the light bulb icon to turn off the light. - Right key = special treat items (children’s own examples) left key = healthy food items. (Children’s own examples) - Score icon = Bob’s age and weight. How healthy and happy he is. How well Granddad rates as Bob’s owner. - Match icons with text should be; to exercise him, when he is sick, to clean up his droppings. - To reset clock: press mode to enter clock mode. Press enter for 2 seconds to enter clock set mode. The clock will start flashing. Use the left key to increase the hour. Use the right key to increase the minutes. Press enter again to set the time. - The game is over when Bob dies. - Students’ own answer.

What’s That You’re Watching? Page 47

- C = children’s programs. - Parental guidance = PG.

G = general viewing. Subtitles = S

Wildlife Park Page 49

- Entry fee will vary depending on group structure. - Icons (as they appear on the page) Information walkways Restaurant car park First aid toilets Baby change table picnic table.

Top Secret Page 50

Answers will vary.

Your Lucky Day Page 51

Answers will vary.

What’s that Your’e Looking At? Page 52

Answers will vary.

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Big Bob the Virtual Rabbit Page 46

B/W = black and white program. Repeat = R

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Mystery Photos Page 53 CD Cover Page 54

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Viewing Activities  

Provides teachers with a range of practical activities for investigating both written and visual material. Buy now: http://www.teachersuper...

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