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and Folk Tales Through Drama © ReadyEdPu bl i cat i ons

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Written by Elizabeth Swasbrook. Illustrated by Melinda Parker. © Ready-Ed Publications - 2000. Published by Ready-Ed Publications (2000) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood W.A. 6024 COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution. ISBN 1 86397 339 7


Foreword

Mankind’s rich heritage of Fairy and Folk Tales will always be a source of delight and deep fascination for the young and very young. With that in mind, I decided to write a set of plays based on some well known favourites to foster the ‘starry-eyed-wonder’ of children in the lower and middle primary. I have already tried a few of the plays at school assemblies with great success and pleasurable applause from audiences.

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It is my firm belief, gained through years of teaching experience, that dramatization is a stimulating and an enjoyable way of developing muchneeded speaking and listening skills. An appreciation of literature is also very essential in the formative years. Many of these skills will doubtless, coincide with the prescribed language indicators and outcomes. As teachers, we are aware that role-play, through individual and group participation is of vital importance for the development of self confidence, accurate pronunciation and enunciation of words, clear and expressive speech, facial expressions and gestures to denote feeling, and the extension of courtesy to others; skills which automatically flow into most, if not all, educational areas.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

The plays in this book are designed for performance in an informal classroom situation or for a wider audience at school assemblies and concerts. The excitement, joy and satisfaction felt by both teacher and taught cannot be underestimated.

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Elizabeth Swasbrook

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Contents The Elves And The Shoemaker (1) ............... 5 The Elves And The Shoemaker (2) ............... 8 The Three Wishes .......................................... 12

r o e t s Bo r e The Ugly Dwarf .............................................20 p ok u SThe Wind And The Farmer .........................25 The Trout And The Fisherman ...................30

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The Wolf's Story ............................................15

The Four Seasons .......................................... 35

The Jar Of Olives .......................................... 39 The Blind Men And The Elephant..............43

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© RThe eaNightingale dyEd.............................................46 Publ i cat i ons Two Men And A Donkey.............................. 49 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Teaching Suggestions

The following suggestions should be used as a guide only. Most teachers have a wealth of experience and their own effective methods to draw upon. 1. In selecting characters, make the best use of children’s abilities. 2. Inspire the shy and retiring ones to have a go as this usually produces amazing results.

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3. The main purpose of the chorus and group speaking is to encourage whole-class involvement to avoid the feeling of being left out.

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4. Utilize your ingenuity to design simple props and scenic back-drops where necessary. The best resources at hand are children, parents and art/craft sessions.

5. An essential ingredient for success is regular and consistent practice as the old adage ‘Practise makes perfect’ is decidedly true. Allocate a regular practice time each day for at least four weeks. 6. Children should be given sufficient time to learn parts as rote learning definitely strengthens the memory.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 7. Other teaching points are facial expressions, gestures and appropriate •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• body movements that highlight the performance.

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8. The plays may be adapted, simplified, or shortened to suit class needs providing the story line is left intact.

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The Elves And The Shoemaker (1) (Based on a traditional fairytale)

CHARACTERS

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[A shoe shop - Placard “QUALITY BOOTS AND SHOES” - a table, one piece of leather, small tools. Backdrop - a village scene. A few pairs of boots and shoes to be gradually displayed as the play progresses.]

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Setting:

Shoemaker His wife Two elves Shoppers - 3 or more Gentlemen - 3 Narrators - 3 class groups (more groups if desired)

Group 1

(together, loud and clear) Once upon a time, in a small village, in a beautiful green valley, there lived a kindly old shoemaker and his wife.

Group 2

They were very poor. Business hadn’t been good at all. There wasn’t enough money to buy leather and food.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (cheerfully)

Shoemaker

Wife

(sadly, holding up a piece of leather) Only one piece of leather left and no money to buy more. Whatever are we going to do?

Never mind, dear husband. That piece seems enough for one pair of gentleman’s boots. Do not worry. Things will be well!

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Shoemaker

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The shoemaker carefully cut out the pieces. He soon felt tired and decided to complete the boots the next day.

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Group 3

(yawning and stretching) I think I’ll go to bed now and complete this tomorrow.

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When the shoemaker returned to the workroom the next morning, he was absolutely amazed to find a pair of beautifully finished boots in the shop window.

Shoemaker

(calls out excitedly - holds up a pair of boots) Wife! Wife! Do come here and see these beautiful boots. I wonder who could have made them?

Wife

(holds them and puts them down) They are very beautiful indeed. Quick, someone is coming in!

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Gentleman

(enters and sees the boots) My, these are a perfect pair of boots. I’ve never seen anything like them before. You must be an excellent shoemaker! If they are for sale, name your price.

Group 2

The Shoemaker, being an honest man, asked for just what the boots were worth. The gentleman was extremely pleased, paid the price and walked out smiling.

Wife

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(happily) Now you can buy enough leather to make two pairs with money left over for food. That night the shoemaker cut two pairs. Once again he felt very tired and went straight to bed.

Group 1

Group 2

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Group 3

The next morning the same pleasant surprise awaited him. The two pairs were sold the very next day.

(Display two pairs - two gentlemen walk in and purchase the two pairs.)

This happened day after day. Boots and shoes were completed mysteriously. Business boomed! People flocked to his shop from all over the countryside.

© R(Display ead yEdPubl i cat i ons a few more pairs of boots and shoes. Shoppers come in.) orr e vi ewbecame puwell-known r pos ehissgood on l yboots •and Group 3•f The Shoemaker for quality

shoes. He and his wife were now well off but they remained honest and kind.

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Wife

Shoemaker

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(looking fondly at his wife with hands on her shoulder) Dear wife, now that we are doing so well, don't you think it is time we found out who our kind helpers are?

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Shoemaker

I was thinking the same thing. It will be nice to say 'thank you.'

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Tonight, we will stay up and peep into the workroom but we must be very quiet.

Wife

(smiling and clapping her hands) What a marvellous idea!

Group 1

That night they hid behind the door and peeped into the workroom. To their complete surprise, they saw two ill-clad elves, busily working and singing a sweet song.

Elves

(singing sweetly) Each night we do a kindly deed, helping only those in need! Once all is well, we slip away, to help others another day!

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Group 3

The next day, the good wife decided to sew some tiny clothes for the elves. She used brightly coloured material and made little coats, trousers and caps to keep them warm.

Elf 1

(picking up the clothes and smiling) What do we have here? These will fit us perfectly!

Elf 2

This is their way of thanking us. It was good to help these two kindly people. Now that they're doing so well, we must leave and go elsewhere.

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(They take the garments and slip away, blowing kisses.) The Shoemaker and his wife knew the elves would not return. They were grateful for their help. They were never in want and lived happily ever after. THE END

(Cast take a bow)

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Group 3

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The Elves And The Shoemaker (2) (Based on a Traditional Fairy tale)

CHARACTERS

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[Stage - A shoe shop (Sign - 'Quality Boots and Shoes'), a table, one piece of leather and some small tools. Children seated in three groups. Backdrop showing a village nestling in a green valley etc.]

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Setting:

Shoemaker His Wife Two Elves Shoppers - 3 or more Narrators - 3 Class Groups (more groups may be used) Two Noblemen

Group 1

(together, clearly and expressively) Once upon a time, in a small English village, nestling in a beautiful green valley between two snow-capped mountains, lived a kindly old Shoemaker and his gentle wife.

Group 2

Even though they were very poor, they were always willing to share the little they had with others. They were loved and respected by all who knew them.

© RDuring ead yEdPubl i cat i ons the last year, business had not been good at all. Now, there wasn't enough money to buy food, leave alone leather. •f orr e vi ew p ur p se on y• The old Shoemaker intended too make uses of the lastl piece of

Group 3

leather he had left.

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Wife

Group 1

Shoemaker

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(sadly, holding up the last piece of leather) Only one piece of leather left and no money to buy more. Whatever are we going to do, dear Wife?

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Shoemaker

(cheerfully) Dear Husband, that piece of leather seems enough for one pair of gentleman's boots. Do not worry! Things will soon be well.

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That night, after a meagre supper, the old Shoemaker carefully cut out the pieces for one pair of boots. He laid them out neatly on the table and prepared to begin sewing them together. He soon realized he was tired and decided to complete the boots the next day. (yawning and stretching) I think I'll go to bed now and complete the boots tomorrow. (Two little Elves tiptoe in and look at the pieces of leather.)

Elf 1

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I'm glad we decided to come to this house tonight as the old Shoemaker is badly in need of our help. Ready-Ed Publications


Elf 2

I had to cast a spell on him to make him sleepy. Yes, he does deserve our help as he and his good wife are such honest, kind-hearted folk.

Elf 1

I'm glad we can help the good at heart. There isn't much to do tonight. Just one pair of boots.

Elf 2

We will be able to complete this job long before daylight.

Group 2

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Before first light, the two Elves slipped away, their work done. After a good night's rest, the Shoemaker returned to his workroom. He wished to get the boots completed that very day. He was absolutely amazed to find a pair of beautifully finished boots in the shop window.

Wife

(raising his hands and looking surprised) Wife! Wife! Do come here and see these exquisite boots. Whoever could have completed them?

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Shoemaker

(examining the boots) The stitches are so tiny and perfect. You are a very good workman, dear Husband, but this is just wonderful. We will have no trouble selling these fine boots.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Nobleman (entering) •f orr evi ew pu r p os es l y • I couldn't help noticing those perfect boots in o yourn shop window. Group 3

No sooner had the shop opened for business, when the doorbell rang and in walked a wealthy nobleman.

You are an excellent workman. If they are for sale, name your price.

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Wife

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Shoemaker

The Shoemaker being an honest man, asked for just what the boots were worth. The nobleman was extremely pleased, paid the price and walked out smiling.

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Group 1

(happily) Dear Husband, I'm glad you took my advice and stopped worrying. Now you can buy enough leather to make two pairs of good shoes with money left over for food.

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(smiling) You are always right, dear Wife. I must be off to the market now and I'll be sure to buy enough food to stock our empty larder. (The Shoemaker and his wife mime while story is being narrated.)

Group 2

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That night the Shoemaker cut out pieces for two pairs. Once again he felt too tired to continue so he went straight to bed. The next morning the same pleasant surprise awaited him. The two pairs of boots were sold that very day. (display two pairs - bought by the second nobleman) Page 9


Group 3

This happened day after day. Boots and shoes were being mysteriously completed during the night. Business boomed! People flocked to his shop, not only from the village but from the surrounding villages and towns as well.

Group 1

(display a few pairs - shoppers admire shoes) The Shoemaker soon became well-known for his good quality boots and shoes. Often people came into the shop to admire the beautiful footwear and to see the master shoemaker himself. The old Shoemaker and his wife were now quite well off but they remained honest and kind. (looking fondly at his wife) Dear Wife, now that we are doing so well, don't you think it is time to find out who our kind helpers are?

Wife

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Shoemaker

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(gently) Yes, it is time for us to find out who our mysterious helpers are. It will be so nice to say, "Thank you".

Shoemaker

Tonight, we will stay up and peep into the workroom, but we must be very quiet.

Wife

(smiling and clapping her hands) What a marvellous idea!

© RThat ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons night, they hid behind the door and peeped into the workroom. To their complete surprise, they saw two ill-clad elves, •f orr evworking i ewon p r p o sesonl y• happily theu boots and shoes.

Group 2

Elves

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(singing sweetly and working at the same time - may be adapted to any tune) Each night we do a kindly deed, Helping only those in need; Especially if they're good at heart Always happily doing their part. We usually help night after night, Quietly slipping away at first light. Once all is well, we go away To help some other another day.

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They sang a sweet song as they worked. The Shoemaker and his wife watched and listened in complete silence.

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The next day, the wife decided to sew some tiny clothes for their two poorly clothed helpers. She used brightly coloured material and made little coats, trousers and caps to keep them warm. This was her way of thanking them for their kindness.

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Group 1

That night, while the Shoemaker neatly laid out the pieces of leather he had cut, his good wife placed the clothes she had sewn into two neat piles. (garments made from colourful paper)

Group 2

Once again, the Shoemaker and his wife hid behind the door. Their silent watch was soon rewarded. Into the workroom, merrily skipped the two little elves. One looked at the pieces of leather neatly laid out while the other noticed the two piles of colourful clothing.

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(picking one a garment and holding it up) What do we have here? Such bright colourful garments. These will fit us perfectly, I'm sure.

Elf 2

And keep us warm as well. They now know who we are and this is their way of thanking us.

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Elf 1

Elf 1

It was good to help these two kindly people. Now that they're doing so well, we must leave and go elsewhere.

Elf 2

We will complete our work here tonight and say our goodbyes. Tomorrow night, we will visit the old seamstress in the next village. The poor dear is fast losing her eyesight and needs our help.

Shoemaker and hisP wifeu tiptoed quietly toi bed, knowing the © RThe e a d y E d b l i c a t o n s elves would not return. They were grateful for their help and pleased that other needy folk would soon be receiving their help •f orr e vi e wtheyp ur po s sagain on l y • too. They knew would never be ine want and lived

Group 3

THE END

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(Cast take a bow)

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happily ever after. As for the two elves, as soon as their work was completed, they slipped away waving a last fond farewell.

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The Three Wishes

(Based on a Traditional Tale) CHARACTERS

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[Stage - Backdrop - paintings of a forest with a lonely cottage - the old-fashioned open hearth with a wood fire - some Olympian Gods. Woodcutter busily chopping wood. His good wife busy with household work. A table and two chairs.]

Narrator 1

(clearly and expressively) Long long ago, in a tiny cottage near a forest, lived a woodcutter and his good wife.

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Setting:

Woodcutter His Wife The God Jupiter Narrators Chorus

Narrator 2

Everyday, the woodcutter would go into the forest to chop wood. His wife stayed at home and did the housework.

Chorus

The Woodcutter was a bit of a shirker, But called himself an honest worker!

© RThe ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons Woodcutter was not happy chopping wood every day. The work was hard and he didn't like it. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Narrator 3

Narrator 4

Suddenly, he heard a terrible sound and to his great horror, the God Jupiter appeared before him.

Jupiter

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(throws down his axe in disgust) I do nothing but work all day long! I'm tired and fed up of this work day after day.

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Woodcutter

(appears suddenly and stands with arms outstretched - voice like thunder.) So you work all day long, do you! Always complaining, from what I can see, Woodcutter. Work is too much for you, eh?

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Woodcutter

(falls on his knees trembling) I'm deeply sorry, Great God Jupiter! I promise I won't complain again!

Jupiter

(still very loud) I'm here for a reason. I'm tired of your complaints so I have decided to give you three wishes. Think carefully as the wishes will be granted the moment you make them.

Chorus

You've been granted three wishes only, So use them very very sensibly!

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Narrator 1

The God Jupiter vanished. The Woodcutter rose from his knees and rushed home. He was so eager to get to the cottage that he forgot to pick up his axe. (Woodcutter rushes in and calls out.)

Woodcutter

Wife! Wife! You won't believe this but something wonderful happened in the forest today!

Wife

(makes him sit down) Husband, sit down and calm yourself. You're not making much sense.

(excitedly) We're going to be very very rich so let us celebrate. Bring out the wine and build up the fire.

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Woodcutter

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Chorus

Let us now dance and sing, For we can have most anything!

Wife

(rubbing her brow) I think you've gone off your head! It's bad enough going through these hard times. Please do not add to them.

Woodcutter

(calmly) I'm calm now. Believe me, the God Jupiter appeared to me in the forest. I trembled and fell on my knees. He said I was very hard-working and he promised me three wishes.

Wife

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Woodcutter

Narrator 2

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It must be your imagination. Gods don't appear to people out of the blue. (jumps up and pivots around) Believe it or not but it's true! We can ask for riches or a beautiful home or anything we like.

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Seeing her husband dancing for joy, she believed his story. Unable to hold back her delight at their good fortune, she joined in the dance. (holding hands the pair pivot around then sit down)

Wife

(joyfully) I can ask for a costly jewelled ring or an expensive fur coat or a grand carriage, can't I?

Woodcutter

(looks thoughtful) Jupiter advised me to think over it very carefully as we don't want to waste our three wishes.

Chorus

Yes, think it over very carefully, For you have three wishes only!

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Narrator 3

His wife thought he had made a very wise decision. She persuaded him to put his feet up and enjoy a rest.

Narrator 4

She placed more logs on the fire and the cottage looked cheerful and warm. The Woodcutter sat back to think about his new found riches.

Woodcutter

(lazily picking up his glass) Wife, I feel so good right now that I wish there were some thick sausages sizzling on the fire.

Narrator 1

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Before the Woodcutter realized what he had said, a string of sausages appeared on the floor moving towards him.

Narrator 2

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(this may be pulled across the floor)

His wife was so shocked, that she sat there for a while staring at them. Suddenly she shot out of her chair and began scolding him.

Wife

You silly silly man! Look what you've done now. One wish gone. I told you, you've gone out of your mind!

Narrator 3

She continued to growl at him and call him names, telling him that she had lost one chance to get what she so dearly wanted.

though theE Woodcutter was sorry for what hen hads so © REven e a d y d P u b l i c a t i o thoughtlessly done, his wife refused to stop. This angered him and he did another silly thing. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Narrator 4

Narrator 1

The moment he mentioned his wish, it happened. The sausages now hung from his wife's nose. He laughed and laughed while she wept and wept.

Narrator 2

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I wish those sausages were hanging from the tip of your nose. That would help to close your mouth.

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Woodcutter

The laughter stopped! The Woodcutter felt sorry for his wife whom he dearly loved. He knew how he would have to use the last wish.

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Woodcutter

I wish the sausages to disappear forever. There go our three wishes. I wonder if we would have been happy with our riches anyway.

Chorus

The lost wishes helped to change their ways, Now hard work and happiness fill their days! THE END

(Cast take a bow)

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The Wolf's Story

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CHARACTERS

Setting:

Wolf Little Red Riding Hood Grandma Grandma (proxy) Mother Judge Bailiff Woodcutter Three Storytellers Witnesses - 6 Speakers - 2 Chorus (Class Group)

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[Stage - Class group seated on one side of stage. Characters, ready to come to the forefront on cue. Table and chair in a prominent position for the Judge. Two backdrops - depicting the woods in springtime. )

(Chorus sings the first two verses of "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?") Wolf

(walks on stage, holding up a paw, and interrupts Chorus) Hold it!

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons (continues) •f orr enot vi pu r po s es l y • I am ae bigw bad wolf and you don't need too be n afraid of me.

(The singing stops abruptly and the children become statues, staring wide-mouthed at the Wolf. A few gasp in surprised horror at the Wolf’s sudden appearance.)

Speaker 1

Nonsense! We all know what you did to Red Riding Hood's Grandma.

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Wolf

Speaker 2

Wolf

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(angrily) Says who? Says the Woodcutter. There he is and he'll repeat his story if you like.

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Wolf

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What about giving me a chance to tell my side of the story and then all of you can judge whether I am guilty. (points to everyone, including audience) I wish you to bear in mind that according to the law I am innocent till proven guilty. (walks up to the front proudly) Well said, Wolf! You are definitely innocent till proven guilty. I am a judge in real life and I would like to hear your side of the story. This will be the courtroom. (waves his arm in the direction of the audience) Those present here today will be the jurors and decide once and for all whether the Wolf is innocent or guilty. Page 15


(Judge sits at the table and bangs his mallet for silence.) Speaker 1

(out aloud) An honest to goodness trial. This is bound to be good!

Speaker 2

(equally loud) All these years I was made to believe the Wolf was guilty of swallowing Grandma alive. Now, we will know for certain whether this is true or not!

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(bangs his mallet for the second time) Order! Order in the Court! Bailiff, lead the Wolf to the witness stand! Let him take the oath to tell the truth and nothing but the truth.

Bailiff

Wolf

Judge Wolf

(leads the Wolf to thew Witness box and makes him place his paw on the Bible - an ordinary book may be used) Do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?

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Judge

(very solemnly) I do so promise to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help me God.

© RYour ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons Honour, I have one small request to make. I seek your permission for these storytellers to relate my story, •f orr ev i ew pu r p osesonl y• while I show you exactly how it happened. You may begin your story, Wolf.

Storyteller 1

(As the story is being narrated, enactment takes place.) Early one fresh and sunny morning, last spring, Wolf decided to leave the wolf pack and wander off to the edge of the woods. He often came here to watch human children at their play. He found some of the things they did very interesting like throwing sticks for their dogs to catch. He often wondered whether he could pass as a pet dog as he felt he could catch a stick just as well. He also wondered what it would be like to make friends with children.

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Very well then. Get on with it!

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Judge

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Mother

(calls out) Red Riding Hood. Take this basket of goodies for your grandmother. She is sick in bed. Try to get back quickly.

Red Riding Hood

Yes, Mother. I'll pick some spring flowers for her as I pass through the woods. Goodbye. I'll be back soon.

Storyteller 2

A while later, he saw Little Red Riding Hood leave her home with a basket on her arm. He had heard the children call her by that name because she always wore a red hood. (…cont.)

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She skipped along the path that led into the woods. Wolf was curious to find out where she was going, so he followed her. Suddenly, she tripped and fell over. Wolf ran up to help. He also helped to put her goodies back into the basket. Red Riding Hood

Thank you very much, Mr Wolf. You are very kind.

Wolf

Aren't you afraid of me, Little Red Riding Hood?

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Red Riding Hood

No! Why should I be afraid of you when you've been so kind?

Wolf

Where are you going on this pleasant morning?

Wolf

I'm going to visit my sick Grandma.

Does she live in that quaint little cottage in the middle of the woods?

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Red Riding Hood

Red Riding Hood

Yes, that's where my Grandma lives. I'm going to pick some pretty spring flowers for her too.

Wolf

Well, I'll run on ahead and tell your Grandma you're coming. See you later. (Red Riding Hood waves and Wolf leaves the stage.)

bounded ahead andu came to thea quaint little cottage. © RSo eWolf ad yE dP bl i c t i o n s He knocked on the door. He heard a voice asking him to come in. When he entered, Grandma screamed. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Storyteller 3

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Judge

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Storyteller 2

Wolf was shocked to hear Grandma calling for help and referring to him as 'the wicked wolf'. He tried to calm her down by telling her he wasn't going to hurt her. Grandma continued to scream and cry for help. Wolf became worried as he knew this would frighten Red Riding Hood too. So he took off her glasses and bonnet and locked her up in the cupboard. Very interesting! Please continue.

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Storyteller 1

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Wolf suddenly had a bright idea. He would put on the bonnet and glasses and pretend to be Grandma. He honestly did not wish to frighten his little friend, Red Riding Hood. Soon he heard a knock on the door. (continue enactment)

Wolf

(softly) Come in, my dear.

Red Riding Hood

(enters) Hello Grandma. How are you today? Look what I've brought for you. (draws closer)

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Red Riding Hood

Why Grandma, you look so different. You have great big eyes, great big ears and great big teeth. Poor Grandma! Did your illness make your face change so much?

Wolf

Don't you recognise me, Red Riding Hood? I'm not your Grandma, but your good friend, the Wolf. Your Grandma is in the closet. I put her there because she thought I was going to hurt her. I was worried you would be frightened too.

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Storyteller 3

And that's exactly what they were about to do when suddenly the old woodcutter rushed in with a huge axe. He had heard Grandma's screams earlier on and rushed into the woods to fetch his axe. As soon as Wolf saw the weapon, he ran off as fast as his legs could carry him. He didn't want to be killed. Wolf thinks humans are strange creatures, nice one minute and horrible the next.

Teac he r

Well then. Let's bring Grandma out and have a wonderful party. Mother sent some lovely things to eat. You bring Grandma out of the closet and I'll make a pot of fresh tea.

Wolf

Judge

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Red Riding Hood

Your Honour, that's how it really happened. To make my case stronger, a few 'nice' humans would like to tell you some facts about the wolf family, which might help other humans to understand us better.

© RVery ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons well, I will permit this. They may come up to the witness stand one by one. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (Witnesses hold up a placard with the statement in bold print.) Humans fear wolves but wolves usually keep clear of them.

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Witness 1 Witness 2

Wolves do not attack humans unless humans try to hurt them.

Witness 3

Wolves travel and only hunt in packs or family groups.

Witness 4 Witness 5

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Wolves usually kill sick or hurt animals for food.

Hunters have killed a large number of wolves for their skins.

Witness 6

If this needless killing is not stopped, wolves will be in danger of becoming extinct.

Judge

(nodding his head each time in agreement) Interesting facts! Very interesting indeed and I agree with everyone but you have not yet proved your innocence beyond the shadow of a doubt.

Wolf

Forgive me, Your Honour. The last witness will prove my innocence beyond a doubt.

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Judge

Bring in the next witness! (Grandma enters and takes the stand. The Chorus gasp in surprise.)

Grandma

Your Honour, everything that has been said in this court today, is absolutely true. I did scream for help. Wolf tried to calm me down. He did not hurt me. You can see that I am whole and well.

Judge

(nods his head and smiles) Well, Wolf. How do you plead?

Wolf

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Not guilty, Your Honour. Wolves are not bad or wicked. I did not hurt Grandma. There she stands alive and well. (stands before the audience) After hearing the Wolf’s story and listening to all the facts, what do you say? Is Wolf guilty or not guilty?

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Teac he r

Judge

Everyone

(loudly as one voice) NOT GUILTY!

Judge

(smiles at Wolf) Wolf you are innocent and now free to join your pack and return to the woods. It is to be hoped that humans will stop the needless killing of your kind. Be happy and keep out of trouble.

Wolf

youy very much, Your Honour. My gratitude ton alls those who © RThank e a d E d P u b l i c a t i o witnessed on my behalf. •f orr ev i ew puoffr p sesonl y• (Bows and walks the o stage.

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. te

I'm afraid of the big bad wolf, The big bad wolf, the big bad wolf; I'm afraid of the big bad wolf, Look what he did to Grandma!

m . u

Play ends with the singing of the last verse of “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf”)

o c . che e r o t r s super

He swallowed her up bit by bit, Bit by bit, bit by bit; He swallowed her up bit by bit, That's what he did to Grandma.

Now I'm not afraid of the big grey wolf The big grey wolf, the big grey wolf; Now I'm not afraid of the big grey wolf, 'Cos he really didn't hurt Grandma. THE END

(Cast take a bow) Ready-Ed Publications

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The Ugly Dwarf

(Based on the Traditional Fairytale Rumpelstiltskin)

Setting:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

[Stage - The street - Miller and passers-by walking up and down]

Storyteller 1

SCENE 1

Once upon a time, in a far away country, there lived a stout, wellfed Miller. He had a very beautiful daughter of whom he was very proud. He wished everyone to know about her great beauty.

© R(stops ead yEdPubl i cat i ons a passer-by, sticks out his chest proudly) Did you know that I have a very beautiful daughter? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Chorus Miller

Miller His Daughter The King The Ugly Dwarf Passers-by - 3 Storytellers - 3 Chorus - Class Group Courtiers - 2

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Teac he r

CHARACTERS

Yes! He wished to tell everyone about her great beauty.

Miller

(stops another passer-by) I must tell you that I have a very beautiful daughter!

m . u

(shows amazement) I didn't know, but what is that to me? Ha!

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Passer-by

Passer-by 2

Really! What can she do? (moves on)

Miller

(scratches his head and thinks aloud) I've never thought of that. I wonder what she can do? I have an excellent idea.

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o c . che e r o t r s super

(taps a third passer-by on the shoulder) I have a very beautiful daughter and do you know, Sir, she can spin straw into gold? Passer-by 3

Why don't you tell the young King? I'm certain he will be very interested.

Miller

(rubs his hands together joyfully) Thank you, my good man. That is exactly what I will do at the first opportunity I get.

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Storyteller 2

The Miller's opportunity soon arrived. One pleasant day, while strolling in the woods, he came across the young handsome King out hunting deer with many of his nobles.

Storyteller 3

Fortunately for the Miller, the King had stopped under a widespreading oak tree to rest. He dismounted and leaned against the thick trunk. He noticed the Miller's bulky frame and motioned for him to come forward.

King

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My good man, what are you doing in the forest so early on this fine day? (bowing) Sire! I have been waiting for an opportunity to tell your Royal Highness that I have a very beautiful and accomplished daughter. She knows how to spin straw into gold.

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Teac he r

Miller

Attendant

(aside to the king in a loud whisper) Sire! You are greatly in need of gold. Luck has come your way at last.

King

(smiling and nodding) This is a very interesting piece of news and has come just at the right moment. Bring her to the palace tomorrow bright and early.

Miller

very pleased) © R(looking e a d y EdPubl i cat i ons Yes, Your Royal Highness, bright and early. My deepest gratitude for your kindness. •f orr evi e wand pskips ur p omerrily) sesonl y• (bowing, he turns along When the King sees my daughter, he will want to marry her and make her his Queen, not ask her to spin straw into gold.

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. te

Yes, he will surely want to marry her and make her his beloved Queen. SCENE 2

m . u

Chorus

o c . che e r o t r s super

Storyteller 1

The next day, the Miller took his daughter to the palace. He was ordered to leave immediately. She was placed in a room full of straw and a spinning wheel. She wondered what it was all about and became tearful and afraid.

King

(haughtily pointing to the straw) I expect this straw to be turned into gold by the morning otherwise your head will be chopped off. (turning on his heels, he walks out proudly)

Chorus

Turn the straw into gold or your head will be chopped off. (sliding hands across throat)

M/Daughter

(ringing her hands in fear) Whatever will I do? Whatever will I do? I cannot spin straw into gold!

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Storyteller 2

Fortunately for the distraught girl, an ugly dwarf suddenly appeared and kindly offered to help her.

Dwarf

(shuffling in with a merry laugh) Now! Now! Do not weep my pretty maiden. I am at your service. What will you give me if I spin this straw into gold?

M/Daughter

(smiling through her tears) Thank you, kind Sir. I do not have very much but you may have my pearl necklace. (hands him the necklace)

Dwarf

Chorus

The dwarf happily took the necklace, sat at the spinning wheel and began to sing a funny little song. (singing loudly) We are wizards, Brave and bold! Only we can spin Straw into gold!

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Teac he r

Storyteller 3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(singing a second time while dwarf continues to spin) Yes, you are a wizard, Brave and bold! Only you can spin Straw into gold!

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Storyteller 1 The next morning, the King was extremely pleased to see the •f orr ev i ew pu r pos ethe sMiller's onl y•he straw turned into gold. Unfortunately, for daughter,

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Storyteller 2

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m . u

was not only very handsome but also very greedy. He ordered the poor girl to be placed in another room full of straw which had to be turned into gold by the morning. That night, the dwarf returned. The Miller's daughter was very happy to see him and willingly gave him her lovely diamond ring in return for his help.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Storyteller 3

The King was delighted with the beautiful girl's efforts. He wanted to marry her but also wished for more gold. So he promised to marry her if she turned one more roomful of straw into gold. The third night, when the dwarf appeared, he discovered that the Miller's daughter had nothing more to give him.

Dwarf

(quite angrily) I'm afraid I cannot help you unless I receive something in return.

M/Daughter

(weeping) Except for this gown I am wearing, I have nothing else to give. You must help me now and when I become Queen, I will repay you a hundredfold.

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Dwarf

I cannot accept that unless you offer me something I can be sure about.

M/Daughter

Very well, then. You may have my first born child when I am Queen.

Storyteller 3

And the dwarf accepted the very unusual offer. SCENE 3

Setting:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

[Queen seated with a doll in her arms, King standing beside her - two courtiers standing by.] The young King, true to his word, married the Miller's daughter much to the pleasure of the Miller and all the people. By the time the beautiful Queen's first baby arrived, she had forgotten all about the ugly dwarf. She was absolutely astonished when he made his appearance in the palace and demanded she keep her promise.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Storyteller 1

Dwarf

(points to the baby in the Queen's arms) I have come to take what is mine - the baby princess.

Queen

(very distressed and clutching her baby) Oh no! You cannot have my baby. I will give you anything you want but not my baby.

Dwarf

© R(reaches eadoutyEdPubl i cat i ons for the baby with arms outstretched) A promise is a promise and must be kept. •f orr ev i ew pisu r p ose sonl y• Please hand me what now rightfully mine.

Dwarf

Very well! You may keep your precious baby on one condition. You must discover my name. I will give you three days and three days only. If you fail, the young princess is mine. Is this agreed upon?

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m . u

You were kind to me once, I beg you to be kind again and let me keep my baby.

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Queen

o c . che e r o t r s super

Storyteller 2

The Queen agreed with a heavy heart. As soon as the ugly dwarf left the palace, she sent messengers far and wide to find out the dwarf’s name. On the morning of the third day, a messenger returned with good news.

Messenger

(bowing) Your Majesty, while I was travelling through the forest two nights ago, I noticed an ugly dwarf, fitting your description, dancing around a glowing fire and singing: "Today I brew, tomorrow I bake, The day after, the Queen's baby I take. I can see it clearly in the flame, Rumplestiltskin is my name!"

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Chorus

I can see it clearly in the flame, Rumplestiltskin is my name!

Storyteller 3

The Queen was so happy and relieved that she gave the messenger a bag of gold. Later that day, the dwarf appeared, sure he would get the baby princess.

Dwarf

(smiling and self-assured) What is my name, fair queen?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (mockingly) Is your name Harry or Parry? Is it Williansey or Moressy? It must be Peterkin!

Dwarf

(angrily) NO! NO! NO! Do not waste my time and give me what is rightfully mine.

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Teac he r

Queen

Queen

Wait a moment please. I do remember now. Your name is Rum-Rump--- Rumple- (scratching her head thoughtfully) I have it now. It has to be, it must be, Rumplestiltskin!

Storytellers

(together) The court laughed and applauded. The dwarf was furious. He stamped his foot on the stone floor with all his might and hopped away shrieking.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Dwarf •f (shrieking) Oh my poor foot! Oh my poor foot! All is lost! The dwarf left angrily. The King laughed merrily. The Queen hugged her baby joyfully.

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THE END

m . u

Chorus

o c . che e r o t r s super (Cast take a bow)

Ready-Ed Publications


The Wind And The Farmer (Based on a Traditional Fairytale)

CHARACTERS

The North Wind The Farmer His Wife His Three Children The Inn Keeper Elves - 2 Narrators - 4 Chorus - Class Group

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Setting:

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Teac he r

(Simple props - a recorder covered with silver paper for the flute, a small drum etc.) [Stage - A field - a few plants to indicate a crop of wheat or barley. The Farmer moving up and down the stage, admiring his crop, smiling and rubbing his hands with joy.]

Narrator 1

SCENE 1

(clearly and expressively) Long long ago, in a faraway country, there lived a poor farmer. He had a wife and three children.

and family comeP forward and take at bow.) © R(Farmer e a d y E d u b l i c a i ons He found it very difficult to feed and clothe his family because each year his crop was thoughtlessly destroyed by the North Wind. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Narrator 3

. te

This year, though the winter had been a very severe one, his crop had survived for the first time in many years. He was very pleased that for once, he had escaped the North Wind's wild anger. He hoped to sell the grain for a good price as he was desperately in need of money.

m . u

Narrator 2

But alas, that was not to be! The North Wind had not forgotten the Farmer's field. That night, the North Wind suddenly appeared and blew and blew and blew. By morning, every stalk was flattened to the ground. The miserable Farmer gazed at his lost crop and wept.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(Chorus imitates the sound of the wind while someone quietly flattens the plants.)

Farmer

(wringing his hands in despair) What am I do now? Once again my crops have been destroyed by the cruel North Wind. My family and I will surely starve.

Chorus

Farmer, do not despair. Go in search of the Wind, Tell him how he has sinned. Search here, search there, Search everywhere; Till you find him!

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Farmer

(looking around curiously) I hear voices telling me to go in search of the Wind. That is exactly what I will do. I will go in search of the North Wind and not return until I find him. I will make him pay for ruining my crops (Wife and children surround him and wave goodbye as he leaves)

Narrator 4

Wishing his family goodbye and swearing them to secrecy, he set off on his quest. He searched far and wide, till at last he came to a cave. There, fast asleep, lay the North Wind.

Farmer

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(shaking him) Wake up! Wake up, Wind! You are not going to sleep while I suffer. (sitting up suddenly, rubbing his eyes and saying gruffly) Who's there? Who dares to wake the mighty North Wind from a much earned rest?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Wind

Farmer

(trembling but trying to hide his fear) I am but a poor farmer. You have robbed me of my crops year after year, you big bag of wind. I demand you give me back my crops. I am here to make you pay.

Wind

(angrily) Pay! Pay! Pay for what?

Farmer Wind

© RPay ea E dhave Pdestroyed ubl i c a t i o ns ford they crops you year after year. You say you are a poor farmer and I am responsible for destroying •f orr e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y • your crops. I must admit, I do enjoy creating confusion wherever I

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Narrator 1

Farmer

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m . u

go. Here, take this bag of gold. It should repay all your losses. Go straight home to your family. (hands him a bag) The Farmer thanked the Wind and left happily with the bag of gold. Passing a roadside inn, he stepped in for a drink as he was tired and thirsty. He had forgotten the Wind's instructions.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(light-heartedly) Give me a large drink of the best wine you have, my good man.

Innkeeper

(looking at his old tattered garments) And how do you intend to pay for it, my good Sir?

Farmer

(taking a couple of gold pieces from the bag) With these gold pieces, my good man. I will also be needing a bed for the night.

Narrator 2

(characters mime during the narration) The farmer drank far more than was good for him. That night, he fell into a drunken sleep. The greedy Innkeeper stole the bag of gold and threw him out of the inn early the next morning.

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Farmer

(wringing his hands and shouting) What do I do now? I have been robbed by that dishonest innkeeper!

Chorus

Farmer, do not despair! Go in search of the Wind, Tell him how you have sinned. Tell him of your pain, And ask for his help again!

Farmer

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (rubbing his head) I hear those voices again! I will do what they say.

Narrator 3

The farmer decided to return to the cave and ask the Wind for his help. Shaking with fear, he faced the North Wind again.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

SCENE 2

Wind

(very gruffly) Why have you returned? Did I not give you enough gold?

Farmer

(shamefacedly) I am sorry to be back, kind Sir. You were very good to me but I disobeyed your instructions. Last night, I stayed at an inn and the keeper stole the bag of gold. He threw me out this morning.

Wind

© R(angrily) eadyEdPubl i cat i ons I shouldn't feel sorry for you but I do. Here, take this silver flute. •f orr ev i e wuponp r po o ndrink l yyou•need. When you play it,u you will get s alle thes food and This time, go straight home.

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Farmer

. te

Unfortunately, the foolish farmer entered the inn to boast about the silver flute. The cunning Innkeeper gave him plenty to drink and that night, he stole the silver flute. Once again, the farmer was thrown out into the street the next morning.

m . u

Narrator 4

(sobbing) I have lost everything. There is nothing left for me to do except lie down and die.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Chorus

Farmer, do not despair! Seek the Wind once more! Fear not if he should roar. Your plea may not be in vain, If you promise not to drink again.

Farmer

(looking around) Thank you, whoever you are. I will return to the Wind and promise not to drink again.

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SCENE 3 Narrator 1

The farmer trudged all the way back. The Wind had just returned after enjoying a wild night in Timber Town. He was not at all pleased to see the farmer a third time.

Farmer

(trembling with fear) Kind Mr Wind, Sir, forgive me for disturbing you again. If you help me this time, I promise I will never return. I also promise, I will not drink again.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Narrator 2

Farmer

Wind

(very loudly - voice like a roar) I have an excellent way to help you - a way you will never forget. (begins to sing to a drum in the corner) Out of the drum My jolly men come. Use the blue, use the red, Drum some sense into his head!

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Wind

Immediately, out of the drum, jumped two little elves. They beat the farmer with their red and blue drumsticks. The Wind laughed merrily while the poor farmer jumped up and down, crying for mercy.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evhis i e wtop ur os e-s nl y (raising hand make thep elves stop theyo vanish into • the

(jumping up and down and crying aloud) Mercy! Mercy! Make them stop! I have had enough and learnt my lesson.

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Farmer

Narrator 3

Farmer

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m . u

drum) Take the drum and teach the dishonest Innkeeper the same lesson you have just learnt. If I ever set eyes on you again, it won't be your crops but you I will blow away. (bowing low) Thank you, thank you, kind Mr Wind! I will not return again, this I promise you.

o c . che e r o t r s super

The farmer returned to the inn. The innkeeper sensed trouble and refused to attend to him, pretending that he had no more wine. The farmer pushed his way in, placed the drum on the floor in front of the innkeeper and began to sing. (singing aloud) Out of the drum My jolly men come. Use the blue, use the red, Beat him till he's nearly dead!

(the elves rush out and begin to beat the Innkeeper unmercifully)

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Innkeeper

Enough! Enough! Please make them stop! I promise I will return your bag of gold and the silver flute. I admit I stole them while you were asleep.

Farmer

What else should you promise?

Innkeeper

I promise to become an honest man and never steal from my customers again.

Narrator 4

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

The Farmer raised his hand and the elves stopped. Laughing merrily, they vanished. The Innkeeper, sore and bruised, returned the stolen bag of gold and the silver flute. He kept his promise and in years to come, became known as 'The Honest Innkeeper'.

Chorus

The Farmer returned to his family. They found it difficult to believe his story, till they saw the bag of gold, the silver flute and the drum. They always had plenty, thanks to the North Wind and they lived happily ever after. Now the Farmer lives happily With his wife and family. Never again will they be in need, Thanks to the North Wind's kind deed.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Narrators (Together)

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Ready-Ed Publications

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons (Cast take a bow) •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• THE END

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The Trout And The Fisherman (Based on a Traditional Folk Tale)

CHARACTERS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Narrator 1

ew i ev Pr

[Stage - Backdrop made up of three scenes - a very old cottage on the banks of a river, a magnificent mansion and a palace on a hilltop. A wide blue strip of paper to indicate the river. A good-sized paper boat, a fishing rod, an oar and a large stuffed trout.]

Teac he r

Setting:

Shamus the fisherman Shamina (a) his wife Shamina (b) dressed as a queen The Magic Trout (Voice only) Narrators - 4 Chorus - Class Group

(clearly and expressively - points to the dilapidated cottage) On the banks of a beautiful and peaceful river teeming with fish, stood a very old cottage. Strong winds had lifted a number of roof tiles. Some of the windows had lost their panes and flapped and creaked constantly. The broken front door, standing on one hinge was difficult to shut. The yard was littered with rubbish and the few trees and shrubs needed to be pruned.

© RIne adyEdPubl i cat i ons this cottage lived Shamus, the humble fisherman and Shamina, his cranky wife. She hadn't always been this way. As a young •f orr ev i e w ur po seso l y bride, she had beenp gentle and hard-working, butn years of • hard

Narrator 2

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Chorus

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Shamus was a fisherman, Shamina was his wife, Her fussy cranky ways, Caused much strife.

m . u

work with very little to show, had turned her into a shrew. Now she was never satisfied with the quantity of fish Shamus brought home each day.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(Shamus looks at his wife sadly while Shamina angrily shakes her fists in the air.)

Shamina

Why aren't you on the river this morning, Shamus? We need fish for food and fish for the market.

Shamus

(meekly) What happened to all the fish I brought home yesterday, Shamina? Never mind. I'll do what you say and take the boat out, again. (Shamus leaves with his fishing rod - says aloud to himself) It's much more peaceful to be out on the river, anyway!

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Narrator 3

Shamus walked down to the river bank deep in thought. Things were getting worse and worse and there didn't seem a way out. Shamina was never satisfied with his catches. (Shamus gets into the boat) Miserable and downhearted, he rowed the boat to the deepest part of the river. He cast the line and waited. Suddenly, he felt a tug. His miserable thoughts disappeared just as suddenly.

Shamus

(aloud to himself) This seems a big one. I better be careful when I reel him in. What a beauty! I've never seen such a large trout before. A very large trout Dangled from his line. He thought of the price, It would fetch this time!

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Teac he r

Chorus

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Narrator 4

The trout fell onto the bottom of the boat with a resounding thud. Then it lifted its head, looked at Shamus with its large eyes and began to speak. Shamus was completely stunned and stared widemouthed.

Trout

(voice - loud and clear) Please do not hurt me, good fisherman. I am really a magician and magicians do not make the best meal, I must warn you.

© R(inesurprise) adyEdPubl i cat i ons Goodness me! A talking fish and such a beauty too! I suppose you •f orr e vi wp ur ose so n y • to are right. Ie wouldn't dream ofp sending a talking fish tol the market

Shamus

be sold, killed and eaten.

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Narrator 1

Shamina

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Chorus

Ready-Ed Publications

Please put me back into the water and I promise your kind deed will not go unrewarded.

m . u

Trout (Voice)

Shamus removed the hook carefully and gently dropped the Magician Trout into the river. He watched it swim away rapidly. He returned home without any fish but a good story. Shamina was furious.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(stamps her foot in anger) You are very stupid, Shamus! Why didn't you ask the Trout for something in return for its life? I want you to go back to the river at once, hook the Trout again and ask for a beautiful house and furniture. I am tired of living in this broken-down cottage. Shamina was cross, Very cross indeed! She ordered Shamus back, To tell the Trout her need.

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Narrator 2

Off strode Shamus, annoyed at being called stupid. He was soon in the same spot as before. He cast his line and called out to the Magician Trout.

Shamus

Trout, Trout, Magician True Come up, for I must speak with you. Yesterday, I saved your precious life, Now you must save me from my wife!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (he hooks the Trout)

Narrator 3

The Trout heard the fisherman's cry. He remembered his promise and came to the surface.

Shamus

Trout (Voice)

What do you wish from me, good fisherman?

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Teac he r

Trout (Voice)

I need your help, not because I saved your life but because you are a magician. You must know I am a poor fisherman. My wife and I live in an old cottage by the river. She has not been happy and now wishes to have a beautiful house and beautiful furniture. I know all about you, Shamus and I have not forgotten your kindness. I will do what you ask. I hope a beautiful house will make your wife happy.

Trout was really kind, © RThe e a d y E d Publ i cat i ons And granted Shamina's wish. She had a beautiful mansion, •f orr ebecame vi ew pur posesonl y• And very rich!

Chorus

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Shamina

. te

When Shamus returned, he was not surprised to see a magnificent mansion in place of the old cottage. (points to the mansion) What surprised him was his wife's next demand, which came after a few weeks.

m . u

Narrator 4

(shrewishly) I'm tired of this great house. I want something bigger and better. A magnificent palace on yonder hilltop will please me greatly. Off with you, Shamus! You know what to do!

o c . che e r o t r s super

Narrator 1

Shamus knew he would have to return to the river and hook the Magician Trout again. He wasn't sure if the Trout would help him a second time. Even though he was shocked and angry, he decided to try for Shamina's sake. As soon as he arrived at the same spot, he called.

Shamus

(calling out) Trout, Trout, Magician True Come up, for I must speak with you! Remember, I saved your precious life Now you must save me from my foolish wife!

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Chorus

To Shamus, his wife, Was a foolish person. He knew she would soon, Learn a bitter lesson.

Trout (Voice)

(suddenly appears on the hook) Fisherman, are you in trouble again? Indeed, you have a very foolish wife. I will grant your request as I wish only for your happiness. Go now!

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Unfortunately for Shamus, his wife's demands were far from over. Since she lived in a palace, she wished to be changed into a beautiful queen. (Shamina (b) dressed as a queen walks on stage.) The Magician Trout granted this request. Her satisfaction did not last long. She wanted more, much much more. The next day, she called out to her husband.

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Teac he r

Narrator 2

Shamina

(shrieking in a high-pitched voice) Shamus, you seem to be happy the way you are, just a poor fisherman. I'm already tired of being just a queen. Now I want to be like God. Go to the Trout at once and make known my request.

Shamus

(angrily) Shamina, I have tried my best not to get angry with you but now I am, very very angry. How can you even consider a request like that. You must be mad to wish to be equal to God.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi e wpulling pu posesonl y• Shamina (screaming and herr hair) I am not mad! I want you to go now. Go! Go! Go! Very well! You will be responsible for the consequences! (turns on his heels and walks away)

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Narrator 3

Shamus

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Trout

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Shamus

Poor Shamus rushed out of the palace, jumped into his boat and rowed to the middle of the river. He sat for a while deep in thought, fully aware of the consequences of his wife's last stupid demand. He would ask anyway.

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(calls softly) Trout, Trout, Magician True Please, please, I must speak with you. My wife has gone mad! My Lord! She now wants to be like God!

(Voice - raised in anger) Your wife is not only mad but bad-tempered, ungrateful and greedy. Return to your old cottage, Fisherman. You will find your foolish wife as she was before. Return to your simple life! Goodbye, Shamus!

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Shamus

(sadly) Goodbye and thank you for all your kindness. This is what happens when we are not content. We had everything and lost it all because of our greed.

Chorus

(whole class group) Human beings are full of greed. Their wants are greater than their needs. Learn this lesson one and all, Happiness comes when wants are small.

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(Shamina 1 returns, in old clothes, weeping bitterly.) When Shamus the Fisherman returned, he noticed his weeping wife, dressed in her old garments, seated outside the old cottage. Everything else had vanished like a dream. THE END

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Narrator 4

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The Four Seasons

CHARACTERS

}

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[Stage - Backdrop of bush scenes showing the work of the four Seasons - a cottage in the bush - the Seasons dressed appropriately appear on cue - Chorus seated to one side.] SCENE 1

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Setting:

Summer Dressed in the Autumn appropriate Winter colours Spring Mother Daughter Step-daughter Yasmin Narrators - 4 Chorus - Class

Narrator 1

A long time ago, in the wild Australian bush, stood a small stone cottage. Here dwelt an old woman with her own daughter and step-daughter, Yasmin.

Narrator 2

Early in the morning, thick smoke from the chimney, showed that Yasmin, the pretty young step-daughter, was cooking breakfast. While she worked hard, the old woman and her daughter lay fast asleep.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Chorus•f Lazy bones, lazy heads, orr ev i ew pur posesonl y• Fast asleep in soft, warm beds.

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Step-mother

Yasmin

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Step-mother

It wasn't long before they were awakened by the aroma of sizzling bacon and eggs. After breakfast, the old woman had an unusual task for Yasmin.

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Step-daughter, take this basket and collect all the red kangaroo paw you can find on the mountain side. Your sister's bed room needs brightening up.

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(fearfully) But Step-mother, it is winter now. You know kangaroo paw only bloom in the springtime! (crossly) Do not question my orders. Go immediately and do not return without them.

(Yasmin sets out with a basket on her arm - using her cloak to protect herself from the wind and rain.) Narrator 4

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Yasmin set out with a heavy heart. She trudged up the mountain side in the cold and rain. She kept hearing gentle voices singing a comforting song. Page 35


Chorus

Yasmin dear, wipe away that tear, Have no fear for Spring is very near!

Narrator 1

Yasmin felt much better. She peered into a deep cleft in the mountain and was surprised to see four handsomely dressed fairy folk. She stepped closer and was soon seen by them. The one dressed in white spoke first.

Winter

What are you doing here, little lady? I am Winter and my companions are Spring, Summer and Autumn.

Yasmin

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Good morning! Please to meet you, fair Seasons. I am here to collect the special red kangaroo paw for my step-mother. Dear child, I am Spring. I make the kangaroo paw bloom but unfortunately it is not yet time for me to make my appearance.

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Spring

Winter

I still have another month to bring cold winds, rain and hail. I may even send a blanket of snow to cover these mountains.

Yasmin

Then I will just wait here till it is time for you, gentle Lady Spring to appear. I cannot return without the flowers.

Autumn

If this poor child stays here much longer, she will freeze to death.

must aE wayd to help her.b Letl usc think the matter over. © RWe ea dfind yPu i at i o ns Spring (thoughtfully, after a short pause) •f orr ev ew p r posesonl y• I have ai suggestion to u offer. Summer

If Winter agrees, I am prepared to change places with him for a short while and make the native flowers bloom.

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Winter

Chorus

Narrator 2

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What a brilliant idea! We can save this child. What do you say, Winter?

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Autumn

Very well! I shall disappear for a while and leave it all to you, Spring.

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To Yasmin, Spring was very kind, Now the kangaroo paw was easy to find.

And so it happened as the Seasons planned. Spring brought freshness and warmth and soon the flowers burst into bloom. Quickly, Yasmin picked a basketful of red kangaroo paw, thanked the Seasons, waved goodbye and skipped joyfully home. SCENE 2

Narrator 3

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Mother and daughter were very surprised when Yasmin returned home with the most beautiful kangaroo paw they had ever seen and related her story. Ready-Ed Publications


Step-mother

You silly girl, why didn't you ask for a variety of flowers and fruit from all the Seasons.

Step-sister

You could have asked for more, much more. You lost your chance, but I'm going to take mine.

Narrator 4

So without another word, she ran off into the bush, leaving her warm cloak behind. Little did she realise that Winter had returned.

Narrator 1

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She met the four Seasons in the same place on the mountain side. Instead of greeting them, she rudely demanded fruit and flowers that usually appear in the different seasons. I want juicy peaches, bright red plums, sweet-smelling daffodils and tulips right now. I will not leave till I get what I came for. (stamping her feet in anger)

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Step-sister

Spring

(gently) Try to calm down, girl! We're not used to hearing requests made in such an impolite manner.

Step-sister

Manners can be a waste of time, especially when you get what you want. I'm used to having my wishes granted. Give me what I've asked for and I'll be on my way.

© R(upset) eadyEdPubl i cat i ons This rude creature has gone mad! How can anyone in their right senses make such demands? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Autumn

Narrator 2

Winter came down in all his fury. Cold winds blew strong and hard. Rain and hail beat down on her bare head. The girl shivered and crouched down in fear, covering her body with her arms. Unable to bear Winter's anger, she fell face down and lay still.

Chorus

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I'm sorry, my fellow Seasons. We cannot give into this silly girl. My time is not yet over and she will soon feel my anger.

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Winter

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Rain beat down hard upon her, She fell flat and did not stir!

Step-mother

(looking out eagerly) It is getting late and my daughter has not yet returned. Whatever could have happened? Yasmin, I'm going in search of her. Clean the house while I'm gone.

Narrator 3

Unfortunately, the wind blew and blew. The rain poured and poured. The old woman, groping her way in the dark, eventually reached the mountain side. To her horror she came upon her daughter lying face down in the dirt. With a shriek of despair, she fell by her side.

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Step-mother

(shrieks in despair and falls by her side) Oh my daughter! My beautiful daughter!

Narrator 4

Yasmin, also concerned about her step-mother and step-sister, quickly followed and arrived just in time to hear the terrible cry. She saw both of them lying still and great sorrow filled her heart. The Seasons stood around and felt the same sorrow. (They stand around the two figures looking very sad. Yasmin begins to sob.)

Spring

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What can we do to save these poor creatures? This poor child's grief is too much to bear. I agree with you, Spring! We must think of a way to help.

Summer

Winter

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Autumn

I have an idea but once again Winter must consent. I am prepared to take over for a short while. I will cause the sun to shine and dry up the earth. The warmth will once again restore these two poor creatures.

I am prepared to leave it to you, Summer. I also feel sorry for them. I honestly did not mean to be so cruel. Goodbye.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Winter disappeared! The sun began to shine in all its glory. Beautiful blue skies appeared. The earth was soon dry. Yasmin noticed the two figures begin to stir. She went towards them and helped them up.

Step-sister

(surprised) Whatever happened! I feel I've just woken up from a refreshing sleep.

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Step-mother

Narrator 2

Chorus

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Narrator 1

(smiling) That's funny! I feel exactly the same. Whatever are we doing here? We better be on our way home. Come on you two.

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And so, arms entwined, they made their way home, their terrible ordeal forgotten. The Seasons, standing a short distance away, wore smiles too. It was certain they had a hand in this happy ending. Life for the three of them was now much happier, Watched over by Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer. THE END

(Cast take a bow)

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The Jar Of Olives

(Based on a Traditional Tale)

Setting:

Caliph of Baghdad Ali Corgia Accused (First Olive Merchant) Wife of the Accused Second Olive Merchant Third Olive Merchant Judge Boy Judge Minister Storytellers - 4 Chorus - Class Group

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CHARACTERS

[Stage - Chorus seated in a group - A street in the city of Baghdad]

Storyteller 1

SCENE 1

(clearly and expressively) This story comes to us from the Arabian Nights which is a collection of two hundred fascinating stories told by the beautiful Queen Scheherazade. She spent one thousand and one nights relating these stories to the old Caliph in order to save her life.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Chorus (draw hands across throats and make a clicking sound) Yes, to save her beautiful slender •f orr ev i ew pur poneck. sesonl y•

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In the great city of Baghdad lived an olive merchant named Ali Corgia. He longed with all his heart to see the wide and wonderful world, but he had no desire to spend the one thousand pieces of gold he had saved by working hard. He hid the gold in an olive jar, covered the top with fresh olives and requested his old friend, another olive merchant, to take care of it for him. He did not tell his friend what was inside the jar.

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Storyteller 2

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Storyteller 3

Ali Corgia placed the jar in his friend's storeroom and off he went to see the wide and wonderful world. He sincerely believed the jar would be safe. But was it? See what happens after seven long years!

Chorus

Yes, see what takes place after seven long years. SCENE 2

Setting:

[The home of Ali Corgia's friend seven years later. A couple seated on mats before a low table.]

Wife

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Dear husband, I wish to have some olives with my dinner tonight, but we do not seem to have any. Page 39


Olive Merchant 1

What a pity. Wait! I remember now, Ali Corgia left a jar of olives in our storeroom.

Wife

(shakes a finger at him) Shame on you, husband! You promised to keep that jar safe for him, so we must not touch it.

Storyteller 4

The olive merchant did not heed his wife's warning. Quietly he entered his storeroom and opened the jar. The olives were rotten so he tipped them out. Imagine his great surprise when gold coins began to roll out.

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(shows surprise then rubs his hands with glee) Whoever would have thought that Ali Corgia could own so many gold coins. These belong to me now for no one knows whether he will ever return. I'll fill the jar with fresh olives just in case …

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Olive Merchant 1

Chorus

Shame on you! Shame on you, olive merchant! You broke a solemn promise.

Storyteller 1

Unfortunately for the olive merchant, Ali Corgia did return from his travels that very year. To his utter dismay, when he opened the jar in his friend's storeroom, he discovered all his precious gold gone. His friend swore he hadn't touched the jar.

Corgia shows dismay, walks across to his friend and points to © R(Ali e a d y E d P u b l i c a t i o n s the jar. The olive merchant shakes his head vigorously.) •f o1rr ev ewI p ur es o nDid l y Olive Merchant Upon myi honour, promise Ip dido nots touch your jar. you• not find the jar in exactly the same spot as you put it?

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Storyteller 2

Judge

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(They go before the Judge.) Ali Corgia was very disappointed and did not believe his friend was speaking the truth. He decided to take his friend before the chief judge. The Judge looked at his ragged clothes and did not believe he could own one thousand pieces of gold. He looked at the olive merchant's rich garments and believed his story.

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My good friend, why would this wealthy merchant steal your gold? I do not think the rich are capable of stealing.

Storyteller 3

The Judge dismissed the case. Ali Corgia was disappointed for the second time. His only hope was to seek justice from the Caliph himself.

Chorus

Yes, seek justice from the Caliph. He is a wise and just ruler.

Ali Corgia

(aloud to himself) I am absolutely certain the Caliph will believe me.

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Storyteller 4

Ali Corgia's case was to be heard by the Caliph the very next day. That night, the Caliph and one of his ministers, dressed in ordinary clothes, went out into the streets. It was usual for the Caliph to do this as he discovered a great deal about his people in this way. (The Caliph sees a group of street boys acting out the case, through mime.)

Storyteller 1

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(follows the boy and taps him on the shoulder) You must be in the Great Hall tomorrow morning, by order of the Caliph.

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Minister

The Caliph was surprised to see and hear a group of street boys acting out the case of Ali Corgia and further surprised to discover how cleverly the boy judge solved the case. He decided to get the boy to judge the case in the Great Hall the next day.

Boy

Wh.. Why? What have I done?

Minister

Nothing! Don't worry, boy, nothing will happen to you. Just be there. SCENE 3

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Caliph (gently) •f orr v i e wboy. pIu r p es n yCorgia • as Doe not be afraid, wish youo to s judge the o case ofl Ali Setting:

[Gathering in the Great Hall. The Caliph places the boy on his throne, takes off his own grand turban and places it on the boy's head.]

Boy

(to Ali Corgia) Come forward. State your name and your case!

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Ali Corgia

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you did last night in the street. Go ahead and speak out!

(bows to the boy judge) My Lord! My name is Ali Corgia. I had a jar containing one thousand pieces of gold which I covered with a layer of fresh olives. I left the jar in the storeroom of my once good friend, that olive merchant. (points to the accused) When I returned from my travels, after seven long years, I found the jar in his storeroom but the gold was missing.

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Boy Judge

Where is the jar now?

Ali Corgia

Here it is, my lord! Full of olives only.

Olive Merchant 1

I swear I didn't touch the gold!

Boy Judge

Quiet! Speak only when you are questioned. Now! Were you given that jar to take care of for your friend?

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Olive Merchant 1

Yes, but I swear I didn't touch the gold!

Boy Judge

For the last time, I forbid you to swear. Call in the two olive merchants from the market. (They come near.) Open the jar and taste those olives. (Each tastes an olive.)

Olive Merchants

(Speaking together) My lord, these olives are fresh from this year's crop. Had they been seven years old, they would have been rotten and mouldy.

Chorus

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Yes, absolutely rotten and mouldy!

(turning to the accused olive merchant) Now speak! Did you or did you not remove the gold and place fresh olives in the jar?

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Boy Judge

Olive Merchant 1

I… Ah… I didn't mean… (hangs his head in shame)

Boy Judge

(turns to the Caliph and bows) Your Highness, he is guilty. It is a great shame that he stole from his friend. I leave you to sentence him. I cannot do that as I am only a street boy.

Caliph

hisy hand ond the P boy's shoulder) © R(places e a d E u bl i cat i ons For a street boy, you have done very well. You have shown more wisdom than the chief judge there. He based his judgement on the •f orr evi ew p u r p osethe struth on y• outward appearance but you discovered byl looking at the

Ali Corgia

My gratitude to the wise young judge. (makes a deep bow and withdraws)

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facts. Some day, you are going to make a fine judge.

The Caliph ordered the olive merchant to return the one thousand pieces of gold to a happy Ali Corgia.

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Storyteller 3

The olive merchant was sent to jail for a period of seven years. This tough sentence was to prevent others from taking what did not belong to them.

Storyteller 4

The boy received many presents from the Caliph, Ali Corgia and other well-wishers. He was encouraged to finish school and study law. He received the undying gratitude of Ali Corgia.

Chorus

Yes, the undying gratitude of Ali Corgia and our gratitude to the wise young judge. THE END

(Cast take a bow) Page 42

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The Blind Men And The Elephant (Based on a Traditional Folktale From India)

CHARACTERS

Setting:

Storytellers (3) Blind men (6) Ramu (pronounced Ramoo) Chorus (Class Group)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

[Six blind men are seated in a circle round a fire having a lively discussion. Encourage characters to use body language, facial expressions and mime while storytellers speak.]

Chorus

Once upon a time, in a sheltered cave in a deep forest, lived six blind men. They had moved away from their village as they felt different and alone. Now they lived happily, using their other senses to find food and learn about their new environment.

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Storyteller 1

They used their other senses, Hearing, touch, taste, smell, To search for food, And keep themselves well! (Children may hold up placards depicting the above.)

© RThe ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons blind men had made friends with the animals and were able to recognise them. When they walked through the forest, many of •f orr efeathered vi ew pu r ponotheir se son l yfelt• their friends perched shoulders. They the

Storyteller 2

Chorus

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Oh yes! They roamed freely Among the giant trees. Ate the delicious fruit, Enjoyed the gentle breeze.

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soft coat of the deer and the stringy hair of the orang-utan and were not afraid.

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Storyteller 3

They were a happy group but happier still when Ramu, the village headman, came to visit them. He was their one and only friend.

Storyteller 1

One bright day, Ramu heard the blind men discussing an animal they knew very little about.

Blind man 1

Even though we are blind, isn't it wonderful that we know all the animals in this great forest.

Blind man 2

Oh no, we don't! We know nothing about a strange creature called the elephant.

Blind man 3

I remember my family talking about the elephant and how it can be trained to perform tricks in a circus.

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Blind man 4

Where are we going to find such a creature? Let's forget the whole thing.

Blind man 5

My good brothers, let us not give up so easily. We'll roam the forest till we find one.

Blind man 6

I'm the oldest and wisest and I say let us do it. Learning so much about the world we live in has kept us happy. I'm certain Ramu will help us.

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(appears suddenly and surprises them) Of course, I will! I listened to your discussion and I know just the place to find an elephant. Follow me.

Chorus

(The men stand and follow, holding one another's turban tails. Ramu leads them to a cardboard model.) At last! At last! To this strange creature we go; To touch, to smell, to listen, And then to know!

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Ramu

(The first blind-man accidentally falls against the body of the elephant. He picks himself up and rubs his hurt shoulder vigorously.)

© RFriends, ead yEdPubl i cat i ons be sure of this, the elephant is as hard as clay. It is like the clay wall of a village hut. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Blind man 1

Blind man 3

(walks in front of the elephant and feels the tusks) Oh, my good friends, be sure of this, the elephant is like a curved sword.

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(feels the ear) Friends, be sure of this the elephant is indeed like a huge fan.

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Blind man 2

Blind man 4

(feels the tail) You are all wrong, my cherished friends. Be sure of this, the elephant is like a long, knotted rope.

Blind man 5

(feels the trunk carefully and suddenly jumps back) My dear dear friends, be sure of this, the elephant is like a snake, more like a huge python and this makes me afraid.

Blind man 6

Out of my way! I am the oldest and wisest among you and will tell you what the creature is really like. (bends and feels the leg) All of you are wrong. The elephant is like the bunyan tree, very thick and very strong.

Ramu

(clapping his hands and laughing out aloud) All of you are right in your own way. The elephant's shape and size

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Ready-Ed Publications


fit your descriptions. (Suddenly they hear the elephant trumpet. Voice imitation - does not have to be perfect. The blind-men stamp their feet and clap their hands with joy.) Blind men

(together) Now we know it all. This strangest of God's creatures has a voice like a trumpet.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S The ears like fans! The legs like trees! The trunk like a snake! The tail like a rope! The tusks like swords! The body like a wall! Now we know it all!

THE END

(Cast take a bow)

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Chorus

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The Nightingale

(Based on a Traditional Tale)

Setting:

Storytellers - 3 Emperor of China Empress of China Nightingale (girl or boy with a sweet voice) Mechanical Nightingale (boy/girl - must move and act like a puppet) Court Physician Court Guard Messenger Passer-by Chorus

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CHARACTERS

[Stage - Emperor seated, appearing old and ill, staring at an open page in a book. Empress standing by his side and looking at him sadly. Storytellers facing the audience. Chorus seated in a group on one side.] SCENE 1

long time ago in the away country ofa China, lived an old © RAEmperor. e ad y E dfarP ub l i c t i o ns His beautiful palace was in the middle of a deep forest. In the forest lived a nightingale. Anyone passing through the forest •f orr ev i e w pur p ovoice. sesonl y• could hear the nightingale's sweet

Storyteller 1

Yes, anyone passing through the forest could hear the sweet voice of the nightingale.

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Passer-by

Chorus

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Chorus

(Nightingale singing her sweet song. "One Love" is a good choice.) (walking along and listening to the nightingale) What a beautiful voice! I have never heard anything so exquisite before.

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A most exquisite voice indeed!

Storyteller 2

The Emperor had heard of this wonderful bird in a book written by an old Chinese author. He stared long and hard at paintings of this most-talked of bird. He longed to hear her song but being old and feeble he could not leave his palace. This made him feel very very sad.

Chorus

This made him a very sad Emperor. All those around him were very sad too.

Empress

(touching his shoulder gently) My Lord, why are you so unhappy today?

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Emperor

(looking up sadly and sighing) I wish with all my heart to hear this wonderful bird, but alas, it can never be!

Empress

Do not despair, my dear husband, I shall see what I can do. One of the palace guards should be able to trap this beautiful bird. (Empress claps her hands. A guard appears and bows low before her. She gives an order in a slightly raised voice.)

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Go into the forest at once and fetch a nightingale. Do not return till you have trapped one in a cage.

Emperor

Storyteller 1

So that very day, a young guard went into the forest. He had no trouble in trapping a nightingale and returning to the palace. (The Nightingale stands to one side.)

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Storyteller 3

(stares at the Nightingale and smiles for the first time) Will you sing for me, sweet Nightingale? (The Nightingale sings the first verse of 'One Love'. Everyone listens in silence, completely enthralled.)

The Nightingale sang so sweetly that the Emperor and all in the palace wept for joy.

present on the wipe their eyes) © R(all ea dy Estage dP u bl i cat i ons Chorus Oh yes! They all wept for joy. • f o r r evi ew pur posesonl y• Storyteller 2 Each day, the Nightingale sang for the Emperor who was so pleased, he ordered a splendid cage to be built for her.

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(A large cage [home-made with strips of colourful card] is brought onto the stage and placed to one side. The Nightingale is placed inside.)

Storyteller 3

All went well till one bright day, a gift arrived for the Emperor.

Messenger

(bows low) Your gracious Majesty, a wealthy stranger asked me present this unusual gift to you. Should it be unwrapped?

Emperor

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(excited) A gift for me! What is it? Unwrap it at once! My curiosity is getting the better of me.

(The gift is unwrapped. A mechanical nightingale is revealed, standing perfectly still.) Storyteller 1

To the Emperor's surprise, it was a mechanical nightingale studded with diamonds and rubies. The messenger turned a key and the bird began to sing. (Nightingale begins to sing sweetly.)

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Emperor

(shows delight and rubs his hands together joyfully) This is absolutely magnificent! Place it in my bedroom as I wish to hear it sing as soon as I wake up and before I go to bed. (The nightingale moves stiffly to one side.)

Storyteller 2

Unfortunately, the real nightingale heard the Emperor and feeling unwanted flew back to the forest. One sad day, the mechanical nightingale broke down and could no longer sing. The Emperor longed to hear the sweet voice of the real Nightingale and became very ill.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S (Emperor totters to his chair)

(head drooping) I am dying. I wish to hear that lovely voice once more before I leave this earth.

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Emperor

Court Physician

(examines the Emperor) I'm afraid he is dying. If we do not find the Nightingale, the Emperor will be dead before the morning.

Chorus

(sadly) A dying Emperor! The Nightingale must be found!

Empress

(to the Physician) Send a court guard immediately to search the forest and bring back the Nightingale.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Storyteller But the who had learned to love old l Emperor, •3f orr e vNightingale, i ew p u r p ose sthe on y• heard of his illness and quickly flew to the palace of her own accord.

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Emperor

(Nightingale hops into the cage and sings the same verse. All on stage listen and smile happily.) Her sweet singing made the Emperor well again. The Empress and everyone in the palace were filled with joy. A great feast was held to celebrate the Emperor's recovery.

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(pivoting around in a little dance of his own) I am well! Hurrah, I am completely well! Praise to the beautiful Nightingale! (points to the Nightingale) Let us all dance and sing. (begin to dance and laugh merrily) The Emperor is well. Let us all dance and sing!

(Everyone on the stage follows suit, dancing and singing merrily to any tune.) THE END (Cast take a bow) Page 48

Ready-Ed Publications


Two Men And A Donkey (Based on a well-known fable)

Teac he r

CHARACTERS

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

[Stage - Story session. Children seated in a group facing the audience. Child impersonating the Teacher standing or seated in a chair. Use simple props made by the children.]

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Setting:

Teacher (a child may take the part and impersonate the class teacher) Father Son Donkey (either a child or a prop) Voice Imitation (Donkey) Narrators - 2 Townsfolk - 6 Class Group

Teacher

Good morning, class. How would you like an interesting story this morning, before we begin our day's work?

Class

(together) Good morning, Mr/Mrs/Miss (Teacher's name). That will be wonderful! May we have one from Aesop's Fables?

© R(smiling) ead yEdPubl i cat i ons Why not! Aesop's Fables are very interesting and each story teaches us something good. Which one would you like to •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• hear?

Teacher

Teacher

I have a marvellous idea! We'll have a drama class and act out the story instead.

Class

Teacher

. te

That is a good idea and will be lots of fun!

m . u

We'd like to hear, 'The Man, His Son and the Donkey' again, if you don't mind, Mr/Mrs/Miss...............!

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Class

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(pointing to certain children) You be the father. You be the son. You can be the donkey. Cover yourself with a sheet and wear the headgear. You six can be the townsfolk. We'll place the stream here and put a bridge across. (places a wide strip of blue paper with a wooden plank across) Take your places now and don't forget to speak clearly and expressively.

Class

What about the Narrators?

Teacher

(touches her brow to indicate she had forgotten) Ah yes! You two can be the storytellers as you know the story very well. Let's begin! (shows where the narrators and townsfolk should stand and

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signals for them to begin) Storyteller 1

(expressively) Once upon a time, a man decided to take his son to a fair in the next town. In those days, animals such as horses and donkeys were used for transport and work. Being poor, the man owned only a donkey.

Storyteller 2

(characters mime the actions) The donkey had been fed, watered and given a rub down. The father was ready to start out as it was a good distance to the next town. He called out to his son to hurry so they would have plenty of time to look around and have some fun.

Storyteller 1

Hurry up, Thomas. You better ride the donkey. It's a long way to the fair and I don't want you to get tired.

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Teac he r

Father

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(Thomas mounts the donkey while his father leads the way. The donkey brays now and again - eeaw! eeaw!)

They had gone only a short distance when they passed a group of people standing by the roadside. They were surprised to hear laughter and some unfriendly remarks.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Towns person 1 (in surprise) •f orr e vi ethat? wThe pu r po se s on l y •the Did you see son, who is big and strong, rides while

(The first two townsfolk standing by the wayside, point to them and remark.)

father walks. What is this world coming to?

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Son

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Storyteller 1

(shaking his/her head) I think the boy has no thought for his old father. He should be walking and his tired father riding on the donkey's back.

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Towns person 2

(dismounts) Father, it's true. I'm big and strong. I shouldn't be riding while you walk. You sit on the donkey.

o c . che e r o t r s super

(Helps his father to get on the donkey's back and they continue on their way.) The son walked by the donkey's side and they continued on their way. Further down the road, they came across some other townsfolk who stared long and hard at them. (They meet the second group.)

Towns person 3

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(pointing to them in utter disbelief) I don't believe this! That is one thoughtless father! He rides while his poor son walks. His feet must be aching and sore.

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Towns person 4

(arms on hips) I agree with you! What father would ride while his son walks? The better thing to do would be for both of them to ride.

Father

Well son, you heard what was just said. Hop on behind me. It will be better for everyone concerned if we both ride.

Son

Very well, father. Maybe then, people will stop staring and passing rude remarks.

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Both rode on the donkey's back. The animal's pace became very slow. They had to cross a stream to get to the next town. To their dismay, they noticed another group, pointing, staring and laughing. (The third group are near the stream. They throw their heads back and laugh and laugh.)

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Teac he r

Storyteller 2

Towns person 5

(laughing heartily, pointing and rubbing his/her eyes) I just can't believe my eyes! Two big hulks riding on a small helpless donkey. How would they feel if the donkey rode on their backs?

Towns person 6

(shaking with laughter) That's it! Why don't they carry the poor little donkey the rest of the way?

© R(both ea dyEdPubl i cat i ons dismount) Do you know, Thomas, they're right? The donkey must be tired •f orr evi etwo wof p p os sload. onl y• carrying the us. u Wer do make ae heavy

Son

I'm sure you're right, father! We'll tie the donkey's legs to this pole and carry it across the stream. The bridge is quite safe.

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. te

Storyteller 1

m . u

Father

(They tie the donkey's legs to a pole and lift the pole onto their shoulders. The six townsfolk quickly walk to the other side of the stream.)

o c . che e r o t r s super

As they were crossing the stream carrying the donkey, a large group had gathered to watch. The scene was so funny that once again they were met with hilarious laughter. (children laugh loudly)

Storyteller 2

The loud noise frightened the poor donkey. It struggled and kicked its legs hard. The father and son were unable to control the donkey. It struggled so much, that suddenly it fell into the stream and was drowned.

Father

(sorrowfully, looking down into the stream) There goes our only means of transport.

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Son

(looking down as well but rather cross) And do you know why, father. Because we listened to too many remarks and tried to please all those strange people.

Teacher

Do you think Thomas was right?

Class

Yes we do! When we try to please too many people, we end up pleasing nobody, not even ourselves.

Teacher

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I agree! Pleasing everybody isn't always the right thing to do. Well I enjoyed that and I hope you did too.

(Cast take a bow)

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Teac he r

THE END

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Page 52

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Ready-Ed Publications


Fairy & Folk Tales Through Drama