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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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About Ready-Ed Publications

Ready-Ed Publications

Ready-Ed Publications was established in 1984 with the purpose of creating practical classroom blackline master activities. At the time, the role of the teacher was becoming ever more diverse with an increasing range of duties and responsibilities within the school and school community. Since then, the role of the teacher has continued to evolve with an escalating range of tasks and obligations, ensuring a reduction in time available to prepare work for the daily instructional program.

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Throughout these past 24 years, Ready-Ed Publications has built a reputation as publishers of Australian made, high quality, innovative, timesaving materials for teachers of primary and lower secondary levels. In addition, all materials are based on state or national curriculum guidelines or specific age-related interest areas and subjects.

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Ready-Ed Publications aims to assist busy professionals by making available contemporary classroom materials that contain relevant and stimulating work to support the requirements of the curriculum.

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K-2 Number Activities © 2003 Ready-Ed Publications; Revised edition published 2008 Printed in Australia Author: Merryn Whitfield Illustrated by Terry Allen Published by: Ready-Ed Publications PO Box 276 Greenwood WA 6024 www.readyed.com.au info@readyed.com.au

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ISBN 1 86397 556 X •ISBN: f or r evi ew pur posesonl y•

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COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

Links to Student Outcome Statements

. t e- Number o Level 1 Level 2 - Numberc . che e r o t r s super

The activities in this book can be linked to the following outcomes. Please check the Skills Checklist on Page 5 for a complete guide to the numeracy concepts addressed in the activities.

Count and Order 1.11 Number Patterns 1.12 Applying Numbers 1.14a

Mental Computation 1.15

Count and Order 2.11 Number Patterns 2.12 Equations 2.13 Applying Numbers 2.14a Mental Computation 2.15

The outcomes mentioned above refer to material from:

Mathematics - a curriculum profile for Australian Schools

(1994) ISBN: 1 86366 213 8 This document is published by: Curriculum Corporation, St Nicholas Place, 141 Rathdowne St, Carlton VIC, 3053. 4www.curriculum.edu.au/catalogue/

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Contents Introduction.......................................................................4

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Skills Checklist..................................................................5 Teaching Notes..................................................................6

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Activity Pages

Adding On - Addition........................................................28

What Number Am I? - (1-100) Whole Numbers................10

Number Balancing - Addition............................................29

What Number Am I? - (1-100) Whole Numbers................11

Unequal Numbers - Whole Numbers................................30

Build A Rocket - (1-30) Whole Numbers..........................12

Doubles and Near Doubles - Addition...............................31

Matching Numbers and Objects - Whole Numbers............13

Dice Roll - Place Value.....................................................32

100’s Chart (1-100) Place Value .....................................14

Domino Addition - Addition..............................................33

Counting On and Counting Back (1-30) Addition and Subtraction.......................................15

Dice Groups - Multiplication.............................................34

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What Number Am I? - (0-10) Whole Numbers....................9

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Place Value (1-100) - Place Value....................................17 Number Line Counting - Whole Numbers.........................18 Number Line Addition - Addition.......................................19 Number Line Subtraction - Subtraction.............................20

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Teens: Number Patterns - Place Value...............................21 Organising Data - Whole Numbers....................................22

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Ladybird - Addition..........................................................23

Caterpillar Groups - Multiplication....................................35 How Many? - Multiplication..............................................36 Bug Off - Multiplication.....................................................37 Groups Of - Multiplication.................................................38 Group Match - Multiplication............................................39 Making Numbers (1-30) - Mathematical Processes..........40

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More Counting On and Counting Back (1-100) Addition and Subtraction.....................................16

Making Numbers (1-100) - Mathematical Processes........41 Bingo: Mathematical Processes . .....................................42 Lotto: Mathematical Processes ........................................43 Addition Dice Game - Addition.........................................44

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Answer Match to 20 - Addition and Subtraction.................24 Answer Match to 100 - Addition and Subtraction...............25 Dice Addition - Addition...................................................26 What’s the Difference? - Subtraction.................................27

Subtraction Dice Game - Subtraction................................45 Challenge Page - Mathematical Processes........................46 Answers...........................................................................47

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Introduction processes they and their peers used to solve a number of mathematical problems. This analysis is designed to promote the use of varied strategies by students, encouraging them to participate in cooperative learning. Many of these questions are open ended in nature and are useful discussion points for future lessons and activities.

This book provides K-2 students with written activities to help develop, consolidate and enhance their use of early mathematical skills and strategies, including: forward and backward number sequencing, identifying numerals and matching them to groups of objects, finding differences, solving problems, comparing numbers, using doubles and familiar number combinations, and grouping numbers to make patterns.

Mathematics is not a system of right or wrong. It is a process of developing understandings and being able to apply these understandings to new situations and relationships.

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The “K-2 Number Activities” resource book provides a series of activities and activity pages which enable students to access, use and understand increasingly more difficult strategies and processes when solving mathematical problems. It is designed to support and enhance the use of concrete materials within the classroom.

Involving students in critically analysing their thinking processes, even at the most early stages of mathematical study, is a critical component in engaging and challenging all students and ensuring personal success and self motivation.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons The ins thiso book are •f orr evi ew pur pactivities ose nl y• designed to complement the

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0-1000, making this a valuable resource for composite classes or those classes with diverse mathematical profiles.

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• www.curriculumsupport.nsw. edu.au/maths/countmein/ The Count Me In Too program is an innovative numeracy project which is an initiative of the New South Wales Department of Education and Training.

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Many of the pages also contain “Think About It” boxes which pose questions of students, aiming to involve them, individually or in groups, verbally or in written form, to examine, respond to and evaluate the

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mathematical strategies and number concepts outlined in programs such as Count Me In Too.

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“K-2 Number Activities” contains 38 activity pages suitable for a range of student abilities, covering the broad subsections of mathematical learning in number of whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication and place value. Some of these areas have graded activities to suit differing levels of student understandings and experiences, i.e. 0-10, 0-100,


Student Name

counts forward orally counts backwards orally

forward sequencing of written numerals backward sequencing of written numerals counts concrete objects with 1 to 1 correspondence matches written numerals with groups of objects

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identifies written numerals

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understands place value

groups numbers into tens and ones adds two single digit numbers

adds three or more digit numbers

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subtracts two digit numbers

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makes equal groups of objects

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subtracts single digit numbers

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explains the mathematical processes used uses a variety of mathematical processes

instantly recognises dot patterns on a dice counts by ones, twos and fives counts by threes and fours

identifies the largest and smallest value numeral identifies numbers that are near doubles

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Teaching Notes Here are some ideas to help you get the most out of the written activities in “K-2 Number Activities”. All activities are flexible in terms of their grouping strategy. They can be completed in teacher guided groups, student led groups, or independently, according to teacher discretion.

Unequal Numbers (Page 30) Make sure that students are familiar with the use and operation of an equal arm balance. This activity could be linked with a series of measurement based lessons. Talk about what would make numbers heavy (being larger in value) or light (being lower in value). Have students act this out. Write a number on the board, then call out a second number. The children have to squat on the floor if the second number is larger (heavier) than the first, or stand on tip toes if the second number is lower (lighter) in value than the first.

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Preliminary Activities: Involve students in meaningful counting activities: Counting the number of boys and girls in the class; counting how many children ordered their lunch; counting how many books were borrowed from the library - the possibilities are limitless.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Whole Number S

Addition and Subtraction

Activities: © ReadyEdPreliminary Publ i c at i ons Focus students’ attention on how we user addition and subtraction iny everyday •f orr evi ew pu p o s e s o n l • life: How many lollies were eaten and

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Activity Pages: What Number Am I? (Pages 9, 10, 11)

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Some quick and easy addition and subtraction games can be completed as oral lesson breaks. Flashcards can be useful and are readily available in most schools to reinforce simple number patterns such as add or subtract one. Use calculators to show what happens when repeatedly adding one or subtracting one from a given number. As students’ skills develop, start looking at counting by two or five. Make models of eyes, hands or feet to help students visualise this concept of multiple counting.

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This is a series of three graded activity sheets. As an introduction, first go through the Who am I? questioning structure orally with students, to familiarise them with the written format. The first activity (numbers 0-10) contains a number line to assist students in eliminating numbers as they go through the clues. For example, the clue “I am a single digit number” will mean that 10 is crossed off.

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how many are left? How many children are in the class? Add the number of boys and girls and take away those students who are sick or on holidays.

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As short lesson break activities ask students to identify which number comes before or after a given number. Encourage instant recognition of dot patterns as on a dice. Play games such as Buzz, or Snakes and Ladders, and sing number songs such as 10 Little Indians or 10 Green Bottles.


Activity Pages: Counting On and Counting Back (Pages 15, 16)

Multiplication

These two activity sheets are the best place to start, once students have a basic understanding of oral number sequences.

Sorting and categorising groups of objects is an excellent way of introducing the concept of multiplication. Many students will already have experiences of ‘times tables’ from older friends and siblings. However it is important to stress the importance of understanding the concept of multiplication, not just the process of it.

Number Line Addition and Subtraction (Pages 19, 20)

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Answer Match (Pages 24, 25)

With these two activities, students need to have a firm grasp of the concepts of both addition and subtraction. They need to solve the problems before matching the addition question to the subtraction question with the same answer. Each question has a matching pair. Children can draw lines or colour code to match.

The language of multiplication can be quite ambiguous, especially with students who have special learning needs, or who come from a language background other than English. Practice in using terms such as ‘groups of’, ‘rows of’, ‘collections’, ‘lots of’ is important, as is the use of phrases such as ‘two fives’ and ‘four threes’.

Activity Pages:

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These activities are an alternative to always using concrete counters or cubes. Encourage students to start at the biggest number first (this helps to ease the confusion when subtracting) and then jump forwards or backwards the required number of spaces, just like counting on and counting back.

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Preliminary Activities:

Caterpillar Groups (Page 35) and Groups Of (Page 38)

© ReadyEdP ub l i c at i o nforswritten These are the starting point multiplication activities. They provide •f orr evi ew puexamples r pos soton l yand •can be fore students follow completed in small groups or individually.

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Many of the addition and subtraction activities involve the use of dice. Provide more advanced students with a variety of different dice to use; for example 12 sided dice, or dice with written numerals. Students could even make their own.

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Dice Groups (Page 34) and How Many? (Page 36)

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Dice Games

These are the middle stage of multiplication, where students are expected to understand the concept of multiplication as a series of groups or collections, each containing the same number of objects.

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These activities involve students in combining their understandings of the different written language forms of multiplication. They will need to have had many previous experiences in using and discussing these language forms before working on these activities.

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Place Value Preliminary Activities:

Mathematical Processes

Start by looking at numbers between 11 and 19. Develop the concept of ‘1 ten and some more’. Use a variety of concrete materials and have students involved in grouping and bundling these objects into 1 ten and then those which are left. Initially name them as ‘1 ten and 3 more’, or ‘1 ten and 6 more’.

These five activity pages are open-ended and can be used in a variety of ways.

These can be made more difficult by having addition or subtraction involved. The students write the number answers, but the teacher calls out an addition or subtraction question which students have to solve before identifying the chosen number. It can also be used to reinforce multiplication facts and times tables.

Activity Pages: 100’s Chart (Page 14) Once students have correctly glued on the cut-out numerals, they may complete the chart by writing in all the missing numerals. Alternatively, call out numbers orally and have students then place them into the correct position on the chart.

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When students are familiar with the idea of place value, ask them to identify the place value of digits in everyday numbers such as the date, and ask them what it means. Display a 100’s chart in your room and spend some time each week looking at the number patterns represented by it and the place value of different numbers.

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Bingo and Lotto (Pages 42, 43)

Making Numbers (Pages 40, 41)

These pages will challenge every student in the class. Some will stick with the familiar addition and subtraction, others will experiment with fractions or other mathematical processes, e.g. percentages. These are great class discussion points to demonstrate the scope of possibilities and to enhance the self esteem of all students.

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These are two similar activities involving students in identifying place value up to the hundreds column. Some students might find it helpful to have a blank chart labeled with unit/ten/hundred columns in which to write numbers, to help them in deconstructing the place value of the digits.

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Challenge Page (Page 46) This is for advanced and experienced students. The questions involve higher order thinking skills as well as a degree of creativity. It is suggested that the questions not be completed all at once, but over a series of lessons to enable students to return and further develop their answers and to work cooperatively in a group situation.

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Place Value (Page 17) and Dice Roll (Page 32)

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Date:

Name:

Whole Numbers (0-10)

What Number Am I?

Read the clues below. Use the numberline to help you by crossing off incorrect choices as you read through the clues.

1. a) I am a single digit number. b) I am more than 7. c) I am an even number. 0

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I am the number___________

3. _a) I am an odd number. b) I am a lonely number. c) I am called a single.

2. a) I am less than 6. b) I am more than 2. 0 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 © Rme ea dyE dPu b l i c a4t i o n s c) Double makes 10. I am the number___________ • f o r r e v i e w p u r posesonl y• 0

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4. _a) I am more than 5. I am the number___________ b) Add 2 to me to make 12. c) I am a 2 digit number.

Do. Your I am the number___________ t e Own o c . che _a) I am ______________ e 5. _a) I o amr an odd number. t r sI am less than 6. supe _b) I am ______________ r b)

c) I am ______________

I am the number

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c) Triangles and triplets are _ named after me.

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I am the number___________ 9


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Whole Numbers (1-100)

What Number Am I?

Read the clues below to work out the answer. Remember to read all the clues.

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1. I am a 2 digit number. I am a multiple of ten. My first digit is an even number. I am less than 30.

3. I am an even number. My first digit is an odd number. My second digit is worth nothing. I am halfway to a century.

I am the number___________ I am the number___________ 4. I am less than 100. 2. I am not a ‘teen’ number. I am an odd number. I am more than 10. I am more than 90. I am less than 20. © ReadyEd PMy ub i cat i on 2l digits add ups to 18. My 2 digits are the same numeral. •f orr evi ew pu r pthe os esonl y• I am number___________

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I am the number___________ 5. I am more than two dozen. I am less than 40. I am a multiple of 3. My two digits add up to 9.

. Your te Own I am the number___________ o c . che _a) I am ______________ e r o t r THINK ABOUT IT s r upe _b) I am ______________ s

c) I am ______________

Which clues did you find the easiest? Why?

I am the number

Which clues did you find the hardest? Why?

Do

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What Number Am I?

Whole Numbers (1-1000)

Read the four clues for each question. Use these clues to help you work out the answer.

5. I am greater than 700. My last digit is 0. I am 3/4 of the way to 1000. I am less than 800.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S I am the number___________

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1. I am a 3 digit number. I am an even number. I am a multiple of 100. My 3 digits added together equals

I am the number___________ 6. Write your own clues for the answer below. 2. I am a 3 digit number. ______________________ I am a multiple of 5. My 3 digits add up to 11. ______________________ My first and last digits ©to R adyEdP bl i cat i ons u ______________________ add up 10.e Ir am the number 800. • f o r r e v i e w p u p o s e s o n l y• I am the number___________ THINK ABOUT IT

I am greater than 200 I am less than 250. My first digits add up to 4.

_ ______________________________

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Did you write the same clues as your friend?

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3. I am an even number. My first digit is 1. I have 4 digits. I am worth the same as 10 centuries.

Are some of your clues different? Why do you think this happened?

o c . che I am the number___________ e r o t r s s _ ______________________________ r u e p 4. I am a multiple of 10.

Below write the most interesting clue someone in your class wrote for question 6.

_ ______________________________ _ ______________________________

I am the number___________ 11


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Whole Numbers (1-30)

Build A Rocket r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Cut out the numbered squares and paste on the rocket in order, from the smallest at the bottom to the largest at the top.

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Date:

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Whole Numbers

Matching Numbers and Objects

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Cut out the numbered boxes. Paste the number next to the picture showing that many objects or items.

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Place Value (1-100)

100’s Chart r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Cut out the numbered boxes below. Glue them on to the 100’s chart in the correct places.

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THINK ABOUT IT

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What helped you to find the correct place for each number? Which numbers were the easiest to place and why? Which numbers were the more difficult to place and why?

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Date:

Name:

Addition & Subtraction (1-30)

Counting On and Counting Back Counting by one, count on or back from the given number.

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Counting by two, count on or back from the given number. Write in the numbers.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok Write in the u numbers. S 5

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Counting by four, count on or back from the given number.

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Write in the numbers.

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o c . che e r o THINK ABOUT IT t r s super Could you count by two, starting on an odd number? What would happen?

On the back, make your own slithery snake, counting by 2 using odd numbers.

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Name:

More Counting on and Counting Back

Counting by two, fill in the missing numbers.

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Counting by one, fill in the missing numbers.

Place Value (1-100)

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21 © Ready EdPubl i c at i on s Counting by five, fill in the missing numbers. •30 f orCounting r evi ew ur pos es onl y • by p three, fill in the missing numbers.

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30 . THINK ABOUT ITt e o Can you count by ten, starting with a c . ch e number that does not end in zero? r e o t r What would happen if yous counted byr s upe ten, starting at 13? Use a hundreds chart to help you. On the back, make a snake to show what would happen if you counted by ten, starting at 17.

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Place Value

Place Value

Cut and paste the place value squares at the bottom of the page and place them in order, below their matching number.

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=

2 tens

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1 unit

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Example: =

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Whole Numbers

Number Line Counting

On the number lines, draw the movements when counting by different numbers. Remember to land on a whole number, not in between two numbers. Count by one:

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Count by two:

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Count by four:

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Count by five:

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THINK ABOUT IT

Which way was the easiest to count? Why?

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Count by three:


Date:

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Number Line Addition

Number Line Addition

Use the number lines to help you answer these addition questions.

r o e t s Bo r e p o 9 + 6 = _ _____________ k u S 4 + 8 = _ _____________ 12 + 5 = _____________

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5 + 7 = _ _____________

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13 + 6 = _____________

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8 + 8 = _ _____________

o c . c e her r THINK ABOUT IT o t s r e Which number did you s putu onp the line first? Why did you choose this number?

Would it be easier to use the biggest numbers first? Why? On the back of this page, make your own number line addition and ask a friend to find the answer. How did they work it out?

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Date:

Name:

Number Line Subtraction

Number Line Subtraction

Use the number lines to help you find the answers to these subtraction questions.

r o e t s Bo r e p o u 19 - 6 = ______________ k S 14 - 7 = ______________ 22 - 5 = ______________

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12 - 7 = ______________

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20 - 9 = ______________

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11 - 8 = ______________

o c . c e her r THINK ABOUT IT o t s supeWhy? r What number did you start with? How is subtraction different to addition?

On the back, make your own subtraction number line and ask a friend to find the answer. How did they work it out?

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Name:

Teens

Number Patterns

Fill in the dots on the ten frame grid to make these ‘teen’ numbers.

10 + 4 = 14

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10 + _____ = 16

10 + _____ = 19

10 + _____ = 13

10 + _____ = 18

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10 + _____ = 11

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10 + _____ = 15

10 + _____ = 12

o c . che e r o t r s super THINK ABOUT IT

Why are the numbers 11 and 12 not included in ‘teen’ numbers?

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Name:

Organising Data

Whole Numbers

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Using the tally marks, record the number of different shapes found in the picture below. It might help to colour the shapes as you go.

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THINK ABOUT IT Did everyone use the same type of tally marks? If not, how were they different? Why do we use tally marks? How could we show this information? E.g. graph, picture. Draw this on the back.

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Name:

Addition

Ladybird r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Cut and paste the dotted wings at the bottom of the page to match the numeral on each ladybird head.

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Date:

Name:

Addition & Subtraction

Answer Match to 20 r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Colour the different shapes to match the addition and subtraction with the same answer. E.g. Colour 1+1 and 7 - 5 in red as they both equal 2.

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THINK ABOUT IT

How did you find out which answers were the same? Which pairs were the easiest to match? Why?

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Date:

Name:

Addition & Subtraction

Answer Match to 100 r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Colour the different shapes to match the addition and subtraction sentences which have the same answer.

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THINK ABOUT IT Do you find addition or subtraction easier to answer? Why?

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Date:

Name:

Addition

Dice Addition Find the total of these dice: = __________

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r o e t s Bo r e How did you get p that answer?____________________________ ok u _________________________________________________________ S HINT: Group the dice to make groups of ten and then add the extras.

Now try these: = __________

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= __________

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THINK ABOUT IT Which combinations of two dice, added together, make ten? How many ways can you combine three dice to make a total of ten?

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What’s the Difference?

Subtraction

In each pair of numbers, circle the number with the largest value and then find the difference between the two numbers.

9 7

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Difference is:

Difference is:

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10 8

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Difference is:

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Difference is: Difference © ReadyEdP ubl i cat i onsis: •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Difference is:

0 5

14 13

Difference is:

Difference is:

Difference is:

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THINK ABOUT IT Why was it important to circle the number with the largest value first? How did you work out the difference? Is there another way? What is it?

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Date:

Name:

Adding On

Addition

Circle the number with the smallest value. How many do you need to add to make the numbers equal? Write the finished number sentence underneath. The first has been done for you.

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8 7

20 18

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8 5

11 14

8 14

19 5

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p u 7 + 1 = 8S

6 12

10 17

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THINK ABOUT IT Why was it helpful to circle the number with the smallest value first?

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Name:

Date:

Number Balancing

Addition

Fill in the missing numbers to make the beam balance.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S9 = 6 + 3 Example:

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. te + ______ 30 = _____ + _____ 24 = ______ + _____ o c . che e r o t r s super 12 = _____ + _____ + _____

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Date:

Name:

Unequal Numbers

Whole Numbers

Fill in the missing numbers to make the balance beam true. Remember numbers with a higher value make the balance beam heavier.

r o e t s Bo r e p 14 is less ok u S than 20.

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Example: 20 is more than 14.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 9 is more than _____ .

______ is more than 17.

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17 is less than ______ .

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______ is less than 9.

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________________ than 21.

THINK ABOUT IT On the back of this sheet do your own. How can you make it balance?

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Date:

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Doubles & Near Doubles

Addition

Answer these addition doubles.

11 + 11 = _____

19 + 19 = _____

8 + 8 = _____ r o e t s Bo r e p ok u THINK ABOUT IT S How did you work these out?

21 + 21 = _____

6 + 6 = _____

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9 + 9 = _____

_ ___________________________ Is there another way?

_ ___________________________ What is it?

© ReadyEdP ubl i cat i ons _ ___________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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3 + 4 = ______

6 + 5 = ______

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Answer these near double addition questions.

4 + 5 = ______ . te o 10 + 11 = ______ 6 + 7 = ______ c . che e r o t r 10 + 9 = ______ 8 s +u 9 =p ______ s er 7 + 8 = ______

THINK ABOUT IT How did you work these out? ________________________________ How are they similar to adding doubles?_ _____________________

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Date:

Name:

Dice Roll

Place Value

Roll a die three times. Draw the dots and add up the total. Then group these into tens and units. This first one is done for you.

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= 12 = 1 ten 2 units

= _______ = ________ tens ________ units

=y _______ ________ tens ________ © Read Ed=P ubl i c at i ons units •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• = _______ = ________ tens ________ units

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THINK ABOUT IT

Which number on the die did you roll most often? Which number on the die did you roll the least often?

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Domino Additon

Addition

Fill in the dots on the dice to make the number sentence correct.

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6

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4

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11

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17

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© ReDomino adyEdPu bl i cat i ons Snake Fill in the missing numbers on the dominos. The total number •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• of dots on each domino should equal 8.

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Date:

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Dice Groups

Multiplication

Draw circles around the dots on the dice to show how they can be grouped. The first one is done for you.

2 groups of 1 = 2 r o e t s Bo r e p ok u ___ group ___ groups of ____ = 3 Sof ____ = 3

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1 group of 2 = 2

____ group of ____ = 4

___ groups of ____ = 4

____ groups of ____ = 4

___ group of ____ = 5

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ___ groups of ____ = 5 ___ groups of ____ = 5 •f orr evi ew pur po sesonl y• ___ groups of ____ = 6

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THINK ABOUT IT What are some of the ways of saying ‘groups of’? Make a list of your ideas on the back of this page. Share your list with a friend.

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___ group of ____ = 6


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Caterpillar Groups

Multiplication

r o e t s EXAMPLE: B r e oo p u k 4 groups of 1 = S

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Look at the number of sections on each caterpillar’s body. Look at how many spots each caterpillar has. Write down the multiplication number sentence for each caterpillar.

Now try these:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ____ groups of r ____= ____ ____ groups ____ •f or evi e w pur po sesofo____= nl y•

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____ groups of ____= ____

____ groups of ____= ____

____ groups of ____= ____

____ groups of ____= ____ 35


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How Many?

Multiplication

Complete the patterns by drawing the rest of the shapes.

= 2 legs

= 3 sides

= 6 sides r o e t s Bo r e p oksides = 6 legs = _____ u S ____________ = _____ legs ______________ = _____ sides ____________ = _____ legs

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= 4 legs

______________ = _____ sides

= 4 sides

= _____ points

© ReadyEdPub l i cat i ons = _____ points •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ____________ = _____ sides _____________ = _____ points = 8 sides

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____________ = _____ sides _____________ = _____ points

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____________ = _____ sides _____________ = _____ points THINK ABOUT IT . see in = _____t sides What patterns did you e o the number of sides, legs or c . che e points for each shape? = _____ sides r o t would you see r s s r u pattern e What p ____________ = ____ sides

____________ = ____ sides ____________ = ____ sides

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if you made a pyramid with an octogon (8 sided shape)? Draw it on the back of this sheet to help you work out the answer.


Date:

Name:

Bug Off

Multiplication

Cut out the body parts of three bugs below. Paste them together to make these multiplication facts true.

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Groups Of

Multiplication

Draw the dots on the dice to make the multiplication sentences true. Put your own numbers for the last two sentences.

r o e t s Bo r e p o u _____ groups of _____ =k _____ S

= _____

18 = _____

_____ groups of _____

5 _____ group of _____

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5 groups of 2

= _____

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _____ groups of _____ = _____ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Draw the dots on the dice to help you answer these questions:

= _____

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_____ groups of _____

THINK ABOUT IT How did you answer these multiplication questions?

. 1 five t ise _____ o c . che ae friend how Askr o 2 fives are _____ r st they worked it out. super 3 fives are _____

4 fives are _____ 5 fives are _____ 6 fives are _____ 7 fives are _____ 38

On the back of this page, draw your own dice groups. Ask a friend to find the pattern.


Date:

Name:

Group Match

Multiplication

Cut out the number sentences at the bottom of the page and paste as a flap over the correct answer in the grid at the top of the page.

6

3r 4 o e t s B r e oo p u k S 7 8 9

11

2

12

13

14

5 10

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1

15

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. t e 3 sevens

22

23

24

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o 7 ones c . che e r 4 threes 11 twosr 4o fours 3 ones r su pest 2 ones

2 threes

17 ones

4 twos

3 sixes

11 ones

13 ones

2 twos

23 ones

1 nineteen

3 threes

2 sevens

6 fours

1 five

5 twos

3 fives

2 tens

5 fives

1 one

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Making Numbers

Mathematical Processes (1-30)

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In the spaces, write some different number sentences to give the same answer. Remember you can use addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and even fractions.

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Date:

Name:

Mathematical Processes (1-100)

Making Numbers r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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In the spaces, write some different number sentences to give the same answers. Remember you can use, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and even fractions.

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Date:

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Mathematical Processes

Bingo r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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On your bingo board, write your own numbers in any order. Don’t repeat any numbers. When a number is called out and you have written it on your bingo board, cover it with a counter. When all your squares have counters on them, call out BINGO!

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THINK ABOUT IT You can play this game in different ways. You can have addition bingo, subtraction bingo, groups of bingo, fraction bingo. Try playing it where the first person to get five in a row, up and down, sideways or diagonally, is the winner.

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Date:

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Mathematical Processes

Lotto r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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On the blank lotto board below, write numbers in any order between 1 and 20. Cut out the numeral tiles at the bottom of the lotto board and put in a pile. The teacher calls out a number between 1 and 20. If you have that number, cover it with the same numeral tile from your pile. The game is finished when someone covers all of their numbers.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •these f or r evi e wp uplace r poinse sonl y• Cut out numeral tiles and a pile. 2

2

4

6

7

8

9

10

19

20

21

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18

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THINK ABOUT IT Try playing lotto using numbers before or after the number written.

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Addition Dice Game

Addition

r o e t s B r e ooTotal: Total: p u k S

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Get one die. Roll it. Draw the number of dots shown on the first die below. Write that number on the TOTAL line. Roll the die again. Draw the dots and add that number to your total. After 10 rolls of the die, what is your grand total?

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THINK ABOUT IT Why were there so many different totals in your group? What do you think would happen to the range of totals if everyone in the group rolled the die 20 times?

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Date:

Name:

Subtraction Dice Game

Subtraction

Play this game the same as the Addition game. This time, though, start with a total of 50. Each time you roll the die, record the number of dots and take them away from your total.

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StartingTotal: 50

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. teFinishing Total: o c . THINK ABOUT IT che e r What happened when you got closer to a totalt ofo zero? r s suget e r to zero? How many rolls did it take you to p

Why were there so many different answers to the question above in your class? How many rolls of the die do you think it would take to get to zero if you started at 100? Why do you think this? Try it out on the back of this page.

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Date:

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Challenge Page

Challenge Page

1. How many ways can you combine the numerals 1, 2, and 3 to make new numbers or number sentences? List them below.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok ____________________________________________________ u S 2. How many ways can you get the answer 10 from a number sentence? List them below.

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____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________

3. What is your favourite number? Why?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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4. The numerals we use, e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, … are symbols to mean how many objects. Choose one numeral between 1 and 10 and design a new symbol for it in the space on the right.

. te o ____________________________________________________ c . che e 5. Draw or write about how people use numbers in everyday r o r stat home, when su life. Think about how you use numbers er p ____________________________________________________

shopping or driving in a car.

______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

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Answers (Page 9) - What Number Am I? Whole Numbers (0-10) 1. 8, 2. 5, 3. 1, 4. 10, 5. 3. (Page 10) - What Number Am I? Whole Numbers (1-100) 1. 20, 2.11, 3. 50, 4. 99, 5. 36.

(Page 21) - Teens: Number Patterns 10+6=16; 10+9=19; 10+3=13; 10+5=15; 10+8=18, 10+1=11, 10+2=12.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(Page 11) - What Number Am I? Whole Numbers (1-1000) 1. 400, 2. 515, 3. 1000, 4. 220, 5. 750.

(Page 13) - Matching Numbers and Objects Whole Numbers 1 pencil, 2 eyes, 3 cricket stumps, 4 window panes, 5 fingers, 6 dots on dice, 7 caterpillar bodies, 8 spider legs, 9 flowers. (Page 14) - 100’s Chart: Place Value (1-100) Answers will vary.

(Page 22) - Organising Data: Whole Numbers Triangles = 35; Circles = 30; Rectangles = 11; Diamonds = 2; Squares = 4. (Page 23) - Ladybird: Addition 5 = 3 and 2; 9 = 5 and 4; 13 = 6 and 7; 14 = 6 and 8.

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(Page 12) - Build A Rocket: Whole Numbers (1-30) 3, 7, 10, 11, 16, 19, 23, 28, 30.

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(Page 20) - Number Line Subtraction: Number Line Subtraction 12-7=5; 19-6=13; 14-7=7; 22-5=17; 11-8=3; 209=11.

(Page 24) - Answer Match to 20: Addition and Subtraction 5+9 = 15-1; 3+6 = 12-3; 5+3 = 11-3; 11+4 = 20-5; 10+7 = 19-2; 5+5 = 16-6; 0+4 = 7-3; 1+1 = 7-5. (Page 25) - Answer Match to 100: Addition and Subtraction 12+13 = 50-25; 30+7 = 40-3; 40+40 = 90-10; 50+23 = 85-12; 19+7 = 36-10; 60+40 = 100-0 16+14 = 51-21; 60+6 = 70-4; 89+10 = 100-1; 20+25 = 51-6.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(Page 16) - More Counting On and Counting Back Place Value (1-100) Counting by one: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30; Counting by two: 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42; Counting by three: 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45, 48, 51, 54, 57, 60; Counting by five: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30.

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(Page 26) - Dice Addition: Addition 15, 12, 13, 18, 12, 25.

(Page 27) - What’s the Difference? Subtraction 9-7=2; 21-18=3; 15-13=2; 4-3=1; 20-12=8; 108=2; 16-11=5; 5-0=5; 14-13=1.

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(Page 15) - Counting On and Counting Back Addition and Subtraction (1-30) Counting by one: 1, 2, 3 4, 5, 6 7; Counting by two: 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16; Counting by four: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28.

(Page 28) - Adding On: Addition 9+6=15; 13+3=16; 6+6=12; 18+2=20; 5+3=8; 11+3=14; 10+7=17; 17+3=20; 8+6=14; 5+14=19; 4+7=11.

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(Page 17) - Place Value: Place Value 9 = 9 units; 16 = 1 ten 6 units; 0 = 0 units; 124 = 1 hundred 2 tens 4 units; 41 = 4 tens 1 unit; 207 = 2 hundreds 0 tens 7 units; 58 = 5 tens 8 units; 35 = 3 tens 5 units; 92 = 9 tens 2 units. (Page 18) - Number Line Counting: Whole Numbers Answers will vary. (Page 19) - Number Line Addition: Number Line Addition 5+7=12; 9+6=15; 4+8=12; 12+5=17; 8+8=16; 13+6=19.

(Page 29) - Number Balancing: Addition Answers will vary. (Page 30) - Unequal Numbers: Whole Numbers Answers will vary. (Page 31) - Doubles and Near Doubles: Addition 22, 18, 38, 42, 12, 16; 7, 11, 15, 9, 21, 13, 19, 17. (Page 32) - Dice Roll: Place Value Answers will vary.

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(Page 33) - Domino Addition & Domino Snake: Addition Answers will vary. (Page 34) - Dice Groups: Multiplication 1 x 3 = 3, 3 x 1= 3; 1 x 4 = 4, 4 x 1 = 4, 2 x 2 = 4; 1 x 5 = 5, 5 x 1 = 5; 1 x 6 = 6, 6 x 1= 6, 2 x 3 = 6, 3 x 2 = 6. (Page 35) - Caterpillar Groups: Multiplication 5 groups of 2 = 10; 3 groups of 3 = 9; 6 groups of 2 = 12; 4 groups of 5 = 20; 2 groups of 4 = 8; 7 groups of 3 = 21.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

(Page 36) - How Many?: Multiplication 6, 8, 10; 6, 9, 12, 15; 12, 16, 20; 5, 10, 15, 20, 25; 6, 12, 18 24, 30;

(Page 38) - Groups Of: Multiplication 5 groups of 2 = 10; 4 groups of 3 = 12; 3 groups of 6 = 18; 1 group of 5 = 5; 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45. (Page 39) - Group Match: Multiplication 1=1 one; 2=2 ones; 3=3 ones; 4=2 twos; 5=1 five; 6=2 threes; 7=7 ones; 8=4 twos; 9=3 threes; 10=5 twos; 11=11 ones; 12=4 threes; 13=13 ones; 14=2 sevens; 15=3 fives; 16=4 fours; 17=17 ones; 18=3 sixes; 19=1 nineteen; 20=2 tens; 21=3 sevens; 22=11 twos, 23=23 ones; 24=6 fours; 25=5 fives.

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(Page 37) - Bug Off: Multiplication 5 x 1 = 5; 2 x 2 = 4; 3 x 3 = 9.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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(Page 41) - Mathematical Processes: Numbers to 100 Answers will vary.

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(Page 42) - Bingo: Mathematical Processes Answers will vary.

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(Page 43) - Lotto: Mathematical Processes Answers will vary. (Page 44) - Addition Dice Game: Addition Answers will vary.

(Page 45) - Subtraction Dice Game: Subtraction Answers will vary. (Page 46) - Challenge Page Answers will vary.

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(Page 40) - Making Numbers: Mathematical Processes: Numbers to 30 Answers will vary.


K-2 Number Activities