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r o e t s Bworking r For students at risk at e o p o u k Middle Primary levels S

fuss free maths Book 3 measurement, chance and data

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . By Sandy T asker Tasker c e her r o t s super

Illustrated by Terry Allen. © Ready-Ed Publications - 2003. Published by Ready-Ed Publications (2003) P.O. Box 276 Greenwood W.A. 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution. ISBN 1 86397 559 4


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Book 3

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Contents

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Information on the Series ............................................................................. 4 National Curriculum Links - Book Three ....................................................... 6 Specific Learning Difficulties ....................................................................... 7 How are Individuals With Specific Learning Difficulties Affected? ................9 General Strategies for the Home ............................................................... 11 Internet References ................................................................................... 12 Parent Power Maths Words........................................................................ 13 Measurement ....................................................................... 14 Time..................................................................................... 16 What’s The Time? Help Sheet .............................................. 19 Progress Chart Getting It Right...................................................................... 20 What Can I Do? ................................................................... 21 Activity Sheets Tallies 1 ................................................................................ 22 Tallies 2 ................................................................................ 23 Bar Graphs 1 ....................................................................... 24 Bar Graphs 2 ....................................................................... 25 Measuring Length 1 ............................................................. 26 Measuring Length 2 ............................................................. 27 Estimating and Measuring Length 1 ..................................... 28 Estimating and Measuring Length 2 ..................................... 29 Measuring Perimeter 1......................................................... 30 Measuring Perimeter 2......................................................... 31 Area 1 .................................................................................. 32 Area 2 .................................................................................. 33 Litres and Millilitres 1 ........................................................... 34 Litres and Millilitres 2 ........................................................... 35 Kilograms and Grams 1 ....................................................... 36 Kilograms and Grams 2 ....................................................... 37 What’s The Time? 1 ............................................................. 38 What’s The Time? 2 ............................................................. 39 Looking at Calendars 1 ........................................................ 40 Looking at Calendars 2 ........................................................ 41 Looking at Timetables 1 ....................................................... 42 Looking at Timetables 2 ....................................................... 43 Looking at Timetables 3 ....................................................... 44 Mapping Skills 1 .................................................................. 45 Mapping Skills 2 .................................................................. 46 Answers ............................................................................................ 47

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Book 3

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Information on the Series About The Books

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This homework series has been created for classroom teachers and parents - with students of a range of abilities taken into consideration. The focus will be on reinforcement of “the basics” in maths, as well as activities aimed at developing understanding of classroom activities in mathematics. It is sometimes difficult to locate materials suitable for homework activities in the area of specific learning difficulties. Some homework is designed to cover a broad range of topics on one page - making it confusing for some students to read and answer. Some homework activities are not linked to classroom work and do not include examples or answers which enable parents to support their child’s learning. Students with Specific Learning Difficulties experience a range of problems with their academic learning. These aspects include:• Difficulties with word recognition and comprehension • Coping with pages that are too cluttered and with too many differing requirements • Being unable to sequence, recall and apply strategies in abstract situations • Striving to process formation - while working to meet deadlines • Having trouble with personal organization with their schoolwork. The books in this series are designed with these problems in mind, and whilst pages are designed for the student with learning difficulties, they can also be used as a simple and straightforward introduction to concepts or a reinforcement of mathematical strategies for the whole class. The books will follow a basic format, with a variety of homework topics usually containing a choice of two worksheets.

Structure of the Books

The series is presented in books as follows: Middle Primary Book One: Number: Written Calculations Includes information on specific learning difficulties, as well as activities on: Digit values Rounding Addition of whole numbers up to 10 000, including regrouping Subtraction of whole numbers up to 10 000, including regrouping Addition and subtraction of decimals, up to 2 places, including regrouping Multiplication of whole numbers up to 100 by whole numbers up to 10, including regrouping Division of whole numbers up to 100 by whole numbers up to 10, with remainders Book Two: Number: Applications Includes information on specific learning difficulties, as well as activities on: Skill drills Greater than / less than values Money skills, including making up amounts, ordering cost prices and working out change Fractions - identifying up to 1/12, equivalent fractions, ordering and adding simple fractions Estimation Book Three: Chance and Data; Measurement and Space Includes information on specific learning difficulties, as well as activities on: Tallies - taking and interpreting basic tallies Bar graphs - introduction to construction and labelling Estimating and measuring length in cm and mm to 100 cm Measuring perimeter in cm and mm Working out area by counting grid squares Recognising and estimating volume of everyday objects more than / less than 1 Litre Recognising and estimating mass of everyday objects more than / less than 1kg Telling digital and analog time to 5 minutes Locating dates and calculating weeks /days on a calendar Reading and constructing simple daily timetables

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Book 3

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National Curriculum Links The aim of the activities is to focus on one concept per page, therefore, only one outcome in a strand from the National Mathematics outcomes will usually be addressed. Strands and outcomes focused on in this book are shown on the following page.

Specific Learning Difficulties This section will contain information from a variety of referenced sources including online literature and recommendations from trained and experienced consultants. Information will include descriptions of the various learning difficulties and ideas for strategies in the classroom and at home. A list of website addresses containing information and ideas is provided for teachers and parents.

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“Parent Power” Pages

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The information provided on Specific Learning Difficulties at the beginning of this book can also be photocopied and given to parents who are requesting additional information. However, it should be made clear that this is a guide only, and contact with local recognised Specific Learning Difficulty associations or child development centres should be made if there are any particular concerns. Parent Power pages can be photocopied and sent home at the commencement of each unit and include: • Terminology • Mathematical strategies and examples • Learning and practice ideas in the home and community It is also suggested that teachers photocopy answers to each section and include these when sending home the Parent Power Page. This enables parents to feel confident in checking their child’s work and giving them valuable, immediate feedback.

Progress Charts

It is widely appreciated that success is built on success, and the more students are able to track their own progress, the more likely they are to be motivated to attempt the next stage in their learning. Students can keep these progress charts as an ongoing record of their homework.

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How To Use This Book

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Each topic will focus on a single maths concept with a choice of two separate homework sheets. The teacher is able to introduce and explain the homework to the whole class and then select which worksheet is assigned to each student. As both worksheets focus on the same content, only differing by the level of complexity, there is no need to isolate students by giving them separate instructions. Teachers may also choose to give all students the first sheet, and then follow up with the second sheet if the student is able to complete the first with minimal difficulties. Some topics in this book have 3 or 4 sheets. These should be completed in sequential order. Note: Although the second worksheet is designed for the more “able” students in the classroom, this certainly does not discount students with learning difficulties. Research shows that many students with Specific Learning Difficulties can work at an average to above average level, provided that their needs are taken into consideration. With this in mind, both worksheets have been designed so that ALL students have the opportunity to be extended.

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National Curriculum Links - Book Three

Activities in Book Three mainly address the following outcomes in the Measurement Strand, with some content from Chance and Data and Space.

Represent Locations

Represent Locations

Interpreting Data

Interpreting Data

Display & Summarise

Display & Summarise

Organising Data

Organising Data

Space

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2.16 3.18 2.19 3.19 2.20 3.20 2.21 3.21 2.25 3.25 2.26 3.26 2.27 3.27 2.8 3.8

Activity Page Tallies 1 & 2

Measuring Length 1&2

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Bar Graphs 1 & 2

Estimating Length 1&2

Perimeter 1 & 2

Area 1 & 2

Chance & Data

Time

Time

Estimating

Estimating

Measuring

Measuring

Measurement Choosing Units

Written Computation

Number

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Litres and Millilitres 1 & 2

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Kilograms and Grams 1 & 2

What’s the Time? 1 & 2

Calendars 1 & 2

Timetables 1 - 3

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Mapping 1 & 2

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Specific Learning Difficulties (SLDs) What are Specific Learning Difficulties?

Specific Learning Difficulties ARE: • A range of conditions including dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and dysgraphia. • Significant difficulties in one or a few areas of learning, whilst demonstrating average to above average abilities in most or all other areas. Specific Learning Difficulties ARE NOT: • A result of global low intelligence, physical conditions such as visual or hearing impairments, or a lack of appropriate parenting or teaching. • Attention difficulties (or behavioural disorders) such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Specific Learning Difficulties are founded on a reduced capacity to learn, and attention difficulties stem from a reduced capacity to concentrate and attend to tasks when learning. Specific Learning Difficulties CAN: • Appear to overlap, as learning areas often merge. For example, a person with reading difficulties may struggle in maths in the presence of lengthy word problems or poorly set-out activities (www.dyslexia-speld.com).

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Descriptions of the Types of Specific Learning Difficulties

(www.dyslexia-speld.com)

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Dyslexia is the most commonly recognised and well-researched SLD, characterised by difficulties in: • Recognising, reading and spelling words; • Comprehension of written information; • Relating new written concepts to stored ideas and existing knowledge; • Phonological coding, the process of associating sounds with letter groups; • Producing written work (sequencing letters, recognising letter reversals).

Dyscalculia describes significant difficulties in the area of mathematics. People with dyscalculia may possess average to above average linguistic skills but struggle with: • Mental recall of basic facts; • Accurate calculation; • Understanding and applying mathematical concepts, rules and formulas; • Awareness of time, direction (such as spatial and mapping skills) and sequence; • The ability to estimate and recognise errors in maths work; • Money and budgeting; • Games that involve strategic planning or complex scoring.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• (www.dyscalculia.org)

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Dysgraphia outlines difficulties with the production of written language which may occur in isolation or in conjunction with other SLDs. Underlying causes include difficulties with sequencing and ordering of letters and words, attention difficulties leading to poor fine motor and organisational skills and reduced auditory processing. (www.ldonline.org) Dyspraxia describes difficulties in the ability to plan and execute new or unfamiliar movements in a coordinated manner. During early childhood, many new tasks are being learned, so this is a time where dyspraxia can significantly impact upon daily living. Problems can appear with performing fine and gross motor tasks (Motor Dyspraxia) and / or speech-related tasks (Verbal or oral Dyspraxia). (www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk)

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Associated Difficulties

Visual and Visual-Perceptual Difficulties (Source: www.children-special-needs.org)

These difficulties may occur in conjunction with, or as a result of, other learning or attention difficulties. The problems listed below can also place a considerable strain on the reading process for a child, and can often go unnoticed until the child is in primary school, where the he / she spends longer periods of time focusing on print. Myopia (short-sightedness) - may lead to difficulties in reading information written on the blackboard or on charts around the classroom, if not rectified with glasses or contact lenses. Binocular coordination - the action of both eyes moving together, a process required to read effectively. Convergence - the movement of both eyes inwards, reaching an accurate point of focus. Fixation - where the eyes meet on a specific point so that the image is clear. Pursuit - smoothly tracking across an image or follow a moving object. Saccades - a “jump” from one point of focus to another without losing place. This is particularly important as skilled reading involves a series of fixations on words across a line rather than one continuous movement. • Children who have difficulty with any of the above may show signs such as skipping or re-reading lines, misreading small words, using their finger or moving their head as they read.

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Directionality - A convention of the English language is that information is written from left to right. Some children confuse or reverse this direction and may also confuse letters that are the same shape in a different direction, such as d and b, or p and q. Visual Figure-Ground is the ability to distinguish certain forms, words or features amongst irrelevant visual information such as reading print on a cluttered page, successfully scanning for key words within a block of text and editing work for errors. Visual Discrimination relates to the distinction of similar words. Some children, for example, may consistently confuse similar words such as bad and bed, through and thorough. Visual Form Constancy describes the recognition of the same object image or word in a different form, for example, being able to read the same sentence correctly in a variety of fonts, or understanding that a word is the same whether it is represented in capital or lower case letters. Visual Closure can be demonstrated by mentally or physically completing “gaps” in visual images, such as writing the end of a word where only part of it is given or doing “dot-to-dot” and jigsaw puzzles. Visual Memory aids in both reading and writing, as familiar words can be recognised, pronounced and spelt more automatically once they are retained. Students with poor visual memory take longer to learn new words. Visual Sequential Memory refers to the recall of a sequence of shapes, images or words, and the ability to apply what is recalled. For example, looking up at the board to remember and write down a list of spelling words. Visual Motor Integration is the process of integrating visual input with motor output – the coordination of “seeing, planning and doing”. In the classroom context, this skill is used in accurate copying of images and words, staying on the lines when writing and correctly aligning maths calculations, to name a few examples.

Auditory Processing

Auditory processing problems affect the learner’s ability to interpret auditory information. Often under the broad category of Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD), this group of disorders are caused by a dysfunction of the brain, rather than of the ear, and include symptoms such as: • A slower rate of processing auditory information due to a perceived distortion of the incoming sounds; • A sensitivity to excessive noise or background noise – inability to concentrate and distractibility; • Difficulty locating directionality of sound; • Confusion of similar words or sounds; • Poor memory of verbal instructions; • Difficulty interpreting intonation such as jokes, sarcasm, questions, etc.; • Apparent hearing loss, e.g. saying “What?” often despite normal results on hearing tests; • Poor reading and/or writing as a result of some of the above problems. There are several subgroups, which more specifically describe auditory processing disorders and like visual perceptual problems, these can exist in conjunction with other learning or attention difficulties.

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Attention Deficit Disorder

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Attention Deficit Disorder or ADD is a neurological disorder that has been a focus of media attention over the last decade. There are two types that are commonly recognised: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by: • Constant fidgeting or moving about in a seat; • Having trouble waiting a turn; • Impulsivity; • Difficulty listening to and following instructions. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is evident in individuals who: • Are quiet, withdrawn and sluggish; • Demonstrate low self-esteem; • Are often described as “daydreamers”; • Need constant prompting to remain on task. Both types tend to be: • Easily distracted • Forgetful • Disorganised As previously mentioned, Attention Deficit Disorder is a separate entity to Specific Learning Difficulties and each requires some unique strategies to best approach the difficulties. There are, however, instances where an individual may experience both conditions to a certain degree. Initially, it may be difficult for the untrained individual to pinpoint the “cause”. A student with attention difficulties may appear dyslexic because their distractibility leads them to constantly lose their place when reading. Conversely, a student with a specific learning difficulty may become so frustrated that they avoid work or give up easily, appearing to “lose concentration”.

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Source: http://add.about.com

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How are Individuals With Specific Learning Difficulties Affected? Some of the obstacles that students with SLDs can face are: • Being branded as “lazy” because they are capable in most areas, and their difficulties often do not correspond with expectations based on their intelligence; • Becoming frustrated that they understand a concept, but are not able to read or write about it; • Developing a low self-esteem as they struggle to keep up with their peers; • Missing out on educational support and resources during the time it takes to identify their problems. On the positive side, having a SLD can also mean that the individual: • Is constantly seeking out alternative ways of thinking and learning, thus becoming a creative and innovative thinker or a strong leader; • Is an intelligent, capable individual, who can be educated at any level if approached with understanding and a willingness to provide appropriate learning opportunities and strategies; • Can overcome learning difficulties to become successful in their chosen fields. Some examples of these people can be found at: www.nald.ca and www.dyslexiaonline.com

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General Strategies for the Classroom

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Below are some ideas that may be of assistance with any of the areas of difficulty listed above. They are not intended to be specific strategies for any one area. These suggestions are provided as a guide only and it is recommended that teachers and parents seek specialised, individualised assessment and intervention for students who have SLDs. Location - Seat the student where they can: • Read the board; • Hear instructions clearly; • Easily access teacher assistance; • Locate reference charts; • Find personal belongings; • Be free from potential distractions. Organisation - Encourage a desk that: • Is clear of “clutter”; • Contains daily work items in a clear pencil case or a tin (contains only the “essentials” such as pencils, ruler, eraser, scissors, glue and a calculator). A daily or weekly checklist to ensure that all stationery is available may help the student to keep track of when things need to be tidied or replaced. Collaboration - A peer tutor needs to know how to: • Prompt and set good examples for the student; • Help without “spoon-feeding” them with the answers; • Avoid distractions. Support Success - Building self-esteem by: • Drawing attention to any success, even if partial, e.g. “Well done! You are using the formula correctly, you just might like to check your final calculation again”. • Drawing on student’s strengths, e.g. asking them to dictate answers verbally if extended writing is difficult. Break It Down - Aid learning by breaking tasks down into manageable components. • Help the student to plan each stage of a task with a familiar “plan of attack” can be helpful. For example, when approaching a word problem, asking “What sort of sum is this”, then “What numbers will be in the sum”, then “Write the sum”, etc. Allow Extra Time - allowing students additional time in situations such as tests is a fair means of compensating for their difficulties. Additional time can also be given to a student by spending a few minutes explaining a new concept in advance before introducing it to the class, so that the information is consolidated, rather than lost in a panic. Easy On Eyes - Try some of the following and ask the student what they prefer. • Font: simple, clear font with no serifs, such as “Arial”. (This book is typeset in Arial.) • Size: Medium to larger size, for example 14 point. • Line Length: 45 - 75 characters including spaces and punctuation. • Paragraphing: wide margins (1.5 - 2.0 cm), 1.5 or double spacing, short, clearly separated paragraphs. • Alignment: Do not justify - it leads to uneven spacing on the line. • Emphasis: simple headings, using bold instead of italics. Use boxes to highlight information. • Points: Use bullets or numbers to identify a list. • Paper: Use matt paper, and try cream or other pastel colours, as many students with SLDs find white paper harder to read from. • Limit irrelevant pictures, background print and borders. • Additional space for ease of working out. • Guiding lines, boxes and cues to assist students with setting out their work. • Simple pictures, only used to reinforce concepts or problems, not as additional decoration on the page.

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Multisensory Learning - Students with SLDs often learn more successfully if provided with a variety of sensory experiences. To consolidate a concept use some of these…it will help ALL students learn: Look at it, write it in six different colours, write it in the air, trace it on sandpaper, show classmates on the blackboard, sing it or make it into a rhyme, say it to a partner, draw it, act it out, use counters, MAB blocks and plastic money or other real objects.

1x9 bend first finger down

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4

4x9 5

3

• Reversals, e.g. 6 + 4 = 4 + 6 • “Tens pairs” (pairs of numbers adding up to 10) e.g. 1 + 9, 2 + 8, 3 + 7, 4 + 6, 5 + 5…

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Keep On Track - To avoid “losing track of time” • Issue regular warnings about how much time is left • Try a timer on the student’s desk (if this does not cause additional stress) • Highlight a number of items that they should aim to complete before then next time you pass by their desk. Room To Move - Provide an outlet for excess energy by… • A small “fidget toy” such as a palm sized squeeze ball • Asking the student to take messages to other classrooms Memory Strategies • Reference charts • Mnemonics, poems • Visualising in pictures • The “9 x table finger” technique i.e.

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General Strategies for the Home Some of the strategies below may be of assistance when supporting your child in their mathematics homework. • Short and Sweet - Shorter, more frequent sessions of homework minimise the risk of your child losing concentration. Practising a task over a number of days will help to reinforce the concept, so try 10 - 15 minutes of homework each day rather than one hour, once a week.

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• A Friendly Place - Create an environment that is consistent, quiet, comfortable and well lit, with plenty of space for both you and your child to work together. Have a glass of water for your child to drink. Some students also work best if they have small snacks to nibble on whilst they work. • The Right Stuff - Make sure your child has all the necessary equipment before starting. Some handy things to have include highlighters (to emphasise important parts of the homework or examples), eraser (so that mistakes can easily be corrected and there is no mess of scribbling out), sharpener (so that writing is clear and easy to read), lined scrap paper (with relevant sized lines and plenty of space for working out and examples).

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • In Tune - Background music has been found to be beneficial for some

• Write it Big - A whiteboard may be a useful way of working out problems. It is easy to see, easy to rub out, and another way of introducing a different sensory experience to the child. learners. Classical (Baroque) music has been researched quite extensively and may be of assistance.

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• Check it Off - Using a checklist to tick off tasks that have been done give your child a sense of achievement as well as helping them to keep their place. • Charts are not Cheating - A chart with rules, formulas, definitions and basic maths facts can help your child enormously. Remember that integrating several concepts at once can be overwhelming, and it is best to “isolate” the new skill being learned until your child is confident. For example, if your child is learning how to calculate area, a multiplication chart may be useful until he / she has learned how to use the length x width formula.

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o c . che e r o t r s super • Success is the Best Foundation - Remember that every time your child gets something correct, even if it is just one part of a larger task, praising them for their success is the most effective way to increase their self esteem and to motivate them to continue. Vary your positive comments, make them specific: “Good work for writing the 3 in the correct column!” and give them small rewards for reaching their goals: “You finished the whole page! Let’s go and kick the footy!”

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Internet References The following can be used as alternatives for parents who wish their child to practise basic mathematics online. http://www.math.com - Go to “Homework Help” for a range of explanations on a variety of maths skills. http://schooldiscovery.com - Visit sections such as “Parents”, “Brain Boosters” and “Webmath” for a range of activities.

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www.discover.tased.edu.au - A Tasmanian education site with links to mathematics activities

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www.kevinsplayroom.co.uk - Visit the “Maths” section and explore activities such as the Maths Dictionary, A-Plus Math (including online flash cards), Curious and Useful Maths with interesting tricks and puzzles, and Math Baseball. www.yahooligans.com - Follow the links from School Bell > Math > Real World Math to discover activities for sites such as Math in Daily Life, Cadbury Learning Zone, Cool Math and Figure This.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o rr e vi ew pu r p oseso nl y• with more information on learning difficulties:

www.awesomelibrary.org - Follow the links from Maths > Elementary School for a range of activity and article sites.

Sites

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www.dyslexia-speld.com - Western Australian organisation for people with learning difficulties. www.ldonline.org - Contains many links for a range of informative sites.

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www.interdys.org - International Dyslexia Association website.

o c . c e herof dyscalculias r www.dyscalculia.org - Information (specific learning difficulties o t s r u e p in maths).

www.bda-dyslexia.org.uk - British Dyslexia Association website with ideas for parents and educators.

Contact your local organisation that caters for people with dyslexia and specific learning difficulties, or ask your local child development centre or child health service for more information.

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Parent Power Maths W ords Words Here are some meanings for words that you might read in maths work. Examples are underneath. Addition - Plus, add or “what is the sum of?” e.g. 2 + 4 = 6

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Subtraction - Minus, take away or “how much is left?” e.g. 5 - 2 = 3

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Multiplication / Multiplied by - Times, “lots of” or “what is the product of?” e.g. 3 x 5 = 15

Whole Number - 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 … (counting numbers as well as zero) Even Numbers - 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 … (numbers divisible by 2) Odd Numbers - 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 ... (numbers not divisible by 2)

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Division / Divided by - Shared into groups or “how many times does x go into y?” e.g. 10 ÷ 2 = 5 or 10 shared into groups of 2 = 5 groups.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •Numbers f or-r evi e w ur p2o ses on l y •into it, Composite Numbers that havep more than numbers (factors) that divide

Prime Numbers - A number that can only be divided by 1 and itself. e.g. 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29.

e.g. 2, 4, 6, 8, 9,10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18. e.g. Factors of 16 are 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 so it is a composite number.

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Rounding - Finding the closest 10, 100 or 1000 for the number. e.g. Round 46 to the nearest 10 = 50 Round 530 to the nearest 100 = 500 Round 2978 to the nearest 1000 = 3000 • If the number to be rounded is “in the middle”, e.g. 35 is in between 30 and 40, most sources agree that it is best to round up, i.e. round 35 to 40. It is best to check with individual teachers on what they expect and why.

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Parent Power Measurement Learn these to help you understand measurement. kilo = one thousand = 1000

centi = one hundredth

milli = one thousandth

1 kilogram (kg) = 1000 grams (g) 1 kilometre (km) = 1000 metres (m)

100 centimetres (cm) = 1 metre $6.55

1000 millimetres (mm) = 1 metre 1000 millilitres (ml) = 1 litre

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Length (How LONG is it?) kilometres = km

metres = m

centimetres = cm

km

m

cm

My house to school

1 km

1000 m

100 000 cm

1m

100 cm

My desk

My fingernail

1 cm

An ant

millimetres = mm mm

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Example

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1 000 000 mm

1000 mm 10 mm 2 mm

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Multiply length x width. Units are squared mm, cm or km, e.g. Area = 4 m x 6 m = 24 m² My neighbourhood block = 1 km² = 1 000 000 m² My bedroom window = 1 m² = 10 000 cm² My computer key (1 letter) = 1 cm² = 100 mm² 10000 m² = 1 hectare (ha)

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Volume (How much is it FILLED up?) • Litres = L Millilitres = mL Small water tank or outdoor spa = 1kL (kilolitre) = 1000 L (litres) Carton of milk = 1 L (litre) = 1000 mL (millilitres)

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Area (How much SPACE does it take up?) Perimeter (How LONG is it AROUND the OUTSIDE?) • Add the lengths of all the sides: My classroom = 8 m + 8 m + 8 m + 8 m = 24 m

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Mass (Often called weight - how much does it WEIGH?) • Tonne = t Kilograms = kg Grams = g Total mass of a class of children = 1 t = 1000 kg = 1000,000 g Bag of rice = 1kg = 1000 g

When are length, perimeter and area used? • Making models, craft work, clothes, e.g. measuring a 3 cm hem. • House and garden plans, renovating, working out amounts of material required, e.g. ordering enough paving to cover 5 m² or checking the length of a wall to make sure a new couch will fit along it. Page 14

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Parent Power • •

• •

• • • •

When are liquid and mass measurements used? Showing amounts of products on their packaging, e.g. a 250 g packet of chips, a 2 L bottle of soft drink. Providing measurements in the kitchen, laundry or outdoors, e.g. 6 g of butter in the recipe, 10 mL of medicine for a chest cold, 50 mL of washing liquid, 10 mL of pool chemicals. Keeping a record of body weight on the bathroom scales.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Liquid and mass activities at home: Use a variety of containers to show the same amount of liquid, e.g. pour water from a narrow measuring jug into a wide bowl to see how different it appears. During cooking, familiarise your child with the different types of measuring tools that they can use, including cups, tablespoons and teaspoons. Note: although these are names of everyday items, they also represent specific measurements. Not all plastic cups = 1 cup! Plan a birthday party, and estimate the number of drink bottles required based on a trial measurement of 1 glass of drink. The same can be done with food portions.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Length, perimeter and area activities at home: Buy model or craft kits which require measuring for your child. These will produce a more pleasing result if measurements are accurate, whilst many projects still allow for a certain degree of flexibility. Sewing is another excellent way to practise measurements. Encourage your child to estimate distances, using pacing out, e.g.” If you step really widely, that is about 1 m. How many metres across is your bedroom using this trick?” Keep a height chart of your children, and ask questions each time you measure, e.g. “How many cm have you grown in the last 6 months?” “How much taller than you is Joe?”, “What is your height in mm?”. Ask your children to estimate with their hands how large something is, e.g. “This brochure says that the TV is 60 cm wide – show me how big you think that is with your hands.” “I caught a fish that was this big – how many cm do you think that is?”

. te

Ready-Ed Publications

m . u

Distances in sporting events, e.g. 100 m sprint, jumping 3.5 m in the long jump. Distances between places, e.g. I live 5 km from school, shop or park. Mum jogs 2 km each day.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Book 3

Page 15


Parent Power Time 1 year = 365 days = 52 weeks 10 years = 1 decade 100 years = 1 century 1000 years = 1 millennium

= 12 months

1 month 30 days = April, June, September, November 31 days = January, March, May, July, August, October, December February has 28 days or 29 days in a leap year (every 4 years)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1 week = 7 days 1 fortnight = 14 days

1 hour = 60 minutes = 3600 seconds 1 minute = 60 seconds Clock face 11

12

8

Words

3:00

Three o’clock

3:15

Three fifteen OR quarter past three

2 3

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3

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3:30

Three thirty OR half past three

3.45

Three forty five OR quarter to four

4 7

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Digital

1

10

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Teac he r

1 day = 24 hours

5

Morning = am Afternoon / Night = pm 12:00 pm (daytime) = noon 12:00 am (night time) = midnight Page 16

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Parent Power

• • • •

Teac he r • • • • • •

• • • • •

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

When are calendars used? Keeping track of day-to-day events, remembering birthdays and other special events, making and keeping social arrangements, looking forward to see what day of the week dates fall on.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Time activities at home: Frequently ask your child to tell you the time, staring with simple hourly times such as 3 o’clock and gradually introducing terminology such as “quarter past” etc. Keep a variety of clocks at home, with different faces, roman numerals, numberless faces, as well as digital clocks to accustom your child to reading the time in a variety of contexts. Buy your child a watch from a young age. If they ask the time they can have the question put back to them. Make clocks using a paper plate, split pins and cardboard for the hands and a black marker for the numbers. Use this to practise telling the time. Keep a clock near where your child is doing homework so that they can keep track of how long they have been working. Teach your child how to use a stopwatch and time activities such as siblings racing, the time it takes to complete a puzzle, etc. Show your child how to set their own bedside alarm. Point out the difference between am and pm. Encourage use of the oven timer or microwave time settings when cooking with your child. Ask your child to help you set the video recorder to tape their favourite show. Talk about a 24 hour clock – relate this to real-life examples such as flight times when going on holidays, using some timers such as video recorders, on some television programs such as “army” shows. Relate daily activities back to time by mentioning in everyday conversation: “Go and spend five minutes brushing your teeth.” “Dinner should be ready in half an hour when ‘The Simpsons’ has finished.” “We are running late – it takes ten minutes to get to school and it is already 8:30!”

m . u

When do we need to tell the time? All the time! Making sure you are not late, keeping appointments, social visits, knowing what time to turn on the TV for a favourite show, going to bed at the right time.

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Calendar activities at home: Record family members’ birthdays on a calendar that is easily seen by the child. Ask them questions like “What day of the week does grandma’s birthday fall on?”, “How many weeks and days until your birthday”, “What is the date two weeks before Christmas?” Send unique cards to relatives “Happy two-decade birthday”, “Congratulations on reaching 2920 days on earth” by working out years in different ways on a calculator. Find out about leap years and when they are. Use computer programs such as Publisher to make personalised calendars for the home and as presents. Have child decorate special days on the family calendar at home.

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Book 3

Page 17


Parent Power • • • • •

Timetable activities at home: Allow your child to watch a certain amount of television each day. They can use the TV guide to work out when they would like to watch and how much time they will be watching each program for. Work with your child to devise a timetable for a special family day during the holidays. Use public transport timetables including connecting services and cinema schedules. Allow times for travel and lunch, etc. Work with your child to write a timetable of their school week. Keep it in their room so that they can always be prepared for sport, library, etc. Devise a homework timetable with your child and try to stick to it, so that it becomes a routine. Tick each week off and set goals, with rewards for your child sticking to the timetable.

• •

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Teac he r

When are timetables used? Public transport timetables. School – daily schedules. Television guides. Entertainment – cinema and other events.

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m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Book 3

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Parent Power

What’s the Time? Help Sheet Big Hand

Small Hand

Time

Digital Time

12

1

1 o’clock

1:00

12

2

2 o’clock

2:00

Examples 1:00 11

12 12

3 o’clock

3:00

4

4 o’clock

4:00

5

5 o’clock

5:00

1 2 3

9 8

4 7

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5:00 11

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1 2

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12

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6 o’clock

6:00

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7:00

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© Rea dyE Publ i cat i ons12:00 10 10d o’clock 10:00 orr ev ew11p ur pos esonl y• 12•f 11i o’clock 11:00 12

11

12

1

2

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3

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8

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12 o’clock

12:00

7

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The small hand is leaving the 2 and going towards the 3.

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Big Hand 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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Time Digital Time 5 past 2 2:05 10 past 2 2:10 Quarter past 2 2:15 20 past 2 2:20 25 past 2 2:25 Half past 2 2:30 25 to 3 2:35 20 to 3 2:40 Quarter to 3 2:45 10 to 3 2:50 5 to 3 2:55 3 o’clock 3:00

Examples 2:15

Book 3

12

1

2

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2 3

8

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11 2 3

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4 7

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3:00

1

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Examples 2:30

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Page 19


Progress Chart

What Can I Do? Colour the lines in as you learn something new: Encourage your child to use their own judgement for colouring in. The first square can be coloured in straightaway. Getting some right: Approx 4/10; Getting most right: Approx 6/10 to 8/10; I can do this: Consistently getting more than 8/10 and confidently trying more complex problems

Tallies Starting to learn Bar Graphs

I can do this!!

Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Measuring Length Starting to learn

Measuring Perimeter

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Teac he r

Starting to learn

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Getting some right Getting most right

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Measuring Area •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Starting to learn

Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Measuring Litres and Millilitres

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Starting to learn

Getting some right Getting most right

m . u

Starting to learn

I can do this!!

. teGetting some right Getting most right I can do this!! o c . c e her r What’s the Time? o t s sup er Starting to learn Getting some right Getting most right I can do this!! Measuring Kilograms and Grams Starting to learn

Looking at Calendars and Timetables Starting to learn

Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Getting some right Getting most right

I can do this!!

Mapping Skills Starting to learn Page 20

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Progress Chart

Getting It Right

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

How many sums have you got right today? Keep this chart and colour in ticks each day until you reach the top of the rockets.

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m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Note to teachers / parents: Some students may respond well if ticks are given for partially correct answers at first. Keep this safe in a plastic sleeve. Different colours can be used each day to show improvements in the number correct. Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 21


Name:

Due Date:

Tallies 1 Tallies are used to record how many are counted. Remember: I = 1 III = 3 IIII = 5

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Each time you reach 5, put a stroke through the other 4 strokes.

Boys

Girls

IIII IIII IIII IIII II

IIII IIII IIII IIII III

5

5

10 15 20 22

Total = 22 boys

10 15 20 23

Total = 23 girls

Count by 5’s for each group of 5 and then add the extras.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

A teacher counted the number of boys and girls in her class.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Answer these questions about tallies: •f orr evi ew pur poHow semany so nl y books did• they Bob

w ww

IIII IIII II

IIII III

______ + ______

m . u

Jo

read altogether? (Add the number of books that Bob and Jo read.)

How many books did Bob and Jo read?

. te o c How many Year 4 children are in each group? . How many Year 4 students che e r are there altogether? o t r s s per Group Number of Children u Total Total = _____ books

Total = _____ books

Answer = ______ books

________

Red

IIII IIII IIII IIII III ________

Blue

IIII IIII IIII IIII IIII II ________

Green

IIII IIII IIII IIII I

Yellow

IIII IIII IIII

Page 22

+ ________ ________ Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Tallies 2 Tallies are used to record how many are counted. Boys

Girls

IIII IIII IIII IIII II

IIII IIII IIII IIII III

5

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

10 15 20 22

Try these:

5

10 15 20 23

Total = 23 girls

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Teac he r

Total = 22 boys

Count by 5’s for each group of 5 and then add the extras.

Bob

Jo

Jan

Barry

IIII IIII II

IIII IIII IIII I

IIII

IIII IIII IIII IIII II

Total = _____ stickers Total = _____ stickers Total = _____ stickers Total = _____ stickers

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

How many stickers altogether? _______

Favourite flavour

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Chocolate

Strawberry Vanilla

Banana

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Number of children Total IIII IIII IIII III IIII IIII I

m . u

What are the favourite ice cream flavours?

o c . che e r o t r s super IIII IIII IIII IIII III IIII I

What is the most popular flavour? _________________ What is the least popular flavour? _________________

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 23


Name:

Due Date:

Bar Graphs 1 Look at the tallies and see if you can label the bar graph.

Chocolate Strawberry

IIII IIII

10

IIII II

7

20

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S IIII IIII IIII III 18

10

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Teac he r

Vanilla

Total Number of children

Favourite flavour Children

________ ________ ________ Favourite flavour

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Make a bar graph here:

Make a tally of the knives, forks and spoons in the kitchen drawer at home (ask a parent first and only count the blunt knives!). Tally

Total

Knives

20

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Utensil

Forks

Spoons

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15

o c . che e r o t r What utensil was there the most of? s super Teaspoons

Number

10

5

What utensil was there the least of? Knives

Forks

Spoons Teaspoons

Utensils Page 24

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Bar Graphs 2 Look at the tallies and see if you can make the bar graph. Favourite flavour Children

Total 20

Chocolate Strawberry

IIII II

7

IIII

4

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 10

IIII IIII

9

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Teac he r

Vanilla

Chocolate Strawberry

Vanilla

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Answer the true or false questions about the bar graph.

30 25 20

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Number

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red = 25 blue = 16 white = 30 yellow = 10

15 10

o c . che e r o t r s super 5

Red

Blue

White

Yellow

Car Colours

There were more red cars than yellow cars.

True

False

Blue cars were seen the most.

True

False

I saw 5 green cars.

True

False

If I add blue cars to yellow cars, I get more than the number of red cars.

True

False

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 25


Name:

Due Date:

Measuring Length 1 40 0

1

2

3

30

20

10

0

4

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

When measuring with a ruler, make sure you always have the 0 on the end of the object.

0

1

2

3

4

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Use your ruler to measure the length of these objects in cm.

Use this side.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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. te

m . u

= ________ cm

= ________ cm

o c . che e r o t r = ________ cm s super = ________ cm

Page 26

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Measuring Length 2 When measuring with a ruler, make sure you always have the 0 on the end of the object. Use your ruler to measure the length in mm.

Ô

40 30 20 10 1

2

3

4

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

= ________ mm

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Teac he r

0

0

= ________ mm

© ReadyEdPubl i c=a t i ons ________ mm •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Use your ruler to measure the length in cm and mm. (Measure the cm first, then count how many mm are left over.)

m . u

= ________ mm

o c . che e r o t r s super

= ________ cm and ________ mm

= ________ cm and ________ mm

= ________ cm and ________ mm Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 27


Name:

Due Date:

Estimating and Measuring Length 1 Estimate (guess) and then measure the length of these pencils. Estimate

Length

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S cm

Length

cm

Estimate

cm

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Teac he r

Estimate

cm

Length

cm

cm

© ReadyEdPubl i c at i onLength s Estimate •f orr evi ew pur posesocm nl y• cm Length

m . u

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Estimate

cm

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cm

o c . How would you find outc the answer?___________________________________ e her r o t s super _______________________________________________________________ Estimate your height in cm: ___________________

If you can find a way to check your answer at home, write down your real height here: I am __________________ cm tall. Was your estimate close? __________________

Page 28

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Estimating and Measuring Length 2 Estimate (guess) and then measure the length of these pencils. Write your answer in cm and mm. is 3 cm and 20 mm

3.20 cm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Estimate

Length

__ cm __ mm __ cm __ mm Length

__ cm __ mm __ cm __ mm

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Teac he r

Estimate

Estimate

Length

__ cm __ mm __ cm __ mm Estimate

Length

cm __ n mms __ cm __ mm © ReadyEdPubl i c__at i o •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Find 4 other objects around the home to estimate then measure.

m . u

Object

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(e.g. book)

Estimate

Measure

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o c . che e r o t r s super

The big ruler that your teacher uses on the board is 1 metre (1 m). Your fingernail on your pinky is about 1 cm. A small freckle on your arm is about 1 mm. Circle the measurement for these: The length of your hand.

mm

cm

m

The length of the netball court.

mm

cm

m

The length of an ant.

mm

cm

m

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 29


Name:

Due Date:

Measuring Perimeter 1 Perimeter is the distance around an object. 3 cm Look at this shape: 3 cm

3 cm

To work out the perimeter, add up all the sides.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 12 cm

Work out the perimeters of these shapes: 2

2

2

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Teac he r

3 cm

_____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = _____ cm

2

3

©4 ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = _____ cm 3 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2

4

3

3

m . u

_____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = _____ cm

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4

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Measure all the sides and then work out the perimeters in cm:

o c . che _____ + _____ + _____r e o + _____ = _____ cm r st super _____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = _____ cm

_____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = _____ cm Page 30

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Measuring Perimeter 2 Perimeter is the distance around an object. 3 cm

Look at this shape: 3 cm

To work out the perimeter, add up all the sides. 3 cm

3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 12 cm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Work out the perimeter of these shapes. These are in mm: 20

20

20

_______ + _______ + _______ + _______ = _______ mm

20

15

30

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Teac he r

3 cm

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _______ + _______ + _______ + _______ = _______ mm •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 30

40

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m . u

Measure all the sides and then work out the perimeters in mm:

_______ + _______ + _______ + _______ = _______ mm

o c . che e r o t r s super

_______ + _______ + _______ + _______ = _______ mm

_______ + _______ + _______ + _______ = _______ mm

Use cm to work out the perimeter of this page: ______ cm + ______ cm + ______ cm + ______ cm = ______ cm Can you work it out in mm too? _________ mm Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 31


Name:

Due Date:

Area 1 Here is one square cm. This means it measures 1 cm all around.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

This grid shows 6 square cm across and 6 square cm down.

Another way to talk about this shape is to say that:

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Teac he r

There are 36 squares in this shape.

The area is 6 cm².

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A: ______ cm² Page 32

C B

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Work out the area of the shapes in this grid by counting the number of •forf o rr evi ew pur posesonl y• squares each shape.

o c . che e r o t r s super D

B: ______ cm²

C: ______ cm² Book 3

D: ______ cm² Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Area 2 Here is one square cm. This means it measures 1 cm all around.

Work out the area of the shapes in this grid by counting the number of squares for each shape.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

A

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Teac he r

Some shapes have half squares. Add two half squares to make a whole one.

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A: ______ cm²

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B: ______ cm²

C: ______ cm²

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• C B

o c . che e r o t r s super

Which shape has the biggest area?

A

B

C

Which shape has the smallest area?

A

B

C

On the grid, draw a rectangle that has an area of 12 cm².

Challenge: In the space below draw a triangle that has an area of about 9 cm².

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 33


Name:

Due Date:

Litres and Millilitres 1 Here are some things that can measure 1 L (1 Litre).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Find some other things in your home that are 1 L.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Draw them here and write what they are on the line:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Here are some things that can measure less than 1 L.

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m . u

There are 1000 ml in 1 L.

o c Find some other things in your home that are less than 1e L.. ch r er o t s super

Page 34

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Litres and Millilitres 2 There are 1000 ml in 1 L. Here are some things that you can find around the home: 1 L: milk carton, soft drink bottle, dishwashing detergent. 500 ml: sauce bottle, shampoo. 375 ml: soft drink can. 250 ml: small juice bottle.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Find some other things in your home that are 1 L. Draw them here and write what they are on the line:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

=

. te

m . u

Find some other things in your home that are less than 1 L and write the measurement for them underneath.

o c . che e r o t r s super

ml =

ml =

ml =

ml

Circle your best estimate (guess) for each of these:

Ready-Ed Publications

100 ml

375 ml

1L

5L

500ml

20 ml

7L

20L

Book 3

Page 35


Name:

Due Date:

Kilograms and Grams 1 Here are some things that can measure 1kg (1 kilogram).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S There are 1000 g (grams) in 1kg.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Here are some things that can measure less than 1kg.

Circle whether you would measure these things in grams or kilograms: grams

kilograms

grams

kilograms

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

grams

. te

kilograms

grams

kilograms

m . u

grams

kilograms

o c . Find some things inc the home (try the kitchen or laundry) that have a label e he r showing how much they weigh. Draw them here and circle whether they are o t r s in grams (g) or kilograms (kg).s uper

= Page 36

g / kg =

g / kg = Book 3

g / kg =

g / kg Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Kilograms and Grams 2 There are 1000 g in 1kg. Find some things in the home (try the kitchen or laundry) that have a label showing how much they weigh. Draw and label them below.

=

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Make sure you show if it is in grams (g) or kilograms (kg).

=a = u = n © Re dyEdP bl i cat i o s •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Ready-Ed Publications

5g

250 g

m . u

Circle your best estimate (guess) for each of these:

5 kg

o c . che e r o t r s super

20 kg

900 g

5 kg

35 kg

100 kg

500 g

1 kg

5 kg

40 kg

13 g

100 g

1 kg

6 kg

Book 3

Page 37


Name:

Due Date:

What’s the Time? 1 Tell the time on the clocks. Look at how the hands work first. big hand points to ... 11

12

11

1

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 3

9

11

small hand points to ...

9

6

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6

12

9

3 4

8

Page 38

5

6

11

12

5

1

2

3

9

4

7

12

12

1

6

5

4

8 7

1

11

6

12

2

7

1

11

2

4

8

6

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7

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Name:

Due Date:

What’s the Time? 2 Tell the time on these clocks like the example: Clock 11

12

Time

1

5 past 3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S 2

10 9

3

8

or

3:05

4

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6 12

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five past three

1

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3

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Digital Time

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Draw the time on these clocks: 4:45 11

12

9:05 11

1

8 6

4 7

5

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3

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2

9

3

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Page 39


Name:

Due Date:

Looking at Calendars 1 Use this calendar to answer the questions underneath. January

February

March

April

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

1 8 15 22 29

1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

May

7 14 21 28

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

S M TW T F S 1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

June

July

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

August

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

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2 9 16 23 30

S M TW T F S 6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

© Rea dyEdPNovember ubl i cat i o ns October December S M TW T F S S M TW T F S S M TW T F S S M TW T F S •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• September

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 2 3 4

5 12 19 26

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7 14 21 28

8 15 22 29

9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

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4 11 18 25

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3 10 17 24

1 8 15 22 29

o c . Circle your birthday. What day of the week is it? _______________________ ch e r e o t r s su What is the date one week after April 14? ____________________________ er p

What day of the week is January 1? _________________________________

Write all the dates that are on a Sunday in December? __________________ _____________________________________________________________

Page 40

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Looking at Calendars 2 Use this calendar to answer the questions underneath. January

February

March

April

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

1 8 15 22 29

1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

May

7 14 21 28

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

S M TW T F S 1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

June

July

S M TW T F S

S M TW T F S

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

August

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2 9 16 23 30

S M TW T F S 6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

© Read yEdPu bl i cat i on s October November December S M TW T F S S M TW T F S S M TW T F S S M TW T F S •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• September

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

. te

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 2 3 4

5 12 19 26

Write the days of the week for these dates:

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

8 15 22 29

9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

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4 11 18 25

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3 10 17 24

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

o c . che e r o t r s super

April 30 _____________________

September 1 _____________________ July 17 ______________________

What is the date of the third Wednesday in August? _________________________ Circle your birthday. What is the date two weeks later? _________________________ How many days between June 27 and July 4? ______________________ Challenge: Work out the date that is right in the middle of the year: _______________

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 41


Name:

Due Date:

Looking at Timetables 1 Here are some examples to help with reading timetables: 9:00 am

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 1:00 am am am am am pm pm pm

1:30 pm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Remember am = morning

pm = afternoon or evening

30 minutes = half an hour

60 minutes = 1 hour

Teac he r

2:00 pm

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10:15 is also called quarter past 10 10:45 is also called quarter to 11

Here is a timetable for a day at the zoo. Use it to answer the questions.

Activity ©R eadyEd Pisu bfirst l i c at i osee? ns What the thing you o rr ev i ew pur posesonl y• 9:00 am•f Arrive by bus Time

Monkeys

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10:00 am 11:15 am

12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Bears

What do you see at a quarter past 11?

Lions . te o How long do you have to eat lunch? c Lunch . che e r o t r s su r e p Snakes How long do you spend at the zoo?

1:30 pm

Tigers

2:00 pm

Home

Page 42

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9:30 am

What time do you see the tigers?

How many hours between the bears and the snakes?

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Looking at Timetables 2 Here are some examples to help with reading timetables:

9:00 am

9:30 am

10:00 am

10:30 am

11:00 am

11:30 am

12:00 pm

12:30 pm

1:00 pm

1:30 pm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Remember am = morning

pm = afternoon or evening

10:15 is also called quarter past 10

30 minutes = half an hour

60 minutes = 1 hour

Here is a television program. Use it to answer the questions. Remember am = morning

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

10:45 is also called quarter to 11

pm = afternoon or evening

©Show ReadyEdHow Plong ub l i c t i o n s does thea tennis last for? 8:30 am Bus •f oBig rRed r e vi ew pur posesonl y• Time

9:30 am

Today’s News

10:30 am

12:00 pm

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Tennis

If I watch Big Red Bus and Story Time, how long have I watched TV for?

m . u

Story Time

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9:00 am

If I watch Today’s News and All Talk, how long have I watched TV for?

o c . che e r o t r s super

Lunchtime With Bill

12:45 pm

Happy Years

1:30 pm

All Talk

Is Happy Years on at quarter to 12 or quarter to 1?

Which program is the longest? 2:30 pm

Silly Soap Name 2 shows that last half an hour (30 minutes).

Ready-Ed Publications

Book 3

Page 43


Name:

Due Date:

Looking at Timetables 3 Fill in this timetable for what you do on a Saturday: Time

Activity

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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9:00am

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6:00 pm

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What activity did you do for the longest? _______________________________ What took you the shortest time? _____________________________________ What time did you have lunch? _______________________________________ Page 44

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Name:

Due Date:

Mapping Skills 1 When you read a map, always follow across first, then up or down: A

B

1 2 3

Teac he r

D

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

The star is at B1.

The circle is at C3.

ew i ev Pr

4

C

The place where you find something on a map is called a grid reference.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons A f Cw p Dr Ee F l • orBr evi e u pos son y•G

Find the grid references for these shapes.

1

3 4

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5 6

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2

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7

= ________ Draw a triangle at D7. Ready-Ed Publications

= ________

= _________

= _________

Draw a circle at E2. Book 3

Page 45


Name:

Due Date:

Mapping Skills 2 When you read a map, always follow across first, then up or down:

A

B

C

D

1 2 3

The star is at B1.

The circle is at C3.

The place where you find something on a map is called a grid reference. Find the grid references for these shapes.

B E F ©R eadCyEdDPubl i cat i onsG •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

A

1

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6 7

+ = ________

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3

5

N Ï

p

+

2

4

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Teac he r

4

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o c . chØ e r er o t s super

Ø = ________

= _________

p = _________

Draw a tree two across to the right from D2. Draw a house three down from C1. What does the

N on the corner of the map mean? ____________________________ Ï

Draw your own map of your house on the back of this page. Make it a bird’s eye view (as if you are looking at it from above). Page 46

Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


ANSWERS

(N.B. For measurement activities slight variations may occur because of photocopying inconsistencies.)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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Teac he r

Page 22 - Tallies 1 Bob read 12 books, Jo read 8 books; 8 + 12 = 20 books Red = 23, Blue = 27, Green = 21, Yellow = 15; There are 86 students altogether. Page 23 - Tallies 2 Stickers: Bob = 12, Jo = 16, Jan = 5 Barry = 22; There are 55 stickers altogether. Ice cream: Chocolate = 18, Strawberry = 11, Vanilla = 23, Banana = 6; The most popular flavour is vanilla. The least popular flavour is banana. Page 24 - Bar Graphs 1 Bar graph labels: vanilla, strawberry, chocolate. Page 25 - Bar Graphs 2 Check bar graph; True, false, false, true. Page 26 - Measuring Length 1 Measurements are approximately 7 cm, 7 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm (to nearest cm). Page 27 - Measuring Length 2 Measurements are approximately 35 mm, 54 mm, 48 mm, 61 mm; 5 cm & 8 mm, 6 cm & 3 mm, 4 cm & 2 mm. Page 28 - Estimating & Measuring Length 1 Measurements are approximately 11 cm, 8 cm, 9 cm, 6 cm, 7 cm. Page 29 - Estimating & Measuring Length 2 Measurements are approximately 10 cm & 5 mm, 8 cm & 5 mm, 9 cm & 5 mm, 6 cm & 5 mm. Answers for the second part will vary. The length of your hand = cm The length of the school oval = m The length of an ant = mm Page 30 - Perimeter 1 8 cm, 14 cm, 12 cm; 9 cm, 16 cm, 14 cm. Page 31 - Perimeter 2 80 mm, 115 mm; 160 mm, 90 mm, 60 mm. Page is approximately 102 cm or 1005 mm. Page 32 - Area 1 A = 6cm²; B = 14cm², C = 10cm², D = 8cm². Page 33 - Area 2 A = 3cm², B = 4cm², C = 7.5cm². Biggest is C; Smallest is A. Page 34 - Litres and Millilitres 1 Examples of things that are 1 L are: milk, juice, soft drink, cordial, sauce, washing up liquid, etc. Examples of things that are less than 1 L are sauces, small drink bottles, shampoo, small milk cartons, etc. Page 35 - Litres and Millilitres 2 Examples of things that are 1 L are: milk, juice, soft drink, cordial, sauce, washing up liquid, etc. Examples of things that are less than 1 L are sauces, small drink bottles, shampoo, small milk cartons, etc. Best estimate: soft drink = 375 ml; laundry bucket = 7 L Page 36 - Kilograms and Grams 1 Comb = g; computer = kg; CD = g; chair = kg; person = kg Answers will vary for the second part of this question. Page 37 - Kilograms and Grams 2 Answers will vary for the first part of this question. Best estimate: cereal = 250 g; child = 35 kg; stereo = 5 kg; pencil = 13 g Page 38 - What’s The Time 1 5:30, 3:25, 10:30, 2:05, 4:35, 9:25, 12:40, 10:25, 11:15, 8:30, 5:40, 12:45, 7:10, 2:20, 6:30, 10:05 Page 39 - What’s The Time 2 Five forty five, 5.45; eleven fifty, 11.50; eight fifteen, 8.15; seven thirty, 7.30 Page 40 - Looking at Calendars 1 Sunday; Answers will vary; April 21; December 3, 10, 17, 24 and 21 Page 41 - Looking at Calendars 2 Sunday; Friday; Monday; August 16; 7 days; July 2 Page 42 - Looking at Timetables 1 Monkeys; 1:30 pm; Lions: 1 hour; 5 hours; 3 hours Page 43 - Looking at Timetables 2 1 and a half hours or 1 hour 30 mins; 1 hour; 2 hours; Quarter to 1; Tennis; Big Red Bus, Story Time Page 44 - Looking at Timetables 3 Answers will vary.

w ww

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m . u

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Book 3

Page 47


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Page 45 - Mapping Skills 1 A2, C7, D2, E4. Page 46 - Mapping Skills 2 B2, C6, E5, G2.

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Book 3

Ready-Ed Publications


Fuss-Free Maths - Dyslexia/SPELD Series: Book 3