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Title: Cross-Curriculum: Foundation- Year 2

Ready-Ed

© 2014 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Chenelle Davies Illustrator: Alison Mutton

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iii. Wikimedia Commons. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no FrontCover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled “GNU Free Documentation License”. iv. Front cover image:

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Publications

Acknowledgements i. Clip art images have been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and are used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. ii. Corel Corporation collection, 1600 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8R7.

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ISBN: 978 186 397 900 9 2

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Contents Teachers' Notes National Curriculum Links

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures

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7-8 * English - Teacher Information Pages 9-12 * English - Activities 1-4 Page 13 * Science - Teacher Information r o e t 1-3 14-16 s B r * Science - Activities e o Information Page 17 p o * Maths - Teacher u 1-5 k - Activities 18-22 * Maths S 23 * History - Teacher Information Page 24-26 * History - Activities 1-3 27 * Geography - Teacher Information Page 28-30 * Geography - Activities 1-3

Section 2: Asia And Australia's Engagement With Asia

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32 * English - Teacher Information Page - Student Information Page 33 * English © R e a d y E d P u b l i c a t i o n s English Activities 1-3 34-36 * Science - Teacher Information Page 37 f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y• *• Science Activities 1-3 38-40 * 41 * Maths - Teacher Information Page 42 * Maths - Activity 1 43 * History - Teacher Information Page 44-46 * History - Activities 1-3 47 * Geography - Teacher Information Page - Activities 1-2 48-49 * Geography . t

o c . c e he r Information Page 51 * English - Teacher o t r s 52-54 uper * English - Activities 1-3 s Science - Teacher Information Page 55

Section 3: Sustainability

* * Science - Activities 1-3 * Maths - Teacher Information Page * Maths - Activities 1-3 * History - Teacher Information Page * History - Activities 1-2 * Geography - Teacher Information Page * Geography - Activities 1-2

56-58 59 60-62 63 64-65 66 67-68 3


Teachers’ Notes The Australian Curriculum aims to equip students with the skills, knowledge and understandings that will allow them to live and thrive in an increasingly globalised world. In an effort to help students make sense of the world in which they live, three issues have been identified as priorities by the Australian Curriculum: (1) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures; (2) Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia; and (3) sustainability. It is expected that these priorities will be embedded across five core learning areas: English, Science, Maths, History and Geography. This book has done this for you.

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Part of a series of three, Cross Curriculum: Foundation-Year 2, is written for students living in Australia who are in their early years of schooling. It provides an introduction to the three cross-curriculum priorities specified by the Australian Curriculum.

The book is divided into three clear sections, each focusing on one of the priorities mentioned above. The activities presented within each section, cover content descriptors from the five main learning areas: English, Science, Maths, History and Geography.

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All of the activity pages in this book are visually appealing and suitably simple to help lower-primary school students process the concepts being taught at a fundamental level.

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As students complete the activities, they will begin to develop an understanding of the history and culture of Australia’s first peoples; they will be introduced to the diverse cultures of a variety of countries in Asia while exploring our connections to the Asia region; and will begin to develop an appreciation of the need to protect and conserve our Earth’s precious resources.

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The activity pages are coupled with teacher note pages which include: lists of useful websites and resources to extend learning, answers, and suggested ways to introduce the activity sheets.

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National Curriculum Links Sustainability OI.1 The biosphere is a dynamic system providing conditions that sustain life on Earth. OI.2 All life forms, including human life, are connected through ecosystems on which they depend for their wellbeing and survival. OI.3 Sustainable patterns of living rely on the interdependence of healthy social, economic and ecological systems. OI.4 World views that recognise the dependence of living things on healthy ecosystems, and value diversity and social justice are essential for achieving sustainability. OI.5 World views are formed by experiences at personal, local, national and global levels, and are linked to individual and community actions for sustainability. OI.6 The sustainability of ecological, social and economic systems is achieved through informed individual and community action that values local and global equity and fairness across generations into the future. OI.7 Actions for a more sustainable future reflect values of care, respect and responsibility, and require us to explore and understand environments. OI.8 Designing action for sustainability requires an evaluation of past practices, the assessment of scientific and technological developments, and balanced judgments based on projected future economic, social and environmental impacts. OI.9 Sustainable futures result from actions designed to preserve and/or restore the quality and uniqueness of environments.

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ORGANISING IDEAS Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures OI.1 Australia has two distinct Indigenous groups, Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. OI.2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities maintain a special connection to and responsibility for Country/Place throughout all of Australia. OI.3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have unique belief systems and are spiritually connected to the land, sea, sky and waterways. OI.4 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have many Language Groups. OI.5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ ways of life are uniquely expressed through ways of being, knowing, thinking and doing. OI.6 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have lived in Australia for tens of thousands of years and experiences can be viewed through historical, social and political lenses. OI.7 The broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies encompass a diversity of nations across Australia. OI.8 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have sophisticated family and kinship structures. OI.9 Australia acknowledges the significant contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people locally and globally.

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CONTENT DESCRIPTORS Maths Foundation: ACMNA001, ACMNA002, ACMNA005 Year 1: ACMNA017, ACMMG019, ACMMG021 Year 2: ACMNA028, ACMMG037, ACMSP048, ACMSP049 English Foundation: ACELA1426, ACELA1430, ACELY1645 Year 1: ACELA1443, ACELA1447, ACELT1581, ACELT1582, ACELT1585, ACELY1655, ACELY1658 Year 2: ACELA1463, ACELT1590 Science Foundation: ACELA1426 Year 1: ACSSU017, ACSHE022, ACSIS025, ACSSU211 Year 2: ACSSU031, ACSSU032, ACSSU033, ACSIS038 History Foundation: ACHHK002, ACHHK004 Year 1: ACHHK028, ACHHK029, ACHHK030 Year 2: ACHHK045, ACHHK046, ACHHS052 Geography Foundation: ACHGK002, ACHGK003, ACHGK004 Year 1: ACHGK005, ACHGK006, ACHGS007 Year 2: ACHGK010, ACHGK011, ACHGK012

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Asia And Australia's Engagement With Asia OI.1 The peoples and countries of Asia are diverse in ethnic background, traditions, cultures, belief systems and religions. OI.2 Interrelationships between humans and the diverse environments in Asia shape the region and have global implications. OI.3 The peoples and countries of Asia have contributed and continue to contribute to world history and human endeavour. OI.4 The arts and literature of Asia influence aesthetic and creative pursuits within Australia, the region and globally. OI.5 Collaboration and engagement with the peoples of Asia support effective regional and global citizenship. OI.6 Australia is part of the Asia region and our histories from ancient times to the present are linked. OI.7 Australians play a significant role in social, cultural, political and economic developments in the Asia region. OI.8 Australians of Asian heritage have influenced Australia’s history and continue to influence its dynamic culture and society.

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Section 1:

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     English

Teacher Information Page

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures Activity 1 (page 9) •

similar or different to the lessons taught in Dreaming stories.

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Extension: • Create pairs of cards, one showing a picture of an animal and the other displaying the Aboriginal word for that animal. As a class or in small groups, students can play a memory game. • Investigate the names of some common Australian plants and animals that originated from Aboriginal languages using this website from the Australian National University: 4http://andc.anu.edu.au/australian-words/vocabulary/ borrowings-from-australian-aboriginal-languages

Activity 3 (page 11) •

See the Useful Books And Websites section on the following page for a list of books that may be suitable for this activity.

Activity 4 (page 12) •

See the Useful Books And Websites section on the following page for a list of books that may be suitable for this activity. Try to read at least one book that has a traditional Aboriginal setting and one that has a more contemporary setting.

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Students can use the Aboriginal Languages of Australia Digital Archive website to help them to complete this activity:4www.dnathan.com/VL/ index.php If you live in Queensland, the following site has a list of digital Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language books, many of which include animal names: 4www.slq.qld.gov.au/search/ ebooks/virtual-books

Activities For Further Learning •

Delve deeper into Dreaming stories by discussing how they were traditionally told (i.e. orally, usually by an Elder). Brainstorm all the different ways that stories are told now (e.g. through movies, books, radio, dance, plays, online videos, orally using photographs as stimulus, etc.), and discuss the pros and cons of each form. Have students create a story with a moral and select one of the formats above to share their story. As a class, retell a Dreaming story using puppets or stuffed toys. Create a storyboard first, planning what each scene will look like and what the captions will be. Small groups of students can then create each scene and take photographs. Create a slideshow of the captioned photographs using software such as PowerPoint or Keynote, or try an online tool such as PhotoPeach or VoiceThread. A number of traditional Aboriginal stories from around Australia are told using animated videos that include teachers' notes: 4www.abc.net.au/dustechoes/dustEchoesFlash.htm Have students create a report on a famous Australian Aborigine that outlines his/her background and achievements.

Activity 2 (page 10) •

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Examples of Dreaming stories with a lesson include: The Story of the Thukeri, from the Ngarrindjeri Peoples of South Australia, that warns against being greedy: 4http://ngarrindjeri. jay019.com/culture/thukeri.php. The story Spear from the dust echoes website: 4www.abc.net.au/ dustechoes/dustEchoesFlash.htm, which explores the destructive nature of envy and jealousy.

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Extension: • Read a range of Dreaming stories from around Australia, including creation stories. Compare the settings, characters and themes, discussing similarities and differences. Create a word wall to display in the classroom based on the stories. • Investigate how Aboriginal Peoples used message sticks as a communication tool. • Read a selection of European fables to students and compare them with Dreaming stories. Discuss the purpose of fables, and whether the morals of European fables are

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English

Teacher Information Page

Useful Books And Websites •

Let Us Teach You - a number of texts written in dual language (Aboriginal and English):4www.schools.nt.edu.au/walungurru/learn. htm

Aboriginal Language Flash Card App - developed by the Northern Territory Library:4http://artsandmuseums.nt.gov.au/northernterritory-library/programs-and-projects/flash-card-app#. UfdwJdL-Fqx

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List of indigenous children’s books from the National Library of Australia:4http:// bookshop.nla.gov.au/category/indigenous-children-2733. do?paginator.pageIndex=1

Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan and Dee Huxley

Going for Oysters and Pigs and Honey by Jeanie Adams. Teachers' notes at:4http:// k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/ aboriginal/myplace_learn02.html)

You and Me: Our Place by Leonie Norrington and Dee Huxley. Unit of work available at:4http://www.globalwords.edu.au/units/Indigenous_ JPY3_4_html/index.html)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •animated f or r e i ew pur posesonl y• Inanay - an video ofv a traditional Aboriginal nursery rhyme:4http:// raisingchildren.net.au/baby_karaoke/baby_ karaoke_landing.html

Ngaardi and Toonkoo - storyteller David Heathfield tells this south-eastern Australian creation story to a group of families: 4www. youtube.com/watch?v=jQwwa42Zvio&feature=y outu.be

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Virtual Books from the Museum of Queensland - scroll down the page to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Language Books heading at4www.slq.qld.gov. au/search/ebooks/virtual-books

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Aboriginal Dreamtime story - video based on the story of Waatji Pulyeri (The Blue Wren):4www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Sle62XV0BO0#at=108

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RedPixels animation Dreamtime stories - animated videos of Dreamtime stories including: Tiddalik the Frog, Biladurang the Platypus and Girawu the Goanna:4www. youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC8B74B35C3158B81

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Tiwi music - this BTN video explores how the music of the Tiwi Islands is used to tell stories:4www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2893591.htm

Traditional Aboriginal games F-3 - a set of instructions on how to play a range of traditional Aboriginal games using modern equipment:4www.ausport.gov.au/__data/assets/ pdf_file/0011/376139/SP_31864_TIG_resource_K-3.pdf


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* Organising idea: OI.4 * Content descriptor: ACELA1426 (Foundation)

Activity 1

     English

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 See if you can find the words for the pictured Australian animals from an Aboriginal Language Group close to where you live. Write the Aboriginal words for the animals under the pictures. The bottom three squares have been left blank for you to draw and label your own animals.

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 Listen to a story that includes some or all of the animals that you have chosen in the activity above. Draw your favourite part on the back of this sheet.

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures

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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptors: ACELY1655, ACELT1581 (Year 1)

Activity 2

     English

Before Europeans settled in Australia, Aboriginal children did not attend school like you do today. Throughout history, Dreaming stories have been used by Aboriginal Peoples to teach lessons to children and other members of a tribe.

r o e t s Bo r e 1. The Dreaming story that I listened to was: p ok u S

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RRRead or listen to a Dreaming story that was created to teach a lesson.

2. What was the main character like at the beginning of the story? Circle as many words as you can to describe him/her, then add some of your own. shy

lazy

greedy

courageous

kind

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3. Did the character change by the end of the story? How?

4. What was the purpose of the story? What lesson/s were taught? ____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 10

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACELT1582 (Year 1)

Activity 3

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RRRead or listen to a story that shows Aboriginal characters in a traditional setting. RRRecord the similarities and differences between the Aboriginal characters and yourself. Think about the clothes that they wore, the foods that they ate, where they lived, and the activities that they did each day. Colour the similarities red.

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The story that I listened to was entitled:

Aboriginal Characters

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     English

* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACELT1590 (Year 2)

Activity 4

RRRead a variety of indigenous stories. Choose two of these stories, and complete the questions. Look at the illustrations to help you. Book 1 Title:______________________________________________

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u What natural features S are described in the setting/s? What colours are mentioned?

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________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________ What human-made objects are described in the setting/s?

________________________________________________________ What indigenous words are used in the story?

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What colours are mentioned?

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Book 2 Title:______________________________________________

. te o What natural features are described in the setting/s?. c che e r o ________________________________________________________ r st super ________________________________________________________

What human-made objects are described in the setting/s?

________________________________________________________ What indigenous words are used in the story? ________________________________________________________ 12

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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     Science

Teacher Information Page

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures Activity 1 (page 14)

The Bureau of Meteorology has a useful website which allows students to investigate the Aboriginal seasons around Australia:4www.bom.gov.au/iwk/index.shtml

Use this website for more information in regards to each of the musical instruments:4www.aboriginalartonline.com/culture/ amusic2.php If possible, watch videos to show how the instruments are played before completing the activity sheet.

Activity 2 (page 15)

Here is a list of useful websites to research how the plants on the activity sheet were used: 4www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/education/programs/pdfs/ aboriginal_plant_use_and_technology.pdf 4www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/education/programs/pdfs/ aboriginal-bush-medicines.pdf 4www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/education/programs/ Aboriginal-plantuse.pdf 4http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/ austn-indigenous-tools-and-technology 4www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/plant_info/aboriginal_bush_ foods

Extension: • Research how the instruments are made and the materials that they are made from.

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Extension: • Make an annual calendar illustrated with pictures of plants, animals or events from the Aboriginal seasons.

Activity 3 (page 16)

ANSWERS: • tapping; blowing; shaking; beating; swinging

Useful Books And Websites • •

Seasons - 12 Canoes video:4www.12canoes.com. au/ Miriwoong Seasons Interactive Calendar:4www.mirima.org.au/calendar/ Larrakia Seasons Interactive Calendar:4www. larrakia.csiro.au/#/calendar/dalay Other Season Calendars:4www.larrakia.csiro.au/#/ page/calendars 5 Seasons Video Clip:4http://aso.gov.au/titles/ documentaries/5-seasons/clip1/ Ernie Dances To The Didgeridoo, by Alison Lester Walking With The Seasons In Kakadu, by Diane Lucas Big Rain Coming, by Katrina Germein A short clip about food available in the bush:4http://aso.gov.au/titles/documentaries/narbalek/ clip3/ Behind the News: Bush Food:4www.abc.net.au/ btn/story/s3775984.htm Understanding Bush Foods - a video from ABC Splash:4http://splash.abc.net.au/media?id=30798 Bush Medicine - a short video from Parks Australia 4www.environment.gov.au/parks/ publications/booderee/video-bush-medicine.html Cooking in the past and the present - a short video that includes some visuals of traditional Aboriginal methods of cooking:4http://splash. abc.net.au/media/-/m/103154/cooking-food-in-the-pastand-present?source=early-primary-history

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Extension: • Investigate how plants in your local area were used in traditional Aboriginal society. • Invite a member of the Aboriginal community into the classroom to speak to the students about the traditional uses of plants and animals. • Watch this video from the BTN website showing how a tree is used to make a canoe: 4www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2627618.htm

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ANSWERS: • Crinum Lily - leaves were broken or crushed and the sticky liquid inside was applied to the skin to alleviate pain from blue-bottle stings. Banksia - the nectar of the flower of this plant was used to make a sweet drink. Eucalyptus - leaves were crushed and the vapour was inhaled to clear a head cold. Quandong - the fruits of this plant were a common food of Aboriginal Peoples living in central Australia. Yam Daisy - the roots of this plant were roasted in a ground oven and eaten.

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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACELA1426 (Foundation)

Activity 1

     Science

Each Aboriginal group has its own seasons depending on where in Australia it is located. Aboriginal seasons are based on observations of the environment, including changes to plants, animal behaviours and the weather.

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summer

autumn

January February March April May June July August September October November

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1. The groupings below left, show the seasons according to the Gregorian calendar. Investigate an Aboriginal seasonal calendar from your state or local area. Group the months to show the Aboriginal seasons, and write the names of the seasons.

spring

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2. Choose one of the Aboriginal seasons above. Draw a picture and write a sentence to show how animals behave during this season.

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3. On the back of this sheet or in your workbook, draw a picture and write a sentence to show how a plant changes during this season. 14

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* Organising ideas: OI.2, OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACELA1426 (Foundation)

Activity 2

     Science

Botany, also called ‘plant science’, is the study of plants. For thousands of years Aboriginal Peoples have studied how plants can be used for food and medicine.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Leaves were broken or crushed S

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RRDo some research to match up each plant name with its picture and how it was traditionally used in Aboriginal society. and the sticky liquid inside was applied to the skin to reduce the pain caused by blue-bottle stings.

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Crinum Lily (or Swamp Lily)

Banksia

The nectar of the flower of this plant was used to make a sweet drink.

Eucalyptus

Leaves were crushed and the vapour was inhaled to clear a head cold.

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The fruits of this plant were a common food for Aboriginal Peoples living in central Australia. The roots of this plant were roasted in a ground oven and eaten.

Yam Daisy

(or Murnong)

RRAboriginal Peoples also used plants to make useful objects. Do some research and draw an object made from plants on the back of this sheet.

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     Science

* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACSHE022 (Year 1)

Activity 4

RRCircle the correct word next to each picture to show how each indigenous instrument was used to make sound. In the right hand column, draw another instrument that uses the same technique to make a sound. Indigenous Instrument clap sticks

Sound

Draw Another Instrument

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didgeridoo

blowing beating

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tapping

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skin drum

bullroarer

shaking

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swinging beating blowing

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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     Maths

Teacher Information Page

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures Activity 1 (page 18)

Extension:

4 grey shells, 2 black shells, 2 white shells. The pattern repeats itself.

Activity 4 (page 21)

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Watch this video with students, demonstrating how to count in the Noongar language (WA):4http://thesmarties2.blogspot.com.au/2011/08/

counting-in-noongar.html

aborig.s.e.aust/xanthorrhoea-species.html

Extension:

1. marnkurrpa marnkurrpa 2. marnkurrpa; kutju; kutjarra kutjarra

1. A male Aboriginal Elder, the Southern Cross and native grass trees. 2. The flowering spikes made perfect fishing spears; soaked in water the nectar from the flowers made a sweet tasting drink; the flowers were used as a compass because the flowers on the sunnier side of the spikes (usually north facing) open before the flowers on the side of the cooler side. 3. 5 cents - Ecidna; 10 cents - Lyrebird; 20 cents - platypus; 50 cents - kangaroo and emu; 1 dollar - five kangaroos

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Activity 2 (page 19) •

Read Dreaming stories associated with the different animals found on Australian coins. Discuss the significance of each animal to Aboriginal Peoples.

ANSWERS:

ANSWERS:

A useful site when researching the use of grass trees is this one from the Australian National Botanic Gardens:4http://www.anbg.gov.au/

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In traditional Aboriginal society there was little need to count to high numbers, which meant many languages did not have words for every number as we do now. Rather, many tribes had words for the numbers one, two, three, few, and many. Some language groups used the word hand for the number five. Numbers larger than three could be made by combining smaller numbers (as seen in Activity 1). To find number words from an Aboriginal language in your state or local area, go to:4www.dnathan.com/VL/index.php

Prior to completing this activity sheet, create a physical bead string to model examples, then encourage students to count out numbers using the bead string.

Activity 5 (page 22) •

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Extension: • Use the bead strings to play the addition and subtraction game Tug of War, as demonstrated in the video on this school’s blog:4http://mysteriouswonders.global2.vic.edu. au/2012/05/04/bead-strings/ ANSWERS:

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Have a variety of informal units available for students to use to measure the spears (e.g. string, beads, paperclips, matchsticks, wooden cubes, straws, etc.). After completing the activity, discuss which unit was the easiest to measure with and why. Ask students to predict which unit might be the most effective to measure and compare the lengths and widths of life-sized spears.

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ANSWERs: • 1. 4 grey shells, 2 black shells, 2 white shells,

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1. 20 2. 40 3. 54

Extension:

Read more about Aboriginal shell necklaces (and other necklaces) at these sites:

4http://www.nma.gov.au/collections/highlights/ tasmanian-aboriginal-shell-necklaces 4http://www.aboriginalartstore.com.au/aboriginal-artculture/aboriginal-beaded-jewellery-1.php Look at a variety of Aboriginal paintings and have students use a viewfinder (i.e. a piece of black cardboard with a square cut out from the middle) to scan over the artwork and identify patterns used. The Aboriginal Art Online website may be a useful resource:4http://www.

aboriginalartonline.com/index.php

Extension:

• •

Research the different types of spears that Aboriginal Peoples traditionally used and how they were made. Hold a ‘spear throwing’ competition to determine who can throw a ‘spear’ (this could be the handle from a broomstick or similar) closest to a target. Discuss how you will measure who came the closest to the target.

ANSWERs: • 2 is the longest and 4 is the shortest.

Useful Website •

Australian Museum: Indigenous Culture:4http://

australianmuseum.net.au/section-Indigenous-Australia 17


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* Organising idea: OI.4 * Content descriptor: ACMNA001 (Foundation)

Activity 1

     Maths

RRThe table below shows the numbers 1-5 in Wangkatha, an Aboriginal language from the Western desert region of Australia. one

kutju

two

kutjarra

three

marnkurrpa

four

kutjarra kutjarra (‘two and two’)

five

kutjarra marnkurrpa (‘two and three’)

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r o e t s Bo r e p o u k(or ‘three and 1. Following the pattern above, what would the number six S three’) be in the Wangkatha language?

_ ___________________________________________________________ 2. Write the number of fingers being held up in each picture in the Wangkatha language.

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3. What are some number words from an Aboriginal language in your local area or state? Write them in the box below.

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACMNA028 (Year 2)

Activity 2

     Maths

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RRLarge numbers can be counted more quickly and easily if they are grouped into tens first. Use the Aboriginal counting beads below to find out how many beads are on each of the strings.

1

2

How many?

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How many?

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RRDraw a bead string below to show how many students are in your class or year level at your school.

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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACMNA005 (Foundation)

Activity 3

     Maths

Necklace-making has been a traditional practice of Tasmanian Aboriginal women for hundreds of years. Many of the necklaces are made from shells strung in a pattern.

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1. Look at the necklace below. Next to each segment, write how many shells you can count. Can you see a pattern?

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2. Using beads of different colours and sizes, make your own necklace that follows a pattern. Glue a photograph of it or draw it in the space below.

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3. Describe the pattern used in your necklace. _ ___________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________________ 20

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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     Maths

* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACMNA017 (Year 1)

Activity 4

1. Look at this $2 coin. Describe what you can see. _ ___________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________________ 2. Look at the picture of the grass trees. What did Aboriginal Peoples traditionally use grass trees for?

r o e t s Bo r e p ok _ ___________________________________________________________ u S _ ___________________________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________________________

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_ ___________________________________________________________

_ ___________________________________________________________ 3. What animals can you see on the coins pictured below? Find out what names Aboriginal Peoples from a local language group had for these animals and add them to the table below. Aboriginal Name From A Animal/s On The Coin Local Language Group

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* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptors: ACMMG019 (Year 1) ACMMG037 (Year 2)

Activity 5

     Maths

RRTraditional Aboriginal Peoples did not measure objects using rulers and tape measures. Instead they used everyday objects to calculate lengths. Use informal units to find out which spear is the longest, and which is the shortest.

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I used _____________________________________ to measure the spears. The longest spear is: _ ____________________________________________ The shortest spear is:_____________________________________________ 22

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     History

Teacher Information Page

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures Activity 1 (page 24) • •

answers: • Working left to right and top row to bottom row = women; women; children; men and women; women; men

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Extension: • Discuss the following statement as a class: “Toys and games today are better than traditional Aboriginal toys and games”. Have students think about the costs, availability, types of materials needed, whether the toy or game is played indoors or outdoors, how much exercise the toy or game provides, whether the toy or game promotes a skill and how environmentally friendly the toy is to produce. Students could then individually write a persuasive text outlining their point of view. • Create models of traditional Aboriginal toys. • Play traditional Aboriginal games (see the last link listed above for instructions). • Visit the First Peoples exhibition at Museum Victoria to see their display of traditional indigenous toys alongside animated accounts of Aboriginal toys and play.

Activity 3 (page 26)

Display the website on a projector screen or interactive whiteboard if possible. Click on the View Hotspots button to learn more about the different parts of the painting and the story that influenced it. The middle hotspot, links to a short video of the same story being performed in a dance. (Note: if the website is not accessible, the activity can still be completed using another indigenous painting that tells a story).

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The following sites may be useful for researching traditional Aboriginal toys and games: Australian Museum: Explore Indigenous Australian Objects - select the Toys link:4http://australianmuseum.net.au/ExploreIndigenous-Australian-Objects Behind the News: Indigenous Games - a video:4www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2755969.htm Yulunga: Traditional Aboriginal Games (K-3):4www.ausport.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_ file/0011/376139/SP_31864_TIG_resource_K-3.pdf Birrguu Matya - a bush game:4http:// planetcorroboree.com.au/shop/educational/birrguu-matyabush-game/

Extension: • Video students as they look at the painting and orally retell the story. • View the other paintings on the website and share their associated stories - use the links under the Science in the Paintings heading at the bottom of the left-hand menu.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• answers:

Students might see: a dugong, canoes, oars, men, a tree, rope, a harpoon (or spear). What is happening in the painting: The painting shows two men paddling their canoe and trying to catch a dugong.

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Activities For Further Learning •

Read through the Welcome to Country protocol with students, discussing what it means and why we say it. For more information, see the Welcome to and Acknowledgement of Country fact sheet at:4www.reconciliation.org.au/ Visit local sites of indigenous significance, such as rock painting sites or natural features such as caves and lakes. Investigate the knowledge that Aboriginal Peoples have of these places and why they are significant. Investigate dates and times of the year that are significant to Aboriginal Peoples. This could involve looking at traditional seasonal calendars or researching celebrations and events held in honour of Indigenous Australians and their culture (e.g. NAIDOC Week, Reconciliation Week, etc.).

o c . che e r o t r s super Activity 2 (page 25) •

Extension: • Compare the roles in traditional Aboriginal society to roles played by family members today. • Explore the tools that Aboriginal Peoples use for hunting and gathering. The Australian Museum has a number of pictures (and descriptions) of fishing, hunting, cutting and collecting tools:4http:// australianmuseum.net.au/Explore-Indigenous-AustralianObjects

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     History

* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACHHK046 (Year 2)

Activity 1

RRResearch a variety of traditional Aboriginal toys using books and the internet. Choose ONE traditional Aboriginal toy and ONE toy of your own. Draw each toy and complete the questions below. Name of traditional Aboriginal toy:

r o e t s Bo r ___________________________________ e p Is it an indoor or an outdoor oktoy? u S ___________________________________ How is the toy used?

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Is the toy made from environmentallyfriendly materials?

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What can you learn from using this toy? What skills does it develop?

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Name of a toy that you own:

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Is the toy made from environmentallyfriendly materials?

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o c . che___________________________________ e r o t r s su r How isp thee toy used? Is it an indoor or an outdoor toy?

___________________________________ What can you learn from using this toy? What skills does it develop? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 24

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Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures


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     History

* Organising idea: OI.8 * Content descriptor: ACHHK028 (Year 1)

Activity 2

In traditional Aboriginal society, children lived with their extended

family, or kin. Children had many mothers and fathers as all adults in

the kinship group were expected to care for and raise the children. They also had more brothers and sisters than just their biological siblings, and even distant relatives were considered to be their cousins. These kinship groups lived together and shared food and resources with each other.

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Within these extended families, men and women had different roles. Women were responsible for gathering food such as roots, berries, seeds, insects and crabs, as well as making items such as kangaroo skin cloaks and woven baskets. The men hunted animals and fish using tools such as spears, nets and boomerangs. Children helped the women gather food, played games that taught skills that would help them when they became adults, and listened to stories. All adults were responsible for passing on important knowledge to children using storytelling and art.

RRLook at each picture below. Under each one, write whether the traditional Aboriginal activity would be done by a man, woman or child.

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     History

* Organising idea: OI.5 * Content descriptor: ACHHK004 (Foundation)

Activity 1

RRStories of the past can be told in many ways. Visit the following website to see an ancient Aboriginal story from the Yolnu Peoples of Arnhem Land that has been told using a painting: 4http://livingknowledge.anu.edu.au/learningsites/seacountry/22_ dugong.htm

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RRGlue a picture of the painting below.

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RRI can see:

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RRWhat is happening in the painting? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ 26

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     Geography

Teacher Information Page

Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures

Activity 1 (page 28) •

Before completing this activity, you may like to show students photographs of the objects listed on the activity sheet and have them create their own symbols. They can then compare how similar their symbols are to the Aboriginal symbols.

answers: • air; shelter; food; water; love

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Activity 3 (page 30) •

The following sites may be useful in researching the meanings of the place names on the activity sheet: 4www.australiaforeveryone.com.au/names.htm#tas 4www.slq.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_ file/0008/225674/SEQ-Placenames.pdf 4www.det.wa.edu.au/aboriginaleducation/apac/detcms/ aboriginal-education/apac/regions/wheatbelt/noongartown-names-and-their-meanings.en?oid=MultiPartArticleid-9291986 www.gosford.nsw.gov.au/library/local_history/ placenames.html

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Extension: • Look at traditional and contemporary indigenous paintings. How many of the symbols on the activity sheet can your students identify? The following websites may be useful to help the students with this activity: • Papunya Collection:4www.nma.gov.au/collectionssearch/index.php?p=results&QueryTerms=Papunya&Limitp p=20&search=basic&Startrec=0 • Aboriginal Paintings Gallery:4www. aboriginalartonline.com/aboriginalpainting/index.php • View the artworks (each accompanied by a description) on the following websites: 4http://vimeo.com/49435346 4http://livingknowledge.anu.edu.au/learningsites/ seacountry/18_livingbysea.htm 4http://livingknowledge.anu.edu.au/learningsites/ seacountry/19_mapping.htm • Have students choose a place that is significant to them and draw a picture of it as it looks from above. Have them write a list of objects that can be found, and activities that they do at their special place. • View the following unit of work entitled Me And My Smile: Exploring Aboriginal Paintings at: 4http://ecm.det.wa.edu.au/connect/resolver/view/ AENI046/latest/AENI046.pdf • Photocopy and enlarge the symbols to create a set of cards. Students can play a memory game with the cards and add to the set if they wish.

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his grandmother that the bush has an abundance of things to offer.

Extension: • Find the places listed in the table on a map of Australia, and find out which language group each place is in. Use the map on the following website to assist you:4www.abc.net. au/indigenous/map/ • Discuss how the names given by Aboriginal Peoples to places relate to the land, for example how the land was used or its physical features. Think of places in your local area that do not have Aboriginal names, then think what they might have been called by Aboriginal Peoples based on the natural features of the land, the native flora and fauna, etc. For example, a good name for a coastal town might be ‘place of sand and water’.

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Activity 2 (page 29) Extension: • Visit the My Place website:4www.abc.net.au/ abc3/myplace/ Click on the handprint symbols on the right-hand side to interactively explore two traditional Aboriginal shelters. • Read Sam’s Bush Journey by Sally Morgan and Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Little Hare, 2010), a story about a boy who learns from

answers: • 1. Wagga Wagga - derives from the Wiradjuri Aboriginal language. Wagga means crow, so Wagga Wagga means place of many crows ; Nambour - is derived from the Aboriginal word naamba referring to the red flowering bottle-brush Callisteman viminalis ; Goomalling - means the place of the silver-grey possum and is derived from the Noongar Language Group - goomal was the Noongar word for this possum; Wodonga means bulrushes by the Wiradjuri Peoples; Oodnadatta - derives from Arrernte utnadata and means mulga blossom; Kakadu - derives from the Aboriginal flood plain language 27


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* Organising idea: OI.2, O!.6 * Content descriptors: ACHGK011(Year 2), ACHGK003 (Foundation)

Activity 1

     Geography

Aboriginal Peoples have lived in this country for over 40,000 years, and have always had a strong connection to the land. Traditionally, each Aboriginal Language Group had a defined area of land that they had spiritual and cultural connections with – their Country. When Aboriginal Peoples talk about their connection to Country, they are talking about their relationship with everything in the landscape – water, landforms, plants, animals, rocks – as well as the knowledge songs, laws, art and stories that are associated with that place.

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Many Aboriginal Dreaming stories tell of ancestral beings who journeyed across the country creating trees, rivers, waterholes, mountains, rocks and stars, and it is believed that their spirits still rest at sacred sites and inhabit these natural features. For thousands of years Aboriginal Peoples have used art to communicate stories of the Dreaming, as well as their knowledge of the land. Traditionally, the symbols below were used in bark paintings, sand drawings, rock art and for body decoration. Nowadays, they are still commonly used in the paintings of contemporary Aboriginal artists.

RRUse the symbols below to write a sentence about traditional Aboriginal life. Read the sentence to your friend.

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. emu honey ant tekangaroo o c . che e r o t r s human s possum club digging stick r upe tracks

nest

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well or waterhole

man

bush plum

bowl

rain

rain/flowers/ ants/eggs/fruit

Section 1: Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Histories And Cultures

grub

spears

star

rainbow/cloud/ sand dune/cliff


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     Geography

* Organising idea: OI.2 * Content descriptor: ACHGK002 (Foundation)

Activity 2

Aboriginal Peoples were the first people to live in Australia. They did not have brick houses and shops like we do now, instead they lived off the land and everything they needed was provided by the natural environment.  Look at the picture below. Label the things that the Aboriginal Peoples need. The first letters of the words are already there to help you. Think about basic needs today.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u A_ _____________ S S_ _____________ F_ _____________ L_ _____________

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 Colour in the parts of the picture that show the needs listed above. Use a different colour for each need.

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* Organising idea: OI.4 * Content descriptor: ACHGK010 (Year 2)

Activity 3

     Geography

1. Many place names across Australia are actually Aboriginal words, such as the places listed in the table below. Using books and the internet, research what each of these place names mean in the Aboriginal language that they derive from. State

Wagga Wagga

NSW

Nambour

Goomalling

Meaning

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Place Name

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Wodonga

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Kakadu

SA

NT

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. te o 2. The Australian government has officially named many places after c . c e Why do you Aboriginal Peoples or h tribes, such as Tullamarine inr Victoria. e o st super think they have done this? r _ ___________________________________________________________ 3. Find out the meaning of an Aboriginal place name in your local area. Draw a picture on the back of this sheet to illustrate its meaning. Place name: _ ________________________________________________ Meaning:____________________________________________________ 30

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r o e t s Bo r e Asia p And Australia’s ok u SEngagement With Asia

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Section 2:

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Teacher Information Page

Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia Activity 1 (page 34)

was decided at the beginning of the game (at which point the player gets to keep one of the two Ohajiki), or until the player is out. 5. After Player 1 has had a turn, Player 2 gathers the remaining Ohajiki and scatters them on the table. Player 2 then tries to win an Ohajiki. 6. Play continues back and forth until there is only one Ohajiki left on the table. The winner is the person with the most Ohajiki at the end of the game.

Extension: • Compare the recount from the activity sheet with those from the Time Kids website: 4www.timeforkids.com/around-the-world. Simply scroll down to the Asia section, select a country, then click the Day in the Life link on the left-hand side menu.

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Activity 2 (page 35)

Activities For Further Learning •

Activity 3 (page 36)

© ReadyEdUseful Pub l i cat i ons Books And Websites • Song And Rhymes For Children •f orr evi ew pu r posesonl y• (Asia):4www.mamalisa.com/?t=e_cont&c=10

Use wish stones or counters (roughly the size of a $2 coin) to play Ohajiki before completing this activity sheet. See the answers below for additional instructions. Players lose their turn if they: 1. Touch any of the Ohajiki when drawing the line with their finger. 2. Miss their target when they flick. 3. Hit any of the other Ohajiki. 4. Knock any Ohajiki off the table. Visit this site to watch an animated version of Ohajiki: 4http://resources.education.tas.gov.au/ item/edres/4639b0ac-1b3c-c8c6-dd05-750aa4d6446e/1/ ohajikiwithenglish.zip/ohajiki.swf

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Japanese Fairy Tales (read aloud):4www. youtube.com/user/BackToTheArchives/ search?query=japanese+fairy International Children’s Digital Library search for Books by Country, then select Asia & Middle East at:4www.childrenslibrary.org/icdl Asia-Related Literary Texts:4www.asiaeducation. edu.au/teachers/curriculum_resources/english_cr/main_ english_text_page.html AsiaKids Society – stories at:4http://kids. asiasociety.org/stories. Chinese Folk-Tales - scroll down to the bottom of the page to see more at:4http:// traditions.cultural-china.com/en/211Traditions9846.html Japanese Folktales:4http://web-japan.org/ kidsweb/folk/index.html

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Answers: • 1. Players decide how many times an Ohajiki must be hit in order to keep it. Players then play rock, paper, scissors to decide who will go first. 2. Player 1 begins the game by scattering all the Ohajiki over a flat, smooth surface. 3. Player 1 chooses any two Ohajiki and draws an imaginary line between them with his or her finger, then uses his or her thumb to flick one of the two chosen Ohajiki so that it hits the other one. 4. Player 1 draws another imaginary line between the same two Ohajiki and flicks again. This is repeated for as many times as 32

Compare creation stories from different cultures, for example the Aboriginal story entitled The Rainbow Serpent found at:4www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vh6moD9ZOU with this Chinese creation story:4www. mythicjourneys.org/bigmyth/myths/english/2_chinese_ full.htm

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This activity may work better as a class brainstorm rather than an individual activity. After choosing a natural setting or object within the school, have students list describing words or complete a looks like, feels like, sounds like chart. Students can then experiment with sentences until they find three that have the required number of syllables.

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     English

Student Information Page

* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: ACELY1655 (Year 1)

Selamat pagi! My name is Putri, and I am from Indonesia. This is how I spend a typical day.

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5.00 am

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u I wake up, wash my hands and face, then help my Mum and S Grandma prepare breakfast. Today we are having rice, chicken

and cucumber. After breakfast I play with my dog and read for a little while.

6:30 am I leave for school while it is still fairly cool. We go to school six days a week here in Indonesia. Sometimes I walk, but today Dad gives me a lift on the back of his bicycle. Before school starts I make tea for the teachers. Some of my friends have to sweep the classroom, others sweep the playground and water the plants before school - we all have jobs.

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7:30 am The school day officially begins. At school we study Maths, Science, Social Studies, Religion, and our language - Bahasa, Indonesia. Today we also did some craft – my favourite subject! 1.00 pm School finishes, and I walk home. It is very hot! When I get home I change out of my uniform, then help mum prepare lunch. 2.00 pm 4.00 pm

. ta short nap I spend some time praying at the o Aftere temple in our c . house, then I get my chores out of the way. ch e r e o t r shopscotch. Some of my su My friends come over and r pweeplay friends have a TV in their house, but we don’t. I am looking forward to watching cartoons at my friend’s house after school tomorrow!

6.00 pm I help Mum and Grandma prepare dinner. We are having fish, rice and vegetables tonight. After dinner I do my homework and finish off the day with some reading.

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     English

* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: ACELA1426 (Foundation)

Activity 3

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What Putri had for breakfast.

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RRCompare your day with Putri's day. Colour red any similarities.

What you usually have for breakfast.

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How Putri got to school.

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How you usually get to school.

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What Putri did after school. 34

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Something you did after school yesterday.

Section 2: Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia


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* Organising idea: OI.4 * Content descriptor: ACELT1585 (Year 1)

Activity 2

     English

Honeyeater The banksia sways (5 syllables)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S feasting on as the honeyeater feeds (7 syllables) nectar. (5 syllables)

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A Haiku is a Japanese poem. Traditionally Haiku poems describe the natural world, focusing on a particular season. A Haiku poem generally does not rhyme and has only three lines. The words used in the first line should have a total of five syllables, the words in the second line should have seven syllables, and the words in the third line should have five syllables. Look at the poem right for an example.

RRTake a photograph or draw a picture of a natural setting or natural feature found at school. Write a Haiku poem about this setting or feature. Use your senses to help you describe the setting or feature.

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     English

* Organising idea: OI.4 * Content descriptors: ACELA1447 (Year 1) ACELA1463 (Year 2)

Activity 3

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After Player 1 has had his/her turn, Player 2 takes the remaining Ohajiki, and scatters them on the floor. Player 2 then tries to win an Ohajiki.

Player 1 draws an imaginary line between the same two Ohajiki and flicks again. This is repeated for as many times as was decided at the start of the game (at which point the Player gets to keep one of the two Ohajiki), or until the Player is out.

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RROhajiki is a traditional Japanese game for two players. Each player has 10 Ohajiki. Cut out the instructions below and glue them in order to show how to play Ohajiki.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Play continues until there is only one Ohajiki left on the floor. The winner is the person with the most Ohajiki at the end of the game.

Player 1 chooses any two Ohajiki and using any finger draws an imaginary line between them, then uses his/her thumb to flick one of the two chosen Ohajiki so that it hits the other one.

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Player 1 begins the game by scattering all the Ohajiki over a flat, smooth surface.

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Players decide how many times an Ohajiki must be hit in order to keep it. Players then play rock, paper, scissors to decide who will go first.

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     Science

Teacher Information Page

Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia Activity 1 (page 38)

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• •

Read through the websites listed below with your students to help them to complete the activity sheet: Online book with information about houses from around the world: 4www.shelterpub. com/_wonderful_houses/wh-toc.html Houses around the world:4www.hgpho.to/ wfest/house/house-e.html Ask students what would happen if other materials were substituted for the materials used in making the houses, for example ‘What would happen if the chimney of the yurt was made from wood or plastic?’ (It might burn or melt.)

Extension: • Discuss the materials that the toys are traditionally made of. Watch online videos to demonstrate to students how the toys are used.

© ReadyEdPAnswers: ubl i cat i ons • 1. push 2. pull 3. push 4. push and pull •f orr evi ew pur p sandopull nl y 5.o pulls 6.e push (the toy• is rolled

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Extension: • Look at some of the other houses on the websites above and in books. Investigate the materials houses in different parts of the world are made from. • Compare similarities and differences between the two houses on the activity sheet. Investigate the different shapes houses come in, and the reasons why houses are made in different shapes.

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between the palms in a back and forth motion).

Useful Website •

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Activity 3 (page 40)

Activity 2 (page 39) •

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Extension: • Read more about the Qilin at this site: 4www.cultural-china.com/chinaWH/html/ en/13Traditions981.html • This interactive online tool allows students to create their own animal using different animal features:4www.switcheroozoo.com • Have students think about where the animal that they have created would live, what it would eat and how it would move. • Students could research other Asian mythological creatures and idols and describe their features, e.g. Kamadhenu (the Indian goddess from Hindu mythology).

easily molded into the round shape that effectively withstands earthquakes. The chimney of a Yurt is made from metal. As it is part of the oven it gets very hot, so metal is used as it can withstand high temperatures. The walls of the yurt are made from wooden poles covered with cloth filled with wool and fur. Wood is used because it makes a strong structure but is light enough to be carried from place to place. The cloth, wool and fur are used because they are good insulators (i.e. they keep the heat in), and because they are flexible they can easily be wrapped around the wooden structure.

Virtual kendama game:4http://web-japan.org/ kidsweb/virtual/kendama/kendama07.html

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Answers: • The roof of a bhunga is usually made from grass or bamboo. These materials assist in keeping out the heat. Ropes are tied around the thatching to prevent it from blowing away in strong winds. • The thick walls are made from mud or clay. They keep out the heat and can be

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     Science

* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: 1ACSSU017 (Year 1)

Activity 2

The Qilin is an animal from ancient Chinese mythology. Its body is similar to that of a deer, and it has a tail like an ox. It has horns on its head and scales over its body.

H_ _______ _________

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RRDraw lines to the boxes to label the features of the Qilin. In each box, write another animal that has that feature.

_________

_________

S_________ © ReadyEdPubl i cat i o ns _________

•f orr evi ew pur poseson l y• _________

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RRInvent your own creature that has a variety of animal features. Label your drawing.

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Section 2: Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia


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* Organising idea: OI.2 * Content descriptor: ACSSU031 (Year 2)

Activity 2

     Science

Houses are made from different materials depending on where in the world they are found. Most houses and shelters are built to suit the environment, and generally use materials that are available locally.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Bhungas From India

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RRResearch the two types of houses from the Asian region below. List the materials used to build the labelled parts, then describe why these materials have been used.

What is the roof made from and why? _____________________________ _____________________________ What are the walls made from and why?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _____________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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_____________________________

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What is the chimney made from and why?

What are the walls made from and why? _____________________________ _____________________________

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     Science

* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: ACSSU033 (Year 2)

Activity 3

RRUnderneath each traditional Asian toy, write whether it uses a push or pull force (or both). Ring Toss - Japan

3

2

BuGuri (spinning top) - India

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OtoshiDaruma - Japan

4

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1

Puppet - Indonesia

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     Maths

Teacher Information Page

Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia Activity 1 (page 42) •

Have students generate questions to investigate Chinese culture, for example: ‘What is your favorite Asian food?', 'Which Asian country would you most like to visit?’ or ‘Which Asian food would you like to see available from the canteen?’ Guide students to collect data by telling them to ask a selection of people and to record their results in a tally format.

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Activities For Further Learning

Play the Korean counting game sam-yewgew (Korean for ‘three, six, nine’). In the original version, players stand in a circle and count around the circle, starting with the number one. When a multiple of three (a number with three, six or nine in it) is reached, the player must clap instead of saying the number aloud. This game can be easily modified in order to teach students skip counting. For example, the rule could be that the students must only say every second number, or fifth number, and all other numbers must be replaced with a clap. Investigate the history of the abacus with students. Find out who invented it, which country it originated in, and what it was used for. If possible have some abaci available for students to use to count. As a class, investigate the Chinese Zodiac calendar. Have students work out their Zodiac sign, then ask them to figure out the next year that their Zodiac sign will reappear. Hold an origami-making session with students. Once they have made a few, have them name and draw the 2D shapes that they can see. Investigate the effect of one-step slides and flips using flags from Asian countries. Which ones remain the same, and which look different?

Useful Websites •

Asia education - Mathematics lessons for Foundation to Year 10 based on the Australian Curriculum:4www.asiaeducation.edu. au/curriculum_resources/maths/mathematics.html

Count in Chinese:4http://kids.asiasociety.org/ languages/count-chinese

Chinese games - play Fingers Out using Chinese numbers: 4www.activityvillage. co.uk/fingers_out.htm and 4www.chcp.org/games. html#fingers

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Extension: • Have students design coins as part of a new school currency. Brainstorm images relating to the school environment that could be featured on the coins. • Set up a reward system where students earn paper money for positive behaviours. They can then use this 'money' to purchase rewards of differing values.

After completing the activity, discuss what visual clues the students used to sort their coins.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur os eCake:4www.activityvillage.co.uk/ sonl y• • p Play Moon

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moon_cake.htm

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* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: ACMNA017 (Year 1)

Activity 1

     Maths

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RRBelow are a mix of coins from Singapore, Japan and Australia. See if you can group the coins on a blank piece of paper to show which countries they are from.

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     History

Teacher Information Page

Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia Activity 1 (page 44) ANSWERs: • 1. Sunday 2. Friday 3. Four 4. Eight 5. No

Activity 2 (page 45) •

Extension: • Share images and stories of families around the world with students. You may find the following websites and books useful: •

Use the following website as a starting point for students to research information about their local Chinatown:4http://australia. gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/chinatownsacross-australia

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Use the following websites to find photographs of families around the world, or search for your own: What The World Eats is a website that contains photographs of families around the world with their weekly groceries - Part 1: www.time.com/time/ photogallery/0,29307,1626519,00. html Part 2: www.time.com/time/ photogallery/0,29307,1645016,00.html Family photographs around the world: http://flavorwire.com/205437/photos-fromaround-the-world-of-families-and-theirpossessions/view-all

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Activity 3 (page 46)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• A day in the life stories at4www.worldvision.

Time kids - simply scroll down to the Asia section, select a country, then click the Day in the Life link at:4www.timeforkids.com/aroundthe-world.

Wake Up, World!: A Day in the Life of Children Around the World by Beatrice Hollyer

A Life Like Mine: How Children Live Around the World by DK Publishing

Yikang's Day - From Dawn to Dusk in a Chinese City by Sungwan So

Geeta's Day: Fom Dawn to Dusk in an Indian Village by Prodeepta Das

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com.au/resources/SchoolResources/Content. aspx?id=e7d8ad16-4291-41c7-9462-900107e5c129

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* Organising idea: OI.8 * Content descriptors: ACHHK003 (Foundation) ACHHK029 (Year 1)

Activity 1

     History

RRThe calendar below is for the month of February. Use the calendar and information on the poster to answer the following questions. Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1 5

11

12

25

19

2

3

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Sunday

6

7

8

9

10

13

14

15

16

17

20

21

22

23

24

27

28

1. What day does Chinese New

Chinese New Year begins

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Saturday

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 2. What day will the fireworks be Chinese •f orr evi ew pur p osesonl y• Year begin? _____________

New Year

3. How many days will the

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walking tour run for? _______ 4. How many walking tours will

Fireworks Display

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on? _____________

February 15th at 8pm

Street Parade

February 16th 1pm – 2pm . te o Chinese New Year c 5. Mei has a 1 hour basketball . che e Markets r o training every Saturday, r st sup February 16th and 17th 10am-4pm r e starting at 1pm. Will she be

there be in total? __________

able to make it to see the street parade? Yes / No 6. Add some more events to the

Walking Tours of Chinatown

Monday 11th to Thursday 14th Twice daily at 11am and 3pm

calendar designed to celebrate the Chinese New Year. 44

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Section 2: Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia


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* Organising ideas: OI.5, OI.7 * Content descriptor: ACHHK002 (Foundation)

Activity 2

     History

RRFind photographs of three families from different parts of Asia. Write how many adults and how many children are in each family. Draw lines to show what part of Asia the families are from. Display with your photographs around the classroom.

Family 1

Family 2

Adults

Family 3

Adults r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Children Children Adults

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Children

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Mongolia •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• N.Korea S.Korea

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Arabian Sea

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Nepal

Pa k

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ist an

China

Japan

East China Sea

Bhutan laos

Taiwan

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burma Bangladesh

Pacific Ocean

thailand

vietnam

cambodia

Sri Lanka

Maldives

malaysia

singapore

brunei

Indian Ocean indonesia East Timor

Australia

RRGlue a photograph of your family into your exercise book. Write down how many adults and how many children there are in your family.

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     History

* Organising ideas: OI.5, OI.7 * Content descriptor: ACHHK045 (Year 2)

Activity 3

Many cities around Australia have a Chinatown due to the large number of Chinese migrants who moved to Australia during the 1800s. Chinatowns are a unique part of our heritage as they have historical and cultural significance.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u The Chinatown thatS I am investigating is in the city of:

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RRVisit your closest Chinatown, or research it using books, the internet and local history museums. Use the information that you find to answer the questions below.

1. What year was it established?________________________________________ 2. What buildings are present?_________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 3. What objects can you see?_ _________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

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4. What can you buy?_ _______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

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5. Glue or draw a picture of the Chinatown that you have studied here.

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     Geography

Teacher Information Page

Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia Activity 1 (page 48)

Conduct a scavenger hunt/bingo game with your class that encourages students to complete quick activities, find objects or research answers to questions relating to Asian countries, for example: 1. Find someone who has been to an Asian country. 2. Find something that was made in an Asian country. 3. Learn a Yoga position. 4. Find out what city the 2008 Olympic Games was held in. 5. Find a menu from an Asian restaurant in your local area. 6. Find a photograph that was taken in an Asian country.

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Extension: • Mark each country on a map so that students can visualise where their items have come from. Investigate how far each item would have travelled to get to their house (use a tool such as Google Maps that calculates the distance between two places). Determine which item has travelled the furthest. • Create a tally to show how many items have come from each country. Which country have most items come from? Search the classroom for other items made in Asia, and add them to the tally. • Have students sort the items into categories, e.g. clothing, appliances, decorative items, food, etc. • Think about the materials that the items are made from, and whether the materials came from the country where the item was made. • Discuss the concept of trade and how Australia can play a role in the economic development of a country by trading fairly with it.

Imagine that your class is going on holiday to a country in Asia. Ask students to come up with a list of questions that they might have, then combine these as a class. Try to find the answers to these questions using books, newspapers, the internet and by contacting people who have visited the country.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Extension: • Compare the weather around Asia with the weather around Australia on the same day. If they had a choice, what city would students like to be in today and what activity would they like to do in this place? • Complete the same activity sheet at other times of the year, and compare the results. How does the weather change during each season and affect the activities that we do?

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Useful Books And Websites •

Google Maps:4www.maps.google.com.au

Go Indonesia – an interactive map of Indonesia that allows students to explore the islands and read about foods, games, religion, language and more:4www. asiaeducation.edu.au/sites/goindonesia/indonesia.htm

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Activity 2 (page 49)

o c . che e r o t r s super Activities For Further Learning •

Investigate the physical features of Asian countries and how these affect the places where people live (for example, how the majority of the population in India live around the coast as there are mountainous regions throughout the middle of the country). This can be effectively demonstrated by comparing physical maps with population maps.

Asia Education Foundation: Geography - includes a unit of work for Foundation linked to the Australian Curriculum, entitled Special Places:4www.asiaeducation.edu.au/ curriculum_resources/geography/geography_cr.html

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* Organising idea: OI.7 * Content descriptor: ACHGK012 (Year 2)

Activity 1

     Geography

RRBring in two items from home that have been made in an Asian country. Draw and label them in the boxes below, and write the country that they come from.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Item:_______________________ Item:_______________________ Country this item was made in:

Country this item was made in:

___________________________

___________________________

RRLook at the items that your classmates have bought in that were made in Asia. Draw and label four different objects below.

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Item:_______________________

Item:_______________________

Country this item was made in:

Country this item was made in:

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___________________________

___________________________

Item:_______________________

Item:_______________________

Country this item was made in:

Country this item was made in:

___________________________

___________________________

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     Geography

* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptor: ACHGK006 (Year 1)

Activity 2

RRIn each box, draw one of the symbols below and write the temperature to show what the weather is like around Asia today. Use the internet to find this information. Link the boxes to the countries using lines.

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r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Beijing, China New Delhi, India

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Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Mongolia

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew p ur posesonl y• China

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India

Pacific Ocean

Philippines o c Vietnam . che e r o r st super

Indian Ocean

Indonesia

Australia

Hanoi, Vietnam

Jakarta, Indonesia

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Manila, Philippines

Section 2: Asia And Australia’s Engagement With Asia

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r e oo p u S Sustainability k

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Section 3: r o e t s B

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     English

Teacher Information Page

Sustainability Activity 1 (page 52)

Discuss the importance of these signs. What are the consequences of people choosing not to follow these rules?

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Activity 2 (page 53) •

The list of fiction books on the right-side column of this page may help you with this activity. Visit your school library or local library for a selection of suitable non-fiction books.

Read through and discuss any words that the students have not heard before or are unsure of the meaning. Have students number the steps once they have been glued onto the blank piece of paper. Discuss the importance of recycling for the environment.

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• •

Write a text recounting an event, e.g. treeplanting, rubbish collection, paper-making. Create a Word Wall highlighting vocabulary associated with sustainability.

Useful Websites

4. Fiction: characters, dialogue, setting, imagination. Non-Fiction: index, headings, photographs, information, sub-headings, bibliography.

Activity 3 (page 54) •

Activities For Further Learning

World:4www.clubdirtgirlworld.com/ © ReadyEdP• • uDirtGirl b l i c at i ons REL Sustainability - units of work based print texts with a sustainability •f orr evi ew pur paround ose sonl y• theme:4www.curriculumpress.edu.au/rel/

Answers:

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Answers: • Recycle: on bins or packaging. Place litter in the bins provided: in public areas. No camping: in National Parks or protected bush areas. No fishing: at beaches where people swim and areas where the fish are protected. Keep dogs on leads: in public places where vegetation could be damaged.

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sustainability/index.php •

Stuff Swap - read this guide on how to organise a ‘stuff swap’:4www.ecokids.ca/pub/ take_action/campaigns/en/act_for_the_planet/swap.cfm

Sustainability unit - written for Years 3 and 4, but could be modified for a young audience:4www.globalwords.edu.au/units/ Sustainability_JPY3_4_html/index.html

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layer of the slurry on top of the screen. 6. Lift the screen straight out of the pan. Hold the screen over the pan so that some of the water can drain off. 7. Place the screen, with the pulp side up, on a stack of newspaper. Lay small flowers, leaves and grasses on the pulp, if you wish. 8. Cover your paper with more newspaper and roll with a rolling pin to squeeze out the water. 9. Lift off the top newspaper. Gently peel the homemade paper from the screen and allow it to dry on dry newspaper.

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Answers: How To Make Recycled Paper • 1. Cut a piece of screen and fold the edges twice to make a frame. 2. Tear up some tissues and place in a bowl. You will need about 3 tissues for a 15 x 16 centimetre piece of paper. Add enough hot water to fill the bowl about 3/4 full. 3. Beat the tissues and water to make a "slurry". Add a tablespoon of starch. 4. Pour the slurry into a shallow pan. 5. Slide the screen to the bottom of the pan and gently move it around to get an even

Useful Fiction Books • • • • • • • •

Uno’s Garden by Graeme Base Lester and Clyde by James H. Reece The Lorax by Dr Seuss One World by Michael Foreman Schumann the Shoeman by John and Stella Danalis The Trouble with Dragons by Deb Gliori The Vegetable by Ark Kim Kane What Planet are you from Clarice Bean? by Lauren Child

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     English

* Organising ideas: OI.6, OI.7, OI.9 * Content descriptors: ACELA1430, ACELY1645 (Foundation) ACELA1443 (Year 1)

Activity 1

RRSymbols are often used to communicate a message without using words. The symbols below show ways that people can care for the environment. Next to each one, write what the symbol means and where the symbol might be found in everyday life.

Meaning

Where This Symbol Might Be Found

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Symbol

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Section 3: Sustainability


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* Organising idea: OI.9 * Content descriptor: ACELY1658 (Year 1)

Activity 2

     English

RRRead a variety of fiction and non-fiction books that explore the issue of sustainability. Choose one of the books that you have read and answer the questions below. 1. What is the title of the book that you have chosen?

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r o e t s Bo r e p Fiction / Non-Fictionok 2. Is it fiction or non-fiction? u S the author wrote this book? 3. Why do you think

______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

4. Cut out the words at the bottom of the page, then glue them in the correct box below to show which type of text they are most commonly associated with. Add your own words.

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Non-Fiction

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characters

headings

photographs

setting

bibliography

index

sub-headings

dialogue

imagination

information

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Section 3: Sustainability

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     English

* Organising idea: OI.9 * Content descriptor: ACELA1426 (Foundation)

Activity 3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Slide the screen to the bottom of the pan and gently move it around to get an even layer of the slurry on top of the screen.

Cover your paper with more newspaper and roll with a rolling pin to squeeze out the water.

Place the screen, with the pulp side up, on a stack of newspaper. Lay small flowers, leaves and grasses on the pulp, if you wish.

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RRBelow is the procedure for making recycled paper, but there is just one problem – it has been jumbled up! Cut out each part of the procedure and glue in order on a blank piece of paper.

Paper is usually made from trees, but you can recycle tissue and make your own paper.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Screen

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Lift the screen straight out of the pan. Hold the screen over the pan so that some of the water can drain off.

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Tear up some tissues and place in a bowl. You will need about 3 tissues for a 15 x 18 centimetre piece of paper. Add enough hot water to fill the bowl about ¾ full.

Screen with edges

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Beat the tissues and water to make a “slurry”. Add a tablespoon of starch.

Cut a piece of screen and fold the edges twice to make a frame.

o c . che e r o t r s super Lift off the top newspaper. Gently peel the homemade paper from the screen and allow it to dry on dry newspaper.

Section 3: Sustainability

Pour the slurry into a shallow pan.


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     Science

Teacher Information Page

Sustainability Activity 1 (page 56)

Activity 3 (page 58)

Discuss how trees are used around the home and school by both humans and animals. Record as many different products that are made from wood. Investigate other parts of trees that are used to produce products. Read The Lorax by Dr Seuss. Try to imagine a world without trees. Discuss the importance of trees and why we need to look after them.

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Activity 2 (page 57) •

Discuss why the beach environment and the city environment at the bottom of the page would not meet the needs of the kookaburra (i.e. there is nowhere for the kookaburra to shelter and nest, the beach only has salt water, the types of animals that live in these places would be different and a kookaburra might not eat them). Discuss the importance of preserving trees.

Answers: • 1. fruit; eat; shade 2. shelter; food 3. air; carbon dioxide; oxygen 4. shelter; sun

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Present your findings at a school assembly to make other students aware of the need to turn off dripping taps. Have students make signs (by hand or digitally) to place in bathrooms and near sinks to remind students to turn off taps completely. Discuss the importance of saving water. Tell them that only 0.1% of the world's water is drinkable. The majority is salt water found in seas and oceans. Tell them that saving water can't be done by individuals or small groups alone, we must all participate.

Activities For Further Learning •

Design a habitat to cater for the needs of a new species (e.g. it likes to hide under rocks and lie in the sun, it eats bugs, it lays its eggs on leaves, etc.). Look for animals that live in trees and take photographs of them. If actual animals cannot be seen, have students take photographs of evidence left by animals, such as nests, webs, droppings and cocoons.

© ReadyEdP• ubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Extension: • Brainstorm or research the types of animals whose needs would be met in a beach environment. Discuss adaptations that animals have that allow them to successfully live in this place.

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Answers: • 1. Will the kookaburra have a place to nest and shelter if this happens? No. 2. Which type of food will the kookaburra have less of? Spiders (and possibly lizards too as there will be less leaf litter). 3. Do you think that this place would still be a good place for the kookaburra to live? No - because not all of its needs are being met. 4. Where else might the kookaburra go to live? The oval would be the habitat closest to its natural environment.

Useful Books And Websites

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Eco friendly kids:4www.ecofriendlykids.co.uk/

Garbology:4www.naturebridge.org/garbology.php

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

The Lorax by Dr Seuss

The Last Tree in the City by Peter Carnavas

Leaf by Stephen Michael King. Teachers notes available at:4www.scholastic.com.au/ schools/education/teacherresources/assets/pdfs/Leaf_ TN.pdf)

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     Science

Activity 1

* Organising ideas: OI.7, OI.9 * Content descriptors: ACSIS025 (Year 1), ACSIS038 (Year 2), ACSSU032 (Year 2)

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

How much water is in the bucket after an hour?

How much water is in the bucket after four hours?

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 Ask your teacher to turn on a tap so that it is slowly dripping. Put a bucket underneath to catch the water.

How much water is in the bucket the next day?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

What should you do if you see a tap dripping?

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__________________________________________________________ Why?

. te o __________________________________________________________ c . c e her r __________________________________________________________ o t s super __________________________________________________________

How will your class recycle the water in the bucket so that it is not wasted?

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Section 3: Sustainability


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     Science

* Organising ideas: OI.1, OI.2, OI.3 * Content descriptor: ACSSU211 (Year 1)

Activity 2

 Show how the needs of this kookaburra are being met by its habitat by drawing lines from the words to the picture.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

shelter

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air

water

food

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons  The local council is planning to remove all the trees from this area •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• and build a car park. 1. Will the kookaburra have a place to nest and shelter if this happens?

2. What type of food will the kookaburra have less of?

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________________________________________________________________

. te o 3. Do you think that this place would still be suitable for the kookaburra to live? c . c e Yes / No her r o t s s r u e p 4. Where else might the kookaburra go to live? Circle the habitat you think a ________________________________________________________________

kookaburra could survive in.

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Section 3: Sustainability

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     Science

* Organising ideas: OI.1, OI.2, OI.3, OI.7, OI.8 * Content descriptor: ACSSU032 (Year 2)

Activity 3

 For each picture, fill in the blanks to describe what is being provided by the tree.

oxygen fruit food air carbon dioxide shelter sun shade shelter eat

2

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1

These trees are providing _______________ for people to _________. The trees are also providing _________ for the fruit-pickers.

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The trees are making the _____ cleaner by absorbing ___________ ___________ and emitting _______________. 58

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons This tree provides ____________ •f orr evi ew pu r posesonl y• and ___________ for the koala.

Section 3: Sustainability

The girl is using this tree as ____________ from the ______.


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     Maths

Teacher Information Page

Sustainability Activity 1 (page 60)

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Activity 2 (page 61) •

Before beginning the activity, discuss the meaning of the word ‘decompose’. View the following video entitled It’s not scary, it’s decayed by PBS Kids at: 4www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pCD4h8Pp7qM or search the internet for time-lapse videos of materials decaying. After completing the activity and sharing the answers, discuss whether natural or human-made materials take longer to break down.

Activity 3 (page 62)

Extension: • Have a ‘rubbish-free lunch’ day, where students try to limit the amount of packaging used in their recesses and lunches. Collect rubbish the day before and on the day, and compare the difference. • Discuss how successful the event was as a class, and communicate results to parents.

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Encourage students to choose a variety of areas, some with lots of trees and bushes and some with hardly any. Examples of areas that students might investigate include: the car park, the oval, a native garden, basketball courts, the playground, etc. Students might silently observe the area for five minutes, then actively explore the area for insects. Before starting the activity, have students predict the area in which they will see the most animals. After the activity, discuss the correlation between the number of trees in an area and the number of animals seen.

Activities For Further Learning •

Count how many birds are seen in a garden at the school over a short period of time. Plant a variety of native plants known to attract birds and conduct a recount. Compare the results, and discuss why it is important to attract birds to our gardens. Using a simple map, have students show where rubbish bins are located and where recycling bins are located around the school. Ask the students whether they think more bins are needed, and if so discuss who to speak to in order for this to happen. With parent assistance, have students check the water meter at their houses to see how much water is used in a week. Compare results as a class. Discuss measures that can be taken to reduce water usage and have students fill out an action plan to implement in their households. Check water use again after a month and compare results.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Extension: 1. Have students put the items from the activity sheet on a timeline in order to visually represent how long each object takes to break down. Research other items to add to the timeline. 2. Investigate the role that decomposition plays in the natural world, and how it can help the environment. 3. Investigate the journey that rubbish and/ or recyclable materials take once they leave your bin. Where does our waste go and how is it processed? 4. Conduct experiments so that students can experience first-hand the breakdown of materials. Bury various objects in containers of soils and check them on a regular basis, describing and photographing the changes that occur.

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Answers: • apple: 1-2 months; aluminium can: 200-500 years; styrofoam cup: forever; cardboard box: 2 months; glass bottle: 1–2 million years; wool socks: 1-2 years

o c . che e r o t r s supe r Useful Book •

The Magic School Bus Meets The Rot Squad: A Book About Decomposition by Joanna Cole (Scholastic, 1995)

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* Organising idea: OI.1 * Content descriptors: ACMSP048, ACMSP049 (Year 2)

Activity 1

     Maths

 Choose four different outdoor areas in your school, some with lots of trees and bushes and some with very little plant life. For each area, keep a tally of how many insects, birds and other animals you see during a ten minute period.

Area 2: _________________ r o e t s Bo r e p ok Tally: u S insects

Area 1: _________________ Tally:

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birds other animals Total

How many trees and bushes are in this area?

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insects birds other animals Total

How many trees and bushes are in this area?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons trees and There are •f trees and There are o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o n l y• bushes in this area of the school.

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Area 3: _________________

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Tally:

insects birds other animals Total

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bushes in this area of the school.

Area 4: _________________ Tally:

o c . che e r o t r s super insects birds other animals Total

How many trees and bushes are in this area?

How many trees and bushes are in this area?

trees and There are bushes in this area of the school.

trees and There are bushes in this area of the school.

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Section 3: Sustainability


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* Organising ideas: OI.3. OI.8 * Content descriptor: ACMMG021 (Year 1)

Activity 2

     Maths

 The items below frequently get put into rubbish bins and are taken to landfill. Tick to indicate the time that you think it takes each item to break down or decompose. You can then compare your guesses with the answers that your teacher gives you. Item

Correct Answer

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S q  days q  weeks q    months q  years q    hundreds of years q    millions of years q    forever

aluminium can

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apple

How Long To Decompose? q  days q  weeks q    months q  years q    hundreds of years q    millions of years q    forever

days q  weeks © Reaq  d y E d P u bl i cat i ons q    months q  years q    hundreds of years •f orr ev i e w p u r posesonl y• q    millions of years

styrofoam cup

q  days q  weeks q    months q  years q    hundreds of years q    millions of years q    forever

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cardboard box

glass bottle

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q    forever

o c . che e r o t r s super q  days q  weeks q    months q  years q    hundreds of years q    millions of years q    forever q  days q  weeks q    months q  years q    hundreds of years q    millions of years q    forever

wool socks

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Section 3: Sustainability

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* Organising idea: OI.9 * Content descriptor: ACMNA002 (Foundation)  

Activity 3

     Maths

((Year

 It is important to try to reduce the amount of rubbish that we create.

lunch 2

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lunch 1

How many pieces of How many pieces of rubbish will be left rubbish will be left over from lunch from lunch 2?n © 1? ReadyEdover Pub l i c at i o s

•f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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How many pieces of rubbish will be left over from your lunch today?

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 Draw your lunch here:

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On the back of this page draw some food that you could bring to school that has no packaging (or that has packaging that can be reused or recycled).

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Section 3: Sustainability


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     History

Teacher Information Page

Sustainability Activity 1 (page 64)

In small groups, have students take on one of the four roles prior to completing the activity sheet. Ask them to role play what their character might say or do when faced with the scenario of a new development being built. Groups can then share their answers with the class and discuss the reasons for each character’s point of view.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Useful Websites •

Climate time machine - see how average temperatures and sea levels around the world are increasing over time:4http:// climatekids.nasa.gov/time-machine/

Future Sparks - a website for children about the future of clean energy:4http://futuresparks. org.au/

Ollie Saves the Planet:4www.olliesworld.com/ planet/aus/info/info/sr_nr05.htm

Activity 2 (page 65) •

1. 2. 3.

Display and compare the answers as a class. Create some simple graphs to show differences, e.g. number of TVs/computers/ phones in grandparents’ childhood houses compared with now. Discuss who had (or has) the more sustainable lifestyle in terms of waste and energy use. In order to make a decision, you may like to share some of the following facts with students: In Australia, over 10 million new plastic bags are used each day. If everyone in the world lived the way Australians do now, we would need more than four planets to support us. Each baby using disposable nappies in Australia sends 700 kilograms of waste to landfill every year, accounting for approximately 5% of landfill content. Australians are the second highest waste producers in the world behind Americans. The facts above come from the following websites:4www.cleanup.org.au/au/Campaigns/ plastic-bag-facts.html,4http://environmentvictoria.org. au, and4www.greennappy.com.au/

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• • Sustainability Unit - written for Years 3 and

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4. •

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Answers: • 1. Against 2. For 3. For 4. Against

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Stuff Swap - read this guide on how to organise a ‘stuff swap’ and reuse household items:4www.ecokids.ca/pub/take_action/campaigns/ en/act_for_the_planet/swap.cfm 4 but could be modified to suit a younger audience:4www.globalwords.edu.au/units/ Sustainability_JPY3_4_html/index.html

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or did they reuse toys passed down from brothers and sisters? What were toys made from – natural or processed materials? How were toys packaged? Discuss the differences between then and now, and how our entertainment preferences now use more energy and create more waste.

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Extension: • Use this task as a springboard to investigate how we can all reduce our waste, use less energy and live a more sustainable lifestyle. • Compare entertainment, toys and games from when their grandparents were children to the entertainment, toys and games available now. How many of the forms of entertainment used by the students’ grandparents used electricity or batteries? How often did they get new toys,

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     History

* Organising ideas: OI.7, OI.9 * Content descriptor: ACHHS052 (Year 2)

Activity 1

 An area of local bushland is about to be cleared and developed into a housing estate.

After

1. Would the birds and animals in the area be for or against the new development?

r o e t ___________________________________ s Bo r e p 2. Would a builder whoowas going to u k S be paid to build the houses be for or against the new development?

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Before

___________________________________ 3. Would a family who needs a place to live be for or against the new development?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew___________________________________ pur posesonl y•

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4. Would a person who enjoys bush walking in the area be for or against the new development? ___________________________________

. tethe characters above. Draw and label your o  Choose one of character c . below. In the speech bubble, write what they might say to the ch e r er o developer. st super

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Section 3: Sustainability


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     History

* Organising idea: OI.8 * Content descriptors: ACHHK030 (Year 1), ACHHK046 (Year 2)

Activity 2

 Find out about your grandparent's childhood by asking him/her the questions below. Record the answers. 1. How many computers were there in your childhood house?__________ 2. How many televisions were there in your childhood house?__________ 3. How did you get to and from school most days?_ ______________________

r o e t s B r e oo How many cars didp your family own when you were a child?_ ____________ u k What did your parents use to carry groceries home from the shops? (E.g. S plastic bags, cloth bags, paper bags.)

4. How many telephones were there in your childhood house?_ ____________ 5.

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6.

_______________________________________________________________

7. What did you usually eat for lunch at school? How was your lunch packaged? _______________________________________________________________

8. Did your parents grow any fruit or vegetables in your garden? If so, which ones?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _______________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

9. How did you stay warm in winter when at home?

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10. How did you stay cool in summer when at home?

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_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

. te o _______________________________________________________________ c . c e r 12. How did your familyh wash and dry clothes? t er o s s r u e p _______________________________________________________________

11. Did you wear disposable nappies or cloth nappies when you were a baby?

 Compare your family’s lifestyle with your grandparent’s lifestyle when he/she was a child. Did he/she live a more sustainable lifestyle as a child than you do now?

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Section 3: Sustainability

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     Geography

Teacher Information Page

Sustainability Activity 1 (page 67)

CoolAustralia.org4http://coolaustralia.org/ curriculum-materials

Ollie Saves the Planet 4www.olliesworld.com/ planet/aus/info/info/sr_nr05.htm

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Activity 2 (page 68) •

Prior to completing the activity, discuss what students can see in the picture. You may like to label some of the features on an enlarged version so that students become familiar with the words that will be used in the activity.

ARKive4www.arkive.org/education/teachingresources-5-7

ARKive games 4www.arkive.org/education/games

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Students can draw pictures or write what they can see and hear in their special places. For example, if their special place is the nature garden they could draw a plant, a tree, a butterfly and a bird in the ‘see’ box; and a bird and other children in the ‘hear’ box. Take a photograph of students in a pose that shows them caring for a special place. For example, if their special place is the library they could be snapped turning the pages of a book carefully, putting rubbish in the bin, etc.

Useful Websites

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

answers: • fences; weeds; paddocks (x2); milked; fed; dung; machinery; sheds

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Activities For Further Learning •

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Have students make up their own signs for the school and hang them in appropriate places, e.g. The poster ‘Please Turn Off Dripping Taps’ could be hung in the students' toilets, the poster ‘Please Do Not Tread On Plants’ could be laminated and stuck on a wall near a garden bed, etc. Have students collect and weigh all the junk mail that their family receives over a week. Students can then create a ‘No Junk Mail’ sign to put on their mailbox at home in order to reduce this waste of paper.

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Extension: • Go to the website entitled: My Visit to an Organic Farm4www.ecokids.ca/pub/eco_info/ topics/landuse/organic_farm/index.cfm

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* Organising idea: OI. 7 * Content descriptor: ACHGK004 (Foundation)

Activity 1

     Geography

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

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My favourite place at school is:

What can you hear in your special place?

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What canP you see © Ready Ed ub l i cat i ons in your special place? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Draw a picture or glue a photograph in the box below to show how you can care for your special place.

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Section 3: Sustainability

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     Geography

* Organising idea: OI.9 * Content descriptor: ACHGK005 (Year 1)

Activity 2

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 The picture below shows some different ways that a dairy farm is cared for and managed.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

 Use the picture and the words below to fill in the blanks about the different ways that the land and animals on a dairy farm are cared for. You will need to give some words a capital letter. Some words can be used more than once.

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trees dung sheds milked fences weeds fed machinery paddocks

1. ______ are built to stop cows trampling on plants along the river.

. te to provide shelter for the cows from theowind and 3. ______ are planted c . c e hot sun. her r o st su er p 4. The farm is divided into a number of _______. The herd is rotated 2. ______ are removed from the paddocks.

through the _______ so the grass and soil have time to recover. 5. Cows are _______ and ________ every day. 6. ______ beetles are used to turn cow pats into fertiliser for the plants on the farm. 7. Damage to _______ , fences and _______ are quickly repaired. 68

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Section 3: Sustainability


Cross-Curriculum: Foundation to Year 2