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Title: Teaching Primary Art © 2012 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Chani Crow

Copyright Notice

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Teachers’ Notes

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SECTION ONE: JUNIOR PRIMARY ART ACTIVITIES Activity 1: Mini Masterpiece: Wassily Kandinsky Activity 2: Mini Masterpiece: Piet Mondrian Activity 3: Mini Masterpiece: Pablo Picasso Activity 4: Papier-Mâché Plates Activity 5: Wild Things Activity 6: City Silhouettes Activity 7: Memory Paintings

6-8 9-11 12-14 15-17 18-20 21-22 23-24

SECTION TWO: MIDDLE PRIMARY ART ACTIVITIES Activity 8: The Four Seasons Your Art Room Activity 9: Line Making Activity 10: Charcoal Eyes Activity 11: Inspired by Joan Miró Activity 12: Chinese New Year Pendants Activity 13: Tree Silhouettes and Leaf Prints Tree Template

25-27 28-29 30-31 32-33 34-36 37-39 40-41 42

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Contents

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SECTION THREE: SENIOR PRIMARY ART ACTIVITIES Activity 14: Pop Art Activity 15: Surreal Fish Bowls Fish Bowl Template Activity 16: Good and Evil Mask Mask Template Activity 17: Hokusai Wave Paintings Pop Art - Australian Cultural Icons Basic Art Room Materials

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Teachers’ Notes

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As a practising Primary School Art Specialist, I know how hard is can be to regularly plan and create effective, and hopefully inspiring art projects for multiple year levels. Not only do your projects need to engage students, but they also need to teach them about the various elements of art, expose them to different artists and art vocabulary, and provide them with opportunities to be assessed. All of the projects included in this book have been created with this in mind. The projects are labelled either Junior, Middle or Senior. This is a guide only as many of the lessons can be easily modified to suit either older or younger age groups.

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Lessons are linked to the broad focus areas of: Art Ideas, Art Skills and Art Responses. These broad learning areas mean that projects can be easily linked to most art curriculums. I have tested each project in my own classroom and have made adjustments as I have taught each one to ensure that all of the projects are as user-friendly as possible. However, they by no means cover everything and should be used within a wider teaching program. It’s important to also have unstructured lessons where the focus is on the process rather than the end product and where students are simply encouraged to experiment.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Throughout the book, I refer to A4, A3 and A2 paper sizes. A4 paper is equivalent to 210 × 297 millimetres, A3 to 297 x 420 millimetres and A2 to 420 x 594 millimetres.

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General Tips  Mounting Artwork: A4 and A3 paper sizes are mentioned throughout the book in the following activities: 1-3, 5-7, 10-11 and 17. If you would like to mount the students’ artwork completed in these activities, it is best, before you start the activity, to slightly reduce the size of the A4 or A3 drawing paper on which the children will create their artwork. This will make mounting the artwork much easier. The art piece can be centred onto A4 black paper or coloured card which will leave a border around the artwork.  Reducing A4 or A3 Paper: Use a Stanley knife to trim approximately one to two centimetres off one short edge and one long edge. It is possible to trim five or six sheets of paper at once.  Design Sheets: Glue design sheets to the back of mounted artwork. This makes it much easier to keep each student’s work together (especially if you are using it as an assessment piece).  Check that all students have put their name on the back of their work.

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Teachers’ Notes Some tips for setting up your own art room Organisation is key to having a functional art room. Create a system for storing all art materials so that you always know what you have and where to find things. Make the items that you use regularly easily accessible and clearly label anything that is going to be stored away for a length of time.

Find a balance between keeping useful bits and pieces, and hoarding! In most art rooms, space is precious, so only keep things that you are going to use.

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Make resources that you can keep and re-use. This is particularly important for beginning teachers or for teachers who haven’t taught art before. Posters and general art displays should be laminated so that they can be wiped down. I found that making a display sheet for each project made displays more effective and much easier and they could also be reused if you repeated the project later on.

Stretch your resources. You can find art materials in all sorts of places. Find organisations or businesses in your community that might be able to provide recycled items – these often create projects that are the most interesting.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Photograph and archive! I try to take photographs of each project, but especially the ones that have multiple steps. Photographing artwork not only reminds you how a particular project developed, but is also a good way to share the process with other teachers and future students who may work on similar projects. Publish the photographs in the school newsletter or on the school web site.

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Don’t forget to develop your own knowledge by talking to other art teachers. Find good web sites and blogs to give you inspiration for new projects.

Enjoy what you do! This is probably the most important part of being an art teacher. Students will respond to your own attitude towards art. If you are enthusiastic and always willing to ‘have a go’, then they will too.

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See pages 28-29 for more general tips on how to set up a functional art room and see page 55 for a list of basic art room materials. I would like to thank the staff and parents of Highgate Primary School for their support in the production of this book. Most importantly, I would like to thank all of my students who inspire me daily.

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Activity 1

Mini Masterpiece: Wassily Kandinsky Focus: Art Ideas/Art Responses

Age Group: JUNIOR

Time: 3 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Design Sheet (page 8)  Colour examples of Wassily Kandinsky’s paintings

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 Coloured pencils

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 8 for each student. Step 2: Show students the following examples of Kandinsky’s work: On White II (1923), Composition VIII (1923) and Composition VII (1913) and display them in the classroom. Step 3: Discuss the types of colours, lines and shapes that are used in the paintings (e.g. circles, straight lines). Encourage students to think about how the paintings make them feel and why they do or don’t like them. Step 4: Ask students to complete the Design Sheet on page 8.  Tip: To help younger students complete task 1 of the Design Sheet, write up a list of the words on the board to help them, e.g. colourful, energetic, geometric. To help students complete task 3 of the Design Sheet, show them the Students’ Art Gallery on page 7.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr vi ew ur posesonl y• e Lesson 2 p  Materials

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 A4* drawing paper * see page 4  Pencil

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 Oil pastels or wax crayons

 Materials  Mini Masterpiece from Lesson 2  Oil pastels or wax crayons  Black wax crayon  Black card 6

Step 1: Tell students that they will begin their Mini Masterpiece based on Wassily Kandinsky’s work. Step 2: Students should use their plans on their Design Sheets to sketch their design onto an A4* piece of paper in pencil. They should then use oil pastels or wax crayons to colour their Mini Master designs.  Tip: Remind students to refer back to Kandinsky’s original paintings while they are working.

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 Completed Design Sheet from Lesson 1

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Step 1: During the first half of this lesson, give students time to complete the colouring of their designs started in Lesson 2. Step 2: Encourage students to use a black wax crayon to outline the main shapes and lines of their designs in the final stages. Step 3: Once students have completed their artwork, they should mount their pieces onto black card or paper and add their name. See tip for Mounting Artwork on page 4.


Mini Masterpiece: Wassily Kandinsky

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Tom – Year 3- Highgate Primary School

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 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

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Use the box below to write down as many words as you can that describe the paintings of Wassily Kandinsky. Think about the different colours, shapes and lines that he has used.

Look at the picture below. Use the empty box to write down the names of all the shapes that you can see.

Composition VII (1913)

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© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Draw a picture to show what your Kandinsky style artwork will look like.

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Activity 2

Mini Masterpiece: Piet Mondrian

Age Group: JUNIOR

Focus: Art Ideas/Art Responses

 Materials

 Lesson 1

 Design Sheet (page 11)  Colour examples of Piet Mondrian’s paintings  Pencil  Ruler

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 11 for each student. Step 2: Show students Composition II in Red, Blue and Yellow (1930) and Composition 10 (1932-42) by Mondrian and display in the classroom. Step 3: Discuss the types of colours, lines and shapes that are used in the paintings (e.g. primary colours of red, blue and yellow and thick, black straight lines). Step 4: Ask students to complete the Design Sheet on page 11. To help them complete task 3 of the Design Sheet, show them the Students’ Art Gallery at the bottom of page 10.

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 Coloured pencils

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Time: 3 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 2 © Read y E dPthat ub l i ca t i o n sMasterpiece Step 1: Tell students they will begin their Mini  Completed Design based on Piet Mondrian’s work. Sheets from Lesson 1e • f o rr v i ew pur posesonl y• Step 2: Students should use the plans on their Design Sheets  A4* Drawing paper *see page 4  Pencil

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 Ruler

 Oil pastels or wax crayons

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 Materials  Mini Masterpiece from Lesson 2

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 Oil pastels or wax crayons  Pre-cut strips of black paper  Glue stick

to rule up their artwork in pencil onto A4* drawing paper (see example 1 on page 10). Step 3: Students should then use oil pastels or wax crayons to colour selected areas of their design (see example 2 on page 10).  Tip: Remind students to refer back to Mondrian’s original paintings while they are working.

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Step 1: During the first half of this lesson, give students time to complete the colouring of their designs started in Lesson 2. Step 2: Students should glue strips of black paper over the top of their pencil lines (see examples 3 and 4 on page 10). Step 3: Once students have completed their artwork, they should mount their pieces onto black card or paper and add their name. See tip for Mounting Artwork on page 4.

 Black card

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Mini Masterpiece: Piet Mondrian

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 How to Create a Mini Masterpiece: Piet Mondrian

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 Tip: This activity is particularly suited to Year 1 students as there is no writing involved on the Design Sheet.

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 Student Design Sheet

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Name:

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Circle the type of lines and shapes that Mondrian uses in his paintings.

Look at the picture in the first box. Use the empty box to try and copy the picture.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Composition 10 (1932-42)

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Activity 3

Mini Masterpiece: Pablo Picasso Focus: Art Ideas/Art Responses

Age Group: JUNIOR

Time: 3 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1  Materials  Design Sheet (page 14)  Colour example of Pablo Picasso’s paintings

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 Pencil

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 14 for each student. Step 2: Show students Weeping Woman (1937) and Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907) by Pablo Picasso and display. Discuss how Picasso has shown different angles of the face in his paintings. Step 3: Encourage students to find different parts of the face. Explain that they will be drawing a front view and a side view of a face then combining the two views together on the Design Sheet.  Tip: It is advisable to demonstrate to the class what constitutes a ‘front view’ and a ‘side view’ of a face. Show the students the Students’ Art Gallery on page 13 to help them visualise this idea. Step 4: Ask students to complete the Design Sheet on page 14.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons e Lesson 2 p •f orr vi ew ur posesonl y•  Materials

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 Oil pastels or wax crayons  Materials  Mini Masterpiece from Lesson 2  Oil pastels or wax crayons  A4 black paper or card  Glue stick

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Step 1: Tell students that they will begin their Mini Masterpiece based on Pablo Picasso’s work. Step 2: Students should use the plans on their Design Sheets to sketch their design onto A4* drawing paper in pencil. They should then use oil pastels or wax crayons to colour their designs.  Tip: Remind students to refer back to Picasso’s original paintings while they are working.

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 Completed Design Sheet from Lesson 1

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Step 1: During the first half of this lesson, allow students time to complete the colouring of their designs started in Lesson 2. Step 2: Once students have completed their artwork, they should mount their pieces onto black card or paper and add their name. See tip for mounting artwork on page 4.


Mini Masterpiece: Pablo Picasso

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Side View

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 How to Create a Mini Masterpiece: Pablo Picasso

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Combine Front and Side View

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Lily May – Year 2 Highgate Primary School

Harriet – Year 1Highgate Primary School

Jordanne – Year 2Highgate Primary School 13


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

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Mini Masterpiece: Pablo Picasso 1

Look at this portrait by Pablo Picasso. Parts of the face I can see … ____________________

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Taken from Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907)

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Draw a picture that merges your two faces together. You should end up with a very strange looking person!

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Activity 4

Papier-Mâché Plates

Age Group: JUNIOR

 Plastic plate  Vegetable oil

Step 1: Tell students that over the course of two lessons, they will create a basic plate mold by pasting at least four to five layers of newspaper strips onto a plastic plate. Show them example 1 on page 16. Step 2: Demonstrate how to spread vegetable oil over the inside of the plastic plate (this is so that you can later remove the papiermâché mould without it sticking to the plate). Step 3: Show students how to take pre-cut strips of newspaper and dip them into a container of diluted PVA glue and layer them onto the inside of a plastic plate. Ensure that the newspaper strips are sufficiently covered in glue and that they lie flat against the plate, but not so much that they leave a pool of glue. Step 4: Once students have seen the process, they can begin to cover the insides of their plates with oil, including the outer rim, and cover their plates with four to five layers of newspaper.

 Diluted PVA glue (half water/half PVA glue)

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 Newspaper (pre-cut strips)

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Time: 5 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials

 Container for glue mix

Focus: Art Skills/Art Ideas

 Lesson 2 © Rea d E dP u l i cat i otheir ns Step 1:y Give students time tob completely cover papier-mâché plates with newspaper. (Depending on the age of your class and •f orr e vi ew plesson ur p os eneed so nl y •session.) how long their art is, they may a whole second

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 Materials

 Design Sheet (page 17)

 Papier-mâché plate  Acrylic paint  Paint brushes  Pencil  Coloured pencils

Step 2: Once the papier-mâché process is complete the plates will need to be left to dry for a few days. Ideally they should be removed from the plastic plates after a day or two then turned upside down so that the bottom of the papier-mâché can also dry out.

 Lesson 3

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 Materials  Papier-mâché plate  Newspaper (pre-cut strips)  Diluted PVA glue  Container for glue mix

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Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 17 for each student. Step 2: Provide a number of different colours of acrylic paint for the students to choose from. Step 3: Each student needs to paint the inside and rim of their plate with one solid colour , it may need more than one coat of paint to achieve this. Show them example 2 on page 16. Step 4: Once the students have completed their paintings and are waiting for them to dry, they can work on their plate designs on their Design Sheets. If you are working with older students, encourage them to create a fairly intricate design, however they should avoid using fine detail that they will struggle to reproduce on their actual plates. Show them the Students’ Art Gallery on page 16. Allow them approximately 15 – 20 minutes to complete their Design Sheets. 15


Papier-Mâché Plates  Lesson 4

 Materials

Step 1: Using their completed Design Sheets from Lesson 3, students should begin painting their designs onto their plates. Encourage older students to use a number of colours and to try blending two or more colours together. Each student should also paint the inside and rim of the plate.

 Papier-mâché plate  Acrylic paints  Paint brushes

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 Materials

 Papier-mâché plate  Acrylic paints

 How to Create Papier-Mâché Plates

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 Paint brushes

Step 1: Each student should paint the outside and bottom of the plate using the same background colour as the inside of the plate. Optional: To varnish the inside of the plate, paint on an even more diluted mix of PVA and water (75% water and 25% PVA glue).

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 Tip 1: Organisation is the key to this project running smoothly. Make sure that you pre-cut LOTS of newspaper and have a large air tight container of pre-mixed glue.  Tip 2: If possible, have lots of adult helpers! This is quite a messy project and students will need assistance with the pre-cutting of newspaper strips, the refilling of glue containers and end of session clean up.  Tip 3: I have found that extra large plastic plates make quite good glue mix containers. They are reusable and allow students to lay their newspaper strips down flat into the glue.

Nuay Yee Win – Year 2 - Highgate Primary School


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Papier-Mâché Plates Design the inside and rim of your plate.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Design the outside of your plate.

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Activity 5

Wild Things Focus: Arts Ideas/Art Skills

Age Group: JUNIOR

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Design Sheet (page 20)  Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

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 Pencil

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 20 for each student. Step 2: Discuss the features of different animals, such as an eagle’s wings, a rhino’s horn and a duck’s webbed feet. Look at the book, Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak and see how the ‘wild things’ are made up of different animal features merged together. Explain to the students that they are going to be creating their own ‘wild thing’. Step 3: Brainstorm a list of animals as a class – make sure that you include creatures with very distinctive or unusual features (e.g. webbed feet, spines, trunks, scales etc.). Step 4: Ask students to complete their Design Sheets and plan a design for their own ‘wild thing’ combining different animal features. It is best if they stick to around three to five different body parts.  Tip: If you are working with Year 1 or 2 students, make sure that they are able to see the animal names on the board to help them with spelling.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•  Lesson 2

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 Completed Design Sheet from Lesson 1

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 Edicol dye in several colours (e.g. red, blue, yellow, green and purple)  Paint brushes  Water container  A5 thin card (cereal boxes are ideal)  Pencil 18

Step 1: To begin their art pieces, students should firstly create the background on a piece of A4* paper. Explain to the students that they will be painting their background with edicol dye (or tempura paints) and it will be made up of colours only and no pictures. Step 2: When they are choosing what colours to use for their background, they should consider where their creature lives: in a dark cave, a nest in a tree, in a rainforest or a desert? Step 3: When students have finished painting their backgrounds and are waiting for them to dry, they can begin to create their ‘wild things’. Referring back to their Design Sheets, they need to sketch their creatures onto some thin card with a pencil. The card should be no bigger than A5 so that the finished creature will easily fit onto the background.  Tip: Remind students not to have a lot of small detail that will be difficult to paint. Students will be painting their creature in Lesson 3.

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Wild Things  Materials  ‘Wild thing’ pencil sketch  Acrylic paint various colours  Paint brushes  Water container  Materials

 Permanent marker  Scissors

 Hot glue or PVA

Step 1: Using a permanent marker, each student should outline his/her ‘wild thing’ and then carefully cut it out. Step 2: Once it has been cut out, you will need to use hot glue or PVA to glue the students’ creatures onto their painted backgrounds. See Students’ Art Gallery below.  Tip: This is a great opportunity to ask for parent/adult helpers!  Optional: The finished artwork can be mounted onto black or coloured card. See tip for Mounting Artwork on page 4.

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Step 1: Students should paint their ‘wild thing’ with acrylics.  Tip: Remind students that this is a creature from their imagination so they can use whatever colours are available.

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 Painted ‘wild thing’  Painted background

 Lesson 3

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Students’ Art Gallery © Ready EdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

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Luka – Year 3- Highgate Primary School

Isaac – Year 3- Highgate Primary School

Rewina – Year 3- Highgate Primary School

Waiira – Year 3- Highgate Primary School 19


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Wild Things Use the box below to write down the names of the different animals that you will use to create your ‘wild thing’.

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Your Design

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Draw a picture to show what your ‘wild thing’ will look like.

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Name Your Wild Thing

Make up a name for your ‘wild thing’ using the names of the animals that you have used.


Activity 6

City Silhouettes

Age Group: JUNIOR

 A3* drawing paper *see page 4  Chalk pastels

Step 1: Show students examples of sunsets and talk about the different colours that they can see. If they have not previously used chalk pastels, then it is a good idea to demonstrate to the class how you can use your finger or a tissue to blend pastels together. Step 2: Students should begin their pieces by creating the background for their city silhouette. Using an A3* piece of drawing paper, the students need to first draw a horizon line approximately halfway up their page. From there, they need to draw their sun and its reflections, and colour the entire page with chalk pastels (see example 1 on page 22).  Tip: This can be very messy. It is a good idea to have wet cloths/ wipes ready to wipe down tables, and a bucket or sink of soapy water for students to wash their hands when they are finished.

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 Tissues

Time: 2 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Example pictures of sunsets

Focus: Art Ideas/Arts Skills

© Rea yE2dPubl i cat i ons d Lesson  Materials Step 1: Show the students examples of pictures of city skylines •f orr e i ewDiscuss puhow r p osecan sbeodiffn l yshapes • and inv silhouette. buildings erent  Example

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 Glue stick

 Background pieces completed in Lesson 1

sizes. Step 2: Using a white or light coloured pencil, students need to draw the outline of their city skyline onto an A3 piece of black paper (see example 2 on page 22).  Tip: Tell the students to start their skyline just under halfway up the side of their black paper and to make sure that their buildings are different sizes and shapes. Step 3: Once students have drawn the outline of their skyline, they need to carefully cut along the line.  Tip: Demonstrate cutting out the skyline to make sure that students don’t cut out each individual building. Step 4: Using a glue stick, each student needs to glue his/her silhouette onto the chalk pastel sunset (see example 3 and Students’ Art Gallery on page 22) . Younger students may need help to make sure that their silhouettes and the sunset pages line up.  Optional: Using the white or light coloured pencil, students can draw the windows of each building.

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pictures of city skylines in silhouette

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City Silhouettes  How to Create City Silhouettes

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In Lesson 1 students create the background using chalk pastels on A3 drawing paper.

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In Lesson 2 students draw the outline of the city skyline onto a piece of A3 black paper, then carefully cut out the skyline.

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3 To complete the city silhouette students glue the skyline onto the chalk pastel background.

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Kendrick – Year 2- Highgate Primary School 22

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Angel – Year 2- Highgate Primary School


Activity 7

Memory Paintings

Age Group: JUNIOR  Materials  A3* drawing paper *see page 4  Pencil

Time: 3 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1 Step 1: Have a class discussion about favourite memories. Ask the students to share some of their favourite memories of events or occasions. This can be anything from a birthday party or playing with friends to reading a book in a favourite spot. Step 2: Ask students to use a pencil to draw a ‘memory bubble’ on an A3* piece of paper. Encourage them to make their shape as large as possible without going over the edges of the paper (see examples on page 24). Step 3: Inside the bubble, the students need to draw a picture of their chosen memory.  Tip: Remind the class not to add any words or make their images too intricate as it will be hard to paint later. Step 4: Once their pencil design is complete, students will need to use a black wax crayon to trace over all of their pencil lines.

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 Black wax crayon

Focus: Art Ideas

a Lesson 2 dP © Re d y E ubl i cat i ons Step 1: Students first paint the inside of their ‘bubble’ with edicol dye  Memory (watercolours or tempura paints could also be used). bubble picture • f o r r e v i e w p u r p o s e s o nl y• Step 2: Once this is finished, they need to choose one colour to paint from Lesson 1

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 Edicol dye (*alternative: tempura paints or watercolours)  Paint brushes

the area outside the bubble and leave paintings to dry flat.  Tip: Have a limited number of colours available to paint with if you are working with a younger age group.

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 Materials

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 Materials  Memory painting

 Black permanent marker  Pencil

Step 1: In order to complete the students’ paintings, there are a number of options (depending on the time that you have available and the age of your students). They can either use a black permanent marker to add a simple pattern into the area outside the bubble or they can work back with a permanent marker to outline any areas that need extra definition and can add a sentence (independently or with assistance) about what their memory is about. The sentence can either be written around the edge of the bubble or on the back of the painting. These paintings also look great when mounted onto black paper or card. See page 4 for Mounting Artwork tip.  Tip: If students are adding a sentence, get them to write it in pencil first, before going over it in permanent marker. 23


Memory Paintings

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Elena – Year 2- Highgate Primary School 24


Activity 8

The Four Seasons Focus: Art Ideas/Art Skills

Age Group: MIDDLE

 Lesson 1

 Materials

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 27 for each student. Step 2: Discuss the change of seasons and how it affects the environment. Ask students to give examples of images and colours associated with each season (e.g. autumn is associated with earthy colours, falling leaves and cooler weather). Step 3: Explain that they will be creating a design for each of the ffour seasons and that they will have a choice of mediums with which to complete each design. w SStep 4: Ask students to complete task 1 on their Design Sheets by describing each of the four seasons. d  Tip: If you are working with a younger year group, then you may need to remind them what adjectives are and provide them with some examples. SStep 5: Students should then complete the four panels on their Design Sheets using pencil.  Tip: Encourage students to concentrate on patterns and shapes rather than images. If they have enough time they can colour their designs using coloured pencils.

 Design Sheet (page 27)  Pencil

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 Coloured pencils

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr e i ew p osesonl y• v Lessons 2u &r 3p  Materials

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 Materials

Step 1: Students should begin their art pieces based on their drawings on their Design Sheets from Lesson 1. Step 2: Students should use their Design Sheets to decorate four precut panels (see tip below) and use a different medium for each panel.  Tip for pre-cut panels: Use two reduced sized pieces of A4 drawing paper for each student. They will need to fold each piece of paper in half lengthways and then cut along the fold line. They should then have four ‘panels’.

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 Design Sheet from Lesson 1  Pre-cut panels – see tip  Pencil  Variety of mediums: oil pastels, chalk pastels, watercolours, crayons, coloured pencils, etc.

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 Four seasons panels  Pencil  Variety of mediums: as above  A3 black card  Glue stick

Step 1: Allow students time to complete the season panels if needed. Step 2: After all panels are complete, students need to glue them onto an A3 piece of black card.  Tip: to ensure that students know how to glue panels on evenly with a gap in between each panel conduct a class demonstration. Lay out all of the panels before gluing them down to ensure that the gaps between each panel are even. 25


The Four Seasons

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Sophie – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

Husna – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

Alex – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

BaLoc – Year 5- Highgate Primary School


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

The Four Seasons 1

Write four adjectives (descriptive words) to describe each of the four seasons. Spring:

_______________________________________________________

Autumn:

_______________________________________________________

Winter:

_______________________________________________________

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Summer:

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_______________________________________________________

Use line, shape and pattern only to create a design for each of the four seasons.

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Summer

Autumn

Winter 27


Your Art Room Ideas for achieving a practical, creative and inspiring art space.

ur The Colo Wheel

Primary Colours

Art r o e t s … everyone Bo r e p o u can do it! k S rt A t tree

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Secondary Colours

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ism c i t S Classroom displays are really an m o R important. It’s amazing what rt students will read when they are A m e s i nc ala © Re dInclude yEartdPub l i c t i o n s daydreaming ina class! a e r m r r Su reference material like colour wheels erfo ism P l a e and elements of art, but also include r • f orr evi ew pur pos e nl y to• tso r o A h things than can inspire. Quotations P Pop from famous artists, a list of the ism n o m i careers in which art plays a part and, lis ss a e r e p R most importantly, the art works Im produced by the rt students themselves. A n ism lia b a u r C t Aus Classroom Displays

. te o t c s i t . e Focus Ar che Student Art r Work o t r s s uper Pablo Picasso

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Your Art Room

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Prepare a set of task cards and separate them into year levels. Make sure that they are designed for students to be able to complete the activity independently, with minimal equipment.

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Organisation

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Task cards for early finishers

Line Making

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Students explore ho w differen can desc ribe t lines experimen an emotion or fe eling and t of a line by with the thickness or o ch to density s an el ging the it is draw pressure chalk past when have used ound then drawn their lin n. Students think about wh Students gr e represen ck ba k ck et at ac ns bl ts (an angr wanderin create a su a city skyline from y line, a g line, a fi ck. ba t er el y ou st lin t e etc). e pa and cu ed onto th

past card and

Project display sheets Each time you complete a project that works well in the classroom, create a simple A4 display sheet and laminate. This creates a great display title that can be hung next to students’ art work and explains the project. Project display sheets can also be reused for classroom or school displays in the future.

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Good organisation will make your life a lot easier! It will also mean that both you and the students will get the most out of each art lesson. Labelling equipment allows you to not only easily find what you need, but it also helps you to know when you need to reorder supplies.

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Classroom numbers Laminating a school set of room numbers can also be part of your reusable display resources.

Celebrate students’ creativity and classroom behaviour by recognising their achievements. You can cut out and laminate coloured paper stars. Each time a child is recognised, you can write his/her name on a star with a whiteboard marker. When all of the stars have been filled, they can be wiped clean and used again. 29


Activity 9

Line Making

Age Group: MIDDLE

Focus: Art Ideas/Art Skills

Time: 1 x 50 minute lesson

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Six to seven pieces of coloured paper per student  Scissors  Black paper  Glue stick

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Step 2: Give each student six to seven pieces of coloured paper. Each piece of paper needs to be slightly bigger than the previous one (see example 1 on page 31).

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 Pencil

Step 1: Introduce this project by drawing three different lines on the board – include a straight line, a spiky line and a curvy line. Ask the students to tell you which line could be described as an ‘angry’ line. Most students will select the spiky line. Discuss how different lines can convey an emotion or feeling. Demonstrate how to vary the thickness or density of a line by changing the pressure with which you draw it.

Step 3: Ask every student to select their largest piece of paper and draw a line near the top of it. Remind them to think about what their line represents (an angry line, a wandering line, a fiery line etc.).

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Step 5: Students should repeat the process with each piece of paper. When each one is glued down it will sit just below the one before it (see example 2 on page 31). Remind students to leave enough room between each line to write a short sentence about what each line represents. See Students’ Art Gallery on page 31.

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Step 4: Students then need to carefully cut along their drawn line. Once they have finished, students need to glue their piece of paper down onto the centre of a piece of black paper that is larger than their largest piece of coloured paper.

 Tip: This project will only run smoothly if all materials are prepared in advance! Make sure that all coloured pieces of paper are pre-cut and sorted into individual student packs. (This can be a great job for an older student who has finished their work!)

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 Tip: If you are working with a younger age group, a simpler option is to get the students to work on one A4 or A3 piece of paper. They can draw each line from one side of their paper to the other, and write a word to describe each line underneath.

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Line Making

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Each piece of coloured paper needs to be slightly bigger than the previous one.

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 How to Create Line Making

Remind students to leave enough room between each line to write a short sentence.

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Tom – Year 3 Highgate Primary School

Isaac– Year 3 Highgate Primary School

Chantal – Year 3 Highgate Primary School

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Activity 10

Charcoal Eyes

Age Group: MIDDLE

Focus: Art Skills

Time: 2-3 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  A4 scrap paper (or photocopy paper)

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 Charcoal pencil

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 A3* drawing paper *See page 4  Pencil

2 Step 1: Demonstrate how to draw an eye 1 by following the six steps right. Step 2: Give each student an A4 piece of scrap paper. Ask them to fold the paper 3 4 in thirds and then in half. They should then unfold the paper to reveal six sections. 6 Step 3: Ask them to number the sections 5 one to six. Step 4: Give them 20 minutes to practise drawing an eye. Make it clear that the demonstrated steps in Step 1 are to be used only as a guideline as every person’s eye is unique! Step 5: Students can begin work on their final eye using an A3* piece of drawing paper. Get students to sketch their eye in pencil first and remind them to take up most of the space on their paper. Step 6: Once they have the main features of the eye in pencil, they need to go over it using a charcoal pencil (charcoal sticks can also work but are a little messier!). At this stage, you want them to just concentrate on outlines only.  Tip: This project can also work really well using a variety of other materials, including: drawing ink, watercolours and water soluble graphite sticks.

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 Paper stumps (tissues, paper towels or fingers will work just as well!)  Black paper

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 Lesson 2-3

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Step 1: Show the students some examples of eye drawings. These can either be the student samples on page 33 or examples that you have sourced yourself. Step 2: Discuss the level of detail in the drawings and how much of it is created by using shading. Step 3: Demonstrate how to use a blending tool, such as a paper stump (or a finger or tissue), to blend the charcoal and create shading. Step 4: Students should then complete their eye drawing and mount it onto black paper ready for display. See tip for Mounting Artwork on page 4.  Note: Depending on the age group of the class, this project will sometimes require a third session in order for students to complete their work.


Charcoal Eyes  How to Draw Eyes

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Sophie – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

Husna – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

Alex – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

BaLoc – Year 5- Highgate Primary School 33


Activity 11

Inspired by Joan Miró

Age Group: MIDDLE

Focus: Art Ideas/Art Skills

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Design Sheet (page 36)  Colour examples of Joan Miró’s paintings  Pencil

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 Coloured pencils

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 36 for each student. Step 2: Show students the following two examples of Joan Miró’s paintings: Daybreak Tagesanbruch (1968) and People and Dog in the Sun (1949). Step 3: Discuss the common characteristics of Miró’s work, e.g. the use of strong black lines, circles and dots, semi-abstract figures and bright colours. Step 4: It may be useful to demonstrate to the class how to create artwork using Miró’s characteristic strong black lines, circles and dots, semiabstract figures and bright colours. Step 5: Students should then complete their Design Sheets by describing Miró’s work then planning their own design in pencil. Step 6: If they have time, they can begin to colour their designs using coloured pencils.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons  Lesson 2  Materials • f o r r evi ew pur posesonl y• Step 1: Students should begin their art piece inspired by Joan Miró  Completed Design

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 Materials  Completed Design Sheet from Lesson 1  Painted background from Lesson 2  Acrylic or tempura paints  Fine paint brushes  Water containers  Pencil 34

by sponge painting a light coloured background onto thick A4 drawing paper or card using three different shades of the same colour.  Tip: Tell students to keep the coloured background very light as bright colours will be used for the rest of the painting. Students should use the lightest shade first and then add small amounts of the darker shades until an interesting texture is created. They should sponge lightly to create a textured effect and use the darkest shade sparingly.  Tip: Students should cover their entire piece of paper with paint.

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Sheet from Lesson 1  A4 card (see tip on page 4)  Pre-mixed paint in three different shades  Paint sponges, kitchen sponges or sponge rollers

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Step 1: Referring to their Design Sheets, students should sketch their design onto their painted background in pencil. Step 2: Students should then add colour to their artwork with acrylic or tempura paints (it is best to use quite fine brushes for this). Remind students to only paint inside the outlines of their designs. Tip: If some areas look pale, encourage students to use more than one layer of paint to create a brighter, more solid colour.


Inspired by Joan Miró  Lesson 4

 Materials

Step 1: For the final stage of the project, students need to use a very fine paintbrush to outline the main elements/figures of their painting in black.  Tip: Remind students to take their time and to ensure that the paint is not too thick.  Optional: Mount finished paintings onto black card (see tip for Mounting Artwork on page 4).

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 Painted background  Black acrylic or tempura paints  Very fine paint brush  Water container  Black card.

Anh – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

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Sophie – Year 5- Highgate Primary School

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 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Inspired by Joan Miró 1

List some adjectives that describe the work of Joan Miró. ______________________________________________________________

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______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

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______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

Design a picture that uses some of the Your ©Design ReadyEdPu l i c at i ons characteristics ofb Miró’s work.

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Activity 12 Age Group: MIDDLE

 Design Sheet (page 39)  Pencil

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 39 for each student. Step 2: Discuss what the students already know about Chinese New Year. Ask the students if they know which Chinese New Year animal represents the year in which they were born. If students do not know, there are numerous calendars available on the internet that they can access.  Tip: Find a printable Chinese New Year calendar that you can display in the classroom, in order to save having to look one up during the lesson. Ideally it should include clear pictures of all of the associated animals. S Step 3: Give each student a piece of air dry clay (approximately the s of a matchbox). size S Step 4: Demonstrate how to roll the clay into a ball and press it d down so it forms an even disc shape (see example 1 on page 38). Remind students to keep an even thickness to the pendant to avoid i developing cracks. it S Step 5: When students have completed Step 4, instruct them to use a pencil to make a hole near the top of the pendant for the string to g through later. go S Step 6: Students should then use a wooden toothpick or skewer to p pinprick their name onto the back of the pendant (see example 2 o page 38). All pendants should then be left to dry . on  Tip: If the clay begins to dry out and crack, get students to dip their fingers in water and smooth over the cracks.  Tip: The pendants will take about a week to dry out completely. During this time they will need to be turned a couple of times to avoid leaving a damp area on one side. Step 7: Students who have enough time can start their Design Sheet. Remind them that they will be painting on a very small scale and not to make their design too complicated. Their design needs to be based on the animal that represents their birth year, but can be representational or abstract.

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 Wooden toothpick or skewer

Focus: Art Ideas/Arts Skills

 Lesson 1

 Materials

 Air dry clay

Chinese New Year Pendants

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Step 1: When dry, each student should undercoat the top and sides of their clay pendant with one colour to provide a solid and even background. The back of the pendant will be painted in Lesson 4. Remind students to paint carefully and not to leave any clay showing on the top or sides of their pendant. Step 2: Once the pendants have been painted and left to dry, students can work on finishing their Design Sheet and colouring their design. 37


Chinese New Year Pendants  Lesson 3

 Materials

Step 1: Students should use fine paint brushes to paint their design (from their Design Sheet) on to the pendant.

 Clay pendant  Acrylic paint  Water container  Fine paint brushes

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 Materials

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 Clay pendant  Black fineliner (fine permanent marker)  Acrylic paint  Water container  Fine paint brushes  String (or leather)

Step 1: Using a black fineliner, students should trace around the main elements of their painted design (this may not be necessary if the design is quite abstract), and add their birth year (see Students’ Art Gallery). Step 2: While the fineliner is drying, students can add their string (or leather) and finally paint the back of their pendant.

 Create a clay base for a pendant

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Students should roll the clay into a ball and press it down so it forms an even disc shape.

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Students should then use a wooden toothpick or skewer to pinprick their name onto the back of the pendant.

o c . che e r o t r s super Students’ Art Gallery

Freya – Year 5 Highgate Primary School

Phoebe – Year 5 Highgate Primary School


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Chinese New Year Pendant 1

Write down the name of your Chinese New Year animal.

2

Write down four different characteristics of your animal.

_______________________________________________________________

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_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

Your Design

Create a design for your pendant that incorporates your Chinese New Year animal.

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Activity 13

Tree Silhouettes and Leaf Prints

Age Group: MIDDLE

Focus: Art Skills

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Pictures of leaves  A4 scrap paper

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 Cardboard bases (one per student)

 Materials

 Leaf sponge  Acrylic paint  Paint brushes  A3 paper  White (or light) coloured pencil  A3 black paper  Scissors  Glue stick

 Lesson 2

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 Kitchen sponges (half a sponge per student)  Hot glue or PVA glue

Step 1: Discuss the change of seasons and how it affects trees and the colour of their leaves. Look at pictures of different leaves and get students to practise drawing the outlines of different shaped leaves. Step 2: Instruct students to draw the outline of a leaf shape on a kitchen sponge and cut it out. Step 3: Students should then use hot glue or PVA glue to paste it onto a thick cardboard base.  Cardboard base: the base should be approximately the size of the student’s hand.  SAFETY NOTE: Ensure that students are adequately assisted if you are using hot glue.

Step 1: Students should use their sponge leaf to make prints by using a brush to paint on two or more different colours (see example 1 on page 41) and printing onto a sheet of A3 paper (see example 2 on page 41). Step 2: While the leaf prints are drying, the students should use a white coloured pencil to draw the outline of a tree onto black paper (see example 3 on page 41). For younger students you could photocopy the Tree Template on page 42 onto overhead film and project it onto the wall so that the students can trace it onto their black paper. Step 3: Students should then cut out their tree outline and glue it onto a light coloured background (see example 4 on page 41).

 Lesson 3

 Leaf print  Tree silhouette  Black permanent marker  Scissors  Glue stick

Step 1: Students should outline their leaves on their dry leaf print (from Lesson 2) with a black permanent marker and add veins to their leaves (see example 5 on page 41). Step 2: Instruct students to carefully cut out each leaf. Step 3: Students should then arrange their leaves onto their tree silhouettes and when happy with the arrangement glue down the leaves (see example 6 on page 41).

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 Lesson 4

Step 1: To complete their final piece, students should use a dry leaf and a black wax crayon to make a number of leaf rubbings. Step 2: Instruct students to cut out the leaf rubbings and glue them falling from the tree and at the bottom of the art piece (see example 7 on page 41).


Tree Silhouettes and Leaf Prints  How to Create Tree Silhouettes and Leaf Prints

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Tip: Have a limited number of colours available to print with, and set a maximum of three colours for any one leaf.

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Tip: Allow students to swap their stamps so that they are able to print several different leaf shapes.

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Activity 14 Age Group: SENIOR

 Design Sheet (page 45)

Time: 5-6 x 50 minute lessons

Step 1: Photocopy the Design Sheet on page 45 for each student. Step 2: Discuss Pop Art and its general concept. Explain that pop artists took ordinary, everyday items and made them into art. Step 3: Show students Andy Warhol’s famous Campbell Soup Can painting to illustrate this idea. Also look at some examples of Andy Warhol’s portraits of famous people, including h ’ Marilyn Monroe and Michael Jackson as well as Roy Lichtenstein’s graphic style cartoon images. Step 4: Explain that the students will be creating their own Pop Art style painting using Australian cultural icons. Discuss what an Australian cultural icon could include. This could be anything from a jar of Vegemite, to the Sydney Opera House or even the Wiggles! Step 5: Students should then use what they have learnt in this discussion to independently complete their Pop Art Design Sheet.

 Optional: images of Australian Cultural Icons (see page 54)

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 Colour examples of Andy Warhol’s pop art, e.g. Campbell Soup Can

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Focus: Art Ideas/Arts Skills

 Lesson 1

 Materials

 Pencil

Pop Art

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 Materials  Cardboard (or canvas)  Paint brushes  Water container  Acrylic paint – multiple colours

Step 1: Students should undercoat the surface that they will be painting on with a couple of coats of white paint and then leave to dry.  Tip: The flat panels from cereal boxes are a great way to go if you are on a tight budget, but you could also work on canvases if you have them available. Step 2: Students should then finish all four designs on their Design Sheet and colour them with coloured pencils or textas. After they have completed this, they will need to select which design they will be using for their final pieces.

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 Design Sheet from Lesson 1  Cardboard (or canvas) in chosen size  Paint brushes  Water container  White acrylic paint  Pencil  Coloured pencils or textas

 NOTE: This project can be adapted for use in countries besides Australia.

o c . che e r o t r s super  Lesson 3

Step 1: Students should begin to paint the main areas of their design on to the surface that they prepared in Lesson 2. They will need to refer to their Design Sheet to do this.  Tip: Remind students to use a lot of the primary colours that were often characteristic of many Pop Art paintings. Remind them also that they may need more than one coat of paint and to leave smaller details until later. 43


Pop Art  Lesson 4-5

 Materials  Cardboard (or canvas)  Paint brushes  Water container  Acrylic paint – multiple colours

 Materials

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Step 1: If your students are using cereal box cardboard, you can create a cheap frame by using a second piece of cardboard that is slightly larger than the painting itself. Measure a ‘window ‘ that will frame the edges of the painting and use a craft knife to cut it out. The frame can then be painted black and glued onto the painting using hot glue.  SAFETY NOTE: Provide adequate adult assistance/supervision when using craft knives and/or hot glue.

Students’ Art Gallery

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 Cardboard (or canvas)  Second sheet of cardboard  Paint brushes  Water container  Black acrylic  Hot glue

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Step 1: Students should continue to paint their designs onto their prepared surface. Step 2: They should begin to add smaller details to their designs. Step 3: When they have finished painting the smaller details, they should add any necessary outlines.

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Lulu – Year 6 - Highgate Primary School

Julia – Year 6 - Highgate Primary School

Laura – Year 6 - Highgate Primary School

Marcus – Year 6 - Highgate Primary School


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Pop Art _____________________________

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Your Design

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List eight different cultural icons that are unique to Australia.

Use four of your listed icons to create four separate designs that incorporate the Pop Art style.

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Activity 15

Surreal Fish Bowls Focus: Art Ideas

Age Group: SENIOR

Time: 3-4 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Out of the Blue by Samy Charnine (www. charnine.com/ paintings/page4/ Blue_Surrealism.htm)

 Pencil

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 Fish Bowl Template (page 48)

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 Other examples of surrealist artwork

Step 1: Look at and discuss a number of different surrealist painters and their work (e.g. Salvador Dali, Rene Magritte, Yves Tanguy). Step 2: Discuss how the subject matter of surrealist paintings is often based on the imagination and dreams. Step 3: Look at the painting Out of the Blue by Samy Charnine and discuss how the painter has changed the placement of the images within the painting (e.g. the clouds have been placed inside the fish bowl and the fish are floating outside of it), to create a surreal image. Step 4: Explain to the students that they will need to create their own surrealism inspired artwork using the Samy Charnine painting as inspiration. Step 5: Photocopy the Fish Bowl Template on page 48 for each student, this will be the starting point for their work. How they incorporate the fish bowl can be left up to them, (e.g. the bowl could be upside down, it could be broken or something inside the fish bowl could be growing or climbing out of it).  Note: some students may like to draw their own fish bowl. Step 6: While students plan their design for the inside of the fish bowl remind them about the characteristics of surrealism, (e.g. the combination of two or more ‘ordinary’ images that when put together and out of their familiar context, become ‘surreal’). Encourage students to think of ordinary images that could be placed into the fish bowl to make it surreal (e.g. a lounge room, hot air balloons or a birthday cake!). Step 7: Once students have come up with a design, they can begin sketching it in pencil onto the fish bowl template.

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 Materials  Fish Bowl Template  Various mediums  Black card  Scissors 46

 Lesson 2

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Step 1: Provide a number of different mediums for students to work with, such as: oil pastels, chalk pastels, wax crayons, watercolour pencils, etc. Step 2: Encourage students to combine different mediums and to try new techniques. Step 3: If you are working with older students, they should be able to work with a degree of independence during this project.

 Lesson 3 Step 1: Students should be able to finish their artwork in this session (although some students may need an extra session to complete their work).  Optional: Cut out the fish bowl and mount finished artwork onto black or coloured card (see Students’ Art Gallery on page 47).


Surreal Fish Bowls

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Kane – Year 6

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Students’ Art Gallery

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Alanis – Year 6

Amaru – Year 6

Freya – Year 6

Amy – Year 6 47


 Student Design Sheet

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Name:

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Activity 16 Age Group: SENIOR

Focus: Art Ideas/Arts Skills

Time: 5 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Mask Template (page 51)  Pencil  Coloured pencils  Felt tip markers

Step 1: Photocopy one Mask Template per student (page 51). Step 2: Discuss the types of characters found in classic fairy tales and myths and how there are, generally, very clear distinctions between the ‘good’ characters and the ‘evil’ characters. Step 3: Explain to the students that they will be designing and painting a mask that shows both a ‘good’ and ‘evil’ side. Step 4: Ask the students what types of colours, images and patterns they associate with each side. The ‘good’ side will often be lighter and involve more pastel colours, curvy lines and rounded shapes. The ‘evil’ side however, may be associated with darker colours such as: black, red and yellow, sharp and spiky lines and more geometric patterns. Step 5: Students should use pencil to plan their good and evil designs on the Mask Template. Remind them to include a dividing line down the centre of their mask as part of their design. The dividing line could also be decorative. Students can then use coloured pencils or felt tip markers to colour their designs.

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Good and Evil Mask

 Lesson 2 © Rea d E dwillPneed ub l i ca t i on s Step 1:y Each student a full face cardboard mask. Step 2: Students should draw their central dividing line directly onto their cardboard (see example 2e ons page 50) and paint each side a •f orr e vi ew mask pu r p os o n l y • different colour (see example 3 on page 50). This is only the background colour and they may have to paint several coats to achieve a good solid colour. Step 3: The masks can then be left to dry.

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 Materials  Mask designs from Lesson 1  Pencil  Cardboard masks  Acrylic paintvarious colours  Paint brushes  Water container  Materials

 Lessons 3-4

 Mask design from Lesson 1  Cardboard mask  Acrylic paint various colours  Paint brushes  Water containers

Step 1: Using their Design Sheet to guide them, students should use a pencil to lightly draw the main features directly onto the painted mask (see example 4 on page 50). Step 2: Students can then begin to paint the pencilled areas (see example 5 on page 50). To achieve the best results, use high quality acrylic paints in a variety of colours. Step 3: Students should complete any fine details and outlines and check that they have not left any area of the mask unpainted.

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o c . che e r o t r s super  Lesson 5

Step 1: Students can decorate their painted mask using sequins, glitter and feathers (see example 6 on page 50). Sequins and glitter can be attached using glue sticks or PVA glue. It is more effective to use hot glue if attaching feathers.  SAFETY NOTE: Ensure that students are adequately assisted if you are using hot glue. 49


Good and Evil Mask

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Students design and colour the Mask Template (page 51) in Lesson 1.

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Students draw a dividing line down the centre of their mask. The dividing line can be decorative.

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 How to Create Good and Evil Masks

They may have to paint several coats to achieve a good solid background colour.

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Students should use a pencil to lightly draw the main features of the design onto the mask.

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5 Students paint their design and then add fine detail.

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During the final lesson, students can decorate the painted mask using sequins, glitter and feathers. The mask is then ready for display.


 Student Design Sheet

Room/Class:

Name:

Mask Template Use the template below to design your mask.

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Your Design

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Activity 17

Hokusai Wave Paintings Focus: Art Ideas/Art Skills

Age Group: SENIOR

Time: 4 x 50 minute lessons

 Lesson 1

 Materials  Copy of The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai  Pencil

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 A4* drawing paper (see page 4)

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 Scrap paper for practice drawings

Step 1: Examine and discuss the artwork, The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai. Step 2: Explain that the students will be creating their own version of this image using edicol dye inks and that they will be drawing themselves into the picture (alternatively you could use watercolours, tempura paints, or ink). Step 3: Instruct the students to practise drawing waves in the same style as Hokusai on scrap paper. They should try to imitate the fire-like edges of Hokusai’s waves. Step 4: Once they have developed some confidence drawing their waves, they can sketch the main elements of their image on to an A4* piece of drawing paper (see example 1 on page 53). Remind your students to sketch their images very lightly in pencil. Step 5: Students now need to put themselves into the picture. They could be in the water, on a boat or even climbing the mountain in the background (see example 2 on page 53).

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page 53). Remind them to start with the lighter colours first and gradually build up to darker shades. Step 2: Once this has been done, they can add some very pale blue to the edges of each wave and some diluted black and brown ink into the sky (see example 4 on page 53).  Remind them to only paint sparingly on the tops of the waves so that they remain mainly white. Step 3: Students should use a darker brown ink to colour any boats and to add any shading around the base of the mountain (see example 5 on page 53). Step 4: Paintings can then be left to dry.

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 Lesson 3 Step 1: To complete the wave paintings students should use a fine black marker to add outlines to the waves, mountain and boat and to add additional detail to any figures (see example 6 on page 53) .  OPTIONAL: Mount onto black card (see mounting tip on page 4).


Hokusai Wave Paintings  How to Create Hokusai Wave Paintings

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Students then add themselves into the picture.

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Sketch the outline of the waves very lightly in pencil.

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Very pale blue should be added to the edges of each wave and diluted black and brown ink should be added to the sky. A darker shade can be used around the base of the mountain in the background.

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Shades of brown inks should be used to colour boats.

A fine black marker can be used to add outlines to the waves, mountain and boats, and to add details to any figures.

Airmoson – Year 6, Highgate Primary School

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Pop Art – Australian Cultural Icons

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Basic Art Room Materials Paper

Stationary

• • • • • • •

• HB lead pencils (2B and 4B pencils are also useful) • Black permanent markers • Fine line markers • Rulers • Scissors • Erasers • Sharpeners • Glue sticks • Hole punches • Staplers

A4 drawing paper A3 drawing paper A2 drawing paper A selection of lithograph or butchers paper A4 and A3 black paper A4 and A3 coloured paper Assorted specialty papers (corrugated/ metallic/ tissue /sugar /cellophane/ crepe etc.)

Acrylic paint Watercolour paint and pencils Tempura paint Gouche paint Edicol dye (or food dye) Drawing inks Oil pastels (regular / metallic / water soluble) Chalk pastels Conte crayons Coloured crayons Black wax crayons Charcoal / charcoal blenders (paper stumps) Coloured pencils Textas Clay (variety of types) Printing ink / fabric paint Variety of painting and priming mediums

PVA Glue Stick on eyes Popsticks Matchsticks Cottonwool / cotton buds Wool / yarn / twine Straws Feathers Glitter Sequins / spangles Ribbon Wire Balloons

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Paint and ink brushes (variety) Glue brushes Stencil brushes Clay modelling tools Craft knives Hot glue gun and glue sticks Hard rollers and soft / sponge rollers Palettes (variety of sizes) Water containers (e.g. ice cream containers) Buckets Cutting mats Pins (for displaying artwork)

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Useful Things to Collect • • • • • • • • •

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Tools • • • • • • • • • • • •

Craft Materials

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Art Materials • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Plastic and glass containers (with lids) Old newspapers Fabric remnants Bottle tops Ribbon and string Buttons and beads Shells Dried flowers and leaves Interesting objects for still life drawing

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Optional Tools • Guillotine • A3 Laminator

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Teaching Primary Art  

Written by a practising Primary School Art Specialist, this book provides step-by-step art projects for students in Years 1-7. Buy now: htt...