Page 1

Teac he r

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


Ready-Ed

Acknowledgements i. Clip art images have been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and are used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. ii. Corel Corporation collection, 1600 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8R7. iii. National Library of Australia. iv. Cover image: statue of an ANZAC soldier; part of the Cenotaph in Martin Place, Sydney (NSW, Australia). © istockphotos.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© 2011 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Yolanda Cool Illustrators: Terry Allen, Melinda Brezmen, Alison Mutton

Teac he r

Publications

Title: Australian History Series – Book 2 The Past in the Present

Copyright Notice

The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

The number of copies does not exceed the number reasonably required by the educational institution to satisfy its teaching purposes;

2.

Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

3.

Copies are not sold or lent;

4.

Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘Ready-Ed Publications’.

educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under Act. For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: info@copyright.com.au

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided that

. te

Except as otherwise permitted by this blackline master licence or under the Act (for example, any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address below.

o c . che e r o t r s super Published by: Ready-Ed Publications PO Box 276 Greenwood WA 6024 www.readyed.com.au info@readyed.com.au

ISBN: 978 1 86397 821 7 2

m . u

w ww

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act.

Reproduction and Communication by others


Contents

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teachers' Notes National Curriculum Links

4-5 6

Section 1: Significant People and Places

Teac he r

8 9

10 11 12 13 14

34 35 36 37

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

ew i ev Pr

The History of a Significant Person Teachers' Notes Activity Person of Historical Interest Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Cemetery Crawl Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Defining Local Teachers' Notes Activity Local Places Teachers' Notes Activity A Place of Historical Interest Teachers' Notes Activity Places of Interest in Australia Teachers' Notes Activity

Indigenous Places Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3

Technology and Travel Teachers' Notes Activity Technology and Buildings Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Newspapers Teachers' Notes Activity Written Documents Teachers' Notes Activity Photographs Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Then and Now Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5 Activity 6 Activity 7

39 40 41 42 43

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 4445 •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 46 20 21 22 23 24 25

o c . che e r o t r s super 26 27

Section 2: Sites of Significance Historical Sites Teachers' Notes Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4

29 30 31 32 33

47

m . u

w ww

. te

15 16 17 18 19

Word Bank Word Game Cards Create a Local History Box Memory Game

48 49 50

51-52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

3


Teachers’ Notes This book has been specifically written for students in Year 2 studying History and living in Australia. The book has been divided into three clear sections.

Teac he r

Excursions are a great way to study the history of your local area. There are a number of appropriate excursions suggested in this book. Here are some things to keep in mind when organising an excursion:

• Before planning an excursion visit the venue yourself a few weeks before you take your class. This is important as it gives you the opportunity to become familiar with the layout by locating restrooms and meeting spaces. It is important to know which exhibitions are in which galleries and ask for floor plans and background information to study. Remember to pick up copies of floor plans for your students or reproduce and distribute your own copies.

ew i ev Pr

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Significant People and Places • Sites of Significance • Changing Technology and People's Lives Excursions

• If parents or volunteers will be helping on your visit, prepare them ahead of time. Let them know which parts of the venue you plan to use and familiarise them with the steps in the lesson and kinds of questions that might be asked by students. Make sure that they understand the purpose of the visit and the activities that you have planned. Before the trip, go over the floor plan with them so they'll be somewhat familiar with how the venue is set out. • Discuss the venue in class before you go. If students are familiar with the process ahead of time, they will be able to concentrate better on the objects and exhibitions. Once you’re at the venue, you may want to review its layout and features with your class.

© ReadyEdP ub l i c at i oResources ns Assessing Your Community's Some of the activities in this book require •f orr evi ew pu r p o s e s o n l y• students to examine objects from the past and

4

m . u

w ww

. te

• Talk with the venue's education or public programs officers well before your trip. Tell them about your learning focus and ask if visitors are allowed to carry backpacks, bring pens or pencils into the galleries, or sit on the floor while they write. The museum staff can help by notifying guards about the students' visit, and you may even want to book a tour to assist students’ learning. Staff can also make sure that the exhibition you wish to visit will be open when you bring your class. If you are able to go behind the scenes to see how objects are collected or displayed, even better.

present. Here are some ideas about accessing interesting objects and making the most of resources in your community:

• Take a close look around your community for places which celebrate and preserve your local community’s heritage. Nearby historical societies, local museums, historic houses, surf lifesaving clubs, cemeteries, sports pavilions, war monuments, and libraries are full of primary sources that can help reinforce your history program. All of these places preserve the past for the future by protecting the past.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Encourage students to collect their own memorabilia from the family and local community.


Teachers’ Notes 3. Local museums (hold articles, documents, photographs and objects). 4. Art galleries (display art and crafts from a particular era). 5. Local churches (have records dating from the earliest years of settlement). 6. Churchyards and cemeteries (have interesting historical evidence). 7. Local schools (keep records of attendance and reports). 8. Local businesses (some keep records of their products).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Work with Other Teachers

Inside the Home

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

• Not every community has a large museum with extensive collections, but almost all communities have valuable resources that can inspire your students to write and tell their stories. If your budget does not allow for excursions, you can bring objects into the classroom or have students bring them in. You may also arrange to have another important community "resource" come into the classroom. Many hobbyists and collectors are happy to share their knowledge with young people. Think about whether someone in the community collects stamps or does dramatizations. Such people can often stimulate students.

9. It is surprising how many treasures we can find at home. Some of these include: postcards, old maps, dockets and receipts, old photographs and sketches, old newspapers, old directories, guidebooks, party invitations, letters and diaries, books and magazines, show programs, menus, and performance programs.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Involve Your Students

w ww

• Your students can participate in the organising and planning of activities. In this way they can let you know what they would like to learn about their local community.

o c Your students need to become little historians . c e h and find primary sources to complete many of r e o t r s the activities in this book. To find the sources s r u e p they need, they could consider looking:

Sources •

. te

Many of the Teachers' Notes include a list of useful words. You may like to make cards of these words to put up around the classroom or have a list on the board for the class to refer to when they're doing their writing.

m . u

• To develop activities using community resources requires effort and time, so consider collaborating with another teacher. This way you can share the workload, as well as sharing information about community resources.

Outside the Home 1. Libraries (hold books, records, letters and newspapers, which can be copied and studied). 2. Local council offices (store records, plans and maps). 5


National Curriculum Links Historical Knowledge and Understanding ACHHK044 – The history of a significant person, building, site or part of the natural environment in the local community and what it reveals about the past.

ACHHS047 & ACHHS048 – Chronology, terms and concepts.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ACHHK046 – The impact of changing technology on people’s lives (at home and in the ways they worked, traveled, communicated, and played in the past).

ACHHS049 – Historical questions and research. ACHHS050 & ACHHS051 – Analysis and use of sources. ACHHS052 – Perspectives and interpretations.

ew i ev Pr

ACHHK045 – The importance today of an historical site of cultural or spiritual significance, for example, a community building, a landmark, a war memorial.

Teac he r

Historical Skills

ACHHS053 & ACHHS054 – Explanation and communication.

w ww

. te

6

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


Section 1: r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Significant People and Places

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

7


Teachers' Notes The History of a Significant Person Focus: • Exploring people of historical interest in the local community.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Important Words: past, now, change, same, then.

Possible Questions:

• Invite an Elder into the class to tell a story about their life in the local area and the changes that they have witnessed in the area. They could bring in photographs and objects to show the students. Ask the children to illustrate a part of the story and make a book for the library to share with other classes. • If you cannot get an Elder to come into the class, organise an excursion or research other significant people's stories using the internet, newspapers and community information guides.

1. When and where were you born? 2. Did you have brothers and /or sisters? 3. Where did you grow up? 4. Is the house that you grew up in still standing? 5. Did you do any jobs at home or after school? 6. What was the most exciting event in your school days? 7. Did you keep any animals? 8. How did you get to school? 9. How was food stored? 10. Where did your milk, bread and groceries come from? 11. Did you have water and electricity? 12. What has changed in the area? 13. Where did you go for your holidays? 14. Did your family have a car? 15. Did your family have a radio or TV? 16. What work did your parents do? 17. What did you like at school? 18. Can you remember any local celebrations? 19. Did you have a collection?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Teaching Notes:

w ww

• When arranging to have speakers or demonstrators come into the classroom, keep in mind that they need a clear idea of what you would like them to do and how long you would like the talk/ demonstration to last. Importantly let your guests know how their presentation fits into the class's lesson. This will help them design their program to suit your needs. Get the class to make a list of questions that they can refer to. If you would like to know more about everyday life, opposite is list of possible questions to ask. (While the class is interviewing the person, they may think of other questions.)

. te

8

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Ask students to thank any guests for coming in to do their presentation.

Section 1: Significant People and Places


The History of a Significant Person

Activity

Indigenous Elders are significant because they are part of a long cultural tradition. Their stories are often passed on through drawings.

 Illustrate an Elder’s story about the local area.

2

4 © ReadyEdPu bl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww 5

. te

m . u

3

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1

o c . 6 che e r o t r s super

Section 1: Significant People and Places

9


Teachers' Notes

Person of Historical Interest

Focus: • Exploring a person of historical interest in the local area.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Important Words: past, now, change, same, then.

Teaching Notes – Sheet 2:

Ask your students to research a person of historical interest from the local community. This could be someone from their family.

Ask the students to prepare their research questions (what they want to find out about their chosen person) on the activity sheet. They can use a variety of sources (internet, newspapers, community information guides and local knowledge) to answer their research questions. They can record the information that they have gathered on the back of their sheet or in their exercise books.

• Using the information that they have gathered, students can create a timeline for their chosen person of significance. They can decide on their own significant events.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Teaching Notes – Sheet 1:

Teaching Notes – Sheet 3:

• Using the information that they have gathered, students can create a family tree for their chosen person of significance.

w ww

. te

10

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Activity

Person of Historical Interest 1

Researching people of historical interest can tell us a lot about the past.

 My seven research questions are:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u Question 2:_S _____________________________________ Question 1:_ _____________________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

________________________________________________

________________________________________________ Question 3:_ _____________________________________

________________________________________________ Question 4:_ _____________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

________________________________________________ Question 5:_ _____________________________________

w ww

m . u

________________________________________________ Question 6:_ _____________________________________

. te_ _____________________________________ o Question 7: c . c e her r ________________________________________________ o t s super ________________________________________________

 Why I consider him/her of historical interest: ___________________

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________ Section 1: Significant People and Places

11


Person of Historical Interest 2

Activity

Timelines help us understand a person’s past.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok When I u was  ______________________________________ S _ ________________________________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Chosen Person:____________________

When I was ______________________________________

_ ________________________________________________ When I was ____________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f o r e vi ew pur posesonl y• When Ir was  _ ___________________________________ ________________________________________________

_______________________________________________

w ww

m . u

When I was _ __________________________________

______________________________________________

. te

o c . ______________________________________________ che e r o t r s super When I was _ __________________________________ When I was _ __________________________________

_______________________________________________

12

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Activity

Person of Historical Interest 3 Family trees help us to understand a person’s past.

 Complete the family tree of your chosen person of interest.

r o e t s Bo r e Date of birth:_______________________ p ok u Place S of birth:_______________________ Parents

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Chosen person:___________________

Father:________________

Mother:________________

Date of birth:____________

Date of birth:____________

Place of birth:____________

Place of birth:____________

Grandfather:____________

Grandfather:____________

Date of birth:____________

Date of birth:____________

Place of birth:____________

Place of birth:____________

w ww

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Grandparents

. te __________ Grandmother:_ __________ o Grandmother:_ c . che e Date of birth:____________ Date of birth:____________ r o t r s su e r Place of birth:____________ p Place of birth:____________

Section 1: Significant People and Places

13


Person of Historical Interest 4

Activity

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Create a word search for your friend to solve, using words which describe your chosen person of interest.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . 1. ________________________ che 6. ________________________ e r o t r s sup r 2. ________________________ 7. e ________________________

14

Words in my search

3. ________________________

8. ________________________

4. ________________________

9. ________________________

5. ________________________

10. ________________________

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Cemetery Crawl

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Exploring people of the past in the local community. • Exploring events of the past in the local community.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Interesting Words: occupation, commemorative, inscription, life, headstone, tombstone, mason, Christian name, surname, church, belief, buried, death, grave, symbols, cause. Teaching Notes:

ew i ev Pr

his/her birth and death, his/her age when died, inscription which praises the person who has died or tells some information about him/her, the person’s occupation, a commemorative verse, manner of death, names of family and /or relatives and symbolic drawings.

Organise an excursion to the local cemetery.

Before the visit discuss how people buried in the local cemetery have more than likely lived in the local community. Cemeteries can tell us a lot therefore, about people Teaching Notes - Sheet 2: who have lived in the local community in the past. • The students could further research the oldest person buried. Students could be Cemeteries can also tell us about events encouraged to link causes of death to past of the past in the local community. They events in the local community (epidemics, can tell us if there was a plague or natural wars, etc.). A large number of child disaster in a particular year or if people deaths could indicate unhygienic living died because of a historic event which conditions in early settlements. Students affected the local area. could also link nationality to patterns of Many cemeteries will provide tours immigration in the local community. for students, brochures and other information. Teaching Notes - Sheet 3:

w ww

. te

o c . che e r o t r sNotes - Sheet 4: supe r Teaching

Teaching Notes - Sheet 1: •

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Ask the students to take rubbings of four headstones at the local cemetery. Ask them to find headstones which include some interesting information. Students can practice taking rubbings of things in the school grounds first, using bricks and signs. You could enlarge the activity sheet to A3 size.

You could tell students about the prominent people in the cemetery, or this information may be obvious. They can research these people further.

When back in class, give out the fourth activity sheet. Collate and display the rubbings and discuss and record findings.

When back in class discuss the information that can be found on headstones: full name of the person buried, the date of

Section 1: Significant People and Places

15


Cemetery Crawl 1

Activity

Cemeteries are like books. They can tell us about people who lived in the past.

 Take four rubbings of interesting headstones. Second Rubbing

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

First Rubbing

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

16

Fourth Rubbing

m . u

Third Rubbing

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Activity

Cemetery Crawl 2

Cemeteries can reveal problems of pioneering, the sadness of family losses, the deaths of young children and local legends and the details of murders and drownings.

 Find the oldest grave.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok Cause:_ ________________________________________ u S Other information:________________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Name:_____________________ Died:________________

What does it tell us about settlement in the local area?

______________________________________________ What else does it tell us about the past?

______________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons  Find• the grave of youngest person buried. f o rr ethe vi e w pu r po sesonl y• Name:

Year of death:

w ww

m . u

Age:

 List three causes of death that you can see in one of the periods: 1800s-1850s, 1850s-1900s or 1900s-1950s.

. te

o c •_ ______________________________________________________ . che e r o t r •_ ______________________________________________________ s super •_ ______________________________________________________

 List some of the different nationalities of people buried in the graves.

 Draw some of the symbols used on the graves on the back of this sheet. Section 1: Significant People and Places

17


Cemetery Crawl 3

Activity

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Name three prominent people’s graves.

 Draw one of the above people's headstones in detail.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

 What does the inscription tells you about him/her?

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

18

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Activity

Cemetery Crawl 4 Cemeteries are full of mysteries and puzzles. Solve them to reconstruct the past.

 Use the information that you have collected to complete the table. 1850s-1900s 1900s-1950s r o e t s Bo r e p ok Most common u surname(s)S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

1800s-1850s

Most common Christian name(s)

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

Most common nationality

m . u

Common causes of death

o c . che e r o t r s super

Prominent people

Section 1: Significant People and Places

19


Defining Local

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Understanding the term local and recognising how local areas can be defined in many ways.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teaching Notes:

• Hand out the activity sheet. • Define the term local on the board. (A particular place or definite region, restricted to the area nearby or close to where someone lives.)

land around their house or it may be the distance from their house to the nearest town. If they live on a station, island or peninsula, their local area is isolated from other areas. People decide on the boundaries of their local area for different reasons. Ask the students to complete questions one and two on their sheets.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Important Words: local, region, place, area, boundaries.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Tell students that Australia is •f orr evi ew pu r pupoofs es onl y• made many boundaries

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Talk about the boundaries of the students' local areas. If they live in a built up area, the boundary may be the block around their house, or around their suburb, town or city. • If students live in the country, their local area may be all the

20

and local areas and ask them what these may be. Have a class discussion and brainstorm their answers on the board. When they mention the states, territories and cities ask them to complete the remaining four questions on their sheets. They can then label other states, territories and cities in Australia.

m . u

w ww

• Tell students that different people can define local areas differently. The local government divides the country into electoral zones, which can be called local areas. Streets, freeways and transport zones divide cities and towns into local areas. A local area could be defined as the zone from which the school draws its students.

• Explain that a person can be considered local to Australia, local to a city or town, local to their school, local to their suburb and local to their street!

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Defining Local

Activity

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

A person can be local to Australia, local to their school, local to their suburb and local to their street.

Complete the Tasks

w ww

1. Mark where you live on the map with an X.

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te o c ___________________________________________________ . che e r o 3. Which state/territory do you live in? ______________________ t r s super 2. Define your local area_ ________________________________

4. Lightly shade this state/territory.

5. What is your capital city?_______________________________ 6. Use a pencil and a ruler to create boundaries around local areas on the map.

Section 1: Significant People and Places

21


Local Places

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Understanding that local places are significant.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Understanding that over time, we have lost touch with the significance of places.

• Tell the students that often, places in their local area have been named for a reason. The names of places can help us understand their significance. Brainstorm some local place names on the board which fit into the following four categories: indigenous, tribute, transplanted and official.

• Transplanted names - names chosen by explorers and settlers to remind them of "the home country", such as New South Wales. It was a way of immortalizing them.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Teaching Notes:

• Official names – are common for electoral districts and shires. These names often attempt to recognise important historical/political/religious people or events connected to local areas.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Ask the students to think of more place • Ask students to pick one of the places names• in their local area andi sortw themp f o rr ev e u r osheet seand so nl y • onp their research it further. • Discuss their individual meanings.

into categories on their sheet.

Useful Website:

w ww

• Indigenous names - like Wagga Wagga and Mylup. If the students look at a map of their local area they will probably find that lots of place names are indigenous.

. te

www.nla.gov.au/pathways/jnls/ newsite/view/263.html is a great website for place names and their meanings.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Tribute names - places that are named after people. It was common for explorers to name places after their founders or social or political people of the time. Some places are also named after famous Australians.

22

m . u

Categories:

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Local Places

Activity

Places are often significant.

 Under the headings write some places that are local to you.

Tribute Names

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Transplanted Names

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Indigenous Names

Official Names

w ww

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te o c My Chosen Place:________________________________ . che e r o t r s super Significance:___________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ Section 1: Significant People and Places

23


Teachers' Notes

A Place of Historical Interest

Focus: • Identifying a local place of historical interest.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Interesting Words: identify, locate, interest, brochure, source, evidence,

Teaching Notes:

• Pin up a map of the local community area using small flags or coloured pins. • Brainstorm with the class the main points of historical interest in your local area. Mark churches, heritage buildings, monuments, museums, National Trust homes, dams/ reservoirs, botanical gardens, war memorials, wharfs and so forth.

one page of information on it by completing the activity sheet. Point out that historical inquiry is not only about answering the questions what and when, but also asking why, how, which and who questions.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

research.

• Collate all the pages to create a class brochure.

w ww

• As a class collect information on these local points of interest and pin it up next to your map so that it becomes an information board. This could include photographs, pamphlets and brochures.

. te

• Pair the students and ask them to pick one local place of historical interest. Ask them to research the significance of the place and create

24

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Activity

A Place of Historical Interest

Researching the history of your local area is like doing a jigsaw puzzle or being a detective. Your job is to piece together all the evidence using many sources.

My place of interest is _____________________________

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Draw a map of where your place of interest is located in your local area.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Questions

w ww

m . u

1. When was it named?_ ___________________________________ 2. Why was that name chosen?______________________________

. te o c _____________________________________________________ . che e r o t r 3. What does it tell you about the past? _ ______________________ s super _____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________  Compare! Use the back of the sheet to paste or draw an old and recent picture of your place of interest. Section 1: Significant People and Places

25


Teachers' Notes Places of Interest in Australia

Focus:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Understanding that there are places of historical interest all over Australia and that the students can be classed as being local to Australia.

Brainstorm with the class places of historical interest in Australia.

• Discuss where these places are in Australia and why these places are of historical significance. For example: Lake Mungo in New South Wales is important because it tells us about when and how the traditional owners of Australia lived. Remains of their lives (clay-pans, camp hearths, remnants of food and skeletons) can still be found there. It is such an important site that it has been listed as a World Heritage Site.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Teaching Notes:

w ww

• Ask students to research some more historical places in Australia and use symbols to show where they are located on the map on their activity sheets.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students must create a key to explain their symbols.

26

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Section 1: Significant People and Places


Places of Interest in Australia

Activity

There are many places of historical interest in Australia.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Draw as many places of interest on the map as you can.

w ww

. te

Key

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 1: Significant People and Places

27


Section 2: s r e p u S

Bo ok ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Sites of Significance or e t

w ww

. te

28

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


Teachers' Notes

Historical Sites

Focus: • Identifying historical sites of cultural or spiritual significance in the local area.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teaching Notes - Sheet 1:

Teac he r

• Ask the students to complete the activity sheet.

ew i ev Pr

• On the board make a list of as many local sites that students can think of that have heritage, spiritual or cultural value for present generations. (Example: a war memorial helps us to understand past conflicts and the Australians who fought to protect our country. Rock shelters and midden sites can help us to understand how and when the first Australians lived: what they ate, how they hunted, what they made, etc.)

surrounded by water so that they could secure a point from which to capture Constantinople and knock the Turkish out of the war. They landed in Gallipoli on 25th April and fought the Ottoman Turkish army. The fighting lasted for eight months and over 8,000 Australians were killed.) Ask students to create a stamp based on some of this information.

• Locate your nearest ANZAC or other war memorial. Try to visit it if possible and discuss its significance.

Useful Website:

© ReadyEdP bl i cat i ons u www.anzacday.org.au/interactives/ childhood puzzles/main.html. This website has interactive ‘click and drag’ • Ask • students tor choose one local site p f o r e v i e w u r p o s e s o n l y • puzzles displaying images relating to that they would like to research further. Teaching Notes – Sheet 2:

w ww

Teaching Notes – Sheet 3:

• Discuss with the students what ANZAC stands for. (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.) They can record this on their sheets.

. te

ANZAC Day.

Teaching Notes – Sheet 4:

m . u

Encourage them to use a range of resources to complete the activity sheet on their chosen site.

• Ask the students to create a poster advertising a local site(s) to the public. The poster should encourage people to visit the site by highlighting its importance to people today.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask them when ANZAC Day is. (25th April first celebrated in 1916.)

• Ask students who we remember on ANZAC Day. (Today we remember all soldiers who have fought in all wars. ANZAC Day was first created to remember those who fought in World War I. Tell them that Australians and New Zealanders were sent to Gallipoli in 1915 to capture the Galliopli peninsula, an area almost completely

Extension Activities:

• Try to visit as many local sites as possible, such as: memorials, museums, rock shelters, creeks, mountains, etc. • You could ask an ANZAC or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person to come in and talk to the students. • Look at ANZAC or indigenous artefacts, and ask the students to tell you what these artefacts tell us about the past.

Section 2: Sites of Significance

29


Historical Sites 1

Activity

There will be sites in your local area of heritage, spiritual or cultural importance.

 List five local sites of heritage, spiritual or cultural significance. Why it is important:

r o e t s B r e oo _ ____________________ p u k S Why it is important:

Name of Site: _ ____________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Name of Site:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons Why it is important: •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Name of Site:

w ww

. te

Why it is important:

m . u

_ ____________________

o c . _ ____________________ che e r o t r s super Name of Site:

Why it is important: Name of Site: _ ____________________

30

Section 2: Sites of Significance


Activity

Historical Sites 2 Local sites can tell us about the history of a local area.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Paste a photograph or draw a picture of your chosen local site.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Name of site:____________________________________

Questions

w ww

m . u

1. Where is your chosen site?_______________________________ ____________________________________________________

. te ____________________________________________________ o c . che e ____________________________________________________ r o t r schosen site. supeyour r 3. Write five words that best describe 2. Why should people visit this site?

____________________________________________________ 4. What is being done to protect this site? ____________________________________________________

Section 2: Sites of Significance

31


Historical Sites 3

Activity

War memorials are important to us today.

 What does ANZAC stand for?

A __________________________________

N __________________________________

C __________________________________

 Create a stamp to celebrate ANZAC Day.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok Z __________________________________ u S A __________________________________

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r Draw sa picture. supe r

 Where is your local war memorial?

_____________________________

_____________________________

32

Section 2: Sites of Significance


Historical Site 4

Activity

Many people do not realise the importance of sites.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Create a poster advertising one or more local sites to the public. Encourage people to visit the site.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 2: Sites of Significance

33


Indigenous Places

Teachers' Notes

Focus:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Understanding the significance of local indigenous sites, places and landscapes.

• List with the students indigenous sites, places and landscapes of historical interest in the local community.

• Look through an atlas as a class and locate and list important indigenous sites, places and landscapes in your state and in Australia.

Teaching Notes – Sheet 2:

Additional Information:

Teac he r

Teaching Notes – Sheet 3:

ew i ev Pr

Teaching Notes - Sheet 1:

To find indigenous places and © ReadyEd• P umeanings bl i ca i o narea s their in t your local contact your AEO at school or the •f orr evi ew puindigenous r pos eso nl y• contact person within

. te

34

your local council or community.

m . u

w ww

• Ask students to choose one local indigenous site, place or landscape to research further. They can do this using the internet, newspapers, community information guides or local knowledge. Alternatively you could research one together as a class.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 2: Sites of Significance


Activity

Indigenous Places 1

There are many indigenous sites, places and landscapes in Australia.

 List some local indigenous sites that are significant to people today.

r o e t s Bo r e ____________________________ p ok u S ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

List of local indigenous sites:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• ____________________________ ____________________________

w ww

m . u

 List some local indigenous places and landscapes that are significant to people today.

. te

o c . che e ___________________________________________ r o t r s s r u e p ___________________________________________

List of local indigenous places and landscapes:

___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Section 2: Sites of Significance

35


Indigenous Places 2

Activity

There are many indigenous sites, places and landscapes in Australia.

 Choose one indigenous site, place or landscape to research.

r o e t s Bo r _________________________________________ e p ok u Where it is Slocated: __________________________

Teac he r

Indigenous site/place/landscape: _________________

ew i ev Pr

_________________________________________ Reasons for its location:_______________________

_________________________________________ Why it is a special place:_ ______________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons _________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

Draw your chosen site/place/landscape.

. te

36

m . u

_________________________________________

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 2: Sites of Significance


Activity

Indigenous Places 3

There are many indigenous sites, places and landscapes in Australia.

 Have a look through an atlas and find some important indigenous sites, places and landscapes in your state. My state is: ___________________________

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S ____________________ ____________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Indigenous sites/places/landscapes in my state are: ____________________ ____________________

____________________

____________________

____________________

____________________

____________________

____________________

© ReadyEdP ubl i cat i ons ____________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

____________________

w ww

. te

m . u

 Place some well-known indigenous places on the map of Australia.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 2: Sites of Significance

37


Section 3: e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Changing Technology and People's orLives

w ww

. te

38

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super


Teachers' Notes

Technology and Travel

Focus: • Understanding that technology has changed the way that we travel.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teaching Notes:

Teac he r

Background Information: • In the 1850s, camels replaced horses and became the main method of transportation because they were more suited to the Australian climate. You could look at pictures of camels and Australian cameleers from this time and read out some cameleer diary entries to the students. Camels were taken over by cars, trains and planes. In 1854 Australia's first trains began operating. First there were steam trains, then diesel locomotives, then electric trains. In 1910 planes were introduced.

ew i ev Pr

• Ask students how people travelled before cars, planes or trains were invented. From there, try to trace the changes that have occurred in methods of transportation because of the changes in technology.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Extension Activity:

• Discuss how technology has also changed the way we communicate when we travel (email, Twitter, Facebook, travel blogs, etc.).

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

39


Technology and Travel

Activity

Technology has changed the way that we travel.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

1

2

3

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Complete the flow chart to show how transport has changed because of changes in technology. The earliest form of transport should go in box 1.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 4

w ww

. te

7

m . u

8

o c . che e r 6 r 5 o t s super

Why is the picture of Ned Kelly funny? How did he travel? _

________________________________________________________

_

________________________________________________________

_

________________________________________________________

40

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Teachers' Notes

Technology and Buildings

Focus: • Understanding that changes in technology have altered the buildings in which we live and work.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Important Words: style, architecture, architect, influence.

• Discuss how we can tell that houses/ buildings are old. Discuss what houses/buildings were made of in the past. As a class, you could collect examples of different materials: wood, brick, etc. • Discuss structural features of old houses that identify them as belonging to the past (Victorian houses for example had no airconditioning so they had wide verandahs and corridors).

• Discuss why old houses and buildings are worth preserving. (Because they tell us about the past by tracing the changes that have occurred in technology as time has passed. They are our history. They give us information about how people lived and what materials were available to them. Old historical buildings attract tourists because of these reasons.)

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Teaching Notes:

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons • Hand out both activity sheets. Find •f orr evi ew pur p osesonl y• an old building or house or part of

• Define the word ‘preserving’. Discuss what could be done to preserve an old house/building (make sure it is not knocked down, nothing is built too close to it which would damage it, nothing is too drastically altered or changed, so it appears in its original form).

. te

Extension Activities:

m . u

w ww

• Also discuss furnishings in houses which identify them as old or new. (Old and new kettles and irons, etc.)

the school to complete the tasks.

• Students could research some heritage-listed buildings in the local area.

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Students could make a diorama of an old house or building. • Students could collect photographs/ illustrations of old houses and buildings and create a sequence chart.

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

41


Activity

Technology and Buildings 1

Technology has changed the buildings in which we live and work.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Sketch your building in the space below.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Name/type of building:______________________

Location:_________________________________

w ww

m . u

Date of building:_ _________________________

How do you know this?______________________

. te o c Style?___________________________________ . che e r o t r s sup r What is e the roof made of? _______________________________________

_________________________ What are the walls made of? ________________________

42

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Technology and Buildings 2

Activity

Technology has changed the buildings in which we live and work.

 How is this building similar to, or different from a new building? Different

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

 What does this house tell us about the past?

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Similar

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons ________________________________________________________ •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

 Why do you think it should be preserved?

________________________________________________________

 What can be done to ensure that it is preserved?

m . u

________________________________________________________

w ww

. te o ________________________________________________________ c . c e her r ________________________________________________________ o t s super ________________________________________________________

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

43


Newspapers

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Understanding how newspapers can tell us about changes in technology.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Interesting Words: headlines, topic, article, reporter.

Extension Activities:

• Throughout our history, writing has been a powerful force. By writing, an author is able to share with his/her readers not only his/her own ideas and memories, but also convey to us information about the time and place in which he/she lived. Old articles can reveal how changing technology has impacted on our lives.

• Organise a visit to the local community news and ask them to talk to the students about what they write about and the process of writing and printing. Discuss the importance of local news.

ew i ev Pr

Teaching Notes:

© ReadyEd• P ubl i cat i ons Collate newspaper articles from the class and create a school •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• newspaper to hand out to others

w ww

• Take the class to the local library/ museum to find old newspaper stories. Bear in mind that newspaper publishers and state libraries have a copy of every newspaper issue that they have ever published.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Ask each student to choose an article that records how people travelled, communicated or played in the past, before the rapid changes in technology. • Ask your students to use their chosen article to complete the activity sheet.

44

m . u

in the school community.

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Newspapers

Activity

Newspapers can help us to trace changes in technology.

 Use your article to complete the task. Name of newspaper:________________________________

r o e t s Bo r e p ok Headline: ________________________________________ u S Reporter: _______________________________________

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Date of article:_____________________ Cost:__________

Topic of article: __________________________________ What does it tell you about how people lived in the past?

_______________________________________________

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

m . u

_______________________________________________

w ww

_______________________________________________

. te

 Draw one or more of the visuals, or create your own to go with the story.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

45


Teachers' Notes

Focus:

Written Documents

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Understanding that written documents can tell us about changes in technology.

Important Words: issued, copies, originals, recreate, loss, damage,

Teaching Notes:

• There are many ways in which the past can be celebrated and preserved. Descriptions, documents, books and objects, (written in and from earlier times) can all celebrate and preserve the past. They can give us an insight into how people's lives and lifestyles have changed because of technology.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

care, old, new, stored, tell, document, information.

• Ask your class to bring in written documents that they may have at home to display. They may not be able to bring in the originals but they could bring in copies. Originals must be cared for to prevent loss or damage. The written document must relate to the local area.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

• Brainstorm as a class, examples of documents and discuss what they tell us about the changes in technology. (Documents can give us information about how people travelled or communicated. Old telegrams can be contrasted with emails and coach tickets can be compared to flight tickets.)

. te

46

m . u

• Discuss as a class what the documents say about changes in technology.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Written Documents

Activity

Documents can record how technology has affected the way we live.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Recreate the document.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

 Answer the questions on your written document.

How old is it?_____________________________________

w ww

m . u

Are there any names or signatures on it?_______________ Are there any dates?_______________________________

. t ethe document tell you about technology? o What does c . che e r _______________________________________________ o t r s super Where was it issued?_______________________________

_______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

47


Photographs

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Understanding that photographs can help us to understand changes in technology over several generations.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teac he r

Important Words: change, now, then, different, same, tell, happen, front, back, today, yesterday, copy, original.

Teaching Notes - Sheet 2:

• Discuss with your class how a lot of information and detail can be found in photographs.

• Discuss how the photographs help us understand the changes that have occurred because of technology.

• Discuss where old photographs can be found (at home, in books, in old newspapers, amongst school records).

ew i ev Pr

Teaching Notes - Sheet 1:

w ww

• Ask the class to bring in a photograph that they have at home of something that is no longer used because it has been replaced. (Example: an old toy, an old kettle, etc.) They can fill out the activity sheet.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

• Before the students paste their photographs on to their sheets, make a photocopy of each photograph and pin them up to make a class photoboard.

48

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Photographs 1

Activity

Photographs can record changes in technology over several generations.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Paste your photograph here:

Answer the Questions

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 1. What can you see in the photograph? •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• _____________________________________________________

m . u

2. How do you know that the object in the photograph is old?

w ww

_____________________________________________________ 3. What was the object used for?

. te

o c . _____________________________________________________ che e r o t r sin the photograph. supthe Draw the object that has replaced one er _____________________________________________________

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

49


Photographs 2

Activity

Photographs can record the changes in technology over several generations.

B. Australia Today

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S National Library of Australia

 Use the pictures to answer the questions.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

A. Before European Settlement

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons 1. Date the two pictures as best you can. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 2. Is there anything the same in the pictures?

w ww

m . u

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

. te o • _ ____________________________________________________ c . c e her r • _ ____________________________________________________ o t s super 3. List six main differences:

• _ ____________________________________________________ • _ ____________________________________________________ • _ ____________________________________________________ • _ ____________________________________________________ 50

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Then and Now

Teachers' Notes Focus:

• Understanding the impact that changing technology has had on people's lives (at home, at work and in the way they travel, communicate and play).

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

Teaching Notes - Sheet 1:

• Discuss with students how the early timekeeping devices rely on no or very little technology.

Teaching Notes - Sheet 2:

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Important Words: generation, technology, impact, communication.

devices which have changed communication. Technology has also produced faster and more efficient cars which has changed the way we travel.

• Examine how many technological goods are made offshore today compared to the time when their grandparents were young.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• Teaching Notes - Sheet 3:

w ww

• Look at some of the traditional toys that indigenous children used to play and learn which depended on very little technology, such as string games which helped them remember stories that they were told.

. te

Teaching Notes - Sheet 6: • Students could ask their parents or grandparents to help them with the second task.

m . u

• Discuss how changes in technology have allowed us to be more mobile and travel longer distances more quickly.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Teaching Notes - Sheet 4:

Teaching Notes - Sheet 7:

• As an extension activity students could discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each item.

• Discuss how changes in technology have resulted in smaller phones and music

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

51


Then and Now

Teachers' Notes

Extension Activities:

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

• Students can make models of old and new items or bring an item in for display.

Teac he r

• Ask students to bring in an old or a new item to display in the class exhibition. •

Once all of the items have been brought into class, ask students to help classify them by sorting them into different groups, according to, for example, features, historical period, material, size, etc.

ew i ev Pr

• Another idea is to set up a class exhibition. This will take some time and organisation but is a rewarding exercise. Here are some pointers:

• When displaying the items, think about how best to showcase them to avoid valuable items being damaged. Documents printed on poor quality paper can turn yellow, fade, go brittle and tear. Don't put rubber bands around these types of documents and display them in flip albums made of polypropylene. Do not put documents in very bright light. Sometimes copies of very fragile documents can be made and handled freely. Coins should be handled carefully. Too much handling will tarnish surfaces so they should be held by the edges. They could be displayed in albums. Some items could be displayed behind glass cabinets.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

52

m . u

• Lastly, invite your students to give the exhibition a name. You will need a label for your exhibition. Get them to think of the colours that they will use in the exhibition title label. They may like to promote the exhibition by creating posters and invitations to its opening. Invite parents and • Think about where the exhibition will people from the school community be located and who will look after it. and get someone to do an opening. • Each student should then label their item. Their label should date and identify the item and include details about its function, owner, what it is made of and any other further information.

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Then and Now 1

Activity

Timekeeping devices measure time. The devices that we use today are different from those used years ago.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Name the timekeeping devices.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

 Cut out the pictures and paste them on a blank piece of paper in the order that you think they were invented. Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

53


Then and Now 2

Activity

The items that we use today are different from those used in the past.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Look at the artefacts from the past below. Label each artefact and say how it was used and what has replaced it. Think about why the replacements are better suited to our lives today.

Name:_ ___________________

Name:_ ___________________

Use:______________________

Use:______________________

_________________________

_________________________

Replacement:______________ © ReadyEdP ubl i cat i ons _________________________ •f orr evi ew pu_________________________ r posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Replacement:______________

. te

o c . che Name:_ ___________________ Name:_ ___________________ e r o t r s supUse:______________________ er Use:______________________

54

_________________________

_________________________

Replacement:______________

Replacement:______________

_________________________

_________________________

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Then and Now 3

Activity

Toys that you play with today are very different from the toys that children played with in the past.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

 Past  Present

 Past  Present

 Past  Present

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Look at the pictures below and tick one of the boxes underneath. Colour all the toys that you play with.

 Past  Present

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•  Past  Present

 Past  Present

 Past  Present

m . u

w ww

 Past  Present

 Draw some traditional toys used for playing and learning by indigenous children.

. te

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

55


Then and Now 4

Activity

Many objects are no longer used because of changes in technology.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Number each set of pictures below in order (one being the oldest and four being the newest).

w ww

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

. te

o c . che e r o t r ________________________________________________ s super

  Choose two old items and two new items. Where do you think these items were and are made?

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ 56

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Then and Now 5

Activity

Technology has changed the way we live. Homes in the past did not have electricity.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S Bedroom

Office

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Draw things that use electricity in the house below.

Bathroom

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

m . u

Kitchen

. te o c Laundry . che e r o t r s super

Ask your parents if you can go for one night (or for a few hours) without using anything electrical, and experience how people used to live in the past! Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

57


Then and Now 6

Activity

Technology has changed the interiors of homes.

 Colour all the things that use electricity in the picture below.

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S What room is this?

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons  Draw items that people used in their homes before electricity. •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

58

For Heat

m . u

For Light

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives


Then and Now 7

Activity

Technology has changed the things that we use in our homes.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Draw lines to match the old and new household objects.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

Section 3: Changing Technology and People's Lives

59


Word Bank  Use these words to create a snap game with the word game cards on the next page. Check words that you do not know. Local places

Technology

Local people

r o e t s BGeneration r e o p ok Primary documents Travel u S Oral history Architecture Family

Local community Local area

Collection

Inscription

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

Date

Landscapes

Research

Indigenous

Houses

Materials

Photographs

Transport

History

Written documents

Preserve

Owner

Location

Original

Museum

Evidence

Telegrams

Electricity

Australia

Artefact

Map

Historical sites

Invention

Heritage

ANZAC

Historical interest

Legend

Spiritual value

Communication

© ReaThen dyEdPubl i c at i ons and now Gallery orr ev i ew pur pose so l y• Cemetery•f Display Places ofn interest

w ww

Document

. te

m . u

Tombstone

o c . ch e r War memorial Elder er o t sKey s per Poster u Resource

Mobile

Cultural value

Efficient

Era

Protect

Object

Rubbings

Timeline

State

Style

Newspaper

Territory

Ancestor

Interview

Present

Past Ancestry

Grandparents

60


Word Game Cards

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

 Create a snap game using the word bank on the previous page.

w ww

. te

m . u

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

o c . che e r o t r s super

61


Create a Local History Box

Activity

1

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

My

Local Area

3

ew i ev Pr

2

Teac he r

 Decorate the box by following the numbered steps.

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y• 4

. te

62

• Cut out the box and fold tabs along the dashed lines.

m . u

w ww

1. Draw an important local site/place. 2. Write the name of a local person of historical interest. 3. Draw your local war memorial. 4. Draw an old and/ or new toy. 5. Write three things that you like about your local area.

Once you have decorated your box…

• Glue the sides together to create a box about your state!

o c . ch e r 5e o t r s Another Idea! super

• You could store an object in the box to create a time capsule to be opened at a specific time.


Memory Game In pairs, cut out the cards and turn them face down. Take turns turning each card over to create a pair. You can create your own cards to add to these.

r o e t s Bo r e p ok u S

© ReadyEdPubl i cat i ons •f orr evi ew pur posesonl y•

w ww

. te

m . u

ew i ev Pr

Teac he r

o c . che e r o t r s super

63

Australian History Series: Book 2 - The Past In the Present  

The Australian History Series has been written for students living in Australia who are studying History in Kindergarten/Pre-Primary through...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you