2022 BCTF AGM Reports and Resolutions

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2022 Reports and Resolutions

BC Teachers’ Federation 106th Annual General Meeting March 19–22, 2022


Introduction This booklet is divided into sections as follows: Part 1 is the Leadership Report of the Executive Committee. Part 2 consists of recommendations of the Executive Committee on a variety of other topics, and resolutions received from locals. Part 3 consists of committee reports, which cover the period since the last Annual General Meeting. Part 4 covers the report of the Representative Assembly and Nominating Committee. Part 5 is an outline of voting rights at the AGM. Please take note of the section on “Voting Cards.” This is a crucial item. The Standing Rules of Order of the Annual General Meeting are also included in this section. AGM business The “business” of the Annual General Meeting will consist of the recommendations in Part 1 and the various recommendations and resolutions in Part 2. To help readers distinguish between recommendations of the Executive Committee and/or Representative Assembly, and resolutions submitted by locals, recommendations have been numbered 1 to 53. Resolutions have been numbered 101 to 145 (“Late” resolutions will be numbered starting at 200; “new” resolutions in the 300s.) Any supplementary recommendations of the Executive Committee and any “late” resolutions will be contained in the information kits distributed to delegates at the Annual General Meeting. Read with Members’ Guide The headings used in this booklet are, as far as possible, the same as those used in the policies and procedures section of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF. The topic headings in both publications are arranged in alphabetical order. Page numbers in parentheses throughout the booklet also refer to the Members’ Guide. Readers can therefore very easily check current policy and procedure statements on matters dealt with by the various recommendations and resolutions. Copies of the Members’ Guide were distributed last fall to each staffroom, and copies were sent to all locals. The Members’ Guide is also available online.

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Under Procedure 2.C.02 (p. 23), locals are encouraged to submit recommendations to the Executive Committee and resolutions to the Representative Assembly throughout the year, for matters that can be dealt with by these bodies. This procedure has a two-fold benefit: action can be obtained sooner, and the amount of Annual General Meeting business is reduced, permitting a more thorough discussion and completion of more Annual General Meeting items. “Late” resolutions: These are covered in 6.C.1 (p. 174) of the Standing Rules of Order of the Annual General Meeting. A “late” resolution must be on a matter that arose too late for inclusion in Reports and Resolutions. The Executive Committee must rule prior to the Annual General Meeting on whether or not the resolution meets the definition of “late” as per the standing rules. The Executive Committee will be meeting on March 18, 2022, to deal with any resolutions submitted for consideration as “late.” New resolutions: These are covered fully in 6.D (p. 174) of the standing rules. To qualify as a “new” resolution, the resolution must meet all the following criteria: The new resolution: 1. arises directly out of the business of the meeting. 2. could not have been submitted in time to become either a regular or late resolution. 3. must relate to an issue that must be dealt with before the spring meeting of the Representative Assembly.


Part 1 Executive Committee Leadership Report Recommendation 1...................................................................7 Part 2 ABORIGINAL EDUCATION Recommendation 15...............................................................12 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Recommendations 16–18........................................................13 Resolutions 102–104.........................................................13–14 BARGAINING Recommendations 19–23..................................................14–15 Resolutions 105–114.........................................................15–18 CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS Recommendations 2–14......................................................9–12 Resolution 101........................................................................12 EDUCATION FINANCE Recommendation 24...............................................................18 EDUCATION POLICY Recommendations 25–30..................................................18–20 FINANCE Recommendations 31–38..................................................20–21 Resolutions 115–116...............................................................21

Part 3 Report of the Executive Committee Executive Stewardship report.................................................39 Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee .....................39–40 Adult Education Advisory Committee .............................40–41 Advisory Committee on French Programs and Services...............................................41–42 Committee for Action on Social Justice............................42–45 Finance Committee...........................................................45–47 Health and Safety Advisory Committee...........................47–48 Income Security Committee.............................................48–50 Pensions Committee.........................................................50–52 Professional Issues Advisory Committee .........................52–53 Provincial Specialist Association Council........................53–54 Teacher Magazine Advisory Board ........................................55 Teachers Teaching on Call Advisory Committee..................................................55–57 Working and Learning Conditions/Bargaining Advisory Committee..................................................57–58 W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Fund Committee........................................................58–59 Part 4 Report of the Representative Assembly............................61–62 Part 5 Voting Rights of the AGM .....................................................64 Standing Rules of Order ...................................................65–71

HEALTH, WELFARE, AND SAFETY OF TEACHERS Recommendations 39–44..................................................21–24 MINISTRY OF EDUCATION Resolution 117........................................................................24 ORGANIZATION OF THE BCTF Recommendations 45–48..................................................24–26 Resolutions 118–127.........................................................26–29 PENSIONS Recommendation 49.........................................................29–30 Resolutions 128–129.........................................................30–31 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, RIGHTS, AND STANDARDS Recommendations 50–52..................................................31–32 POLITICAL ACTION Resolutions 130–145.........................................................32–37 TEACHERS TEACHING ON CALL Recommendation 53...............................................................37

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Artwork by: Soji Chiya Matt

PART 1:

Executive Committee Leadership Report 2022 REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS 6


2022–23 Leadership Report BCTF Procedures 2.A.02–2.A.06 address the annual expectation that the Executive Committee recommend Leadership Priorities for the ensuing year to the Annual General Meeting, and to present those recommended priorities to the Winter Representative Assembly for feedback. Outlined below are the Leadership Priorities being recommended to the 2022 Annual General Meeting: Recommendation 1 That the following be the leadership priorities for 2022–23: The Federation commits to collectively: 1. negotiate and support implementation of improvements to the collective agreement through collective bargaining. 2. advocate for the physical and mental health, safety and well-being of members during and post-pandemic. 3. advocate for and advance the future of public education in a changing world and climate. 4. advance decolonization and changes that address systemic discrimination and barriers within the education system and Federation structures. 5. engage and connect members towards recovery, strength, and solidarity. Supporting statement When these leadership priorities are presented to this year’s Annual General Meeting it will have been two years since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic and with hope, we will be nearing its end. This pandemic has resulted in over 5.5 million global deaths and has caused critical and global interruption, disruption, and threat to public education. Many have now lost someone they know to the virus, and still many more are in stages of recovery, with a constant concern for the unknown long-term impacts it may have. Throughout the world students have experienced tremendous impacts in disrupted education, school closures, inequities in remote technology and options, with vulnerable and disadvantaged students disproportionately impacted. Inadequate workplace safety, the emergence of more highly transmissible variants, and existing shortages have been magnified and have caused critical strain within the education system, and on each individual member. Within British Columbia, climate emergencies and troubling weather patterns have caused devasting damage to infrastructure and homes, cut off vital delivery and shipping routes, resulted in additional loss of life, and added tremendous strain on both an individual and systemic level. Members of the BCTF continue to demonstrate courage, commitment, and strength in their defense of public education however the length and duration of these challenges has, understandably, neared untenable at times for many. As we look toward transition out of the pandemic, recovery will require collective solidarity to protect and advocate for the changes needed to strengthen public education in this changing world.

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Artwork by: Xeyrus Gavin James

PART 2:

Recommendations and Resolutions 2022 REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS 8


CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS Must be passed by special resolution, which requires advance notice to BCTF members and a 75% majority. By-law amendments take effect when registered with the Registrar as stipulated under the Societies Act. Recommendation 2 That By-law 5.1(a) be amended as follows: There shall be an Executive Committee, which shall consist of a President, First Vice-President, Second VicePresident, Immediate Past-President (when applicable), and nine Members-at-Large, elected in such a manner as to ensure that at least three of the Member-at-Large vacancies are filled at each Annual General Meeting. One Member-at-Large position shall be designated to be held by a racialized member Member of Colour and one shall be designated to be held by an Aboriginal member. The designated positions shall have the same term and role as the non-designated positions. The Executive Committee positions are elected by the Annual General Meeting and shall take office on the following July 1. Each member of the Executive Committee shall be a member in good standing entitled to vote, in accordance with By-law 1.1. Supporting statement The Executive Committee is recommending a change from “racialized member” to “Member of Colour.” The by-law requirement for designated positions was adopted by the 2017 Annual General Meeting and, as is important and necessary, our collective learning in the area of equity, inclusion, and full sense of belonging is a continuing process. The Executive Committee has received feedback from the Issue Session on Racism, the Committee for Action on Social Justice, the Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee, and many other members that led to this recommendation. It’s important to revisit terms in general but, more importantly, terms that reflect identity and self-identify. The term “racialized” can be seen as a term applied to, rather than chosen by members who identify as Persons of Colour. See also Recommendation 6 which would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order applying to the election are consistent with this proposed change. Recommendation 3 That By-law 5.4(a) be amended as follows: All nominations for positions on the Executive Committee shall be in writing and shall indicate the position(s) for which the member is being nominated. The nomination shall be by resolution of a general meeting of a local or shall bear the signatures of at least 10 active members of the Federation in good standing and shall include the acceptance of the nominee. A person who has been nominated for a position may withdraw from nomination

for that position at any time prior to the election by notice in writing. Supporting statement Currently, members are nominated for specific positions, and the positions are determined separately and in order of President, First-Vice President, Second-Vice President, Member-at-Large position designated for a member who is Aboriginal, Member-at-Large position for a member who identifies as racialized, and non-designated Member-at-Large positions. However, once the balloting at the Annual General Meeting begins, the name of any candidate who was not elected to the position for which they were nominated, stays on the ballot for subsequent positions for which they meet the criteria, unless they notify the meeting that they wish to have their name removed. The change proposed in this recommendation is that members would be nominated for any and all positions that they wish to run for, with there being no automatic “dropping down” to the next position. See also Recommendation 17 which would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order applying to the election are consistent with this proposed change. Recommendation 4 That By-law 8.3 be amended as follows: Delegates or Local Representatives from a local may designate either a delegate Delegate from the same local or a Local Representative from the same local to hold and exercise the voting rights of the voting card or cards assigned to them provided that the Annual General Meeting may by resolution limit the number of voting cards that may be held and voted by a delegate Delegate or Local Representative, and provided further that locals may, by resolution of a general meeting, establish rules regulating such transfers of voting cards. Supporting statement This is a housekeeping change to ensure this wording in Bylaw 8.3 is consistent with the amendments made to By-law 8.2 at the 2021 Annual General Meeting. Recommendation 5 That By-law 21 be amended to reflect the correct numbering of each subsection as 21.1–21.4. Supporting statement The current numbering for all items under By-law 21 heading is incorrectly listed as 22.1–22.4, despite these being subsections under By-law 21 and not By-law 22. This housekeeping recommendation corrects the error.

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Recommendation 6 That By-law 5.1(f) be amended as follows: The Member-at-Large position designated to be held by a racialized member a Member of Colour is open to the election of a member who identifies as racialized a Person of Colour including those members who identify as being Aboriginal. For clarity, this is intended to include individuals who themselves or their ancestors are settlers and/or immigrants and/or refugees and/or were brought to Canada. Supporting statement The wording in By-law 5.1(f) was adopted at the 2017 Annual General Meeting and provided for any candidates who were not elected to the Member-at-Large position designated for a member who identifies as Aboriginal to “drop down” and run for the position designated for a member who identified as racialized. However, this has been seen by many as inadvertently conflating two different identities and experiences for the members concerned. As well, it implied that members who identify as Aboriginal concurrently also identify as racialized or People of Colour. Therefore, this recommendation proposes to delink what was a direct connection between the two designated positions and provides clarity on the criteria for Member-at-Large positions designated for a member who identifies as a Member of Colour. This does not preclude a member from being nominated as a candidate for each position separately, should they choose to do so. Recommendation 7 That By-law 5.1 be amended to add the following: (g) To ensure a gender balance representative of the membership as a whole, at least five of the seven non-designated Member-at-Large positions be held by members who self-identify as women and/or non-binary, and/or transgender. Supporting statement This change to By-law 5.1 would serve to ensure that, among the non-designated Member-at-Large positions on the Executive Committee, the gender balance would be more closely aligned with the percentage in the membership. For example, the percentage of members who identify as men among the general membership total is low, ranging from approximately 25% among more experienced teachers to approximately 19% among newer teachers. However, over many years, the number of members in Executive Committee positions who identify as men has been comparatively much higher. See also Recommendation 18 which would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order applying to the election are consistent with this proposed change. 10

Recommendation 8 That a new By-law 5.21 be adopted as follows: (a) An Executive Committee member may be removed from office by a two-thirds majority vote at the Annual General Meeting or a Special General Meeting. (b) An Executive Committee member may be suspended from office by a unanimous vote of the other Executive Committee members. Supporting statement BCTF Executive Committee members are considered directors of the BCTF as that term is defined in the Societies Act. The Societies Act stipulates that a director may be removed by special resolution and that the voting threshold for an Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting to remove a director may not be higher than a two-third majority. The proposed By-law 5.21(a) reflects the process that is provided by law through the Societies Act and makes it clear to all members that this process exists. It is also permissible for a Society to include other means for removal or suspension of a director. The proposed By-law 5.21(b) provides an alternative means for suspension, but not removal, of an Executive Committee member by a unanimous vote of the Executive Committee. This would allow the Executive Committee to address an urgent issue to suspend an Executive Committee member in circumstances where there may be a period of time before an Annual General Meeting or Special General meeting is scheduled. Recommendation 9 That the last sentence of By-law 5.1(a) be amended as follows: An Executive Committee member may be removed from office under the provisions of By-law 1.7, By-law 5.21, or By-law 7. Supporting statement This is a housekeeping change to ensure the process for removing an Executive Committee member is clearly referenced in By-law 5.1(a). Recommendation 10 That a new By-law 5.23 be added as follows: The Federation will not make donations to: 1. any federal, provincial, or municipal political party. 2. any individual candidate or group of candidates seeking office in any federal, provincial, or municipal election. 3. any individual seeking the nomination for any federal, provincial, or municipal party.


Concomitantly, the Federation may not directly affiliate to any political party. Locals of the Federation have the autonomy with regard to political donations but will not use Federation grants for this purpose. Supporting statement This recommendation seeks to codify in the by-laws the BCTF’s long-standing practice of not making donations to any political party or candidate and ensure alignment to recent amendments to the BC Election Act. The Federation is non-partisan in this regard and, unlike many other provincial unions, is not affiliated with a political party nor does it donate to any federal, provincial, or municipal party or candidate. Instead, the Federation actively advocates for its policies and positions regardless of which government is in power. In addition, the Federation draws on the opportunity an election provides to highlight teaching and learning conditions, funding, the importance of quality publicly funded public education, and the issues of broader concern in communities. Over the decades, the BCTF has conducted many such campaigns and engaged members in political action in the lead up to elections, seeking to make public education a votedetermining issue. As explicitly stated in the recommendation, this by-law would not prevent locals from making decisions with regard to political donations, within the requirements of the election financing rules applying to municipal, provincial, and federal elections. Related to this recommendation, the Federation has the following in place: • By-law 4.3 includes the statement: “Not withstanding anything contained in these by-laws, no levy on the membership shall be made for the purpose of financing political parties and/or election campaigns of political parties.” • Procedure 27.04 which states: “the BCTF continue its practice of commending or criticizing government education programs and/or the educational programs of political parties.” Recommendation 11 That a new By-law 5.22 be adopted as follows: 5.22 With respect to the performance of Executive Committee members’ duties, the Federation shall ensure that reasonable accommodations required by Section 14 of the BC Human Rights Code are provided for Executive Committee members as needed.

Supporting statement Section 14 of the BC Human Rights Code stipulates that a trade union must not discriminate against any person on the basis of a prohibited ground in the Human Rights Code (race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, political belief, religion, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, or criminal conviction unrelated to membership). The alternative wording incorporating Section 14 clarifies that the motion is intended to address accommodations required under the Human Rights Code. This clarifies any ambiguity about the needs of individual members intended to be covered by the provision. Recommendation 12 That By-law 7.2 be amended as follows: The Judicial Council shall be composed of a chairperson, who shall be elected by the Representative Assembly, and an additional 18 members who shall be elected by the Representative Assembly. Four positions will be designated to be held by members who self-identify as being Aboriginal, Black, or Persons of Colour. All members of the Judicial Council shall be active members of the Federation entitled to vote and must receive a majority of the votes cast by the Representative Assembly. When a Judicial Council member resigns from or otherwise leaves the Judicial Council, the member’s appointment to the Judicial Council may continue solely for the purpose of completing ongoing proceedings. Supporting statement One of the primary ways to combat systemic barriers and racism is to create specific spaces for those who have not traditionally had access. Ensuring that there is greater diversity on the Judicial Council will help mitigate institutional procedural bias. When considered with the proposed changes to the Code of Ethics, this representation on the Judicial Council is critical to ensure appropriate representation in alignment with the diversity of the Federation membership. Recommendation 13 That By-law 20 be amended as follows: Only the Annual or Special General Meeting can amend the Cconstitution, the by-laws, the Salary Indemnity Plan Regulations, and the Code of Ethics and only if a 75% majority of the delegates vote in favour of the amendment(s) passed by at least two-thirds of the votes cast by delegates on behalf of the voting members. Only the Annual General Meeting can amend the Salary Indemnity Plan Regulations and only if passed by at least threequarters of the votes cast by delegates on behalf of the voting members. 11


Supporting statement The Societies Act defines a special resolution as a resolution at a general meeting passed by at least two-thirds of the voting members. The by-laws may set a higher threshold but is not required. Recommendation 14 That Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order 6.B.1 be amended as follows: Special resolutions shall be defined as recommendations or resolutions that seek to amend the constitution and by-laws of the Federation and other resolutions so defined in the Societies Act. Such special resolutions shall require a three-quarters two-thirds majority vote to pass, with the exception of changes to the Salary Indemnity Plan regulations which shall require a three-quarter majority vote to pass. Supporting statement The Societies Act defines a special resolution as a resolution at a general meeting passed by at least two- thirds of the voting members. The by-laws may set a higher threshold but is not required. 101. Vancouver Elementary That a new By-Law 3.10 be added as follows: No member shall hold the role of Local President and/or any other locally released officer for more than 10 years consecutively. Concomitantly, no member is eligible to stand for election for the role of Local President and/or any other locally released officer for more than 10 years consecutively. Supporting statement Service as Local President and/or any other locally released officer should be part of a career in teaching. It should not be a career in and of itself. We should avoid the practice common to other organizations where the impression might be given to the average member that only a small number of people (or only one person) can possibly understand how to be an effective union officer. Renewal helps give us strength in our union. The Representative Assembly has continued to budget for union mentorship grants, training opportunities, and other supports to help grow capacity in locals. Our local is prepared to abide by this by-law, should it be adopted.

ABORIGINAL EDUCATION Recommendation 15 That the Federation request of the Minister of Education that Section 5 of B.C. Reg. 265/89 be decolonized by revising it as follows:

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A requirement that principals must consult with local First Nations and actively work towards implementing the Calls to Action and Calls to Justice. 2. Removing Sec 5 sub-sections 11 and 12. 3. Adding both National Day of Truth and Reconciliation and National Indigenous Peoples Day to Section 10(b). 4. Adding a new (e) to Sec 10, requiring acknowledgment of the traditional territory of the local First Nation(s). With permission from a local Nation, adding a relevant song to the assembly as per Sec 10(c). 5. Adding a new (f) to Sec 10, requiring that every school site acknowledges the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. 6. Adding an additional assembly to Sec 10(b), to also include the school day immediately preceding National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. 7. Adding that for each school assembly, the assembly begin with a territorial welcome (when possible) or territorial acknowledgment. 8. Removing references to the Canadian National anthem, the Canadian flag, and the BC Provincial flag in 10(c) and 10(d). 9. Adding in places where land agreements have been established, that the Canada and British Columbia flags be flown to 10(d). 10. Adding a new (c) to Sec 10.1, where the principal of a distributed learning school must establish a program of activities for the students enrolled with the schools that promotes reconciliation of Indigenous people’s respect for local Indigenous laws and culture. This will include the history and legacy of residential schools, treaties, and Indigenous rights, as the history and current contributions of Indigenous peoples in Canadian society. Supporting statement B.C. Reg. 265/89 is a substantial piece of school regulation under the School Act (www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/education/ administration/legislation-policy/legislation/schoollaw/d/ bcreg_26589.pdf). This particular section contains the powers and duties of principals and other administration. Consideration of proposed amendments to this regulation were referred to the Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee for report back to a future Executive Committee meeting. The Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee recommended the changes above, supported and carried by the Executive Committee, in support of decolonizing this piece of regulation.


ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Recommendation 16 That Annual General Meeting Standing Rule of Order 13.3 be amended as follows: That the election be conducted in the following order: a. President b. First Vice-President c. Second Vice-President d. Member-at-Large designated for an Aboriginal member e. Member-at-Large designated for a racialized member Member of Colour f. Members-at-Large. Supporting statement This recommendation is linked to Recommendation 2 and would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order are consistent with the by-laws. This change to the Standing Rules of Order is consistent with the proposed change to By-law 20. Recommendation 17 That Annual General Meeting Standing Rule of Order 13.11 be amended as follows: Candidates defeated in an election for any office shall be deemed to have been nominated for the office next to be filled, provided they meet the equity criteria. If they do not meet the equity criteria for a specific position or they choose not to run for a designated Member-at-Large position, they will be deemed to have been nominated for the next office to be filled for which they meet the criteria. At any time prior to the conducting of a ballot any candidate may, by giving notice to the meeting, withdraw from the election any or all positions for which the candidate has been nominated.

cannot be met with the candidates remaining, the remaining positions will be declared vacant. Supporting statement This recommendation would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order provisions applying to the election of the non-designated Member-at-Large positions on the Executive Committee are consistent with the bylaw change being proposed on the same matter. See also Recommendation 7. 102. Burnaby That the Federation Standing Rules of Order be changed such that debate on changes to the agenda is limited to 30 minutes at the first session of each day. Supporting statement At nearly every Annual General Meeting, Representative Assembly, and Bargaining Conference, we spend a remarkable amount of time dealing with changes to the agenda which, though perhaps important, takes up far too much meeting time. We could probably get through most of the recommendations and resolutions if we just got to it.

Supporting statement This recommendation is linked to Recommendation 3 and would ensure that the Annual General Meeting Standing Rules of Order are consistent with the by-laws.

103. Coquitlam That Procedure 2.A.08—1. be amended by replacement as follows: That the Executive Committee recommend to each Annual General Meeting: a. The names of active members to serve on the Resolutions Committee, to act as scrutineers, and to act as tellers. b. That recommendations for the Resolutions Committee should include at least one member who identifies as Indigenous and one member who identifies as Black or a Person of Colour. c. That the Executive Committee shall also recommend to each Annual General Meeting the names of active members or honorary associate members to act as chairpersons. Individuals recommended as chairpersons shall not be seeking Executive Committee office.

Recommendation 18 That Annual General Meeting Standing Rule of Order 13 be amended to add a new 13.15 as follows: The election for the non-designated Member-at-Large positions must be conducted in accordance with the representation established in By-law 5.1(g) and take into account the numbers of members who do not self-identify as women and/or non-binary/and/or trans not up for election that particular year. At any stage of the balloting process, in order to meet the ratio, candidates may be declared as ineligible to continue or be declared as elected. If the ratio

Supporting statement Over the last several years, the Federation has made steps towards equity by adding designated seats for members who are Indigenous, Black, or People of Colour to the Executive Committee. Along the same vein, it is now important to create space for the marginalized voices of colleagues to be heard in the Resolutions Committee. By adding a seat for both an Indigenous member and a person who is Black or a Person of Colour to the Resolutions Committee, we ensure that these important, yet often unheard voices are included in supporting members who are crafting amendments, new motions, or 13


alternate wording as well as in supporting chairpersons and giving advice on the Standing Rules of Order. When setting the order of unfinished business this will give more strength to the voices of marginalized members. With more diverse voices in these decisions, we can and will do better in how we advise everyone at the Annual General Meeting and can take another important step toward a more equitable meeting space for everyone. 104. Kamloops Thompson That before subsidiary motions are made, a minimum of three people per side (for/against) are given an opportunity to speak. Supporting statement Currently, as Robert’s Rules indicates in 7.2.i. of the Member’s Guide, the chair can decide when they are “satisfied that an opportunity has been given” to present both sides of an argument and accept a subsidiary motion. At the last few meetings, this has often been used for tabling and referring motions, in which the chair has ruled that the mover of the motion and one speaker on the other side has presented a sufficient argument for both sides—without varying the speaking order. This has the effect of stifling debate and thereby members’ voices. It has been discussed in the recent past that Robert’s Rules, as they currently stand, are oppressive and advice has been given to the Executive Committee from various ad hoc and standing committees that the process needs to be overhauled. Until that process has been reviewed and a new option presented, there needs to be accountability that voices are heard, and debate is not stifled. The intent of this motion is to allow voices to be heard, and when there are no speakers to one side or the other (after varying the speaker’s order), then the subsidiary motion could be accepted. Page 174 states “7.2.i—Subsidiary motions (A subsidiary motion is intended to assist a meeting in treating or disposing of a main motion.) No subsidiary motion, other than an amendment, shall be in order until after the chair is satisfied that an opportunity has been given to present the affirmative and negative points of view.” Page 169 states: “The seven subsidiary motions are: • postpone indefinitely • amend • refer • postpone to a certain time • limit or extend limits of debate • previous question • table.”

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BARGAINING Recommendation 19 That Policy 3.J.01—3.9 be amended as follows: The classroom teacher, in collaboration with the schoolbased team and/or other specialist teachers assigned to provide support services to students, shall have the right to determine the placement of, resources for, and support services necessary to the needs of students with special needs and/or diverse learning and other students in the class. (see also Policy 9.A.21 (4)) Supporting statement This is a house-keeping recommendation. The procedure was previously carried at the Annual General Meeting with specific reference to Policy 9.A.21 (4) which no longer exists. Recommendation 20 That Policy 3.J.01—7.3, and 7.8 be amended as follows: 7.3 The purpose of inclusion of students with special diverse needs into regular classes is to provide a positive educational experience for students with special needs and the other students in the class give students equitable access to education in the least restrictive environment. Classes shall be smaller than the sizes stated in 7.2 when they include a high proportion of students with learning disabilities, diverse learning, behavioural, emotional, or health needs, or with a broad range of student ages, grade levels, or achievement levels. 7.8 Qualified teacher-counsellors shall be provided at a minimum of one teacher-counsellor for each 250 students, with at least one qualified teacher-counsellor per school. Supporting statement The proposed changes to Policy 3.J.01—7.2, 7.3, and 7.8 are intended to clarify and update the wording to reflect current language in inclusive education. Recommendation 21 That Policy 3.J.01—8.7.1, 8.7.2, 8.8, 8.9, 8.10, 8.13, and 8.14 be amended as follows: 8.7.1 Ample, up-to-date and good condition print materials to reflect Canadian, Aboriginal, and global society and to support instruction and student interest and needs through inquiry and voluntary unleveled free reading selection. 8.7.2 Electronic (digital) capacity, including sufficient outlets, connection hardware and devices, and access to a broad spectrum of digital materials and tools free from imposed filtering. 8.8 Fully equipped gymnasium, playgrounds, sports fields, and outdoor environmental study areas shall


be provided. Fields and equipment maintained and serviced to adhere to safety standards. 8.9 Separate changing, lavatory, and shower facilities for boys and girls, including a gender-neutral space, shall be provided to facilitate integrated physical education and sports programs. 8.10 Lavatory facilities for classes including Kindergarten, primary, or for disabled students/ students with disabilities shall be provided within the classroom or the building/portable in which the classroom is located. 8.13 Each school shall have a staffroom of at least 84 square metres, equipped with kitchen facilities. Staff shall have access to adult washrooms and shower facilities. 8.14 Each member shall have a workspace with access to personal storage, appropriate teaching and professional resources, and appropriate supported and maintained technology, including all supporting hardware and components to be provided by the district. Supporting statement The recommended amendments to Policy 3.J.01—8.7.1, 8.7.2, 8.8, 8.9, 8.10, 8.13, and 8.14 address the use of inclusive language around gender and reflect the rights of Indigenous students. It also brings the language up to date for students with disabilities. In addition, the proposed revisions specify that the provision and maintenance of facilities and supplies is important to the learning environment and to the health and safety of students and staff. Recommendation 22 That Procedure 3.E.04 be replaced with the following: That the Field Service Division co-ordinate to provide materials, advice, and assistance to support local and regional bargaining and collective agreement implementation. Supporting statement The intent of this procedure is to outline the role of Field Service staff in supporting local and regional bargaining. This replacement remains consistent with the original intent and no longer references provincial bargaining co-ordinators, a role that has not been in place for many years. Existing 3.E.04—That the BCTF staff and provincial bargaining coordinators devise and carry out a co-ordinated program of field service that includes advice and assistance in case preparation and in the use of bargaining tactics at the local and regional levels.

Recommendation 23 That Procedure 3.E.06 be deleted. Supporting statement Procedure 3.E.06 reflects a period of time when all negotiation was completed locally, and therefore necessitated co-ordination of objectives in certain areas via staff and officers. This is no longer an accurate reflection and the role of the Field Service Division is already outlined in Procedure 3.E.04. This creates contradiction when considered with the policy and procedures that outline the scope and role of the Bargaining Conference. Existing 3.E.06—That the officers and staff co-ordinate the objectives set for learning conditions, working conditions, and salaries, and the efforts of personnel who are working toward accomplishment of these objectives. 105. Burnaby Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation add a new Policy 3.A.05. as follows: That during provincial negotiations the Federation maintain all existing superior local language/provisions. Supporting statement In every round of provincial bargaining, our Bargaining Conferences, Representative Assemblies, and Executive Committee meetings have set this as direction for our Bargaining Team during negotiations with the employer. It is time we include this long-held stance in our own statements of bargaining policy. 106. Kamloops Thompson Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation continue to advocate for increased preparation time to at least the national average for elementary teachers and that this advocacy is ongoing between rounds of bargaining. Supporting statement BC teachers have seen significant curricular and educational change in recent years. Classes are more complex, and additional preparation time is necessary to meet the needs of individual students, connect with colleagues, learn, plan, prepare lessons, and report to parents. Preparation time has not had a commensurate increase to match the workload of teachers. Preparation time for BC’s elementary teachers remains 58% below the Canadian average. Constant pressure on the government is needed to prioritize this matter and address teacher workload.

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107. Kamloops Thompson Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation advocate for preparation time allocation specifically for writing report card comments. Supporting statement Report card writing can be arduous for teachers. In elementary schools in Kamloops, teachers are required to write four reports a year for 20 to 29 students (depending on grade level and composition) on nine different subjects, as well as effort and behaviour. In secondary schools, teachers are required to write twice a year on upwards of four courses, for 104 to 124 students (depending on grade level and composition). This means that many teachers—of all grade levels—are spending hours during the evenings and weekends writing report card comments. Oftentimes, MyEdBC schedules outage times for upgrades during these reporting periods, and there have been many accounts of teachers losing their written reports. This time is often taken away from marking, planning, organizing, and family time—all of which increases the workload of teachers, and contributes to mental health challenges. Furthermore, the BC Government is in the process of changing the expectations regarding the reporting expectations for high school teachers, and, at this point, is not providing any in-service training to prepare teachers for what those expectations are nor how to implement them. This increases the workload and stress that teachers experience. By providing scheduled preparation time (above the regular preparation time for teachers) specifically for writing report cards, it will reduce the stress that teachers experience, thereby reducing mental health challenges, leading to better classrooms and lower burnout rates. 108. Kamloops Thompson Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation advocate for more counsellor support, especially in elementary, to support the social, emotional, and behavioural needs of students. Supporting statement Students across the province have been struggling more than ever with mental health concerns, leading to a decrease in school attendance and academic performance. According to an article released by Centre for Disease Control in July 2021, the pressures students are facing have compounded extensively since the beginning of the pandemic, which has led to increased isolation and often, limited learning resources and opportunities. There are times when online programs and options are offered as a solution by districts, if the technology is available, but as research shows these do not take the place of in-person student services. It is becoming more frequent, 16

however, that Learning Assistance Resource Teachers are required to cancel their instructional groups to help with the compounding number of students struggling with an increase in social, emotional, and behaviour challenges. This negatively impacts students with learning difficulties who require additional instruction. Teachers working as teacherlibrarians and counsellors who have a timetable that allows for flexibility, are expected to be involved with timetabling, record keeping, and other duties. However, there also has been an increase in administrative duties with student services to support an audit-focused system where more time is being spent with files rather than face-to-face with students. Counsellors, in many cases, are shared between schools or have only a partial counselling schedule. This often means having to turn students away to report to their other duties. These numbers are not sustainable and with increasing pressures across the board, we will continue to see a negative impact on students unless there is an increase in services. Statistics Canada is currently reporting the “greatest mental health decline since the pandemic began.” An increase in counsellor support is needed to support these changes. 109. Kamloops Thompson Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation advocate for secondary teachers to receive linear/weekly preparation time (over the whole year). Supporting statement Currently, secondary teachers receive preparation time in only one semester. With the quarter system in the 2020–21 school year, this meant that some teachers received their preparation in the first quarter (September–November 2020). Returning to a semester system in the 2021–22 school year, some teachers are not receiving their preparation until the second semester (February–June). This results in some teachers going 12 months (not including the summer months) without a preparation. This has added a lot of stress and pressure on teachers to prepare outside of school hours. With COVID-19 precautions, more parents are opting to keep their children home when not feeling well, resulting in students missing more in-class instruction, and teachers spending more time learning new online programs and posting in-class instructions and assignments online to help ensure that their students are not falling even further behind. In 2014, there was an agreement between BCSPEA and the Federation to explore the issue of secondary preparation time—and yet nothing has happened. With an already stressful workload, and the added pressures of COVID-19, more teachers than ever are facing burnout. Having a preparation that exists yearround would help support the mental health of teachers by providing greatly needed time to plan, organize, and prepare


course materials for students of all abilities. Secondary teachers receive 52% less preparation time than the national average. For example, Ontario teachers receive 375 minutes per week year-round. The intention of this motion is that this may not need to be a contract negotiation. While more preparation time would be ideal, for the immediate future, it would be beneficial for schools to re-evaluate their schedules to allow for more flexibility for secondary teachers. edvocate. ca/culture-staffing/contracts/ont-summary/ont-qa/ont-details/. 110. Prince Rupert Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That a new clause be added under Bargaining in the Members’ Guide to the BCTF under section 3. Bargaining A. Basic Principles PROCEDURES as follows: That superior local provisions of the collective agreement, as determined by individual locals, will be protected during provincial bargaining. Supporting statement Since we have moved to provincial bargaining, the objective of maintaining superior local provisions in the collective agreement has been brought forward and debated at the Bargaining Conference. A lot of time is spent debating this, which is wrong because it should be part of our policies and how we bargain. Every local has specific clauses they fought long and hard for in their collective agreements. Bargaining that happens at the provincial level should not ever take away the locals’ right to maintain provisions that they consider superior to what is bargained at the provincial level. It is also important that the locals themselves are the ones who decide upon whether any newly negotiated language is superior to what they already have in their local language. 111. Kamloops Thompson Executive Committee advice—That this resolution be referred to the Bargaining Conference: That the Federation advocate for a provincial recruitment and retention strategy for rural teachers and teachers teaching on call. Supporting statement Rural schools and their small communities face many challenges, including access to resources, internet bandwidth, student enrolment, limited course offerings, and limited available accommodation for teachers. These concerns are further exacerbated by the difficulty districts have in recruiting and retaining classroom teachers, specialists, and teachers teaching on call (TTOC). Consistent staffing helps build rapport and community in a school setting. Students need time to connect with adults to foster positive, trusting relationships, which is hard to develop with high teacher

turnover. TTOC shortage is more greatly felt by rural schools, in part because travel allowances to rural schools have not increased in many years and there is little incentive to take an assignment that requires a several hour commute in some cases. The rural TTOC shortage increases teacher workload because non-enrolling teachers are pulled for coverage, the classroom teachers marking and preparation is often not done, and student learning suffers when specialist teachers are pulled from their work to cover absences. The province needs to ensure that rural students receive educational opportunities comparable to those of urban students and that rural teachers have the same supports as their urban colleagues. A provincial commitment would ensure that the problem is addressed by districts and would allow for more significant strategies, such as tax incentives. 112. Prince Rupert That Section G. Provincial Bargaining Structures— Procedures 3.G.02 of the Members’ Guide be amended to add the following clause after 3.G.02—1.: That provincial bargaining objectives and strategies must be dealt with at a Bargaining Conference, and that should the Bargaining Conference run out of time to deal with those objectives and strategies that the following happen: a. The Executive Committee must convene an additional Bargaining Conference as soon as possible, but no later than two months after the unfinished Bargaining Conference, to deal with the remaining unfinished business. b. Any objectives not adopted by the Bargaining Conference(s) will be considered dropped. Supporting statement Section G: Provincial Bargaining Structures 3.G.02—1. states That the Executive Committee schedule a provincial Bargaining Conference of significant duration to adequately deal with the purposes of the conference prior to the commencement of each round of bargaining. During this year’s Bargaining Conference and in previous Bargaining Conferences, often time has run out to deal with the objectives brought forward. Sometimes this has led to those objectives being referred to other bodies of the Federation that were not elected to deal with bargaining by their respective locals. Since the Executive Committee has the authority to convene additional Bargaining Conferences, this addition would ensure that bargaining business is dealt with by the Bargaining Conference as is intended. Time and again we are reminded at the Annual General Meeting that bargaining objectives and strategies are supposed to be dealt with at the Bargaining Conference, therefore, if that is what we, as members of the Federation believe, then we should establish that in policy and provide a way to ensure that this happens. This would ensure that the policy is effectively followed in practice. 17


113. Prince Rupert That the Federation form a task force after ratification of the current round of bargaining to research local language specific to each local in collective agreements, that fall under Letter of Understanding No.1 Appendix 1, for which improvements have not been able to be bargained since the Public Education Labour Relations Act was introduced, with the specific purpose of investigating and devising ways to gain improvements to these items during bargaining, in particular cost related items to deal with inflation. Supporting statement Since the beginning of provincial bargaining, most locals have language that is now deemed to be provincial but is specific to the needs of that local, and for which improvements have not been able to be bargained for almost two decades. Many of these cost items are now way behind what they should be compared to what their costs are today based on inflation. Since these items are often very specific to the locals who negotiated them, they never reach the provincial table to be improved and it is important to find a way to account for the inflation related to these items. We need to find a way to get these items to reach the provincial table and/or be moved to the local table for negotiation. In order to do this, we need a collective strategy to look for commonalities between language and/or clauses that allow us to devise bargaining objectives specific to dealing with these items. 114. Surrey That Procedure 3.G.02 be amended to remove full-time equivalent (FTE). Supporting statement The use of FTE of teaching does not accurately represent membership in locals. We know that many members need to work part time for family commitments, those members only count as part members in this calculation. All members should be valued as complete and whole within our union. Further, using FTE also excludes all members on leave and teachers teaching on call since they have 0 FTE each. The union still has a responsibility to represent those members. In Surrey, that equates to 400 members on leave and 1,300 TTOC who by this calculation have no weight in determining priorities for bargaining their future collective agreements. This calculation as it exists sends a message that they are not full members. Their contribution within bargaining is not represented within the delegates at the Bargaining Conference. Excerpt from the Members’ Guide, Procedure 3.G.02, Bargaining Conference (p. 27). 3. That the delegates to the Bargaining Conference be: i. members of the Executive Committee ii. members of the Bargaining Team (exclusive of staff) iii. local delegations consisting of: 18

• • •

Local President or designate local bargaining chairperson or designate further local delegates elected by the local on the basis of one further delegate per 250 members (FTE) or portion thereof in excess of the first 400 members.

EDUCATION FINANCE Recommendation 24 That Procedure 8.A.04 be replaced with the following: That the BCTF continue to advocate for improved and targeted grants from the Ministry of Education to school boards for students with special diverse needs, and for mechanisms to ensure that all of these grants are used for the ongoing support of assessment, designation, and inclusion of students in schools. Supporting statement This procedure was adopted by the 1993 Annual General Meeting and should be revised given the current context. Procedure 8.A.04 states: That the BCTF seek to ensure that Ministry of Education funding to school boards for students with special needs be increased to support integration and other models, be specifically designated in school board budgets and be expended on behalf of these students.

EDUCATION POLICY Recommendation 25 That Policies 3.L.03 and 3.L.05 be amended as follows: 3.L.03 That the federal and provincial governments should provide increased funding to school boards to ensure improved educational opportunities for students with language barriers who come from homes where English is not spoken. 3.L.05 That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to remove the five-year funding cap for ELL ESL and ESD students. Supporting statement The proposed changes to Policies 3.L.03 and 3.L.05 are intended to update the terminology. Recommendation 26 That Policies 9.H.01, 9.H.03, 9.H.09, 9.H.11, 9.H.15—2., 9.H.17—2., and 9.H.21 be amended as follows: H. English as a Second Language English Language Learners (ELL) 9.H.01 ESL ELL programs should be reviewed and additional staffing and resources, including teachers and multicultural workers, should be provided to assist in the delivery of these


9.H.03

9.H.09

9.H.11

9.H.15—2.

9.H.17—2.

9.H.21

programs. That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF develop provincial guidelines for assessment to support ESL ELL/ESD learners, in particular, ESL ELL/ESD learners with special needs (e.g., students with learning difficulties.); such guidelines to include: placement for ongoing language support; identification procedures for funding and appropriate services. That school boards support the integration inclusion of ESL ELL/ESD students into regular classes by providing both adequate space for the integrated students and ongoing support and resources for the students and the classroom teachers. That the Ministry of Education/school boards ensure that curricular resources are available to members that meet the specific needs of ESL ELL/ESD learners that recognize the cultural diversities of students. and include accurate images of students from a wide variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. That the Ministry of Children and Family Development Social Services, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education and school districts, provide multilingual home-school liaison workers proportional to the diverse backgrounds and numbers of ESLELL/ESD students in each school district. That school districts in consultation with locals, associations/unions ensure that the needs of ESL ELL/ESD students are considered and met in the implementation of all curriculum (assessment) guides and resources. That the BCTF promote public awareness of the issues related to ESL ELL/ESD students by publishing the findings of its ESL/ESD study.

Supporting statement The proposed changes to the language terminology of Policy 9.H as it pertains to ESL has been updated to reflect current English Language Learner (ELL) nomenclature. ELL includes English as an Additional Language (EAL), English as a Second Dialect (ESD), Apprentissage de la Langue Anglaise (ALA), Francization (French Language Learning, FLL).

Recommendation 27 That Policy 9.D.01—5. be amended as follows: That the provincial government should continue to provide the Adult Dogwood Diploma, the BC Secondary Regular Graduation program, and tuition-free education for adult students through programs courses offered by school boards. Supporting statement Adult education requires more than promotion and fostering as a process of life-long learning. The recommended revisions better capture the need for adult education to be a core component of the public education system. Adult education needs to be available in every school to meet the needs of the adult education students who are not afforded equitable access to education, as K–12 students are. Recommendation 28 That Policy 9.D.09 be amended as follows: That adult education programs should be accessible and stable, and that the BCTF call on school districts to both promote and make visible these programs visible in their communities. Supporting statement Adding the word “promote” brings action and intent to the policy. For example, school districts can promote adult education programs in their communities through advertising, social media, and through school district communications. Recommendation 29 That Policy 9.D.11 be amended as follows: That the criteria for measuring student/program success in adult education programs should take into account student needs and goals, learning abilities, and life circumstances and the role of adult education as a support system in the community. Supporting statement Adult education should be considered as K–12 education. The role adult education plays as a support system in the community, while very important, is not relevant in measuring outcomes of success. Recommendation 30 That Policy 9.D.13 be amended as follows: That the comprehensive theoretical and practical components of adult education should be available in all teacher education programs that are offered by teacher education institutions in the province in BC.

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Supporting statement Removing the word “should,” emphasizes the importance of and the necessity for comprehensive theoretical and practical components of adult education programs. The importance is further emphasized by ensuring these components of adult education programs be available in all teacher education programs in BC.

FINANCE Note: Fee recommendations 31–37 were approved by the Executive Committee and the Representative Assembly. Recommendation 31 That for the 2022–23 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.1(a) shall be 1.69% of the actual salary of the member, allocated as follows: • 1.319% to the General Operating Fund • 0.22% to the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund • 0.074% to the Public Education Defence Fund • 0.050% to the Provincial Bargaining Fund • 0.027% to the W.R. Long International Solidarity Fund • 0.000% to the Contingency Fund. Except that the fee for active members who are teachers teaching on call shall be 1.590%. Supporting statement This is a status quo fee recommendation. The recommendation is being made on the following basis: The BC Teachers’ Federation will be entering bargaining with the employer in the second half of fiscal 2021–22 and there is uncertainty of that process and the timing of when bargaining will conclude. During the pandemic, which its end is uncertain, the current fees have allowed the BCTF to change and shift focus. • The BCTF’s cost structure post-pandemic is currently unknown due to increased costs, which may or may not be temporary, and to the extent what those costs will be in the long term. In addition, how the BCTF conducts its business may be different from prior to the pandemic, which may also result in changes in costs. • More often, the BCTF is filling in the gaps for education and finance resources where required. • The 2021 Winter Representative Assembly’s decision to raise the strike pay from $50 to $100 will mean the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund will need to continue to build to meet the increased requirements. • The BCTF has significant contractual employee-related liabilities, including $43 million estimated non-pension post-employment benefits that needs to be paid and funded. • The proposed fee will allow flexibility where funding is 20

required, in particular, the General Operating Fund. The teachers teaching on call fee is recommended to remain at 1.590%. TTOCs receive all services covered by this fee, the same as any other active member. Recommendation 32 That for the 2022–23 membership year, the fee for affiliate administrative membership under By-law 1.6, exclusive of the Salary Indemnity Plan, be $100. Supporting statement This recommendation maintains a status quo fee for this category. Recommendation 33 That for the 2022–23 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.2 (associate membership), shall be $100, except that the fee for associate members who are students enrolled in programs of study in university/college programs leading to certification as teachers shall be $1. Supporting statement This is a status quo fee recommendation. Recommendation 34 That for the 2022–23 membership year, a member who is on leave of absence either without pay or on deferred salary leave, remains an active member, without payment of fees. Supporting statement No change from the current policy as per Procedure 10.B.18—4. This is consistent with By-law 1.8, which provides for members who are on unpaid leave of absence, from the school district in which they are employed, and not also employed by another school district, to remain active members without payment of fee for the leave period. Recommendation 35 That for the 2022–23 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.6 (affiliate membership) shall be an amount negotiated between the BCTF and the affiliate, on a fee for-service basis. Supporting statement No change from the current policy as per Procedure 10.B.18—5. Recommendation 36 That for the 2022–23 membership year, the fee for active membership for those who are members under By-law 1.1(b) shall be the same as the fee for active members


under By-law 1.1(a), provided that the Representative Assembly may, in establishing policy regarding the eligibility of such members, waive or modify the fees. Supporting statement No change from current policy as per Procedure 10.B.18—6. Recommendation 37 That the BCTF appoint the audit firm KPMG as its auditor for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022. Supporting statement The Audit Committee continues to be satisfied with the audit services provided by KPMG and continues to believe that KPMG is best suited to meet BCTF’s financial reporting needs. A comprehensive review of the auditor was last completed in fiscal 2018–19. Recommendation 38 That Procedure 10.L.04—1. be amended as follows: That as an objective, the BCTF achieve a balance in the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund of $40,000,000 $80,000,000. Supporting statement The $40 million goal of the CBDF was set by the 1999 Annual General Meeting. The proposed goal is to reflect the increased membership and also that, at the 2021 Winter Representative Assembly, the daily strike pay was increased from $50 to $100 per day. 115. Comox That the Federation create a three-year roadmap/plan to bring the BCTF member fee to 1.59% of a teacher’s salary with a report to the 2023 Annual General Meeting. Supporting statement The Federation went through over a decade of financial hardship following the 2002 stripping of our contract and the protracted legal and political battle that followed. To deal with these monetary stresses the Federation undertook many austerity measures: cutting staff, programs, and expenses. In addition, a mortgage was taken out on the building and the membership fee was raised with the assurance this was a needed measure and that this was a temporary measure. Since our Supreme Court victory, we have seen a stabilization of our financial situation. Our mortgage is paid off. Our strike fund has been replenished. Our membership (and therefore the influx of member dues) has increased. Now is the time to follow through with the promise of returning the fee to what it was.

116. Prince Rupert That pet boarding be added as a reimbursable expense for traveling on Federation business with receipts being required. Supporting statement On page 59 of the Members’ Guide under Section 10.I.02— Travel and Expense Allowances, it states: In principle, a member or staff person should not be “out-of- pocket” because of necessary expenses when on Federation business. Currently, while most reasonable expenses are reimbursed, one that is not is pet boarding. This is a valid expense that members must pay when conducting union business. Not everyone is lucky enough to have a spouse, relative, or friend that will take care of their pet while they are away, which means a person must find someone willing/able to do it and pay them for their services. This is not cheap. Most people or places that board pets charge at least $20 per day, and it can go up to $50 or more. This adds up over the year, especially if people are volunteering for multiple roles, as many of us have had to do, especially during COVID-19. Even at $20 per day if a person attended the fall and spring zones (two days, not including travel days) and the Annual General Meeting (four days not including travel days), this would be about $160. At $50 per day, this would add up to $400. For members holding multiple positions, the number is obviously larger.

HEALTH, WELFARE, AND SAFETY OF TEACHERS Recommendation 39 That for the 2022–23 membership year, each member eligible to participate in the Salary Indemnity Plan pay, in addition to the fee for the operation of the Federation, a fee for the operation of the Salary Indemnity Fund of 1.99% of the actual salary of the member, plus the participating employee’s share of the employer’s savings from reduced Employment Insurance premiums. Supporting statement The Salary Indemnity Fund (SIF) fee pays for the administration of the SIF’s investments, the administration and payment of SIP claims, and the operation of the BCTF Health and Wellness Program. On June 30, 2020, the Plan had a surplus (assets in excess of 130% of liabilities) of $26.8 million. As a result, the BCTF 2021 AGM set the fee at 1.91% for the 2021–22 school year, which was expected to further reduce the surplus at the June 30, 2021, valuation. The surplus in excess of 130% liabilities was reduced from $26.8 million to $26.7 million. Although the actual cost of the Plan was 2.70% compared to an expected cost of 2.10%, the surplus only decreased slightly 21


due to a larger $18.9 million better than expected investment experience gain plus expected return on surplus. The most recent actuarial valuation of the Salary Indemnity Plan (SIP) illustrates that over the past five years the Plan cost 2.19% of salaries. The Plan’s actuary recommends that the BCTF set the SIP fee at 2.01% of salaries, based on the cost of coverage, decreased by a dividend to consume surplus assets (assets in excess of 130% of liabilities) over 5 years. An SIP fee of 2.01% would consume $5.4 million of the surplus each year and requires 5.5 years to exhaust. In addition, an increase of 0.10% of salaries from 1.91% to 2.01% of salaries for the 2022–23 school year would equate to approximately $4 more per pay period for a teacher earning $80,000, paid bi-monthly over 10 months. Based on this year’s actuarial valuation, the Income Security Committee considered the rising cost of coverage for both the short-term and long-term portions of the Plan, the uncertainties associated with future investment experience gains, potential pandemic effects on future claims and costs, as well as the higher cost of living experienced by members in many areas of the province. A SIP fee recommendation of 1.99% for the 2022–23 school year recognizes the need to provide stability to the Plan from a cost perspective, to reduce the surplus gradually over time, and acknowledges the preference of adjusting the SIP fee in smaller increments rather than larger ones each year. Recommendation 40 That Regulation 13.C.02—3.4 be amended as follows: 3.4 A member applying for benefits, or in receipt of benefits, under the plan may be required to submit to an independent medical examination by a licensed physician selected by the plan administrator or their agent(s). Supporting statement Regulation 3.4 applies to both short-term and long-term claims. This change reflects current practice and gives clarity to members reading the regulation. There are times when sending a claimant for an independent medical examination (IME) is necessary for the adjudication of the claim. These are more commonly done when there are contradictions in the submitted medical or when there have been no treatment plans submitted. Additionally, under the authorization of the Plan Administrator, an IME for the adjudication of claims past the first year of long-term, are often required by Canada Life to assess the current level of disability. Recommendation 41 That Regulation 13.C.02—11.7 be amended as follows: 11.7 If while in receipt of benefits from this plan 22

the claimant is entitled to claim benefits from Workers’ Compensation for the same accident or illness, or Employment Insurance (maternity/ parental) (special benefits, excluding sickness benefits), the benefits from this plan shall be reduced by the amount of benefits from the Workers’ Compensation or Employment Insurance (maternity/parental) (special benefits, excluding sickness benefits) plan. Supporting statement Regulation 11.7 applies to short-term disability claims only. Members in receipt of Salary Indemnity Plan (SIP) benefits who also qualify and receive “special benefits” in the form of maternity or parental benefits from Service Canada already have their short-term SIP benefits reduced by the amount of Employment Insurance (EI) benefits received. As the types of “special benefits” provided by Service Canada have increased over the past 34 years, the proposed change to this regulation would expand the types of “special benefits” which are offset by the Plan. The revision from maternity/parental to special benefits, excluding sickness benefits, is intended to generalize the EI benefits which may be offset. Under current legislation, these benefits would include pregnancy, parental, compassionate care or family caregiver benefits under the Employment Insurance Act. The use of the term “special benefits,” excluding sickness benefits, allows this provision to be correct regardless of future changes to the legislation. This change reflects the value of being mindful of the financial viability of the Plan and cost to members. Please note that EI sickness benefits cannot be collected by claimants while they are in receipt of SIP benefits. The Plan receives a portion of the EI rebate provided by Service Canada to the school districts in BC because the Salary Indemnity Plan provides benefits superior to and instead of EI sickness benefits. Recommendation 42 That Salary Indemnity Plan Regulation 13.C.02—23. be amended as follows: 23.1 For a claimant to remain eligible to receive benefits, any approved accommodation activities remunerative (volunteering, coursework, or accommodation employment) must be recommended by a licensed physician and approved by the Plan Administrator. The Plan Administrator’s decision is subject to review by the Income Security Committee. The claimant may appeal the Plan Administrator’s decision to the Income Security Committee. 23.2 Any of the following may be eligible for consideration as accommodation employment:


a. a return to normal employment duties on a part-time basis; b. any gainful occupation that is of a less demanding nature than the normal employment duties; c. a formal vocational training program. 23.3 The claimant is responsible for reporting involvement in approved accommodation employment activities in the manner established by the Plan Administrator. 23.4 Any request by the claimant for an accommodation extension of benefits beyond that outlined in Regulation 21.1 must be presented to the Income Security Committee for decision. The Income Security Committee’s decision shall be final and binding. Supporting statement Regulation 23 applies to long-term disability claims only. The purpose of the changes to this regulation is to align the changes to the long-established practice of requiring the granting of permission to volunteer and take coursework into the regulations. This would make it clear that the Plan would, going forward, only approve volunteering and coursework for the long-term portion. Recommendation 43 That Salary Indemnity Plan Regulation 22.1 be deleted with subsequent renumbering: 22.1 No benefits shall be payable for, or on account of; a. intentionally self-inflicted injuries or illnesses, or b. illness or injury incurred while in the service of the armed forces of any country. Supporting statement Regulation 22.1 applies to long-term claims only. The Plan is conscious of the potential for this regulation to be applied in a manner that discriminates against claimants with a mental illness. It is problematic to maintain these exclusions under the Plan as it could lead to claim denials where injuries are a result of or an aggravation of a mental illness or a pre-existing condition. The Plan is not aware of any members who have intentionally hurt themselves or injured themselves in the armed forces in order to obtain benefits from the Plan. As a result, the Plan does not expect this regulation change to impact members. Recommendation 44 That Salary Indemnity Plan Regulation 13.C.02—24.3 be deleted and replaced with: 24.3 Any referral of a dispute to a Medical Review Committee must be commenced not later than one year after the claimant has been advised of

24.3

the decision which is the subject of the dispute. To commence the referral to a Medical Review Committee, a claimant must: a. advise the plan administrator in writing that they are referring the matter to a Medical Review Committee; and b. provide the plan administrator with a written statement signed by a physician that they agree to act as the claimant’s designated physician for the Medical Review Committee. The Salary Indemnity Plan shall apply for a doctor to represent the plan within 15 days of the above notification, and advise the claimant of its designated physician as soon as reasonably possible thereafter. If the designated physicians cannot agree upon a chairperson within 30 calendar days after the date the plan advises the claimant of the name of its nominee, the appointment shall be made by the Dean of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, or their delegate. Any referral of a dispute to a medical review committee must be commenced not later than one year after the claimant has been advised of the decision which is the subject of the dispute: a. To commence the referral to a medical review committee, a claimant must: i. advise the Plan Administrator in writing that they are referring the matter to a medical review committee. ii. provide the Plan Administrator with a written statement signed by a physician that they agree to act as the claimant’s designated physician for the medical review committee. b. The Salary Indemnity Plan shall apply for a doctor to represent the Plan within 15 days of the above notification and advise the claimant of its designated physician as soon as reasonably possible thereafter. c. The Plan’s designated physician will review such materials as they deem necessary and may require the claimant to submit to a medical examination, before providing the Plan Administrator with their medical opinion regarding the external agency’s decision. A copy of the medical opinion will be provided to the claimant’s designated physician. d. Upon receiving the above opinion, the Plan Administrator may: i. place the claimant back on claim with payments retroactive to the date of denial/ 23


e.

f.

g.

h.

termination, with the claim continuing to be administered in the same manner as all other long-term disability claims. ii. confirm the external agency’s decision. The Plan Administrator may confirm the external agency’s decision, on the basis of the Plan’s designated physician’s medical opinion or if the claimant has not provided the requested medical information or submitted to an examination. In this case, the claimant may advise the Plan Administrator, within 30 days of their designated physician’s receipt of the medical opinion, that they wish to continue with the medical review committee process. If the member advises they wish to continue with the medical review committee process, in accordance with Regulation 24.3 (e), the designated physicians will select a third physician to act as chairperson for the medical review committee. If the designated physicians cannot agree upon a chairperson within 30 calendar days after the date the claimant informs the Plan Administrator about their desire to continue with the medical review committee, the appointment shall be made by the Dean of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, or their delegate. The Plan Administrator may exercise their discretion to extend the time limits contained in this regulation in circumstances in which the claimant has made bone fide efforts to comply with the time limits.

Supporting statement Regulation 23 applies to long-term disability claims only. A legal risk arises in circumstances where procedural commitments are made but are not adhered to, or where the Plan seeks to impose procedural requirements beyond those set out in the regulations. It is not possible to comply with the process specified in the current regulations. The purpose of the change to Regulation 24.3 is to align the wording in the regulation with the Plan’s practice and reduce the legal risk.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION 117. Langley That, to ensure members are partners in the integration of compassionate systems leadership (one of the three pillars of our provincial Mental Health in Schools Strategy) into BC public schools, the BCTF take steps including (but not limited to): 24

1. requesting that the Ministry of Education provide time and opportunity for BCTF members and staff to take part in the same four-day introductory training that was provided to other education partners (e.g., BCSSTA and BCPVPA members) in 2020–21. 2. investigating opportunities for the work of the BCTF, including meetings and training at the local and provincial levels, to incorporate a compassionate systems leadership lens. Supporting statement There is an endless benefit to the entire system from the balanced collaboration of all parties including the BCTF, community members, colleagues, teachers, students, and senior management. The value of compassionate systems leadership (CSL) training extends significantly beyond the individual person or group. Its worth is not limited to isolated settings, with substantial benefits apparent through implementation within group settings, including classrooms, during parental interactions, not to mention administration or with senior management. The skills provided by this training are representative of a greater diverse population of individuals vital to the healthy operation of the entire system and they are beneficial at every level to encourage simultaneous and continuous alignment with First Nations principles of learning. This collaboration also means working toward the creation and sustenance of traumasensitive schools that emphasize safety, empowerment, and collaborative partnerships between children and adults. The goal of CSL is to grow “compassionate integrity” wherein the ways in which each of us thinks, feels, and acts are aligned in recognition and deliberate consideration of our interconnectedness, our interdependency, and our common humanity so we can learn together in ways that ultimately support the well-being of the entire system including self, family, community, land, spirits, and ancestors.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BCTF Recommendation 45 That Procedure 25.H.14—7. be deleted. Supporting statement This recommendation was made to the 2020 Annual General Meeting but was not brought forward due to the condensed virtual format of the 2020 Annual General Meeting. The original intent of this procedure was to ensure that part-time teachers would be paid at an on-scale rate when they were released for union leave as a teacher teaching on call (TTOC), on a day that was not a part of their contract work. Since this procedure was adopted, the union has achieved gains in collective agreement provisions related to union leave for TTOCs and provisions related to TTOC pay. TTOCs are now


paid on scale for each day of work and are not paid a “top up” by the union. This procedure should be removed from the Members’ Guide as its continued inclusion has caused confusion. Eliminating this policy is consistent with the BCTF principle that a member should not gain or be out of pocket as a result of performing union business. Members on part-time contracts are now able to receive a leave of absence in the following circumstances: • Members on part-time contracts and are on the TTOC list, doing union business on days they normally do not teach will now receive pay from their employer through a leave of absence request. • Members on part-time contracts, doing union business on days that they normally teach will receive pay from their employer through a leave of absence request. Conversely, part-time teachers not on the district’s TTOC list, are unable to receive a leave of absence request. However, they would not be giving up potential work and therefore would not be out of pocket. Procedure 25.H.14—7. states: That part-time teachers who attend a school union representative training session during instructional time when they do not normally teach, be compensated on a per diem rate of 1/189 of the member’s regular scale placement or portion thereof, if the training session is less than a full day. Recommendation 46 That a new Procedure 25.A.52 be added as follows: When participating in BCTF meetings and events, all members are expected to act in accordance with a culture of consent and consider their actions, words, and related feedback in order to ensure a safe, respectful environment for all. Supporting statement Procedure 25.A.48 specifically addresses the BCTF’s role in advancing a culture of consent and the Federation’s responsibility to ensure that members are free from inappropriate comments, gestures, and physical contact at all Federation meetings, socials, and events. Currently, however, there isn’t a corresponding procedure that addresses the responsibility of members participating in these functions to also ensure that they are active participants in ensuring a culture of consent. This proposed new procedure would make clear that members participating at Federation meetings, socials, and events have a responsibility to ensure their actions, words, and feedback are consistent with a culture of consent.

Recommendation 47 That a new Procedure 25.C.40 be adopted as follows: 1. An Annual General Meeting or a Special General Meeting may conduct a vote to remove a member of the Executive Committee under By-law 5.21 in accordance with the following process: a. The member will receive adequate notice of the allegations against them and that their status as a member of the Executive Committee is being considered by the Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting. b. The member will be given an opportunity to make a written submission to the Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting regarding the allegations and their membership on the Executive Committee. 2. The Executive Committee may conduct a vote to suspend a member of the Executive Committee under By-law 5.21 in accordance with the following process: a. The member will receive adequate notice of the allegations against them and that their status as a member of the Executive Committee is being considered by the Executive Committee. b. The member will be given an opportunity to make a written submission to the Executive Committee regarding the allegations and their membership on the Executive Committee. Supporting statement This proposed procedure is to accompany the new Bylaw 5.21. The procedure ensures procedural fairness for any decision concerning suspension or removal of an Executive Committee member. The key elements are that the member is provided with notice and the opportunity to make submissions. By setting out the process in the BCTF procedures, it is clear to all parties involved what procedural requirements must be followed prior to a decision being made regarding suspension or removal from the Executive Committee. Recommendation 48 That Procedure 25.B.02—4. be amended as follows: That until the investigation of representation is complete and the amalgamated and non-amalgamated locals are treated equally, if f For locals amalgamated in or after 1996, the formulae for determining representation and voting cards as set out in Procedures statements 25.B.02 and 25.D.02 shall be applied to the amalgamated local so that it is entitled to the total representation of the former locals as though there had been non amalgamation.

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Supporting statement The current wording of this procedure includes a reference to an “investigation of representation.” That wording has been in the procedure since it was first adopted by the Annual General Meeting in 2003 in the wake of the extremely unfortunate decision of the BC NDP government in the mid-1990s to amalgamate several school districts. The recommendation above leaves the practical effect of the procedure exactly as is, but removes the time-specific reference—and, importantly, the implication of the current procedure that it would no longer be in effect after the “investigation of representation” is completed. This recommendation is consistent with By-law 3.4. 118. Burnaby That members of Federation advisory committees be encouraged to attend/facilitate zone meetings in zones where they don’t work. Supporting statement Our locals, across the province, are rich in diverse experience. The ability for advisory committee members to attend and facilitate zone meetings outside where they work, will allow members to learn about the broad range of working and learning conditions across the province. 119. Coquitlam That Policy 25.D.14 be amended as follows: 1. That the Representative Assembly (RA) Agenda Committee consist of: a. The President and the chairpersons of the RA as non-voting members b. Five Seven LRs, elected by the assembly at its spring meeting, as voting members including: i. one LR who identifies as Indigenous ii. one LR who identifies as Black or a Person of Colour. 2. That the Agenda Committee elect its own chairperson. Supporting statement Over the last several years the Federation has made steps towards equity by adding designated seats for members who are Indigenous, Black, or People of Colour to the Executive Committee. Along the same vein, it is now important to create space for the marginalized voices of colleagues to be heard in the RA Agenda Committee. By adding a seat for both an Indigenous member and a person who is Black or Person of Colour to the RA Agenda Committee we ensure that these important, yet often unheard voices are included in setting the agenda, supporting members who are crafting amendments, new motions, or alternate wording, as well as in supporting chairpersons and giving advice on the Standing Rules of Order. With more diverse voices in these decisions, we can 26

and will do better in how we set agendas for RAs and can take another important step toward a more equitable meeting space for everyone. 120. Greater Victoria That the Annual General Meeting recommend to the Executive Committee that the Federation form a Climate Action Committee, to advise the Executive Committee on climate issues, to work to encourage teachers to act on the climate crisis, and to implement climate related motions from the Executive Committee, Representative Assembly, and Annual General Meeting. Supporting statement We have the Environmental Justice Action Group of the Committee for Action on Social Justice, but this deals with the whole environmental justice area, as well as being active participants in intersectional work with the rest of CASJ. The climate crisis is so big, we need a dedicated group of teachers working on our response to the crisis. We currently have many motions (such as the motion to campaign against liquefied natural gas passed at last year’s Annual General Meeting) for which little has been done due to the limit on time and resources of existing committees and staff. 121. Surrey That Procedure M. Zone Meetings, 25.M.02 be amended to add 1. i. a local political action contact for each provincial electoral district. Supporting statement The Political Action Contacts (PACs) do important work in every provincial electoral district, making sure that every MLA knows one teacher-constituent who speaks to them regularly on issues in BC schools. This is a long-game strategy where these PACs bring current issues to those discussions and insist on fundamental support for public education, proper funding, and all the progressive changes teachers envision for the school system. Every MLA needs to clearly understand the centrality of public education in the functioning of our society, of our democracy, and our economy, and so these conversations are important. To do this work, each PAC needs up to three release days every year to lobby, plan, attend training, and network to keep politicians’ minds focused on public education. Each year a training session or conference should be hosted by the BCTF to train PACs for their crucially important work. 122. Surrey That the Annual General Meeting recommend to the BCTF Executive Committee to establish a Political Action Contacts Advisory Committee to facilitate and enhance the political work of the Federation.


Supporting statement A Political Action Contacts (PAC) Advisory Committee would help steer PAC’s work with BCTF staff, provide leadership at zone meetings or other PAC training sessions, and invigorate this advocacy work. The PACs do important work in every provincial electoral district, making sure that every MLA knows one teacher-constituent who speaks to them regularly on issues in BC schools. This is a long game strategy where these PACs bring current issues to those discussions, and insist on fundamental support for public education, proper funding, and all the progressive changes teachers envision for the school system. Every MLA needs to clearly understand the centrality of public education in the functioning of our society, of our democracy and our economy, and so these conversations are important. 123. Surrey That the Annual General Meeting urge the Executive Committee to form a Climate Action Advisory Committee, to advise the BCTF Executive Committee on climate issues, to work to encourage teachers to act on the climate crisis, and to provide an environmental justice lens to the BCTF Executive Committee, Representative Assembly, and Annual General Meeting. Supporting statement The fight against climate change goes far beyond providing support for teachers affected by horrific climate realities like flooding caused by atmospheric rivers, entire towns lost to wildfires and heat domes. These after the fact reactions keep up continually in an existential threat reality of leaving us vulnerable and constantly in crisis mode with devastating impacts. As union members, we need to develop fully fledged climate action plans that transform the way we do business in all regards. The amazing work of the CASJ—Environmental Justice Action Group needs to be elevated to a fully separate advisory committee, with proper staffing, support, and a more substantial capacity to help our Executive Committee make vital and truly earth saving decisions that strengthen our membership both at work, and in their general lives. If we do not undo the specialist lenses we hold, where we sideline nature/climate as a tokenized side box reality, we are in fact not doing the work of our union to support our members, but rather leaving them fully exposed to the elements. To be a fully social justice union, a climate justice lens is a necessity, this committee will help us achieve that goal by giving teachers and our union leadership the tools we need to stop this man-made ecocide. Let us empower ourselves always.

124. Vancouver Elementary That the BCTF review existing grant criteria to enable locals to hold grievance committee meetings for up to six days per school year. Supporting statement The role of a grievance committee can serve many purposes for a local. The committee can consider the implementation of the collective agreement, prepare a local for local bargaining, and give advice to local executive committees about issues arising within the school year. In smaller locals, this would give more opportunities to share the workload of grievance and serve as another mechanism to educate members about their collective agreement. In this way, the grievance committee can serve to build a stronger local membership by broadening skill sets among local leadership and providing opportunities to train local activists. A grievance committee shares the thinking and advocacy skills of a local and encourages a broader commitment to the agreement. We know that there is unused grant money each year and so by expanding the existing grants to include the support of grievance committees, locals who choose to explore this as an option would be able to create a grievance committee that serves the needs of their local. 125. Vancouver Elementary That the Federation create a comprehensive and dynamic environmental action plan. Supporting statement Climate change is the existential crisis of our era and the time to reverse or mitigate its impact is diminishing by the day. Considering the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) declaring code red for humanity and the editors of 200 medical journals warning that climate change is the greatest threat to public health, I think it is incumbent upon the BCTF to provide an environmental action plan for teachers to consult and use as they see fit. This summer in BC, we experienced an unprecedented heat dome that burned many crops, damaged forests and other plant life, and resulted in many deaths. Then came the unprecedented horrific fires that destroyed massive forests as well as leaving the town of Lytton in ashes and at least two people dead. If this wasn’t enough of a wake-up call, the fall atmospheric rivers descended on the Fraser Valley, flooding the Sumas region and the city of Abbotsford causing catastrophic destruction of farms, houses, and highways. All this devastation during a pandemic. To keep our global temperature from rising 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, we must take immediate action to make planet-friendly changes in our lifestyle. Teaching students about the intricacies of climate change and helping them understand the importance of how we can all help the planet by reducing our carbon footprint is paramount. A climate action plan can assist in that endeavor. 27


126. Abbotsford That the BCTF uphold its duties to protect employment rights and working conditions of all its members, regardless of religion, sexual orientation, gender identification, political beliefs, ethnicity, medical status, or disability. Supporting statement The BCTF Executive Committee has taken a public promandate stance on vaccination for all of its members. Although many local school boards have currently declined a vaccine mandate program for their employees, there remains the possibility that a mandate could be enacted, especially with the support of the BCTF Executive Committee. 1. Duty of the union to represent A union has the duty to represent and support all of its members. The BCTF’s original goals, which remain to this day, were: a. to foster and promote the cause of education. b. to raise the status of the teaching profession in BC. c. to promote the welfare of teachers in BC. As well, one of the priorities set by the 2021 Annual General Meeting (found in Part 1 of the Members’ Guide) is that the BCTF safeguard and improve the health, safety, rights, and security of all members. Further, the Canada Industrial Relations Board, section 37, provides that “a trade union that is the bargaining agent for a unit of employees shall not act in a manner that is arbitrary, discriminatory or in bad faith in the representation of any of the employees in the bargaining unit…” It also states, “a trade union must not discriminate against any employee on any illegal or prohibited ground, such as age, race, religion, sex or medical condition.” The BCTF needs to be held accountable to upholding its own goals and priorities, as well as the regulations of larger entities to which the union is belongs. 2.

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Negative impact on the teaching profession The consequences of losing our valuable colleagues will have a negative impact on remaining teachers. BC schools are already facing a teacher shortage. Teaching staff currently experience consequences such as missed preparation time or having no coverage for their class when they are ill. Administrators and support teachers are frequently pulled from their duties to cover teacher absences. Losing qualified teachers could result in longfought-for class-size and composition language being ignored as students without a teacher are shuffled into existing classrooms. Alternatively, many districts have policies in place to hire uncertified adults to fill those vacant positions. This could set a precedent of hiring untrained, unqualified persons to work in the same capacity as trained and licensed BC educators. Existing

teachers will now bear the burden of coaching and explaining to new personnel. All of this will undoubtedly further weaken the reputation of BC’s teaching profession in the eyes of the public. 3.

Potential legal challenges Our BCTF Code of Ethics is very clear that we must maintain high standards of professional service and conduct toward students, colleagues, and the professional union. The BCTF is not a medical entity and, as such, should not be recommending medical treatments for students and staff. This is beyond the professional capacity of both the President and the union as a whole. While the BCTF Executive Committee seems confident that a vaccine mandate for members would not contravene any laws, there are numerous laws, codes, and acts that could be violated, resulting in costly legal challenges. These include, but are not limited to, the following: a. Bill S-201 (an act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination) prohibits any person from requiring an individual to undergo a genetic test or disclose the results of a genetic test as a condition of providing goods or services to, entering into or continuing a contract or agreement with, or offering specific conditions in a contract or agreement with the individual. The enactment also amends the Canada Labour Code to protect employees from being required to undergo or to disclose the results of a genetic test and provides employees with other protections related to genetic testing and test results. As well, it amends the Canadian Human Rights Act to prohibit discrimination on the ground of genetic characteristics. b. The Immunization Act of 1997 states that” immunization cannot be made mandatory because of the Canadian Constitution.” c. The Nuremberg Code, of which Canada is a signatory, states that voluntary informed consent is essential before performing medical experiments on human beings. The Code also confirms that the person involved should have the legal capacity to give consent without the intervention of any element of force, duress, or other form of constraint or coercion. d. The Constitution Act of 1982, section 52(1) states that the Constitution of Canada is the supreme law of Canada and any law that is inconsistent with the provisions of the Constitution is, to the extent of the inconsistency, of no force or effect. It also confirms that “[e]veryone has the right to life, liberty, and security of the person…” and that “[e]very individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination…”


127. Kamloops Thompson That the Federation advocate for in-service training for all teachers in districts that are changing to competencybased individual education planning. Supporting statement To align inclusive education practices with the new curriculum, many districts are adopting competency-based individual education plans (IEPs). While in-service time is provided for learning assistance (resource) teachers on how to write these plans, there has been little consideration of how to inform parents and classroom teachers about the changes. This change will affect the way in which teachers are expected to participate in, monitor, and report on individualized educational goals. Competency-based IEPs require significant collaboration between the case manager and classroom teachers, beyond what traditional IEPs have previously required. Teachers, particularly those who teach multiple subjects and multiple students with IEPs, do not always have time to attend IEP meetings and work with case managers to create individualized goals pertaining to specific competencies and activities in their classes.

PENSIONS Recommendation 49 That Policy 26.A.01 be amended as follows: A. Pension goal That the goal be the attainment of a pension plan that is fully funded, jointly trusteed, service based, fully indexed, and maintains the relative economic status of members of the pension plan and/or their designated beneficiaries beneficiary(ies) following retirement, disability, or death. B. Pension design 1. Plan members That all members of the BCTF bargaining unit, administrative officers, and superintendents in the BC public school system, eligible employees of Boards of Education or Francophone Education Authorities as established under the School Act, eligible employees of employers approved by the Pension Board of Trustees, and all recipients of a BC teacher pension be members of the pension plan, (hereinafter referred to as plan members). 2.

The pension plan a. That the pension be: i. vested after 20 months of contributory service immediately.

ii. based on service and on the five-year highest average salary earned. iii. defined on a two percent formula integrated with the Canada Pension Plan. iv. indexed fully to the Canadian Consumer Price Index. v. payable at age 55, or later. b. That the pension plan recognizes, as contributory service, up to five years of child rearing time. c. That contributions, when vested, be lockedin to the plan, to another registered pension plan, or to a locked-in RRSP retirement account. c. That subject to a spousal waiver, the plan member may name the beneficiary(ies) eligible to receive a refund the commuted value, a guarantee of pension payment, or a pre-retirement death benefit. d. That there be no discrimination on the basis of gender or marital status in the eligibility for, or the calculation of, single life pensions or their equivalent. 3. Purchase of service: That there be provision for: a. reinstatement of refunds taken prior to January 1, 1996. b. a. purchase of periods of leave of absence. c. b. purchase of service in other jurisdictions. d. c. purchase of service by plan members who were employed in a less than 50% assignment prior to January 1, 1993, provided that the plan member had not signed a waiver declining participation in the pension plan. d. purchase of service for leaves as provided in the Employment Standards Act. 4. Portability a. That there be portability between defined benefit public sector pension plans provided that: i. transfers of service be cost neutral to the pension plan. ii. all service in the exporting plan be credited for eligibility in the importing plan. iii. credited service for pension calculation be determined by the ratio of the actuarial liability in the exporting plan to the actuarial liability in the importing plan.

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iii. if the transfer value from the exporting plan is equal to the amount requested by the importing plan, the total service of the exporting plan shall be credited for pension calculation in the importing plan. iv. if the transfer value from the exporting plan is less than the amount requested by the importing plan, the importing plan shall recognize a portion of the service credited to the person by the exporting plan for pension calculation in the ratio of the transfer amount requested to the transfer value from the exporting plan. v. a person to whom section 4.a.iv. (above) applies to may elect to pay all or part of the shortfall, and for the purpose of pension calculation, shall be given the additional pensionable service. b. That, if the actuarial liability in the exporting plan is less than the actuarial liability in the importing plan, the plan member be permitted to pay the difference to receive full service credit.

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5.

Pre-retirement death benefit That, upon the death of a plan member prior to retirement, a benefit be payable to a spouse, the named beneficiary(ies), or estate.

6.

Group disability plans That a plan member in receipt of benefits from an approved group disability plan be credited with service for that period, and that salary for pension calculation purposes be indexed.

7.

Pension options a. That the normal form of a pension be single life 10-year guarantee. b. That the following further options be available: i. single life no with guarantee. ii. single life five-year guarantee. iii. single life fifteen-year guarantee. iv. ii. joint life and last survivor. v. iii. temporary annuity in the amount of the Old Age Security. vi. iv. a combination of the above. c. That a plan member who has a spouse be required to select at least 60 percent % of the pension on a joint life and last survivor basis, unless the spouse signs a waiver.

C. Governance 1. That the pension plan be managed through a joint trust agreement between the BCTF as the plan member partner, and the BC government as the plan employer partner. 2. That the Pension Board of Trustees be at least 10 persons representing equally each of the plan partners, with the provision that an outside person may be appointed as a non-voting chair. 3. That the plan member partner trustees be nominated by and from the Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee and appointed for three years three-year terms by the BCTF Executive Committee as follows: a. three active plan members who are members of the BCTF and/or BCTF staff. b. one excluded plan member. c. one retired plan member. However, if an appointed trustee should retire during their term, the trustee may, at the discretion of the Executive Committee, complete the term and the objective set out in the preceding statement will be achieved in subsequent appointments. 4. That a plan member partner trustee shall remain a member of the Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee throughout the term of their trusteeship appointed term. Supporting statement Soon after the 2000 Joint Trust Agreement was signed, the plan member groups—BCTF, BC Retired Teachers’ Association, BC Principals’ and Vice-Principals’ Association, and BC School Superintendents Association—agreed on a Common Pension Policy in 2002. This became part of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF. The Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee (TPPAC) reviewed and updated this policy to reflect the 2018 plan design changes, the further 2019 pension improvements, and the updated Employment Standards Act. The BCTF Executive Committee approved the above changes in December 2019 in a recommendation to the 2020 AGM but the recommendation never made it to the 2020 AGM or the 2021 AGM due to the COVID-19 pandemic. TPPAC continues to support the recommended changes. 128. Revelstoke Teachers’ Association That the Federation advise our pension board members to promote immediate divestment from all fossil fuel company holdings in our pension.


Supporting statement 2021 has demonstrated that the climate crisis is here, and increasingly having a direct impact on our members. After the June heat dome destroyed the town of Lytton and killed hundreds of people, we saw relentless fires across the province, for yet another summer of smoke. This was followed by devastating floods in November, which took lives, livestock, and impacted thousands. Schools were closed, and teachers were impacted through flooding of their homes, being trapped in their communities, or worse even, being told to evacuate, as the residents of Merritt experienced. Every ton of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will worsen our plight. The drastic failure of international leaders at the UN COP26 conference showed, yet again, that we cannot simply rely on governments to “do the right thing”. Scientists tell us the world is on track to warm by 3°C by 2100, yet also that anything more than 1.5°C will be deadly and catastrophic. As climate scientist Johann Rockström told The Guardian newspaper: “A rise of 1.5°C is not an arbitrary number, it is not a political number. It is a planetary boundary.” This means that going beyond this limit poses a serious risk of irreversible change. Despite work to improve the ethical investing profile of our pension funds, in 2018 the Corporate Mapping Project in its analysis of our pension’s holdings in fossil fuels, showed how incompatible our pension investments are with a 1.5°C world. The project is a joint initiative of the University of Victoria, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and the Parkland Institute. They analyzed the fossil fuel investments of BCI, the investment arm of the BC public pension system, and the fourth largest pension fund in Canada. Their findings indicate that “As of 2016, BCI had over $3 billion invested in the top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel reserve holders—it is invested in 74% of the oil and gas companies with the largest fossil fuel reserves and 30% of the biggest reserve-holding coal producers. Instead of curbing these investments to align itself with the Paris Agreement, BCI has been increasing its oil and gas investments. Since BCI’s duty is to act in the best financial interests of plan members, its carbon-heavy holdings mean it may be breaching its statutory duty of prudence.” (www.policyalternatives.ca/fossil-fuelled-pensions) We cannot solve this crisis by investing in more fossil fuel production. We should be doing whatever we can to urge our pension trustees to immediately divest from all fossil fuels, to save our communities, planet, and pension for the future well-being of our members. As this past year has shown, there is no more time for delay. The time to act is now. 129. Surrey That the BCTF lobby the Teachers’ Pension Plan Board to set policy that guides the British Columbia Investment Management Corporation (BCI) in: 1. divesting from portfolios containing fossil fuel industries.

2.

allocating a greater portion of investments using environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria.

Supporting statement Many members are interested in socially responsible investments, including fossil-fuel free investments. As more and more organizations begin to divest their portfolios from the fossil-fuel industry, it is time for the BCTF to join this movement. For example, in January of 2012, New York City officials announced that city workers’ pension funds would pull an estimated $4 billion in investments from fossil fuel companies in order to promote clean energy use. Increasingly, fossil-fuel free investments are becoming more prevalent and bringing better returns to their investors. In fact, in 2018, Bank of America Merrill Lynch found that firms with a better ESG record than their peers produced higher threeyear returns, were more likely to become high-quality stocks, were less likely to have large price declines, and were less likely to go bankrupt. A statement of support from the Annual General Meeting would make clear to the pensions board that there is support from members for SRIs and fossil-fuel free investments.

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, RIGHTS, AND STANDARDS Recommendation 50 That the BCTF Code of Ethics, Procedure 31.B.02 be amended to add a new number 10. as follows: 10. In the course of union business and meetings, the member must not discriminate against any other member because of the race, colour, ancestry, Indigenous identity, place of origin, political belief, religion, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or age of that person or member, or because that person or member has been convicted of a criminal or summary conviction offence that is unrelated to the membership or intended membership, or any other protected grounds under the BC Human Rights Code. Supporting statement By embedding this statement of protected grounds under the BC Human Rights Code within the BCTF Code of Ethics, the Federation is clear that all members are required to act in accordance with the BC Human Rights Code. This helps ensure safe spaces free from discrimination for all members in support of greater union solidarity. Recommendation 51 That Procedure 31.C.02 be deleted.

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Supporting statement The current process for the Judicial Council election requires that candidates first be approved by a secret ballot of a local general meeting. This process is a barrier for Indigenous, Black, and Persons of Colour members (and many others) as election then relies on who someone knows and the power they may or may not hold within a local. This causes bias and favours election of those already holding organizational power, such as Local Presidents, Local Representatives, or members of executives simply because their name may be more familiar to those attending a meeting. By deleting this procedure, candidates would follow a process similar to other elected but non-Executive roles in the Federation such as health and safety representative, BC Federation of Labour representative, and Agenda Committee etc. Recommendation 52 That Procedure 31.C.12—1. be amended as follows: 1. The Representative Assembly shall elect at large and maintain an 18-member Judicial Council to implement the Code of Ethics. Four positions will be designated to be held by members who self-identify as being Aboriginal, Black, or Persons of Colour. In addition to the 18 members, the Representative Assembly shall elect a Judicial Council chairperson whose term shall be three years. Initially council members’ terms shall be staggered, i.e., six three-year terms, six two-year terms, and six one-year terms. In subsequent elections, terms for vacancies shall be set to maintain a balance of experience. There shall be no limit on the number of terms for which election to the Judicial Council may be sought but no No term shall be more than three years and no member may be elected for more than three terms. Supporting statement One of the primary ways to combat systemic barriers and racism is to create specific spaces for those who have not traditionally had access. Ensuring that there is greater diversity on the Judicial Council will help mitigate institutional procedural bias. When considered with the proposed changes to the Code of Ethics, this representation on the Judicial Council is critical to ensure appropriate representation in alignment with the diversity of the Federation membership in order to hear and consider matters that include instances of potential breaches of Human Rights Code protected grounds.

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POLITICAL ACTION 130. Burnaby That the Federation demand that when seamless day childcare is in a school, that the first choice for location be an empty classroom or a gym and that the program be fully funded, including all toys and resources. Supporting statement Childcare options for families in our school communities are a necessity. However, it is integral that the integration of seamless day childcare does not infringe on the working and learning conditions of teachers and students. 131. Chilliwack That the Federation adopt the week leading up to September 30 as Truth and Reconciliation Week. Supporting statement September 30, 2021 was the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Recognizing that teachers play a vital role in reconciliation, a week of activities leading up to September 30 would build student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and respect for the history and legacy of residential schools. The act of reconciliation must be part of every educator’s everyday practice. A week for truth and reconciliation could incorporate many activities that integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms. 132. Surrey That the BCTF: a. develop an intersectional campaign to encourage members to frequently and systematically integrate the climate emergency into their classroom lessons. b. promote available materials such as lesson plans and curriculum to support teachers in integrating climate justice in their lessons. c. advocate for the inclusion of climate justice in the curriculum at all grade levels (K–12) and in every subject. Supporting statement While climate change has long been a global issue, it was recently thrust into the spotlight when young environmental activists began worldwide school strikes that quickly became viral. These same students have urged teachers and parents to put the climate emergency forefront in their teaching and parenting. Indeed, recent North American polls reveal that over 80% of parents in the US support the teaching of climate change (NPR/Ipsos). These results are also consistent across party lines. In addition, a nationally representative survey of around 500 educators found that teachers are also overwhelmingly supportive of teaching climate change in schools, as 86% of them agree that it should be taught more frequently and comprehensively. Despite the results


of the poll, there appears to be a disconnect. While many schools participated in Earth Day, over half of the surveyed teachers said they “do not cover climate change in their own classrooms or even talk to their students about it,” while two-thirds said it is because they consider climate change to be outside their subject area. The resolution attempts to support teachers in teaching the climate emergency by first naming it, encouraging teachers to teach it, then providing materials to do so. It is imperative that teachers not avoid teaching about the climate crisis since it is our students that will be most significantly impacted by our failure to mitigate the damage it will inflict on future generations. Finally, the campaign needs to be intersectional because the climate crisis most significantly impacts those in the global south, People of Colour, Indigenous communities, those with mobility challenges, and the world’s most marginalized. In addition, it is caused by a complex set of challenges rooted in multiple injustices and oppressions. Any campaign on the issue of climate change must centre the experiences of the groups most impacted and ensure solutions stem out of those communities. 133. Greater Victoria That the Federation publicly campaign for paid sick leave for all workers, including teachers teaching on call. Supporting statement The pandemic has really put this issue into focus. For the good of all our institutions and our society in general, workers should have the security of not having to work when sick. Employers rail against this idea because they are suspicious of workers and worried about abuse of the days. This is not a good justification for not having a program that significantly reduces the spread of communicable diseases simply by allowing people who are contagious to stay away from the workplace. In future it would be interesting to sponsor a study of the long-term financial benefits of such a program, but to start with it would be good for the Federation to take a public stance on this issue either through press release, targeted advertisement, and/or work with other labour affiliates to build momentum towards having this practice adopted into the provincial labour code. 134. Greater Victoria That the last week of September be designated as Truth and Reconciliation Week. Supporting statement With September 30 being declared a day when students and staff are away from school, it would be a good idea and a small step toward reconciliation to make the last week of September a focused week for schools to focus on this specifically. Similarly, to Remembrance Day where the School Act says that schools must hold an assembly on the last

school day before November 11, it would be good to create the expectation from the union and hopefully the employer that schools are actively engaged in conversations about reconciliation throughout the days leading up to September 30. Ideally, if the 30th is a Friday, Saturday, or a Sunday, this will provide a full week of school days leading up to the 30th. If the 30th lands on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, then the five school days before the 30th would be used for activities. This year there was a lot of discussion about what was being done elsewhere and what should be done in schools. Declaring the week prior to be a week to focus on truth and reconciliation will help our members plan for the day in the future. It should be added, however, that acknowledging and working toward reconciliation is not an event for one singular day or one singular week but should be an everyday occurrence. This motion passed unanimously at the Greater Victoria Teachers’ Associations’ Annual General Meeting, November 16, 2021. 135. Kamloops Thompson That the Federation advocate for in-service training when any new reporting standards are implemented. Supporting statement The BC Ministry of Education is currently revising its reporting guidelines which are scheduled to be implemented in September 2022. While some districts have elected to participate in pilot groups, and some teachers have begun trailing the new guidelines on their own, there has been no province-wide process for educating and supporting teachers with implementation of the new guidelines. This means that many teachers will be asked to navigate an entirely new way of teaching on their own time, taking even more time away from the work of supporting the students that we work with each day. These new guidelines are of particular concern to secondary teachers, who are being asked to change their assessment practices (which will also require pedagogical changes). The Ministry’s expectation that, for each reporting period, teachers will create assessment criteria, plan activities that allow students to learn and practice, assess 104–124 (or more, depending on local language) individuals on their performance for each competency and content knowledge, and then communicate in parent-friendly language will significantly increase our workload. If teachers are being asked to implement new standards, we deserve to be provided with paid time to learn how to effectively do so. Even one or two in-service days would provide teachers with the opportunity to learn the rationale for the changes, discuss what has worked for other colleagues who have already begun the transition, and to begin planning how we can meet the new standards.

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136. Kamloops Thompson That the Federation pressure the Ministry of Education to designate funding to school districts for technology and resources, including remote learning resources. Supporting statement In no other profession would it be acceptable and expected that employees provide the materials necessary to their job due to lack of provision by the employer. A fully funded education system must include ongoing and targeted funds to resources and technology. Funding also needs to include the necessary time and training for teachers to learn to use these technologies. Districts choose where to allocate funds, and resources and training are not a priority. The need for resources has been especially acute since the implementation of the new curriculum. Then the pandemic placed even greater demand on technology and resources. Remote learning only highlighted the urgency of this matter, but the government and districts have not responded. Resources are insufficient to meet today’s educational demands. The need for adequate training for technological change is supported by the Industrial Relations Act. Lack of resource funding has increased teacher workload. Teachers must search for, create, and/or purchase resources out-of-pocket to teach the new curriculum because the funding is inadequate. Also, learning to use technology places additional pressure on teachers. The ability to have readily available and fully functioning technology, in all areas of the province and including highspeed internet access, ensures that the implementation and delivery of the curriculum is more equitable for students. Yet, our province’s rural schools continue to be short-changed. Our province’s less advantaged students are not receiving the same opportunities as those peers with computer and internet access. Districts have policies that allow confiscation of teachers’ personal electronic devices if used with students or on the employer’s network. Teachers place themselves at risk when they have no options other than to use their personal electronic devices when they need technology in the classroom. 137. Surrey That the BCTF Executive Committee lobby the government to direct a portion of revenue from the carbon tax to fund green and carbon-emissions reducing technology in schools and school districts. Supporting statement Most greenhouse gases are stock pollutants, meaning once emitted, they are long-lived in the atmosphere and their build up has consequences over the course of centuries. Ultimately, it is the concentration of greenhouse gases that contributes to climate change and its attendant damages. For this reason, it is imperative that there be a price on carbon. 34

How the revenue is used is ultimately a political decision, and this motion advocates that a portion of tax revenues be used to fund zero emissions or carbon-emissions reducing initiatives in schools and school districts. Revenue from the carbon tax could be used to fund initiatives such as: heating, ventilation, air-conditioning systems, solar-powered energy, electric district vehicles, electric car charging stations for school staff, community-school gardens, and outdoor learning opportunities. 138. Surrey That the Federation lobby the provincial government to encourage school districts to examine school-naming protocols and to make changes to them so that names that are meaningful to the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities that are on (or were originally inhabitants of) that territory are included. Supporting statement We have many schools that are named after locations, or prominent people, due to the perceived honour that is bestowed by naming such edifices after them. However, where possible, this practice should be re-examined, especially if people are serious in their commitment to truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. This would bring Indigenous peoples’ concerns to the forefront and enable students and their communities to greater awareness of why it is important not only to pay lip service in acknowledging traditional territories. Commitment to social justice begins from childhood and can grow subconsciously. If you never had the chance to challenge your beliefs from when you were young, you would think that everything is alright. Children are naturally curious and if they are not familiar with something, like their school’s name, it would be a great opportunity for them to be conscious of and learn about the First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit territory where they are and what happened (or is still happening) to the Indigenous Peoples there. Passing this would be a means of accomplishing Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action #57 which states: “We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Aboriginal peoples...” because teachers are public servants who would need to know the Indigenous history in the area to be able to respond. Moreover, it is noteworthy that the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) is in the midst of conducting a city-wide review of all 583 school sites in a motion approved as of April 2021 “to better reflect the diversity of the city.” In their press release, it is stated that “The TDSB will form a special group that will inform the consultation process for the review of policy P047 and procedure PR592, Naming of Schools and Special Purpose Areas; propose amendments; and provide a


proposal for a city-wide review of all TDSB school names. This group will be composed of students, parents/guardians, educators, community members, appropriate qualified experts, and individuals involved in antiracism work. This plan aims to improve the naming and renaming process for schools to ensure that school names better represent the diverse people, cultures, and history of Toronto, including, but not limited to, Indigenous and Black leaders and the contemporary values of the city.” A similar movement is already happening in BC school districts. In October 2018, the Vancouver School District formed a Naming and Renaming Working Group to review the process that guides the naming of new facilities and the renaming of existing facilities. An update to the process for naming new facilities came into effect in June 2019, where it notes that, “Dual naming shall be considered in naming a new school in English and in hən̓q̓ əmin̓əm̓. Dual names are not required to be a direct translation, and as such may have separate meanings.” The working group then met over the 2019–20 school year to focus on updating the process surrounding renaming existing facilities. 139. Surrey That the Federation lobby the provincial government to recognize September 23–29 as Truth and Reconciliation Week. Supporting statement This proposed resolution addresses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #63: Where we call upon the Council of Ministers of Education Canada to maintain an annual commitment to Aboriginal education issues, including: 1. developing and implementing Kindergarten to Grade 12 curriculum and learning resources on Aboriginal peoples in Canadian history, and the history and legacy of residential schools. 2. sharing information and best practices on teaching curriculum related to residential schools and Aboriginal history. 3. building student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect. 4. identifying teacher-training needs relating to the above. The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation needs to be observed in the same way as Remembrance Day. All schools hold assemblies the day before November 11 and for an entire month or more poppies are sold keeping the day in everyone’s minds. The cruelty that First Nations children and families suffered demands greater attention than just a one-day observance. For the week leading up to September 30 each year, schools should be encouraged to host events to raise awareness in the same way they do for Remembrance Day. Examples of events: film series, Heart Garden, drum and sing outside all week, wear orange all week, walk-ins each morning, blanket exercise. It is highly advisable to

involve older students in planning these so that they can be more committed to its purpose. Holding commemorative events for a Truth and Reconciliation Week would allow for opportunities for Truth and Reconciliation Call to Action #63 to be implemented. It’s already been five years since the calls to action were issued. 140. Surrey That the Federation lobby the government to abandon its investment in liquefied natural gas (LNG) and divert LNG subsidies instead to: 1. retraining for workers currently in fossil fuel energy industries. 2. investment in sustainable, zero-emission energy industries. Supporting statement In 2020, the provincial government provided $1.3 billion in oil and gas subsidies, more than the government spent on combating climate change, and five times more than the government gets back in royalties from the oil and gas sector. These subsidies take the form of tax exemptions, credits to reduce royalty payments, direct spending commitments, and financing for infrastructure. These subsidies do not consider the public expense of cleaning up abandoned wells and fracking ponds, the health and social costs of LNG production and use, or the costs to society from the effects of climate change. Under our current government, subsidies to fracking have doubled, while other west coast jurisdictions like California and Washington are ending fracking licenses. Government money spent subsidizing the oil and gas sector means less spent on health care, education, and housing, while at the same time contributing to the effects of climate change that will impact our members and the students in our care. 141. Surrey That the Federation stand in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en peoples through actions including, but not limited to, the following: 1. making a public announcement. 2. bringing a motion of support to the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, the Canadian Labour Congress, and the BC Federation of Labour. 3. writing a letter to the BC Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resources Operations and Rural Development, and the Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation demanding that the provincial government cease all drilling by Coastal Gas Link on Wet’suwet’en territories in respect and recognition of the rights of Wet’suwet’en to free and informed consent as laid out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)/British Columbia Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act. 35


Supporting statement BC’s adoption of UNDRIP means that Indigenous peoples determine how they will be self-governed. Both the hereditary system of the Wet’suwet’en as well as the elected band council system (imposed through the Indian Act) are legitimate. Both the federal and provincial governments need to meet the required mandate through UNDRIP that requires, “States shall consult and co-operate in good faith with the Indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free and informed consent prior to the approval of any project affecting their lands or territories and other resources, particularly in connection with the development, utilization or exploitation of mineral, water or other resources.” It is with this in mind that we need to elevate and support calls from the Wet’suwet’en to stop drilling under the sacred headwaters that nourish the Wet’suwet’en Yintah. The Coastal Gas Link construction has destroyed an ancient village site Ts’elkay Kwe and threatens salmon spawning grounds and resources that many communities access downstream. The drilling and construction in this area has been destructive and the antithesis of what UNDRIP calls for. 142. Cranbrook That the Federation calls upon the Ministry of Education for a province-wide implementation of the Letter of Understanding for Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers to redress the under-representation of Aboriginal teachers in BC public schools. Supporting statement While these documents have been in effect in BC since on or before 2008, to this date not all school districts have gone through the process to bring this dynamic and beneficial document to life in their districts. This representation also provides the ability to develop authentic relationships between the Indigenous teacher and Indigenous students. While we readily utter acknowledgments of territory and continue to benefit from our presence on Indigenous lands, be it resolved that employment equity agreements can no longer be the privileged choice for an individual district. In the true spirit of reconciliation and equity in action, the weight of these agreements is such that the privilege of choice to implement them should end. Employment equity should be mandated provincially. 143. Vancouver Elementary That the Federation urge the Minister of Education and the Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation to revise Section 5(10)–(12) of the School Act Regulations to: 1. delete any reference to the Commonwealth and imposed loyalty to the Crown. 2. clarify that neither students nor staff shall be obliged to participate in: 36

3. 4.

a. the singing of O Canada. b. any patriotic exercise. c. imposed loyalty to the Crown. include a reference to the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. include a reference to a local First Nation(s) song or anthem.

Supporting statement Given the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the provincial government’s purported support for implementation of these, it is overdue for this section of the Regulations to be thoroughly updated. Many aspects of the Regulations are not currently implemented consistently around the province, which is fine given how problematic they are. It should present no difficulty for these changes to be made by the province. 144. Vancouver Elementary That the Federation advocate for the ending of programs between BC schools and local police and/or RCMP. Supporting statement We know that the incarceration rates and the experiences of police violence, racial profiling, and criminalization impact Black people, Indigenous people, and People of Colour (BIPOC) disproportionately. Regardless of the actions of individual members of local police or the RCMP, the institutions themselves have an impact on our members, our students, and our students’ families. Yes, police officers present a sense of protection and security for those with privilege in a school community, but as teachers we are responsible for fostering an emotionally and physically safe environment for all. Schools are safer and trauma-free when BIPOC members, BIPOC students, and BIPOC families are safe from re-traumatization within them. Only through concrete actions like this can we truly claim to be committed to antiracism and reconciliation. 145. Vancouver Elementary That the BCTF encourage locals and sublocals to recognize the last week of September as Truth and Reconciliation Week. Supporting statement September 30, 2021, saw the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation instituted in as a statutory holiday in BC. Because the day is scheduled early in the school year when school life is most hectic, educational activities to engage staff and students to unlearn colonial ways can fall by the wayside. By recognizing the entire last week of September as Truth and Reconciliation Week, school communities are


encouraged to enact the duty to decolonize our knowledge and practice in meaningful ways, in the form of planned activities in accordance with the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action such as assemblies, collaborations between classes, field trips, guest speakers etc. It is hoped that a week’s worth of planned and sustained efforts will set the tone for the school year ahead by deepening our understanding of settler responsibilities as well as broadening the scope of possible actions.

TEACHERS TEACHING ON CALL Recommendation 53 That Procedure 49.16—1. to Procedure 49.16—3. be deleted. Supporting statement This recommendation was made to the 2020 Annual General Meeting but was not brought forward due to the condensed virtual format of the 2020 Annual General Meeting. The goal expressed in part three of the procedure has been achieved. Teachers teaching on call (TTOC) performing BCTF union business receive a leave of absence, their school district pays their salary and the Federation is involved for that cost. The original intent of the procedure, adopted prior to current collective provision, was to compensate TTOCs for giving up a day of teaching work for doing union business. Now that TTOCs are paid by the employer, while on union leave without issue, portions of Procedure 49.16 (Procedure 49.16—1. through Procedure 49.16—3.) are no longer needed. With the 2006–11 agreement, TTOCs were paid on scale for four consecutive days of work which included a day of union leave retroactive to the first day of work. Many TTOCs were at the top of the salary grid and at Category 6 (Masters). The BCTF paid the salary of the TTOC regardless of their salary category and scale placement.

should be removed from the Members’ Guide as its continued inclusion has caused confusion. Procedure 49.16—1. to Procedure 49.16—3. states: That teachers on call be compensated for: 1.a. performing the duties of an elected BCTF or local position, or 1.b. facilitating a BCTF-sponsored workshop, or c. serving on a BCTF committee or task force, d. staff rep training and PD rep training when such work, including travel time, occurs during regular school hours in which they would normally be available to teach. 2.a. That such compensation shall be at a per diem rate of 1/189 of the member’s regular scale payment, or the rate of pay for teachers on call, in accordance with the collective agreement then in force in the teacher’s own district, whichever is greater. 2.b. That, to receive compensation under 49.16(1), TTOCs must: i. be registered and active with a school board, ii. indicate what their per diem regular scale rate is, iii. indicate any restrictions on availability. 2.c. When a TTOC engages in any of the tasks under Policy 49.16(1) during the time that they would normally be working in a part-time teaching position, the compensation would not be at the TTOC per diem rate. Instead, the Federation would reimburse the member’s school board at the TTOC daily rate, pursuant to a leave of absence request for that member. (The TTOC would, however, be paid their regular salary by the school board in accordance with the part-time position.) 3. That the BCTF work towards negotiating an agreement with BCPSEA in which local school boards would pay a TTOC on local or BCTF business as if they were on the board’s payroll during that time, taking all regular deductions and billing the BCTF or the local, for the TTOC’s salary and pension costs.

In 2014, the BCTF proposed that TTOCs be paid on scale for all days worked and thus, eliminating the four consecutive days of work requirement. The British Columbia Public School Employers’ Association (BCPSEA) would agree to TTOC on scale pay for all days worked in exchange for a salary cap. The BCTF and the BCPSEA agreed to Category 5 Step 8 as the maximum salary. However, Procedure 49.16— 2.c. was erroneously applied for a period of time to provide a “top up” of TTOCs pay up to Category 6 Step 10 when on union leave. Starting in the 2021–22 school year, this practice has been rectified and TTOCs are no longer receiving a “top up” from the union. They are paid on scale by the employer in accordance with the collective agreement. This procedure 37


Artwork by: Kaydenze Tommy Samual

PART 3:

Report of the Executive Committee 2022 REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS 38


Executive Committee report An extensive report on the work done by the Executive Committee in implementing the priorities of the 2021 Annual General Meeting (AGM) and actions taken on decisions of the 2021 AGM will be included in the kits distributed at the AGM. Members can access the document on the BCTF’s website. The following are the reports of the advisory committees to the Executive Committee and are based on their work since the last AGM.

ABORIGINAL EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on: a. Aboriginal education issues. b. workplace climate for Aboriginal teachers. c. the development and implementation of an employment equity program for Aboriginal teachers. d. outreach activities. e. challenging thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and working together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. 2. Facilitate the Aboriginal education portion of zone meetings and summer conference. 3. Assist in the development of local, zonal, and provincial networks of members, and consult on Aboriginal education issues. 4. Review research on the level of success of Aboriginal students in BC public schools, and to provide advice on initiatives to enhance success for Aboriginal students. 5. Work with the Aboriginal Education Association PSA and teachers to improve the level of success for Aboriginal students. Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. continue supporting the infusion of Aboriginal perspectives and content into the curriculum and continue supporting the Federation’s work in highlighting the Truth and Reconciliation’s Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 2. support the Federation’s goal of increasing education about Canada’s historical and current colonial policies and genocidal practices by making Indigenous Studies

a graduation requirement and providing anti-Indigenous racism education for all BC educators and students. 3. communicate information to members regarding the intergenerational effects of colonization on Aboriginal people by helping create workshops that share knowledge and resources on the rich histories and cultures of Aboriginal peoples. 4. help inform teachers about locally relevant teaching resources and in-service in all school districts. 5. continue supporting the Federation’s work in the collaborative development and implementation of local enhancement agreements to foster strong relationships with Aboriginal communities and to ensure that Local Presidents are signatories (see also 2019 Annual General Meeting Report on Enhancement Agreements). 6. promote our Statement of Principles for incorporating Aboriginal ways of knowing and being. 7. support, contribute to, and promote the Aboriginal education resources available on TeachBC. 8. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 9. continue the work of decolonizing our schools and unions and promote the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens. 10. use an equity lens to continue decolonizing existing structures and remove barriers to equitable access to participation within the union. Report The Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee (AEAC), made up of nine members representing locals throughout British Columbia, meets three times each year to advise the BCTF Executive Committee on policy related to Aboriginal matters. The committee continues to ensure that communication is facilitated between teachers and the Federation through the local contacts. Aboriginal education workshops remain a top priority. As of this writing, and since the onset of the pandemic, most workshops are now made available and facilitated online in a 90-minute format. In May 2021, 215 undocumented graves were located and confirmed at the site of Kamloops Indian Residential School. In quick response to the shocking revelation, a new workshop—215: Honouring the Children Buried at Kamloops Indian Residential School was developed by members of the AEAC and Aboriginal facilitators then launched it at the Summer Leadership Conference. The Federation is proud to share several recently developed Aboriginal Education workshops with the healthcare sector, the Canadian Labour Congress, universities, and other unions. A workshop has been developed to educate BCTF staff and facilitators on how to apply the Aboriginal Lens and incorporate it into all aspects of our organization, including our Commitment to Solidarity. 39


The Federation continues the important work of implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Many teachers and student’s provincewide continue to work with Project of Heart: Illuminating the Hidden History of Indian Residential Schools in BC. Demand for this resource continues to require reprinting as requests are now over 30,000 copies. In addition, there have been 81,763 online impressions. Resource development remains another of our top priorities. The Project of Heart canoe, originally commissioned by BCTF to commemorate the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, is making its way around the province. It has been on display in Langley, Comox, Port Alberni, Chilliwack, and Mission, inspiring hundreds of students, teachers, and community members to learn from The Project of Heart, and about the Speaking to Memory Exhibit. Working closely with the Aboriginal Education Provincial Specialist Association (PSA), our advisory committee collaborated to organize the PSA conference into an online format last October 2021. The keynote address featured Myrna McCallum (Bearing Witness) whose timely message was about trauma informed practice. Other featured speakers included: Nancy Knickerbocker, presenting her Weaving and Quilting Our Stories Entwined: a Decolonizing Journey; and Peter Campbell and Penelakut residential school survivors, Raymond, and James Charlie, premiering their new documentary, Penelakut—Returning to the Healing Circle. Employment equity and enhancement agreements also remain a focus for the AEAC. We continue to work towards the goal of achieving employment equity programs in all 60 school districts. We continue to support the joint efforts of teachers, parents, communities, and districts in maintaining the inclusive partnerships and accountability model that enhancement agreement protocols provide. We are committed to building strong relationships with BC education partners and working with the Aboriginal Education Provincial Specialist Association. The AEAC would like to thank the Executive Committee and all Federation members for their ongoing support as well as their efforts to incorporate the Aboriginal Lens and Aboriginal Ways of Knowing and Being throughout the work of our Federation. Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee 2021–22 Jelana Bighorn, Vancouver Brenda Celesta, Kamloops Thompson Brian Coleman, Langley 40

Missy Haynes, Sooke Allison Hotti, Surrey Stephanie Muldoe, Coast Mountain Brandon Peters, Vancouver Secondary Claire Shannon-Akiwenzie, Vancouver Susan Trabant, Prince George Rae Figursky, Executive Committee Liaison On the committee 2020–21 Carol Arnold, Gulf Islands Janisse Browning, Gulf Islands Dawn Doran, Prince George Carlo Pavan, Nanaimo/Ladysmith Brandon Peters, Vancouver

ADULT EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on all matters related to adult education. 2. Review education policy and research, and to provide advice on initiatives to increase opportunities for adult learners. 3. Advise the Executive Committee on the needs and concerns of adult education teachers, including as they pertain to bargaining. 4. Develop strategies for achieving parity in funding for adult education and achieving equity in working conditions for adult education teachers. 5. Challenging thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and working together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Adult Education Advisory Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. raise the profile of adult education teachers within the BCTF. 2. identify ways to engage adult education teachers within the province in the work of the Federation. 3. support the Federation’s advocacy for the parity and equity of per FTE funding for adult education students. 4. support the Federation’s advocacy for parity and equity in accessing professional development opportunities for adult education teachers within their locals. 5. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 6. consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools and unions and investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions.


Report The Adult Education Advisory Committee (AsEAC), consisting of seven members from locals throughout British Columbia, meets three times each year. The committee continues to work on ways to increase the profile of adult education teachers within the Federation. The AdEAC is working to ensure that the membership is aware of the funding disparities in adult education. The committee is working with the Teacher magazine to feature adult education, how it’s been affected by COVID-19, and how adult education teachers meet the needs of adult learners. Advocating for parity per Full-Time Equivalent funding for adult education students, equal to that of K–12 students, continues to be a priority. The COVID-19 pandemic has created an online and distributed learning delivery model that denies students the supports that in-person classrooms provide, which is a continued focus for this committee. Adequate and equitable funding can ensure these students can graduate or upgrade, have a solid chance to rise above minimum-wage jobs, and improve their quality of life. Many adult education teachers do not have the same collective agreement rights as their K–12 colleagues. Inequities in preparation time, paid professional development days, instructional time, class-size and composition limits, work schedules, and course load continue to create inferior work conditions. The committee continues to advocate for equity for adult education teachers. The committee looks forward to exploring ways to challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism, and working with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Developing and strengthening relationships across advisory committees will be a focus. Adult Education Advisory Committee 2021–22 Keith Chan, Coquitlam Lizanne Foster, Surrey Allan Haley, Vancouver Elementary James Hanson, Powell River Dale Hardy, Maple Ridge Kimberley Henneberry Glover, Maple Ridge Joanne Shaw, Prince George Teachers’ Peggy Janicki, Executive Committee Liaison On the committee 2020–21 Karen Jogha, Coquitlam Richard Obayashi, Langley Kiran Sidhu, Richmond

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FRENCH PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Terms of Reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on the needs and concerns of French as a first and working language (FFWL) teachers. 2. Review educational change as it pertains to French education, as a first and additional language. 3. Advise the Executive Committee on bargaining, on professional development, and on other organizational matters as they relate to FFWL members. 4. Review BCTF policy statements and objectives as they relate to FFWL members. 5. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Termes de référence 1. Conseiller le Comité exécutif quant aux besoins et aux préoccupations des enseignant(e)s des programmes de de français langue première et seconde. 2. Suivre l’évolution du domaine éducationnel en ce qui a trait à l’éducation en français langue première et seconde et en aviser le Comité exécutif. 3. Aviser le Comité exécutif au sujet de la négociation collective, du perfectionnement professionnel et autres questions d’ordre organisationnel concernant les membres dont le français est la langue de travail ou première (FLTP). 4. Passer en revue les énoncés de politiques et les objectifs de la FECB par rapport aux membres FLTP. 5. Défier la pensée, les structures et les systèmes qui perpétuent le colonialisme et travailler ensemble en s’assurant que les appels à l’action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation et la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones soient implémentés. Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Advisory Committee on French Programs and Services for 2021–22 be to: 1. advance the cause of French education as a public good in the BC public education system and in the BCTF by supporting the Federation’s advocacy for more equitable working conditions for French as a first or working Language (FFWL) members. 2. achieve greater representation of our FFWL members by specifically developing targeted support and training for French education local chairs (and/or representatives). 41


3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

support local, zonal, and provincial opportunities for all FFWL teachers to build powerful relationships to address their specific needs and honour their linguistic and cultural diversity. continue supporting the Federation’s work to secure resources, in-service, teacher mentorship, and professional development opportunities for FFWL members to support K–12 French programs curricula. actively work to increase the number of French and Canadian online resources, approved by FocusEd (ERAC) as well as those available on TeachBC. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. use an equity lens to continue decolonizing existing structures and remove barriers to equitable access to participation within the union.

Que les priorités du Comité consultatif des programmes et services en français de la FECB pour l’année 2021–22 soient : 1. faire avancer la cause de l’éducation en français en tant que bien public dans le système d’éducation publique de la Colombie-Britannique et au sein de la FECB en appuyant les efforts de la Fédération pour des conditions de travail plus équitables pour les membres dont le français est la langue première ou la lange de travail (FLPT). 2. atteindre une plus grande représentation de nos membres FLPT en élaborant spécifiquement un soutien et une formation ciblés pour les président(e)s locaux(-ales) et/ou représentant(e)s de l’éducation en français. 3. appuyer les opportunités aux niveaux local, provincial et des zones pour tous les enseignants FLPT dans le but d’établir des relations solides afin de répondre à leurs besoins particuliers et d’honorer leur diversité linguistique et culturelle. 4. continuer d’appuyer le travail de la Fédération visant à maintenir les ressources, les services, le mentorat des enseignant(e)s et les occasions de perfectionnement professionnel pour les membres FLTP afin de soutenir les programmes de français de la maternelle à la 12e année. 5. travailler activement à accroître le nombre de ressources canadiennes en français en ligne approuvées par FocusEd (ERAC) ainsi que celles disponibles sur TeachBC. 6. soutenir et promouvoir les priorités de leadership adoptées par l’Assemblée générale annuelle 2021. 7. utiliser la lentille d’équité pour continuer à décoloniser les structures existantes et éliminer les obstacles pour un accès équitable à la participation au sein du syndicat. Report During the 2020–21 year, the Advisory Committee on French Programs and Services (ACFPS) focused on finding ways to build member engagement and capacity with a lens toward 42

succession planning. As the majority of the ACFPS members reached the end of their respective mandates this year, members worked to: • seek out and respond to member feedback as they continued to navigate teaching during a global pandemic, including government pressure to designate funds to equip all teachers with more plexiglass and voice amplification systems. • put forward recommendations to the Executive Committee to advocate for equitable access to pedagogical and Federation resources for French as a first or working language (FFWL) members, including the creation of an annual BCTF conference, government pressure for the creation of an ongoing committee or working group to focus on resource development, and upgrading the BCTF website for bilingual access. • build relationships with FFWL members in partnership with French Education Local Chairs (FELC). • create and curate resources to support existing and future FELCs. • plan, develop, and facilitate activities for zones and Summer Leadership Conference to support ongoing dialogue and capacity building with existing and future FELCs. • ongoing collaboration to prepare and organize a Coalition of French Education stakeholders in supporting FFWL members with respect to programs and services. On the Committee on French Programs and Services 2021–22 Astérie Ndikumana, Nicola Valley Kelly MacLean Dosen, Surrey Keri Russell, Kootenay Columbia Patrice Oscienny, Fernie Robin Coogan-Penner, Vernon Rome Lavrencic, New Westminster Yam Leung, SEPF Benula Bunjun, Executive Committee liaison On the Committee 2020–21 Amy McCallum, Comox Eva Paré, Comox Suzanne Wernli-Roy, Upper Skeena Carmen Woo, New Westminster

COMMITTEE FOR ACTION ON SOCIAL JUSTICE

Terms of Reference Promote safe, healthy, nurturing, respectful, and inclusive environments for all members, students, and families in which to live, work, and learn, where all diversity is celebrated.


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6.

7.

8. 9.

Create and promote resources for members and locals on social justice issues specified status to each action group. Advise the Executive Committee on social justice issues and related BCTF policy, procedures, and events. Work on developing links with other unions, community groups, NGOs, and others on social justice issues. Provide input to the Executive Committee and advice to social justice contacts. Assist locals and zones in developing social justice programs, projects, and events, particularly those that involve the concerns of the individual action groups. Promote and assist in the development of local, zonal, and provincial networks of members on action group issues. Facilitate the social justice portion of BCTF zone meetings, Summer Leadership conference, and the Provincial Social Justice Conference. Advocate for systemic, social justice-related change both within the BCTF and throughout the province of BC. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented.

Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Committee for Action on Social Justice for 2021–22 be to: 1. create a plan of action to support members in engaging in activism with students and their communities advocate that local contacts and communities grow and sustain teacher-led initiatives around Aboriginal people, Black people, and people of colour within classrooms, schools, and broader communities, supporting members’ and students’ connections to existing social justice movements in the community. 2. combat white supremacy, white fragility, and prejudice in members of our committee and our union structures, and work to educate members on dismantling systemic racism and replacing racist structures with ones that actively combat racism and promote equity and inclusion within the BCTF, local structures, governance, and school communities. 3. work to eradicate oppression of and barriers to the LGBTQ2S+ and disabled communities both within and outside of the union. 4. develop strategies to engage members in multifaceted, active citizenship focusing on learning from the current COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on environmental and intersectional social justice issues and language, connections with our natural environment, and union engagement. 5. build awareness of the intersections among CASJ’s

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

action groups and other advisory committees, with the goal of strengthening those connections and creating opportunities to collaborate. develop strategies to support member participation and momentum building on the adoption, implementation, and review of emerging social justice policies in school districts, as well as raising the profile of the Just Recovery principles. develop strategies to combat the deleterious impact of neoliberal policies on public education, society at large, and the global environment. centre and connect the voices and experiences of Black, Indigenous, and people of colour (BIPOC) members throughout our union structures and provide accessible and safe spaces, resources, and supports so BIPOC members feel safe, affirmed, visible, and celebrated. analyze any changes to education delivery required by emerging health or safety issues (e.g., COVID-19) to ensure that they are guided by a social justice lens and that teachers are supported equitably as they adapt to the current reality in education. develop a structure or system of accountability that is embedded in our committee with the goal of decolonizing our schools and unions through the application of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens and by providing opportunities for deeper learning and support. address the ableism disabled people/people with disabilities face and advocate to ensure the provisions of safe working environments, workplace accommodations, and learning accommodations as rights and not privileges. use the social justice lens to support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. connect social justice work with the defense of public education and collective bargaining and advocate for social justice demands to be included in the next round of BCTF bargaining priorities.

Report The BCTF Committee for Action on Social Justice (CASJ) is composed of 28 dedicated BCTF members, who bring their passions, diverse lived experiences, and unique expertise to their work in focused action groups. This community of individuals came together for three virtual sessions in 2020– 21 to do the challenging and rewarding work of promoting healthy, nurturing, respectful, and inclusive environments and to advocate for systemic, social justice-related change within the BCTF and throughout BC. The work of CASJ is the work of making the BCTF and the world beyond the union a more equitable place for all. Despite the challenges of connecting through online meetings, this group has built and strengthened relationships based on 43


mutual respect. This has been made possible by the group’s ongoing commitment to unlearning and relearning, both as conscious individuals and together as a cohesive group. Sharing stories and experiences with one another purposefully has cultivated a greater connection and understanding of their varied perspectives and worldviews. In pushing themselves, making space to reflect, and holding the space to grow and feel discomfort, CASJ members were able to overcome differences and in doing so, represent the best of the union movement. They embody coming together collectively to move forward for the betterment of all, but especially for the most vulnerable. The emphasis on relationship building has created the conditions for members to be themselves and bring their best selves into the work. This has enabled the group, both as a whole and in smaller action groups, to develop policy, recommendations, resources, and actions that maintain the dignity and well-being of all within the education community. CASJ as a committee has continually taken every opportunity to challenge the status quo and to think critically about normative notions of what can or should be. One of the greatest gifts of CASJ is the opportunity for members from across the province to connect and work on issues that are close to their hearts. Unlikely friendships and connections blossomed, even over Zoom, between members with shared lived experiences and identities through intersectional crossgroup work. Early in 2021, CASJ undertook the bold action to focus on decolonizing its own governance and structures through interconnected and cross-sectional work in an intentional retreat. Through an intensive and reflective threeday process, CASJ developed new governance rooted in a more equitable decision-making structure based on consensus and creating space for all voices and opinions. Despite the challenge of teaching and practicing union activism through a global pandemic and having to adapt, revise, and reimagine how the committee would function, the impact of the work of CASJ is far reaching and continues to ripple outward. The committee continued to ground its work in the support of people through the focus on developing COVID-19 specific documents and COVID-19 specific supports for members during another pandemic school year. The committee also continued its works on building upon and growing the understanding of equity and inclusion work both within and beyond the BCTF. The passion of CASJ members in their seven action groups bubbled into the broader union movement in many ways. This work showed up in the creation and revision of many resources and workshops, publications in the Social Justice Newsletter and Teacher magazine, professional development, 44

and networking opportunities such as the LGBTQ2S+ and Racism issue sessions, and the affinity group spaces at the Summer Leadership Conference. This passion and desire to make systemic change was evident in many of the recommendations CASJ brought to the BCTF Executive Committee regarding governance, equity, and inclusion, and addressing barriers within Federation policies and structures. As part of CASJ’s dedication to decolonizing its own structure and governance, the committee adopted a consensus model of decision making and has held two meetings using the Fist to Five model to enable more voices and more equity in decision making. In addition to work in-house, CASJ members contributed to broader social change through their involvement in many different organizations and committees based at the local, provincial, and national level. Through reciprocal growth and sharing, CASJ members both provided support, knowledge, and expertise and received information, ideas, and guidance on specific timely issues. The deeply held belief in the value of connecting with and amplifying the work of other likeminded organizations is foundational to CASJ and is embodied in this work. On the committees 2021–22 Antiracism Ann Alexnder, Surrey Nimfa Casson, Vancouver Island North Rozhin Emadi, North Vancouver Linda Frank, Boundary On the committee 2020–21: Chris Exilus, Peace River North Chanelle Tye, SEPF (term ended mid-year) Disability Justice Al Friesen, Langley Lee, Vancouver Secondary Nichelle Penney, Kamloops Thompson Heather Sallows, Sea to Sky On the committee 2020–21: Leah Kelley, Chilliwack Economic Justice Rick Kumar, Surrey Mary Hotmanie, Burnaby Sara McGarry, Vancouver Secondary Marcus Tse, Nelson On the committee 2020–21: Tyler Emoff, Prince Rupert (term ended mid-year) Richard Pesik, Terrace Kati Spencer, Nicola Valley


Environmental Justice Tara Ehrcke, Greater Victoria Monique Richoux, Greater Victoria Ditta Cross, Burnaby

operations and report to the Executive Committee significant variations from budgeted amounts, on a quarterly basis. 4. Review annually financial aspects of 6th and Ash building operations including the budget and financial statements. 5. Advise the Executive Committee and the Representative Assembly on the setting of the annual fee. 6. Assist the Executive Committee in specific areas such as the Staff Pension Plan Advisory Committee. 7. Act in an advisory/consultative capacity to the treasurer when necessary. 8. Monitor the performance of all BCTF investment funds and review annually the BCTF’s investment policies and practices, and advise the Executive Committee on such. 9. Review annually all insurance coverage. 10. Review annually the BCTF expense policies, including compensation and allowance policies, and provide advice for change to the Executive Committee.

On the committee 2020–21: Sarah Newton, Revelstoke Mary Hotomanie, Burnaby Charity Peal, Nisga’a LGBTQ2S+ Elliot Fox-Povey, Cowichan Valley Lexa Perl, Gold Trail Michelle Hernandez, Coquitlam Trevana Spilchen, Delta On the committee 2020–21: Heather Kelley, Surrey (term ended mid-year) Lee-Ann Locker, Surrey Kammy Willbond, Terrace (term ended mid-year) Peace and Global Education Regie Plana-Alcuaz, Surrey Shailly Sareen, Nanaimo On the committee 2020–21: Amy Ashlyn, Comox Anjum Khan, Vancouver Elementary Status of Women Angela Marcakis, Surrey Serena Mohammed, Richmond Trish Mugford, Vancouver Secondary Sheena Seymour, Upper Skeena Teachers On the committee 2020–21: Sheena Seymour, Upper Skeena Executive Committee liaison: Violette Baillargeon

FINANCE COMMITTEE Terms of Reference A. Financial Management 1. Assist the Executive Committee, and through the Executive Committee, the Representative Assembly, in carrying out the financial responsibilities of the Federation. 2. Develop financial objectives and policies that ensure the Federation operates in a financially prudent manner that results in a sound financial position. 3. Monitor revenues and expenditures in the various funds of the BCTF and Salary Indemnity Fund

B.

Audit Committee Role 1. Provide the auditors with a means of access to the Executive Committee and preserve the auditors’ independence in their relationship with the treasurer and other staff. 2. Ensure that the auditors would have the right to appear before, and be heard by, the Finance Committee at any meeting of the Audit Committee. 3. Before the start of the annual audit to discuss with the auditors, in general terms, the scope of the examination as set out in the engagement letter and the audit fees, and recommend the terms of the engagement letter to the Executive Committee. 4. At the completion of the annual audit, meet with the auditors: a. to review the financial statements prior to approval of the Executive Committee and submission to the Annual General Meeting. b. to review and investigate any items covered in post-audit letters or recommendations on internal control. 5. At other times, to discuss quality and depth of accounting and financial staffing; implementation of new accounting systems and the need to extend the audit examination into areas beyond those required under a normal statutory audit; and to report on these discussions to the Executive Committee. 6. Review the Federation’s system of control, accounting policies, and audit cost, and report, with advice, to the Executive Committee. 45


7.

8.

Nominate, through the Executive Committee, the external auditors for appointment by the Annual General Meeting. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented.

Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Finance Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. review the annual budgeting governance model for all funds and to monitor the performance and cash flows of the Federation. 2. review the fee and fund balances and provide recommendations to the Executive Committee. 3. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 4. perform a comprehensive review of the President’s release-time grant. 5. create a Non-pension Post-employment Benefit Fund investment policy. 6. consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools and unions and to investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions and work. 7. use an equity lens to continue decolonizing existing structures and remove barriers to equitable access to participation within the union. Report General Operating Fund The General Operating Fund (GOF) had a fee allocation of 1.319% (2020—1.319%) and the fund had a surplus of $9.3 million in fiscal 2021, compared to a surplus of $6 million in fiscal 2020. The GOF incurred a decrease of $1.3 million employee future benefit liability re-measurement in fiscal 2021, compared to a decrease of $4.8 million employee future benefit liability re-measurement in fiscal 2020. In addition, the GOF had a net transfer $3.7 million to the Public Education Defence Fund, the GOF Facilities Capital Fund and the GOF Non-Pension Post Employment Benefit Fund compared to a net transfer of $1.5 million in the prior year. As a result, the GOF’s fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $22.3 million, compared to $15.4 million at June 30, 2020. GOF Facilities Capital Fund The purpose of the fund is to accumulate resources for future capital expenditures related to the BCTF building common elements. Contributions to the fund are by budgeted allocation from the GOF, as approved by the Representative Assembly (RA). Transfers from the fund are planned in advance and 46

approved by the RA. This fund was created in the year ended June 30, 2019. During the year ended June 30, 2021, a net transfer of $500,000 was transferred from the GOF to the GOF Facilities Capital Fund. As a result, the fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $1.3 million, compared to $796,000 at June 30, 2020. GOF Non-Pension Post-Employment Benefit Fund The purpose of the fund is to accumulate funds for the non-pension post-employment benefit plan for BCTF staff. Actuarial estimates determine the non-pension postemployment liability and amounts are set aside to fund the liability into the future. Contributions to the fund are by budgeted allocation from the GOF and approved by the RA. This fund was created in the year ended June 30, 2019. During the year ended June 30, 2021, a net transfer of $1.23 million was transferred from the GOF to the GOF NonPension Post-Employment Fund. This transfer includes $2.4 million transferred from the GOF to the GOF Non-Pension Post Employment Fund offset by $1.17 million transferred from the GOF Non-Pension Post-Employment Fund to the GOF for current year benefit payments. The fund had a balance of $3.7 million at June 30, 2021, compared to $2.4 million at June 30, 2020. Collective Bargaining Defence Fund The Collective Bargaining Defence Fund had a fee allocation of 0.220% (2020—0.340%) and ended the year with a surplus of $8.1 million compared to a surplus of $10.8 million in the prior year. During fiscal 2021, the fund incurred approximately $94,000 in expenses. The fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $57.4 million, compared to $49.3 million at June 30, 2020. Contingency Fund The Contingency Fund had a fee allocation of 0.000% (2020—0.000%) and the fund ended the year with a deficit of $17,000 compared to a surplus of $41,000 in the prior year. During fiscal 2021, the fund incurred $40,000 of expenses related to donations. The fund balance at June 30, 2021, remained at $2.1 million, the same fund balance of $2.1 million at June 30, 2020. Provincial Bargaining Fund The Provincial Bargaining Fund had a fee allocation of 0.050% (2020—0.050%) and the fund ended the year with a surplus of $1.3 million, compared to a deficit of $63,000 in the prior year. During fiscal 2021, the fund had reduced expenses due to less bargaining related activities. The fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $3.8 million, compared to $2.5 million at June 30, 2020.


Public Education Defence Fund The Public Education Defence Fund had a fee allocation of 0.074% (2020—0.054%) and had a surplus of $1.1 million compared to $290,000 in the prior year. During fiscal 2021, the fund incurred expenses related to public education advocacy activities. During the year, $2 million was transferred from the GOF to the Public Education Defence Fund. The fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $3.6 million compared to$444,000 at June 30, 2020. William R. Long Memorial Fund The William R. Long Memorial Fund (W.R. Long Fund) had a fee allocation of 0.027% (2020—0.027%). In fiscal 2021, the W.R. Long Fund had a surplus of $195,000 compared to $15,000 in the prior year. The fund balance at June 30, 2021, increased to $460,000, compared to $265,000 at June 30, 2020. Salary Indemnity Fund The Salary Indemnity Fund (SIF) is a legal not-for-profit trust which is controlled by the BCTF. The objective of the SIF is to meet the short-term and long-term obligations of the Salary Indemnity Plan. The net assets of the fund increased by $27.8 million compared to the increase of $4.3 million in the prior year for a total net asset of $312.5 million at June 30, 2021, compared to $284.7 million at June 30, 2020. Total claims paid during the year were $52.6 million which is higher than the $48.6 million in the prior year. On June 30, 2021, the SIF benefit obligation was $220 million compared to $198.5 million in the prior year. The SIF benefit obligation is actuarially determined by the plan’s actuary, George & Bell Consulting. The result is an increase of the surplus to $92.5 million at June 30, 2021, compared to $86.2 million at June 30, 2020. Activities and actions undertaken by the Finance Committee in the 2020−21 fiscal year During 2020–21, the Finance Committee engaged in a number of major activities including: 1. recommending increasing the strike pay. 2. recommending that the new Collective Bargaining Defence Fund investment policy be adopted. 3. recommending changes to the sublocal grant, including providing up to $30,000 support to the partial release of the sublocal president or designate. 4. recommending construction of universal access washrooms at the BCTF building. Audit Committee The Finance Committee, with the Second Vice-President and a representative from the Income Security Committee, met to fulfill the responsibilities of the Audit Committee.

In carrying out these responsibilities, the committee met with the financial officers of the Federation and the external auditors, reviewed internal controls and the scope of the audit, reviewed the financial statements, and recommended them to the Executive Committee for approval. As well, the committee recommended to the Annual General Meeting the appointment of the Federation’s auditors. Finance Committee 2021−22 Susan Bauhart, Central Okanagan Stéphane Bélanger, SEPF Jessa Clark, North Okanagan-Shuswap Denise Hendry, Kamloops Thompson Dana Neidig, Income Security Committee representative, Surrey Steve Querengesser, Haida Gwaii Pauline Veto, Surrey Executive Committee liaison: Katherine Trepanier On the committee 2020–21: Jatinder Bir, Surrey Laurence Greeff, Langley Haymen Leong, Coquitlam Shawna Torres, Kamloops Thompson Mark Morrison, Income Security Committee, Representative

HEALTH AND SAFETY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on member health and safety matters including health and safety policy at the provincial level. 2. Review WorkSafeBC (WCB) issues and provide advice to the Executive Committee with respect to the BCTF positions and strategies on such. 3. Act in an advisory capacity to improve mental and physical health and safety in the workplace. 4. Develop and review BCTF health and safety programs and review other health and safety programs. 5. Assist in developing health and safety training. 6. Facilitate the health and safety portion of zone meetings and Summer Leadership Conference. 7. Advise and assist the Federation in the development of violence prevention programs in the workplace. 8. Advise and assist the Federation in the development of mental health programs in the workplace. 9. Bring awareness to the Executive Committee and Health and Safety contacts of current trends in health and safety. 10. Advise the Executive Committee on provincial and local health and safety issues for collective bargaining. 47


11. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism, and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Health and Safety Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. continue to support the implementation of training and safe work practices during any public health crisis. 2. advocate that all joint occupational health and safety committee members and worker representatives are made aware of the safety orientation and training that is available for members. 3. promote the prevention and reporting of workplace violent incidents. 4. support effective joint committees or worker representatives at BCTF members’ worksites. 5. support the Federation’s advocacy for safe working environments for all BCTF members. 6. promote awareness of health and wellness initiatives such as the BCTF Health and Wellness program and other local options. 7. support the Federation’s advocacy for site-based supports for mental wellness to reduce stigma and promote awareness. 8. support health and safety oriented social justice initiatives. support other labour groups to promote health and safety initiatives for all workers. 9. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the BCTF 2021 Annual General Meeting. 10. promote and raise the profile of health and safety in the membership.consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools, BC teachers’ unions, associations, and to investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Health and Safety Advisory Committee (HSAC) has been actively engaged in health and safety advocacy at the local and federation level. Members of HSAC facilitated and attended Health and Safety Discrete Sessions at the BCTF 2021 Virtual Summer Leadership Conference and served on the BC Ministry of Education Health and Safety Working Group. HSAC members also facilitated sessions at the September 2021 BCTF Health and Safety Forum. In addition, they presented the health and safety bargaining brief at the BCTF Bargaining Conference. Health and safety partnerships Through the HSAC, the BCTF continues its partnership with the BC Labour Heritage Centre’s Day of Mourning in Schools 48

project. The BCTF continues to support a health and safety representatives on the BC Federation of Labour Occupational Health and Safety Standing Committee by having an HSAC member serve on the committee. Health and safety workshops BCTF health and safety workshops continue to be in high demand for both school union representative Training and tripartite training. The BCTF now offers over 20 workshops in English and French. Health and Safety Advisory Committee 2021–22 Michael-Don Borason, Vancouver Secondary Michelle Chapman, Prince George Esther Clark, North Vancouver Darren Companion, Greater Victoria Anna Donaldson, Cariboo-Chilcotin Larry Dureski, Cranbrook Cynthia Hewitt, Alberni Christina Kempenaar, Sooke Gavin Slade-Kerr, Surrey Matt Westphal, Executive Committee liaison, On the committee 2020–21 Don Blakey, Gold Trail Vicki Willis, Chilliwack

INCOME SECURITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on: a. changes in policies and procedures of the Salary Indemnity Plan. b. income security funds administered by the BCTF including an annual statement of anticipated revenue, expenditure, and cash flow for the Salary Indemnity Fund. 2. Participate on the BCTF Finance Committee on matters related to the Salary Indemnity Fund. 3. Participate on the BCTF Audit Committee. 4. Participate on the BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Committee. 5. Act as an appeal panel with respect to decisions of the administrator of any income security plan under the direct control of the BCTF. 6. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and working together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented.


Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Income Security Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. continue to review quality of services to members. 2. monitor and provide advice in regard to the mandate and scope of the BCTF Health and Wellness Program, including Living With Balance/Well Teacher groups and Starling Minds. 3. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 4. consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools and unions and to investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions. Report The Income Security Committee met five times since the 2021 Annual General Meeting. The committee devoted its regular meetings to the following activities: • monitoring information regarding the Salary Indemnity plan (SIP) • providing feedback and input into SIP and Health and Wellness (HW) Program reports • reviewing the actuarial experience of the SIP fund • providing input on fee and plan design recommendations to the Executive Committee • acting as the appeal body to which members may appeal decisions of the SIP Administrator or Health and Wellness Plan Co-ordinator • reviewing and monitoring the BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Plan • discussing the application of Trauma Informed Practice and Aboriginal Lens guide to the committee’s work. One member of the committee sat on the Finance Committee and two members joined the Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator as trustees on the BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Committee. In 2021, the Income Security Committee heard 43 appeals from members. Salary Indemnity Plan In 2021, there was an increase in both short-term and longterm claimants as well as the number of claims paid year over year. Year ending June 30 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

Claims paid (000’s) short-term long-term 12,945 26,509 13,075 29,546 11,379 30,773 12,841 29,052 12,532 30,592 12,389 31,449 14,369 32,665 12,292 34,043 14,062 34,059

Number of claimants short-term long-term 1,211 1,048 1,200 1,030 1,052 1,029 1,147 1,037 1,200 1,061 1,203 1,072 1,350 1,088 1,145 1,064 1,392 1,083

*The number of claimants and claims paid data may change year-to-year as members have up to one year to file a SIP claim. For short term claims, average daily benefit was $189, and average claim days was 56. This represents a slight increase from the year previous. The long-term claims paid data reflects the amount actually paid to members after deducting the following offsets: Canadian Pension Plan (CPP)/Quebec Pension Plan (QPP), Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB), accommodation employment, pensions, Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC), and disability insurance. Without the offsets, the gross amount due to members was $43.92 million, slightly down from $44.35 million in 2020. The two largest offsets were CPP/QPP at $6.27 million and accommodation employment at $2.61 million. Overall, plan liabilities have increased from $198.5 million to $220.0 million. Meanwhile, plan assets increased from $284.8 million to $312.7 million. The SIP continues to operate with a surplus. The goal continues to be for the SIP surplus to be at 30% of the plan. The current valuation has shown that the surplus increased from $86.4 million on June 30, 2020, to 92.7 million on June 30, 2021. The SIP surplus is now 42.1% of plan liabilities, compared to last year’s surplus of 43.5%. The surplus increased in 2020–21 because of positive investment returns offsetting higher liabilities. The investment return outperformed the target with a gain of $18.9 million. The valuation shows that over the past five years, the cost of the short-term component has averaged 0.55% of salaries (a 0.02% increase) and the cost of the long-term component has averaged 1.63% of salaries (a 0.06% increase). The total is equal to 2.18% of salaries, which is up from 2.10%. In June 2003, the Executive Committee passed a motion, which determined that the annual increase to long-term disability (LTD) benefits would be the year-over-year increase in the annual average of the BC Consumer Price Index (CPI), April to March. The annual average of the BC CPI for the twelve-month period ending March 31, 2020, rose from 132.04 to 132.87. That translated into a 0.63% increase in the annual average of the BC CPI year-over-year. The BCTF Executive Committee approved a 0.63% increase to LTD benefits effective July 1, 2021.

49


Below are the increases approved to LTD benefits by the BCTF Executive Committee over the last five years: Year 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

Percent increase to LTD benefits 1.28 1.99 2.19 2.70 2.17 0.63

BCTF Health and Wellness Program The Health and Wellness (HW) Program continues to be well utilized by members. The program received 1,363 referrals for the 2020–21 school year. During the COVID-19 pandemic, members continue to access the program to support returnto-work or in maintaining their assignment due to a medical condition. Due to the complex nature of files and delays due to pandemic restrictions files have trended toward staying open for longer durations than in previous years. The program also provided funding for wellness initiatives. Starling Minds was launched in 2015, and as of June 30, 2021, the number of members that had registered for the online mental fitness program is 5,228. The BCTF piloted The Well Teacher Groups that will be launched this fall in select locals around the province with a goal to offer 30 groups across the province in the 2020–21 school year. BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Policy no. 20414 is a Group Life Insurance Plan which is jointly sponsored by the BCTF and the BC School Trustees Association (BCSTA). The plan was established in 1967 and Great-West Life Assurance Company (now operating as Canada Life) was the underwriter of the plan until August 31, 2020. As of September 1, 2020, the plan’s underwriter is the Manufacturers Life Insurance Company (“Manulife”) and there are 35 school districts that participate. On September 1, 2020, the plan added five school districts. Those school districts had been operating their group life insurance plan through BC Public School employers’ Association (BCPSEA), which was in contravention of their collective agreements. Three representatives from the BCTF and three representatives from the BCSTA form the Insurance Committee which meets yearly at an Annual General Meeting to review the plan’s financial results and determine the premiums which need to be paid. Due to the extra time required for the transition to the new underwriter, the Insurance Committee met twice this year on April 12, 2021, and August 23, 2021.

50

The 12-month period (from September 1, 2019 to August 31, 2020) reviewed by the Insurance Committee represented the plan year, immediately following the July 1, 2019, renewal. The 2019–20 plan years’ experience of 11 life claims totaling $1,613,500, was better than the previous year. There have been between 10 and 15 life claims in each of the last nine years. Overall, the total plan balance as of August 31, 2020, was just over $16.4 million, up from $15.3 million in the prior year. At the April 2021 AGM, the Insurance Committee agreed to maintain current rates and to maintain 12.5% partial premium holiday for the 30 school districts participating in the Plan prior to September 1, 2020; and to also continue the same rate for the 5 school districts that joined the Plan effective September 1, 2020, for another year, for the 2021+–22 Plan year effective July 1, 2021. The next meeting of the Insurance Committee will be on April 11, 2022. 2021–22 Income Security Committee Debbie Comer, BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Committee Representative; Mount Arrowsmith Clint Johnston, Executive Committee Liaison; BCTF First Vice-President, Chilliwack Melanie Miki, BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Committee Representative, Surrey Mark Morrison, Chair; Greater Victoria Dana Neidig, Alternate Chair; Finance Committee Representative, Surrey On the committee 2020–21: Kerri Larson, Fort Nelson Tim McCracken, Richmond Jacquie Shelemey, Sunshine Coast—BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Insurance Committee representative

PENSIONS COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Participate as BCTF representatives on the Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee (TPPAC). 2. Provide advice to the BCTF Executive Committee on pension matters, including retirement income planning. 3. Provide advice, through the TPPAC, to Plan Member Partner Trustees on amendments to the pension plan rules, administration of the pension plan, and investment of the pension funds. 4. Develop and recommend pension policy to the BCTF Executive Committee.


5. 6. 7.

Monitor and review the BCTF Group RRSPs. Monitor and report on the responsible investment practices of the Teachers’ Pension Plan. Challenging thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and working together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented.

Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the Pensions Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. participate in: a. continued communication to members about the importance of the pension plan as a significant part of their salary benefits package. b. supporting the economic welfare of the plan now, and into the future. c. support for initiatives that reach out and include new and younger members in pension education. d. supporting and defending defined benefit pension plans. e. communicating the success and importance of the 20 years of the Joint Trust Agreement. 2. support communication of the Canadian Pension Plan enhancements and the implications for the Teachers’ Pension Plan. 3. support communication of the responsible investing practices of the Teachers’ Pension Plan among plan members. 4. continue to support communication and education of the Teachers’ Pension Plan design changes. 5. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 6. use an equity lens to continue decolonizing existing structures and remove barriers to equitable access to participation within the union. Report The Pensions Committee met four times in 2021. The committee meetings included the following actions: • making recommendations to the BCTF Executive Committee regarding the BCTF Group RRSPs, including the inclusion of two new Sun Life responsible investing funds to the list of offerings for the 1993 BCTF Group RRSP • monitoring media regarding public sector pension plans • monitoring communications to all plan members • monitoring the communication of the Canada Pension Plan enhancements and the implications to the Teachers’ Pension Plan • advocating for improvement of pensions and services to members • monitoring of the BCTF Group RRSPs relative to

compliance with the Canadian Association of Pension Supervisory Authorities guidelines monitoring members’ pension issues.

One member of the committee attended the Shareholder Association for Research and Education Conference in 2021 to support the work of the committee. Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee (TPPAC) The members of the Pensions Committee also attended four meetings as part of TPPAC, which includes representatives of the BCTF, the BCRTA, the BC Principals’ and VicePrincipals’ Association (BCPVPA), and the BC School Superintendents’ Association (BCSSA). All the constituent members are members of the Teachers’ Pension Plan, to which the BCTF is Plan Member Partner in a Joint Trust Agreement with the BC Government, the Plan Employer Partner. The role of TPPAC is to: • review the activities and reports of the Teachers’ Pension Board of Trustees. • recommend the appointment of pension trustees to the BCTF Executive Committee • make recommendations to the BCTF appointed trustees. • make recommendations from TPPAC to the member organizations regarding pension issues. • communicate regularly amongst the member organizations. All members of TPPAC engaged in two days of specialized training sessions related to pension matters. Two BCTF members of the committee attended the BC Public Sector Pension Conference at the BCTF’s expense. Three non-BCTF members also attended the conference at their respective organizations’ expense. On the Pensions Committee 2020–21: Trustees (4): Chung Yan Ip (BCTF), Ken Tannar (BCRTA), Liz Baverstock (BCTF), Leslie Roosa (BCTF) BCTF (6): Eric Young, Judy Stewart, Naomi Nilsson, Randy Chau, Michele Wiebe (to June 30, 2021), Debra Coombes (to June 30, 2021), Glen Hansman (from July 1, 2021), Elaine Ting (from July 1, 2021) BCRTA (2): Gerry Tiede, Howard Spence (to June 30, 2021), Al Cornes (from September 24, 2021) EC liaison: Teri Mooring, Clint Johnston, Carole Gordon Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee Members Trustees (5): Chung Yan Ip (BCTF), Rob Taylor (BCSSA), Ken Tannar (BCRTA), Liz Baverstock (BCTF), Leslie Roosa (BCTF) BCTF (7): Naomi Nilsson, Eric Young, Judy Stewart, Carole 51


Gordon, Randy Chau, Debra Coombes (to June 30, 2021), Michele Wiebe (to June 30, 2021), Glen Hansman (from July 1, 2021), Elaine Ting (from July 1, 2021) BCRTA (2): Gerry Tiede, Howard Spence (to June 30, 2021), Al Cornes (from September 24, 2021) BCPVPA (1): Ankie Carswell BCSSA (1): Lawrence Tarasoff

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Advise the Executive Committee on education policy, including but not limited to: a. curriculum review, development, and implementation. b. professional development and in-service. c. teacher education, certification, and evaluation. d. teachers’ professional autonomy. e. privatization, commercialization, and corporatization. f. enhancing teaching practice and supporting teachers in all stages of their careers. g. classroom assessment and communicating student learning to parents. h. district assessment and province-wide system evaluation. i. inclusion and supports for students school-wide and support for students with disabilities, special needs, and marginalized youth. j. proliferation of technology including issues in relation to privacy, access, and teacher workload. k. tools and opportunities to amplify teachers’ voices on professional issues. l. structures and systems that perpetuate colonialism. m. the funding model for K–12 education in British Columbia. 2. Advise the Executive Committee on the promotion of democratic processes that support teachers’ professional voice and influence issues at their schools and in their school districts. 3. Advise, consult, and advocate for professional issues in dialogue with PD chairpersons, with locals, in zones, at Summer Leadership Conference, and with PSA Council. 4. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the Professional Issues Advisory Committee for 2021–22 be to: 52

1.

Explore and define the issues related to the concept of professional learning through an intersectional lens of decolonization, structural oppression, and systemic racism. 2. Monitor and provide advice regarding Ministry initiatives including curriculum, resources, and strategies for resisting the corporatization opportunities in a postpandemic world. 3. Immediate prioritization, protection, support, and advocacy for the mental health of members during pandemic recovery. 4. Protect and strengthen teachers’ professional autonomy and teacher-led professional development including by supporting professional development chairpersons and refining tools for supporting professionalism. 5. Examine and aggregate the array of challenges and issues that surround designation, inclusivity, integration, and funding of special education. 6. Investigate and advise on the professional issues related to recruitment and retention of teachers. 7. Provide advice on professional issues resulting from COVID-19, including educational change, and how these might disproportionately impact vulnerable school populations. 8. Explore how teachers can support the role and function of public education in supporting equity, including by advancing racial justice and reconciliation, confronting systemic racism. 9. Explore current education policy in relation to enabling patterns of colonization and systemic racism using tools such as the BCTF Aboriginal Lens. 10. Support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. Report • promoted the Professional Development (PD) Lens as a tool to protect and strengthen PD and encouraged locals and PD chairs to maintain teacher control over PD considering Bill 11 (Continuing PD) • used the PD Lens, self-directed PD, and teacher inquiry to continue to promote and grow professional autonomy • advocated for professional autonomy regarding student health and safety during the pandemic • advocated for more funding, co-developed resources, and adequate in-service release time to implement the new reporting order • advocated for the Teacher Inquiry Project with a focus on teacher mental health • advocated for a Professional and Social Issues School Union Representative Training that deals specifically with teacher mental health, drawing on the most current BCTF research • advocated for a grant to support and encourage the


• • •

• • •

formation of a teacher Mental Health Representative position in all locals that would include training and release time for that position participated in zone meetings and the Summer Leadership Conference participated in and gave advice regarding Ministry initiatives, including assessment and reporting participated in the Bargaining Task Force, recommended a bargaining brief based on PIAC priorities, and attended the Bargaining Conference participated in the BCTF Virtual Think Tank on Privatization attended meetings of the BCFED Education Standing Committee discussed issues related to COVID-19 and teaching during the pandemic, including the potential impact on public education and mental well-being of teachers and students discussed and facilitated a session on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Global Policy.

Professional Issues Advisory Committee 2021–22 Joanna Atkinson-Cornthwaite, Nanaimo Runa Bjarnason-Wilson, Golden Erin Coleman, Surrey Adrienne Demers, Fernie Dave MacKenzie, PSA Rep, Vernon Ronak Pahlevanlu, Coquitlam Daniel Shiu, Surrey (resigned September 2021) Jennie Slack, PSA Rep, Burnaby Louise Thomson, Cowichan Valley Ilda Turcotte, Greater Victoria Colleen Wall, Revelstoke Yuri Watanabe, Richmond Robin Tosczak, Executive Committee Liaison On the committee 2020–21 Tom Kertes, Prince Rupert—(Resigned November 2020) Robyn Ladner, Vernon Joanna Larson, Prince Rupert Daniel Shiu, Surrey Kristie Oxley, New Westminster—Provincial specialist association representative Martin Runge, Quesnel—Provincial specialist association representative

PROVINCIAL SPECIALIST ASSOCIATION COUNCIL Terms of Reference 1. Provide, as a community of Provincial Specialist

2.

3.

4. 5.

Associations (PSAs), a forum for: a. the discussion and sharing of mutual concerns. b. developing and helping to support strategies that grow and enhance PSAs. Advise the Executive Committee on: a. matters of particular concern to individual PSAs, or to all PSAs. b. professional matters such as education policy; design, review, and implementation of curriculum, assessment, reporting, and graduation requirements; and PD and in-service. c. bargaining objectives and building public awareness regarding the importance of learning specialist teachers. d. requirements, resources, and advocacy strategies for quality in public education. e. strategies to raise the profile of PSAs. f. PSA finances and other policies and procedures related to PSAs. Provide Local Presidents and local committee chairs strategies to promote PSAs and local specialist associations. Foster the creation of, promote, and support PSA Chapters provincially. Liaise, consult with, and provide advice to the Professional Issues Advisory Committee.

Priorities—2021–22 That the BCTF priorities of the Provincial Specialist Association Council for 2021–22 be to: 1. support PSAs on matters related to COVID-19. 2. support the development of PSA leadership organizational capacity. 3. support the enhancement of PSA services to members. 4. create communication opportunities for partnership and collaboration around PSAs, their chapters, and local PD chairpersons. 5. promote bargaining objectives that support the needs of PSA members. 6. build, strengthen, support, and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 7. use an equity lens to continue decolonizing existing structures and remove barriers to equitable access to participation within the union. Report The following is a brief representative selection of the activities and actions undertaken by BCTF provincial specialist associations during the 2021 calendar year: • Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the PSA Day 2021 conferences were hosted virtually for the second year in a row. Despite some major technical issues, most delegates reported that they had a very worthwhile day of teacher-led PD. 53


• •

• •

PSAs have continued to be directly involved with the Federation’s response to the pandemic. This includes: a. Individual PSAs holding town hall style member meetings online, surveying members, and using other means to collect specialist area feedback regarding the impact of the pandemic in the K–12 system. b. Several PSA presidents continue to represent the Federation on the Ministry of Education’s K–12 Education Restart Steering Committee Health and Safety Workgroup. c. Updated PSA-developed COVID-19 best practice guides for their specialist area members. These guides were also reviewed and approved by the BC Public Health Office. d. PSAs directly contributed to the specialist area information contained within the Ministry of Education’s Provincial COVID-19 Health and Safety Guidelines for K–12 Settings. Providing member support and advocacy dedicated to challenging systemic oppression in education Continuing provision of learning resources and other support materials to members through both PSA websites and the Federation’s TeachBC site Ongoing communication to PSA members with a focus on new members PSAs continue to provide ongoing advocacy related to Ministry policy including: a. curriculum, assessment, reporting, grad requirements b. resources, health, and safety c. mental health d. sustainability and climate change responses e. anti-racism.

PSA Council Denise Hendry, Aboriginal Education Association, AEA Shanee Prasad, Anti-Oppression Educators Collective, AOEC Heather Lytle, Association of BC Drama Educators, ABCDE Sophie Bergeron, Association Provinciale des Professeurs de l’Immersion et du Programme-Francophone BC, APPIPC Mike Shaw, BC Alternate Education Association, BCAEA Nicole Porter, BC Art Teachers’ Association, BCATA Susan Robinson, BC Association of Mathematics Teachers, BCAMT Rome Lavrencic, BC Association of Teachers of Modern Languages, BCATML Naresh Manak, BC Business Education Association, BCBEA Holly Stibbs, BC Co-operative Learning Provincial Specialist Association, BCCLPSA Trevor Randle, BC Culinary Arts Specialist Association, BCCASA Ginger Lidemark, BC Dance Educators’ Association, BCDEA 54

Nicole Jarvis, BC Early Career Teachers’ Association, BCECTA Thomas Diesch, BC Educators for Distributed Learning PSA, BCEDL Patricia Patrick, BC Montessori Teachers PSA, BCMTPSA Mandart Chan, BC Music Educators’ Association, BCMEA Janine Fraser, BC Primary Teachers’ Association, BCPTA David MacKenzie, BC School Counsellors’ Association, BCSCA John Munro, BC Science Teachers’ Association, BCScTA Dale Martelli, BC Social Studies Teachers’ Association, BCSSTA Kristie Oxley, BC Teacher-Librarians’ Association, BCTLA Kyle McKillop, BC Teachers of English Language Arts, BCTELA Elizabeth Seitz, BC Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, BCTESOL Nigel Reedman, BC Technology Education Association, BCTEA Dave McCristall, Computer-Using Educators of BC, CUEBC Jonathan Dyck, Environmental Educators’ Provincial Specialist Association, EEPSA Danielle Neer, Learning Assistance Teachers’ Association, LATA Josh Ogilvie, Physical Health Education British Columbia, PHEBC Jennifer Slack, Provincial Intermediate and Middle Years Teachers’ Association, myPITA Tybie Elenko, Specialist Association of Gifted Educators of BC SAGEBC Melissa Edstrom, Teachers of Home Economics Specialist Association, THESA Sarah Brooks, Teachers of Inclusive Education BC, TIEBC Provincial Specialist Association Council 2021–22 Alexandra Adhikary, BC Early Career Teachers’ Association, BCECTA Nigel Reedman, BC Technology Education Association, BCTEA Susan Robinson, BC Association of Mathematics Teachers, BCAMT Elizabeth Seitz, BC Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, BCTESOL Mike Shaw, BC Alternate Education Association, BCAEA Matthew Sinclair, BC Art Teachers’ Association, BCATA Jennifer Slack, Provincial Intermediate and Middle Years Teachers’ Association, myPITA Holly Stibbs, BC Co-operative Learning Provincial Specialist Association, BCCLPSA Carole Gordon, Clint Johnston, Teri Mooring: Executive Committee liaisons


TEACHER MAGAZINE ADVISORY BOARD Terms of Reference 1. Ensure that the objectives of the magazine are met. 2. Conduct periodic surveys of the effectiveness of the magazine. 3. Participate in the annual planning and review of the magazine. 4. Participate in developing themes and content for upcoming issues. 5. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the Teacher Magazine Advisory Board for 2021–22 be to: 1. Support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 2. Inform and engage members in the bargaining process. 3. Challenge colonial structures and attitudes. 4. Highlight teacher work in implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 5. Highlight member and community actions working toward equity, antiracism, and decolonization in classrooms, schools, locals, and the BCTF. 6. Feature campaigns and ongoing advocacy of organizations the BCTF supports. 7. Raise awareness and support initiatives for climate justice. 8. Promote PD opportunities including resources, workshops, and professional learning opportunities. 9. Include member voices from across the province. Report Teacher magazine was awarded the Canadian Association of Labour Media award for Best Overall Print Publication. The advisory board met twice in 2021 to review recent issues of Teacher magazine and discuss plans for upcoming issues. The board members discussed the visual appeal of the magazine and the important role visuals play in sharing information and stories. Throughout 2021, there was a concerted effort to include more images and graphics in the magazine. The graphic titled Should you talk to your BIPOC colleague about racism in the Jan/Feb edition was republished in other publications and garnered social media attention. The

Nov/Dec edition also featured a graphic to help demystify union processes and structures. Additionally, the magazine has featured photo essays, and encouraged members to share photos to go along with their articles. Over the past five editions, the magazine has covered a variety of topics including racism and antiracism in schools, inclusive education, teaching for reconciliation, mental wellness, outdoor education, and PD. Articles were written by members in a variety of teaching roles including Teachers Teaching on Call and adult educators. Additionally, some of the authors who contributed to the magazine reported it was their first time engaging with the Federation. In 2021, we began using QR codes in the magazine to make digital resources and links accompanying articles easily accessible in the print version of the magazine. Teacher Magazine Advisory Board 2021–22 Shelley Balfour, Cranbrook Jennifer Fox, Peace River South Mahima Lamba, Delta Catherine Quanstrom, Bulkley Valley Alexa Bennett Fox, North Vancouver Executive Committee Liaison: Teri Mooring, Clint Johnston, Carole Gordon. On the Teacher Magazine Advisory Board 2020–21 Renée Willock, West Vancouver

TEACHERS TEACHING ON CALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Advise the BCTF Executive Committee on: a. the diverse identities and varying needs of TTOCs across the province of BC. b. policies, procedures, and activities regarding teachers teaching on call. c. strategies for improving the quality of life and professional recognition for teachers teaching on call. d. structures, resources, and activities which encourage and support the participation of teachers, who teach on call in the locals and the BCTF. 2. Understand and consider in its advocacy, the diverse experiences, backgrounds, and working situations of TTOCs. 3. Advise, consult, and advocate for TTOC issues with TTOC contacts, locals, in zones, at BCTF Summer Leadership Conference, and at the BCTF New Teachers’ Conference. 4. Support communications with members on TTOC issues. 5. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate 55


colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the Teachers Teaching on Call Advisory Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. raise the profile of TTOCs and create a culture of professionalism through activities such as the promotion of TTOC Appreciation Week in May. 2. actively support the Federation’s advocacy for improvements including recruitment and retention, working conditions, benefits, and salaries for TTOCs. 3. assist in developing and implementing strategies to encourage TTOCs to become more active in their locals, provincial specialist associations, and the Federation as a whole. 4. create supports for locals to develop strategies to respond to the needs of, and protect TTOCs’ health and safety, and improve TTOCs’ working conditions, as schools transition out of the pandemic. 5. advocate for equity and awareness of equity-seeking groups to ensure that all TTOCs can count on access, agency, and a sense of belonging. 6. support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. Report The work of the Teachers Teaching on Call Advisory Committee (TTOCAC) this year has centered on advocating for TTOCs during the pandemic. Our members who have been working as TTOCs in the time of a pandemic have been negatively impacted by the loss of employment in the early stages of the pandemic, and more recently by the precarious health and safety conditions that most TTOCs experience. The TTOCAC has taken every opportunity this year to ensure that TTOCs are well informed and to feel that they are supported by their union. Summer Leadership Conference 2021 The TTOCAC members facilitated the online training of new and experienced local TTOC contacts during the Summer Leadership Conference 2021. The training focused on strategies that TTOC contacts could use to support TTOCs in their locals during the pandemic. The strategies included encouraging TTOC contacts to be more active within their locals, establishing TTOC networks within locals, forming a liaison with health and safety contacts, and training on how to work with local executive committees to raise awareness of TTOC-related issues. There were also vigorous discussions on TTOC callouts and redeployment, along with advocating for sick days for TTOCs and job retention. 56

Communication with TTOC Representatives The TTOCAC has been exploring new approaches to connect with the TTOC zonal networks. The new BCTF website offers innovative ways to communicate on topics pertaining to TTOCs, specifically related to their work during the pandemic. The TTOCAC continues to provide information on upcoming PD opportunities, health and safety updates, and workshops for TTOC Representatives across the province. The TTOCAC also spent time with TTOC Representatives during the Summer Leadership Conference to reviewing content for new website area and gathering input from TTOC Representatives at the 2021 Fall zone meetings. Zone Meetings The TTOCAC members planned and facilitated the two virtual zone meetings for the 2021–22 year. The focus has been on support for TTOCs during the pandemic, such as information on health and safety, how to navigate the COVID-19 protocols in schools, and information on employment insurance and other Federal Government financial aid programs. Zone groups also continue to work on the development of local tools to help TTOCs orient themselves to the different work sites. Through their work with TTOC contacts at zone meetings, the advisory committee members worked on developing a strong communications network for TTOCs in locals as well as provincially. There was also discussion with TTOC Reps on ways to access voice amplifiers to reduce chronic vocal strain. The TTOC representatives at zones also contributed their bargaining ideas to the TTOCAC, and they were put forward at the Fall Bargaining Conference. The TTOC representatives also compared their local priorities. Time was also spent on updating and providing a handbook of union basics to new members locally, to help introduce and support new members. TTOC Appreciation Week The TTOCAC members worked with staff to develop communications, guidelines, and promotional materials for this week. The first week in May was chosen as the most appropriate time to hold this event, which will become an annual celebration for TTOCs. The second annual celebration honoring TTOCs will take place during the first full week of May 2022. Involvement in the New Teachers’ Conference Members of the advisory committee were involved in presenting workshops at the February New Teachers’ Conference to introduce new teachers to the BCTF, and on health and safety issues. Committee members also attended the conference. They used their time to hear from new teachers and to network with conference attendees.


Advocating for paid sick leave for TTOCs The TTOCAC is continuing their work in advocating for paid sick leave for TTOCs. The TTOCAC is basing their work on this from the BC Federation of Labour’s (BCFED) initiative for paid sick days for all workers. The TTOCAC is connecting with the BCFED to advance this work. Summer Leadership Conference The TTOCAC members facilitated the online training of new and experienced local TTOC contacts at the Summer Leadership Conference. The training focused on strategies that TTOC contacts could use to support the TTOCs in their locals during the pandemic. These strategies included encouraging contacts to be more active within their locals, establishing TTOC networks within locals, forming a liaison with health and safety contacts, and how to work with local executive committees to raise awareness of TTOC-related issues. BCTF Dispatch BCTF Dispatch is the newsletter for TTOCs that is produced three to four times a year and distributed electronically to TTOC contacts, Local Presidents, and TTOC zonal networks. This newsletter includes information on issues pertaining to TTOCs, specifically related to their work during the pandemic. This publication also included information on upcoming PD opportunities, health and safety updates, workshops, and an advice section for TTOCs called, “SuperTeach.” TTOC Appreciation Week The TTOCAC members worked with administrative staff to develop communications, guidelines, and promotional materials for this week. The first week in May was chosen as the most appropriate time to hold this event, which hopefully will become an annual celebration for TTOCs. On the committee 2021–22 Julie Bond, Cranbrook André Côté, Syndicat des enseignantes et enseignants du programme francophone Sarah Harvey, Greater Victoria Carla Lowther, Peace River North Nadia Mallay, North Vancouver Sonia Manak, Sooke Morgan McKee, Burnaby Karine Ng, Vancouver Secondary Richard Warrington, West Vancouver On the committee 2020–21 Wendy Fontaine, Peace River South Sarah Harvey, Greater Victoria Nitasha Rajoo, Coquitlam Katelyn Watkinson, Campbell River

WORKING AND LEARNING CONDITIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Terms of Reference for 2019–22 1. Raise awareness of, and advocate for, the improvement of working and learning conditions throughout the province to ensure success for each student. 2. Study and analyze information on the provision and allocations of resources to the schools. 3. Study and analyze the workload of members and the quality and equity of learning opportunities provided to students. 4. Develop strategies and provide advice for locals in achieving improved working and learning conditions through local bargaining and other actions. 5. Provide ongoing advice on all matters related to bargaining. 6. Facilitate the bargaining chair portion of zone meetings and summer conference. 7. Assist in the development of local, zonal, and provincial networks of local bargaining chairs. 8. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented. Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the Working and Learning Conditions Advisory Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. Examine and monitor current working and learning conditions and provide feedback to the BCTF Executive Committee regarding possible improvements. 2. Support locals and provide feedback to the BCTF Executive Committee on the implementation of the collective agreement. 3. Monitor and provide feedback to the BCTF Executive Committee on the impact of the teacher shortage and the need for recruitment and retention initiatives with attention being paid to the recruitment and retention of equity-seeking groups. 4. Provide advice on member engagement and ways to build capacity in locals related to bargaining, implementing, and melding of collective agreements. 5. Support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 6. Consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools and unions and to investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions.

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Report The committee engaged in four virtual meetings in 2021: February, June, August, and September. Committee members planned and facilitated training for working and learning conditions representatives/bargaining chairs for the fall and spring 2021 zone meetings. Topics included: • priorities for the year ahead • working and learning conditions and COVID • presentations with respect to engaging members for bargaining and bargaining for antiracism. Committee members planned and delivered two days of training for bargaining chairs who attended Summer Leadership Conference in 2021. Discreet session topics included: • BCTF Bargaining History • Role of the Bargaining Chair • Writing Effective Language • Bargaining in Good Faith. Committee members 2021–22 Tara Elliot, Fernie Jason Karpuk, Kamloops Thomson Mary Lawrence, Prince George Preet Lidder, Vancouver Secondary Ryan McCarty, Mission Tammy McKinley, Chilliwack Chl0ë McKnight, Vancouver Elementary Shanee Prasad, Burnaby Sarah York, Alberni Alison Liddicoat (January–October), Sunshine Coast Jody Polukoshko, Executive Committee Liaison On the Committee 2020–21 David Peterson, Nechako Winona Waldron, Greater Victoria

W.R. LONG MEMORIAL INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY FUND COMMITTEE Terms of Reference 1. Provide advice to the Executive Committee on: a. strategies and priorities for the development and carrying out of international solidarity projects that strengthen public education and teacher unions. b. projects and grants for international solidarity projects based on the priorities. c. activities that build relationships of solidarity between BC teachers and teachers in other countries, including union exchanges and volunteer projects. d. communications that increase member awareness 58

2. 3.

of global education issues and the Federation’s international solidarity work. Approve funding of projects, on amounts not to exceed $5,000 for a project. Challenge thinking, structures, and systems that perpetuate colonialism and work together with others to ensure that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action and United Nations’ Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are implemented.

Priorities—2021–22 The BCTF priorities of the W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Fund Committee for 2021–22 be to: 1. Provide international solidarity that strengthens teacher unions in their ability to support teachers and public education. 2. Engage members in international solidarity through dialogue, exchange, and other opportunities with international partners. 3. Enhance members’ understanding of international solidarity and of strategies learned through the struggles and successes of our Latin American (and other) partner unions by publicizing these in Teacher and other BCTF communications channels. 4. Support and promote the leadership priorities adopted by the 2021 Annual General Meeting. 5. Respond proactively to the needs of partners in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and postpandemic recovery. 6. Consider the role of the committee in decolonizing our schools and unions and investigate the use of the BCTF Aboriginal Lens in committee discussions. Report Over the decades, our Federation’s international solidarity work has deepened and broadened—both geographically and in terms of the range of issues addressed. The focus is primarily on solidarity work in the Americas—South, Central, and North—through an approach of long-term relationships that are mutually respectful and co-operative in developing the nature of project. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated challenging social, economic, and political conditions that most of our partners face. This has included high levels of unemployment or underemployment, high levels of social inequalities and very slow vaccine rollout. Teacher partners have taken on leadership roles in facing these conditions, and creatively used their skills and resources to support teachers and students.


Some highlights from activities in 2021–22 Non-sexist and inclusive pedagogy The Non-Sexist and Inclusive Pedagogy (NSIP) program is a regional initiative that carries out training and consciousnessraising among Central American teachers to facilitate the implementation of non-sexist, inclusive, and democratic practices in the classroom. For 2021–22, the BCTF has supported projects with the National Association of Salvadoran Educators (ANDES 21 de Junio), the Honduran High School Teachers’ College (COPEMH), the First Professional College of Honduran Teachers (PRICPHMA), and the Women’s Collective of the Federation of Honduran Teachers’ Organizations (FOMH). Activities have focused on developing workshops and lesson aids, adapting training to online formats, training teachers in marginalized areas, certifying a NSIP diploma, and lobbying for labour rights. NSIP teaching resources, photos, and workshop outlines developed by partners are available at pedagogianosexista.com. Women’s leadership training The BCTF supports women’s leadership training that is focused on engaging more women teachers in leadership roles in their organizations at the local and national level. For 2021–22, the BCTF has supported projects with the Costa Rican Education Workers’ Union (SEC), the Peruvian Education Workers’ Union (SUTEP), and the Federation of Central American Teachers’ Organizations (FOMCA, Women’s Secretariat). Activities have included online empowerment training, organizing, and participating in local actions, and increasing the visibility of women leaders. The BCTF has also been exploring a partnership with the General Union of Palestinian Teachers (GUPT). Research and democratic pedagogy Latin American partners are using research to better understand priority issues, with the results presented back to teachers in order to collectively develop strategies for action. In Colombia, the Federation of Colombian Educators (FECODE) has continued work on the “Schools as Territories of Peace” project. In Mexico, Totlahtol Yoltok (“Our Living Word”), a local collective of the National Confederation of Education Workers, Veracruz, has continued to lead on the decolonization of Indigenous education. The Initiative for Democratic Education in the Americas (IDEA Network) organized a hemispheric campaign against educational inequality (see idea-network.ca/en/?p=443) and published new issues of Intercambio Magazine (see idea-network.ca/ en/?cat=5).

democratic, and quality public education. In Bolivia, along with the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation (OSSTF), the BCTF has funded a program of union skills training and professional development. In Southern Africa, the BCTF continues to partner with the Namibia National Teachers’ Union (NANTU), supporting PD facilitator training based on the Workshop on Workshops model used by the BCTF. In Cuba, the BCTF is supporting a collaborative project, involving Cuban and BC teachers and students, to develop short videos supporting English language learning. Engaging BC teachers in international solidarity While many in-person exchanges have not been possible due to the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual encounters have continued to allow for unique spaces of learning and solidarity. The BCTF is also a part of Common Frontiers, a national working group with over two decades of experience and credibility in international solidarity. Common Frontiers provides solidarity statements, webinars, a monthly newsletter, and a podcast (Super-exploitation and Resistance) that highlights labour struggles in Latin America for a Canadian audience. Funding of the International Solidarity Program The BCTF International Solidarity Program is funded through a percentage of the fees from the BCTF operating fund. This has allowed the BCTF to have a significant impact in working with colleagues and their unions in Latin America and Southern Africa. Many of the BCTF projects are carried out in a partnership with CoDevelopment Canada (see www.codev.org/). Many BCTF members are members of CoDevelopment and have served on its board. Members of the W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Committee —2021–22 Alexandra Adhikary, Peace River North Karen Andrews, Terrace Annie Ohana, Surrey Lorna Wou, Coquitlam Carole Gordon, Clint Johnston, Teri Mooring, Executive Committee Liaison On the committee 2020–21 Jennifer MacDonald, Greater Victoria Julia MacRae, Surrey

Institutional strengthening The International Program aims to support and strengthen teacher unions as agents of change and defenders of universal, 59


Artwork by: Lara Natalia Daniel

PART 4:

Report of the Representative Assembly 2022 REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS 60


Representative Assembly report The Representative Assembly (RA) held three regular meetings in 2021: January 29–30, May 28–29, and November 5–6. The RA consists of Local Representatives (LRs) chosen based on the formula outlined in Procedure 25.B.02 (page 98) of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF. Local Presidents (LPs) and members of the Executive Committee (EC) are non-voting members of the RA. Voting at the RA is by voting cards issued to LRs based on one card for each 0.2%, or fraction thereof, of the total membership of the BCTF. For virtual meetings voting is done by Simply Voting using weighted votes. Each meeting of the assembly gives representatives the opportunity to review all minutes of the EC. This review assists assembly members in exercising their constitutional responsibility to advise the EC on any question affecting BCTF policy as well as to authorize or prohibit any proposal of the EC deemed to be contrary to, or beyond the scope of, BCTF policy. Each RA also receives a stewardship report outlining action on the implementation of RA decisions. The following is a brief outline of some of the major issues considered by the 2021 RAs. Winter meeting—January 29–30, 2021 • elected delegates to the Canadian Teachers’ Federation Annual General Meeting • advocated for the cohort model not to form part of any necessary safety planning for the 2021–22 school year • donated $15,000 to BCFED • agreed on a minimum local fee, fee for affiliate administrative membership, fee for affiliate membership, fee for associate membership, fee for members on leave of absence, and a fee for member under By-law 1.1(b) • amended Procedure 10.L.12 • demanded government supply three-layer masks, twoper-member • investigated the feasibility of accessing high-speed internet for BCTF facilitators • addressed the decline in men in the teaching profession • investigated working conditions of school psychologists • filed a Labour Relations Board complaint • undated the BCTF mobilization School Union Representative Training workshop • lobbied the government for rapid testing in schools • encouraged locals to petition school districts act on reconciliation plans, policies, and training • demand the government deal with class size and COVID-19

• • • •

created a workshop for school associates/advisory’s made a solidarity statement with Dr. Amie Wolf condemned subsidization of private schools encouraged locals to bring a motion to school boards that they bring commitment to United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People.

Spring meeting—May 28–29, 2021 • elected Ombudspersons, Health and Safety Representatives, RA chairpersons, RA Agenda Committee, Finance Committee, Nominating Chairperson, Alternate Nominating Chairperson, BC Federation of Labour Executive Council delegate • amended Procedures 2.B.16, 25.A.26, 10.J.18, 13.D.06 • amended RA Standing Rule of Order 1.4 • increased equity and inclusion at Federation meetings • encouraged locals to get cultural humility training • urged the government for designation funding • initiated a distributed learning campaign • investigated the eligibility definition for salary indemnity plan • supported districts to conduct equity audits • enhanced the foundation skills assessment exemption campaign • investigated harassment of teachers through social media • investigated long-term disability benefits for members with chronic illness • advocated for mandatory teacher candidate training • advocated for mandatory teacher instructor training • developed materials for mental health issues stigma • lobbied the government for more media/digital literacy curriculum • encouraged districts to pay for mental health first aid training • investigated different leaves relating to maternity • encouraged government to fund outdoor learning • pressed the government to revitalize public services • investigated a change to the Salary Indemnity Plan • lobbied the government for more technology and resources funding • advocated for greater flexibility with tuition credits • urged the Executive Committee that an adult education representative from each local be given a spot at zone meetings • encouraged all locals to organize a walk-in to honour the 215 children found in unmarked graves. Fall meeting—November 5–6, 2021 • elected members to Judicial Council and BC Federation of Labour Executive Council • called on government to withdraw Bill 22 61


• • • • • • •

donated to the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and the Tk’emlúps te’ Secwe̓ peme and shíshálh Nation called on government to provide additional resources to the Northern Health Authority called on government to ensure the Provincial Health Officer mandate is well communicated incorporated bargaining role training at the Federation Leadership Institute signed the open letter to David Eby on zero emissions for new construction became a signatory to the BC Climate Emergency Campaign asked government to change the BC climate plan by updating timelines and targets encouraged all locals to demand that sex/gender be removed from all local and provincial school forms and replaced with pronouns.

Report of the Nominating Committee The Nominating Committee presents the following names (in alphabetical order for each position) of BCTF members who have been nominated pursuant to By-law 5.4 (page 11 of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF) for positions on the Executive Committee. Additional nominations may be made from the floor of the Annual General Meeting. For President—one to be elected Clint Johnston, Chilliwack For First Vice-President—one to be elected Carole Gordon, Central Okanagan For Second Vice-President—one to be elected Rae Figursky, Burnaby Robin Tosczak, Greater Victoria Members-at-Large—six to be elected Aboriginal—one to be elected Jelana Bighorn, Vancouver Secondary Rick Joe, Chilliwack Racialized—one to be elected Benula Bunjun, Sooke Preet Lidder, Vancouver Secondary Dereck Mejias, Vancouver Island North Non-designated Kevin Epp, Okanagan Skaha Lisa LaBoucane, Vernon Shanee Prasad, Burnaby Katherine Trepanier, Prince George Winona Waldron, Greater Victoria

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Artwork by: Theoren

PART 5:

Voting Rights of the AGM and Standing Rules of Order 2022 REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS 63


Voting Rights of the AGM By-law 8.2 (p. 13 of the Members’ Guide) specifies that the voting body at the AGM consists of three different groups of people: (1) the Local Representatives, elected by the local and sublocals, (2) members of the Executive Committee, elected by the AGM, and (3) the delegates, elected by the local and sublocals. Each of the three groups has certain voting rights and responsibilities. The information that follows outlines those for each of the groups and, outlines the rights and responsibilities of locals in selecting their Local Representatives and AGM delegates. Voting rights of delegates 1. Each delegate must be elected by a general meeting of their local or sublocal. 2. A delegate attends the AGM as a representative of the local or sublocal. Each voting card is therefore assigned to the delegate by the local. 3. By-law 8.3 (p. 14 of the Members’ Guide) allows delegates and Local Representative from the same local to exchange and exercise each other’s voting cards, provided that no LR or delegate holds more than eight voting cards, the maximum number of voting cards permitted under AGM Rule of Order 12.7 (p. 176), and subject to any rules the local has made regarding the transfer of voting cards. If a delegate or LR leaves the meeting room temporarily, therefore, they may pass the voting cards to another delegate or LR from the same local, provided that no one holds more than a total of eight voting cards. This provision means that delegates and LRs may vote two different colors of voting cards at the AGM and ensures that all locals can be fully represented in any voting that occurs at the AGM. 4. Delegates are free to vote as they see fit on questions at the meeting. 5. Having stood for election as an AGM delegate, each delegate has the obligation to attend the sessions of the AGM, to ensure that colleagues are represented in all votes. Voting rights of Local Representatives 1. Each LR or alternate LR must be elected by a general meeting of the local or sublocal. 2. Each LR attends the AGM as a member of the Representative Assembly at BCTF expense. Their voting card is therefore issued by the BCTF office. 3. By-law 8.3 (p. 14 of the Members’ Guide) permits a LR or alternate LR to pass their voting card to another LR from the same local or to a delegate from the same local. 4. By-law 8.3 also permits a LR to exercise both LRs’ voting cards and delegates’ voting cards, provided that the cards are transferred to them by members of the same local, provided that they exercise not more than eight 64

voting cards, as specified in AGM Rule of Order 12.7 (p. 176 of the Members’ Guide), and subject to any rules made by the local or sublocal regarding the transfer of voting cards. Voting rights of members of the BCTF Executive Committee 1. Each Executive member is elected by the AGM and is therefore responsible to the BCTF as a whole, not to their local. 2. Each Executive member attends the AGM as a member of the BCTF Executive Committee, at BCTF expense, not as a representative of any local or sublocal. 3. Each Executive member receives a voting card as an individual and may therefore vote only their own card. They may not pass the card to anyone else, including other members of the Executive Committee. 4. An Executive member may not exercise a LR’s voting card or a delegate’s voting card because the EC member does not represent any local or sublocal. Rights and responsibilities of locals and sublocals 1. A local must elect its Local Representative(s) at a general meeting. 2. A local must elect its AGM delegates at a general meeting. 3. By-law 6.7 (p. 12 of the Members’ Guide) allows the president or an “authorized agent” of the local to appoint a substitute if the LR and alternate are both unable to attend a meeting of the Representative Assembly and, by extension, the AGM. 4. A local may elect a person to serve in more than one capacity. For example, the local may have a by-law specifying that the vice-president will automatically be a LR and/or a member of the local’s AGM delegation. 5. A local may make rules regarding the custody and issuance of delegates’ voting cards to ensure that all the local’s cards are present in the meeting room at all times during the business sessions. Such rules may be made to ensure that the members of the local have a voice in all decisions made at the AGM. Please note, however, that such rules cannot infringe on the voting rights of individual delegates. 6. By-law 8.3 (p. 14 of the Members’ Guide) allows local or sublocals to make rules regulating the transfer of voting cards between its delegates and LRs. Such rules must be made by a general meeting of the local.


AGM Standing Rules of Order 1. Right to attend and speak 1.1 All members of the BCTF shall have the right to attend the meeting. 1.2 Surviving spouses shall have the right to speak on pension matters. 1.3 The right to speak shall be on recognition of the chair and obtained by standing at one of the microphones. Every person shall identify themself when granted recognition by the chair. 1.4 The chair shall, in recognizing speakers, have the right to deviate from the order in which persons seek recognition to permit a speaker or speakers to present a contrary point of view from that of those who have already spoken. 1.5 No speaker shall, without the consent of the delegates, speak more than once or for longer than three minutes on each motion, main or secondary, except for the mover of the motion, who shall have the right to speak for four minutes. This rule shall not deprive the mover of the right to close debate, provided that there has not been a procedural motion to close debate. A motion to change these times shall be in accordance with the AGM Standing Rule 7.2.iii.c. 1.6 Asking and answering questions shall not constitute speaking to a motion. 1.7 a. Questions and answers thereto shall be directed through the chair. b. A member may address the meeting in their working language and, when the working language is not English, may have another delegate accompany them to the microphone to provide a translation of their remarks to English. Both the delegate addressing the meeting and the delegate providing the translation shall each have up to three minutes to speak to a motion and up to four minutes when moving a motion, in accordance with Annual General Meeting Standing Rule of Order 1.5. The delegate providing the translation will identify themself when granted recognition by the chair. (13 AGM, p. 4) 1.8 No delegate shall comment on any matter immediately before moving a motion. 1.9 The chair can call for the question to be put, if there has been debate on both sides of the issue, when the time on the agenda for the next item has arrived. If the assembly declines to put the question at that time, the matter automatically goes to unfinished business unless another procedural motion arises. 2. Preparation of the proposed agenda 2.1 The preparation of the proposed agenda shall be the responsibility of the President. 2.2 The proposed agenda shall contain the hours at which each session will convene and adjourn, and shall indicate the business to be transacted during each session.

Recommendations and resolutions shall be referred to by number. The numbers shall correspond to those assigned in a document entitled Reports and Resolutions, Annual General Meeting. This document shall be made available to members as long as possible before convening of the meeting and shall, insofar as is possible, contain all information pertinent to the items to be included in the proposed agenda of the meeting. 2.3 The proposed agenda shall provide opportunities for delegates to ask questions concerning the reports of the Representative Assembly, the Executive Committee or any other BCTF committee or task force. 2.4 Committee reports shall be published in Reports and Resolutions or, in exceptional cases, included in the information kits distributed to delegates. 2.5 Because the proposed agenda must be printed and circulated, provision shall be made for late reports and resolutions. It shall be the responsibility of the Executive Committee to propose the inclusion in the proposed agenda of matters so arising. Component parts of the BCTF shall submit to the Executive Committee resolutions arising too late for inclusion in the printed proposed agenda. 2.6 The Annual General Meeting shall, from time to time, make rules concerning which of its component parts shall have the right to submit matters for the consideration of the meeting. 2.7 (i) The proposed agenda shall commence with the election of chairpersons. (ii) A co-chairperson not in the chair should be available to assist the chair and the meeting by providing parliamentary opinion. (iii) The chairpersons shall be either active members or honorary associate members. 2.8 That the agenda will include scheduled times in advance of the commencement of elections for the Executive Committee positions to allow for speeches from: (i) candidates for Full-Time Table Officer positions, with a limit of four minutes allocated to each candidate. (ii) candidates for Member-at-Large positions, with a limit of three minutes allocated to each candidate. 3.

Motion to adopt agenda Debatable, amendable, but cannot be referred, postponed or tabled. 3.1 The agenda shall be circulated to the meeting. The chair shall bring to the attention of the meeting any changes to the proposed agenda that have originated with the Executive Committee, and shall cause to be presented to the meeting an explanation of why the item(s) could not be included in Reports and Resolutions. 65


3.2 Subject to the provisions of these rules, the constitution and by-laws, and the policies and procedures of the Federation, when a motion to adopt the agenda is made, the meeting can, by motions requiring simple majorities, add items to, delete items from, or rearrange the order of items on the proposed agenda. 3.3 Recommendations and resolutions printed in Reports and Resolutions or contained in the information kits distributed to delegates shall be part of the proposed agenda, and may not be withdrawn except by motions to amend the proposed agenda. 4.

Motions to amend the agenda (subsequent to its adoption) Debatable, amendable, but cannot be referred, postponed or tabled, require a two-thirds majority. 4.1 Once the proposed agenda has been adopted, it becomes the property of the meeting. Items on it may therefore not be withdrawn without the unanimous consent of the voting delegates present. However, any change to the agenda, once it has been adopted, can be made by motion, but any such motion shall require at least two-thirds majority to pass. This includes any motion that limits or extends specified time allocations, changes the order of items remaining on the agenda, or designates specific times for items. 5. Motion to adopt minutes Not debatable, amendable as to errors in fact only. 5.1 There shall be a motion to adopt the minutes of the previous meeting. These minutes shall have been circulated to locals, geographical representatives, members of the Executive Committee, and school staffs. 6.

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

Main motions Debatable, amendable, may be referred, tabled, postponed or reconsidered. A main motion is defined as a motion that introduces a substantive question as a new subject. AGM main motions are introduced as resolutions or as recommendations. Main motions must be moved and seconded. It shall be the primary responsibility of the sponsoring body of a main motion to move and second the motion, but it shall be the right of any delegate to move or second any main motion. No recommendation or resolution shall be discussed or voted on until copies of it have been distributed to the meeting. The names of the mover and seconder, and their locals, shall be included on the printed copies of “late” and “new” resolutions.

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Types of main motions 6.A Resolutions and Recommendations (as circulated to delegates). 6.A.1—A “resolution” shall be defined as a main motion, sponsored by a component body of the BCTF, other than BCTF committees, the Executive Committee or the Representative Assembly, that has been published in Reports and Resolutions. (See also section 6.D of these rules of order and statement 2.C.04.) 6.A.2—A “recommendation” shall be defined as a main motion sponsored by the Executive Committee or the Representative Assembly. 6.A.3—Recommendations shall take precedence over resolutions. 6.B Special Resolutions. 6.B.1—Special resolutions shall be defined as recommendations or resolutions that seek to amend the constitution and by-laws of the Federation and other resolutions so defined in the Societies Act. Such special resolutions shall require a three- quarters majority vote to pass. 6.B. 2—The Societies Act requires notice of motion of any special resolution. 6.C “Late” resolutions. 6.C.1—A “late” resolution shall be defined as a resolution that deals with a matter that arose too late for the sponsoring group to have the resolution published in Reports and Resolutions. “Late” resolutions must be submitted to the Executive Committee prior to the AGM. If the Executive Committee rules that a resolution is a “late” resolution as defined herein, it shall recommend that resolution for inclusion in the proposed agenda. 6.D “New” resolutions. 6.D.1—To be acceptable for consideration by the AGM as a “new” resolution, a resolution must meet all of the following criteria: 1. arises directly out of the business of the meeting; 2. could not have been submitted in time to become either a regular or “late” resolution; 3. must relate to an issue that must be dealt with before the spring meeting of the Representative Assembly. 6.D.2—Before accepting a “new” resolution, the chairperson of the meeting shall ask the chairperson of the Resolutions Committee to indicate to the meeting whether or not the Resolutions Committee believes that the resolution meets the criteria for new resolutions, as stated in rule 6.D.1. 6.D.3—When a new resolution has been proposed for consideration by the meeting, it shall be duplicated and distributed to the meeting at a later session or displayed to the meeting. 6.D.4—A new resolution shall receive consideration only with the consent of the meeting expressed by majority


vote on a procedural motion to accept the resolution for consideration. The motion to accept for consideration shall not be proposed until copies of the new resolution have been made available to the meeting. 6.D.5—All of the foregoing rules shall apply to resolutions intended for consideration under the heading “new business” at the final session, provided that the chairperson may suspend rule 6.D.3 if this resolution clearly deals with a matter of urgent concern that was not evident early enough for rule 6.D.3 to have been applied. 6.D.6—If, when the AGM adjourns, it has not considered a resolution submitted as a “new” resolution, the resolution shall die—that is, it shall not be considered to be unfinished business of the meeting. 6.E Alternative wording for resolutions. 6.E.1—Alteration of the wording of a resolution, or consolidation of more than one resolution, is permissible, provided that the alteration or consolidation is for clarification and does not change the intent. The normal procedure shall be that such alteration of wording will be prepared in consultation between the sponsor of a resolution and the Resolutions Committee. The alternative wording shall be printed and distributed or displayed to the meeting, prior to consideration of the resolution. If the meeting agrees by a simple majority, the alternative wording may be moved instead of the original wording. A motion to accept alternative wording must be seconded, is debatable, not amendable and requires a simple majority. 6.F Procedures for presenting resolutions. 6.F.1—A motion to adopt the resolution may be made from the floor. This motion is the primary responsibility of the delegates representing the sponsoring association. 6.F.2—Attention to any broader implications, inherent in the motion, of which the meeting needs to be aware in disposing of the resolution, may be found in the Advice Booklet. 6.F.3—The chairperson of the Resolutions Committee may recommend an appropriate method of dealing with the resolution, such recommendation to be made prior to the resolution being placed on the floor for debate. 6.F.4—The motion to adopt the resolution is then open for debate, during which procedural motions to give effect to the Resolutions Committee’s recommendations may be proposed from the floor. 7.

Secondary motions (A secondary motion is any motion that is in order when a main motion is being debated.) 7.1 A secondary motion can be made and considered while a main motion is pending. After a secondary motion has been made and has been admitted by the chair as in order it must be acted on or disposed of before direct

consideration of the main question can be continued. Secondary motions that will be accepted by the chair are those listed in rule 7.2. 7.2.i—Subsidiary motions (A subsidiary motion is intended to assist a meeting in treating or disposing of a main motion.) No subsidiary motion, other than an amendment, shall be in order until after the chair is satisfied that an opportunity has been given to present the affirmative and negative points of view. 7.2.i.(a) Postpone main motion indefinitely. Debatable (including debate on the main motion). Not amendable and may be reconsidered only if the motion to postpone indefinitely is passed. A motion to postpone indefinitely allows the meeting the privilege of declining to take a position on a main motion. Its adoption kills the main motion and avoids a direct vote on the question. 7.2.i.(b) Postpone main motion to a subsequent annual general meeting. Debatable (only as to the appropriateness of postponement), amendable (only as to year). Requires majority vote. Postponement to a subsequent annual general meeting has the effect of ordering the inclusion of that item on the agenda of a subsequent meeting. 7.2.i.(c) Amend. Debatable, amendable*, may be referred, postponed or tabled. An amendment is a motion to change, to add words to, or to omit words from, an original motion. The change is usually to clarify or improve the wording of the original motion and must not be contrary to the intent of that motion. *Motions for amendments to amendments of main motions are in order but are not themselves amendable. 7.2.i.(d) Refer to main motion with or without amendment. Debatable (only as to the propriety or advisability of referral), amendable (only as to instructions contained in the referral motion). A motion to refer must indicate the body to which the motion is to be referred, may empower action, or may require a report to a subsequent annual general meeting, to the Executive Committee, or to the Representative Assembly. 7.2.i.(e) Postpone main motion to a certain time. Debatable (only as the appropriateness of postponement), amendable (only as to time). Requires a two-thirds or larger majority vote because it has the effect of amending the agenda. Postponement can be to a later time in the same session or to a later session of the meeting. 7.2.i.(f) Previous question (that the question be put). Not debatable, not amendable, requires a two-thirds majority. 67


This motion may be moved only by a delegate who has been recognized by the chair. After the motion has been seconded, it must be voted on immediately. If it passes, all previous commitments to allow persons to speak are eliminated. The chair may call the question to be put if there has been debate on both sides of the issue, when the time on the agenda for the next item has arrived. If the assembly declines to put the question at that time, the matter automatically goes to unfinished business unless another procedural motion arises. 7.2.i.(g) Table. Not debatable, not amendable, requires a majority vote. A motion to table has the effect of delaying action on a main motion. If the motion is not lifted from the table later (see rule 8.1), the effect of the motion to table is to prevent action from being taken on the main motion. 7.2.ii—Privileged motions (A privileged motion does not relate directly to the pending business, but has to do with special matters that, without debate, should be allowed to interrupt the consideration of anything else.) 7.2.ii.(a) Call for orders of the day. May interrupt speaker, not debatable, not amendable. If the adopted agenda is not being followed or if there is a deviation from the agenda, a single delegate can require that the agenda be followed. A call for orders of the day must receive immediate attention from the chair. The ruling of the chair shall be subject to challenge. 7.2.ii.(b) Question of privilege (point of privilege). May interrupt speaker, seconder is required if a formal motion is made. The question or point must concern the welfare, reputation, right, privilege or physical comfort of a member, a group of members or the BCTF as a whole. The chair shall rule immediately on the validity of the point. The ruling of the chair shall be subject to challenge. 7.2.ii.(c) Recess. May not interrupt speaker, not debatable, amendable as to length of recess, cannot be reconsidered. A recess is a short intermission in the meeting’s proceedings, after which business will immediately be resumed at exactly the point where it was interrupted. The privileged motion to recess is a motion that a recess being immediately, made while another question is pending. A motion to recess that is made when no question is pending is a main motion and follows the normal rules for handling a main motion. This applies whether the recess is to begin immediately or at a future time. 7.2.ii.(d) Adjourn. May not interrupt speaker, not debatable, not amendable, cannot be reconsidered. 68

A motion to adjourn means to close the meeting. The privileged motion to adjourn can be made only where provision for another meeting or session exists. 7.2.iii—Incidental motions (Incidental motions are incidental to the motions or matters out of which they arise. With few exceptions, they are related to the main question in such a way that they must be decided immediately, before business can proceed.) 7.2.iii.(a) Point of order. May interrupt speaker. The point must concern an alleged breach of standing rules and must receive an immediate ruling from the chair. The ruling shall be subject to challenge. 7.2.iii.(b) Appeal (challenge the chair). Debatable by challenger and chair only. An appeal or challenge of the chair is in order when another has the floor, but the challenge must be made at the time of the ruling. If any debate of business has intervened, it is too late to appeal. If any delegate is dissatisfied with any ruling of the chair, the ruling may be challenged. A motion to sustain the chair shall take precedence over all other business. When a ruling of the chair is challenged by a delegate, all other business shall be suspended. The delegate making the challenge shall have the right to present argument to the meeting as to why the ruling is in error. The chair shall have the right to defend the ruling. The vote on the motion to sustain the chair shall follow immediately without further debate. 7.2.iii.(c) Suspend the standing rules. May not interrupt speaker, not debatable, not amendable, cannot be reconsidered. Except where obviously impossible (such as wanting to suspend the rule(s) during a final session of an AGM), a motion to suspend a standing rule shall require notice at a previous session of the meeting and a two-thirds majority vote. Standing rules may be suspended without notice by unanimous consent provided that the suspension is not contrary to the constitution and/or by-laws. Notwithstanding this provision, the meeting may, at any time, on recommendation of the Resolutions Committee, suspend the standing rules with a two-thirds majority vote. 7.2.iii.(d) Objection to the consideration of the question. Not debatable, not amendable, two-thirds vote against consideration is required. Can be reconsidered only if objection is sustained. A motion to object to the consideration of the question can be made when another member has been assigned the floor, but only if debate has not begun or a subsidiary motion has not been accepted by the chair. 7.2.iii.(e) Division of a question. May not interrupt speaker, not debatable, amendable, may not be reconsidered.


When a motion relating to a single subject contains several parts each of which is capable of standing as separate proposition, the parts can be separated to be considered and voted on as if they were district questions. Such a procedure is consideration seriatim. When the decision has been made to consider a question seriatim, each part of the motion shall be separate and any procedural motion shall be applied only to the part being debated. 7.2.iii.(f) Requests and inquiries. Note: The first two types of inquiry are responded to by the chair, or by a member at the direction of the chair; the other requests can be granted only by the meeting. (1) Parliamentary Inquiry—a request for the chair’s opinion—not involving a ruling—on a matter of parliamentary procedure as it relates to the business at hand. (2) Point of Information—a question about facts affecting the business at hand—directed to the chair or, through the chair, to a member. (3) Request to be excused from a duty. (4) Request for any other privilege. 8.

Motions that bring a question again before the meeting The following three motions will be the only ones accepted by the chair to bring a question again before the meeting. 8.1 Take from the table. Not debatable, not amendable, cannot be reconsidered. A motion to take from the table must be passed before any motion that has been tabled can be reconsidered. Because the motion will have the effect of amending the agenda, it shall require a two-thirds or larger majority vote to pass. If passed, the motion shall be dealt with at the earliest opportunity. 8.2 Rescind something previously adopted. Debatable (including discussion on the motion to be rescinded or amended). Amendable. Two-thirds or larger majority vote required because the effect is to amend the agenda. Negative votes only can be reconsidered. A motion to rescind is a proposal to cancel or annul an earlier decision. A motion to rescind, if passed, cancels the earlier motion and makes it possible for a new motion to be placed before the meeting. 8.3 Reconsider Debatable (provided the motion to be reconsidered is debatable, in which case debate may also go into the original motion). Not amendable. Cannot be reconsidered. Two-thirds or larger majority vote required because the effect is to amend the agenda. A motion to reconsider has the following unique characteristics:

a. It can be made only by a delegate who voted with the prevailing side—i.e., voted in favor if the motion involved was adopted, or voted contrary if the motion was defeated. b. The motion can be made and seconded at times when it is not in order for it to come before the meeting for debate or vote. In such a case it can be taken up later, even after it would be too late to move it in the first place. c. A motion to reconsider is in order at any time, even after the meeting has voted to adjourn provided that the mover of the motion has addressed the chair before the chair declared the meeting adjourned. 9. Calling the question 9.1 The chair may call the question to be put if there has been debate on both sides of the issue, when the time on the agenda for the next item has arrived. If the assembly declines to put the question at that time, the matter automatically goes to unfinished business unless another procedural motion arises. 10. Committee of the whole 10.1 The meeting may, when considering any item on the agenda, resolve itself into a committee of the whole. The procedure shall normally be used for either of two reasons: 1. The topic is sufficiently complex to warrant interim decisions that will become binding only after passage of a final composite resolution recommended to the meeting by the committee of the whole. 2. The matter is a sensitive one and it is the opinion of the meeting that only BCTF members and staff should be in attendance. 10.2 The procedure shall be for delegates to move and second that the meeting resolve itself into a committee of the whole, naming the chairperson of the committee. After discussion, during which the standing rules may be waived, the committee of the whole shall move to rise and report to the meeting. 10.3 A motion that repeats the words of the report of the committee shall then be placed before the meeting. Only the motion carried by the meeting in regular session shall appear in the minutes. 11. Special committee of the whole 11.1 Prior to pension matters being considered, the meeting shall move into a special committee of the whole with delegates, staff, representatives of honorary associate members and others, as appropriate, present. 11.2 The number of honorary associate member representatives shall be determined on the same basis as local delegates. 11.3 During the special committee proceedings, the honorary 69


associate member representatives shall be governed by all applicable rules contained in section 11 of the BCTF Standing Rules of Order of the AGM as if they were a local of the Federation. 11.4 The delegates and honorary associate member representatives shall consider the recommendations and resolutions placed before the meeting in the special committee of the whole. 11.5 All recommendations and resolutions that were considered in the special committee of the whole proceedings must be considered out of committee by active members. 12. Voting 12.1 a. Voting cards shall be issued to locals, to local representatives, and to members of the Executive Committee in accordance with By-law 8.2. These cards shall be distributed at the time and place designated on the proposed agenda. b.The following process has been adopted for the replacement of lost voting cards: i.a member of the voting body advises the Resolutions Committee, in confidence, that a voting card or cards have been lost. ii. without indicating in any way the local or individual, members of the Resolutions Committee move and second that the rules be suspended to allow number of voting card(s) to be replaced. 12.2 No local may elect more delegates than it is entitled under By-law 8.2. This rule does not preclude the right of a local to elect “alternate” delegates who can replace their elected delegates if the need arises. 12.3 When a local elects fewer delegates than it is entitled to under By-law 8.2, the local shall make rules regarding the distribution of the extra voting cards among its delegates. 12.4 Delegates are free to vote as they see fit on questions at the meeting. 12.5 All voting, except for elections and recounts—the latter as specified in rule 12.10—shall be conducted solely by show of voting cards. There shall be no roll call votes. 12.6 Delegates may vote only the cards of their own locals and/or the cards issued to the local’s representatives. 12.7 Subject to the provision of rule 11.1, each delegate shall be guaranteed the right to hold one voting card, but no delegate may hold more than eight voting cards. 12.8 Call for a count of voting cards. Call must be supported by 100 people. Is not debatable, not amendable, and may not be reconsidered. When a delegate considers the chair to have erred in discerning the result of a vote, they may call for a count of voting cards. 12.9 All counts of voting cards shall be taken by scrutineers assigned to clearly defined areas, and shall be made using 70

a numerical call system. 12.10 That should a recount be required, it shall be taken by ballot rather than by show of voting cards. 13. Election of Executive Committee members 13.1 a. Election of Executive Committee members shall be conducted by secret ballot. b. Ballots will display candidate names, including traditional Indigenous, chosen and/or legal names, at the discretion of each candidate. 13.2 a. Ballots shall be distributed to delegates at the time and place designated on the agenda. No replacement ballots shall be permitted and no ballots shall be distributed at any other time or place than that specified on the agenda. b. The following is the process has been adopted for late pick- up of ballots: i. a member of the delegation advises the Resolutions Committee, in confidence, that a ballot or ballots have not been picked up; ii.that without indicating in any way the local or individual, members of the Resolutions Committee move and second that the rules be suspended to provide a local or an individual, with the appropriate ballot(s). 13.3 That the election be conducted in the following order: a. President b. First Vice-President c. Second Vice-President d. Member-at-Large designated for an Aboriginal member e. Member-at-Large designated for a racialized member f. Members-at-Large. 13.4 Nominations made in accordance with By-law 5.4 shall be circulated to the meeting. Further nominations for any office may be made from the floor during any session prior to that at which the election will be conducted. 13.5 That should a Member-at-Large, part-way through their term of office, accept nomination for a table officer position, their position as Member-at-Large shall be declared vacant as of the following July 1, and the AGM shall fill the position for the unexpired portion of the term. 13.6 All nominees shall be introduced at the close of nominations, and all candidates for an office shall be introduced as a group immediately preceding the balloting for that office. 13.7 A ballot for election of Members-at-Large shall be valid if marked for at least one candidate, but shall not be valid if marked for more candidates than the number of vacancies to be filled. 13.8 Should the validity of any ballot be questioned by any person assigned to count the ballots, it shall be the sole responsibility of the chairperson of the Nominating Committee to decide whether or not that ballot is valid. 13.9 On the completion of each ballot the chairperson of the


Nominating Committee shall report to the meeting the number of votes received by each candidate, without attaching names to the numbers. Following an indecisive ballot, and before each candidate is identified with their vote count, the candidate receiving the fewest votes shall be dropped from the ballot. At this time the meeting may at its discretion order the dropping of additional candidates from the next ballot. If at the time of balloting for a particular office there is a sole nominee for that office, that person shall be declared elected. If at the time of the first ballot there are more candidates for an office than positions available, the meeting shall go through the process of dropping candidates as described above. When this process has the number of candidates remaining equal to the vacant positions, such remaining candidates must still obtain more than 50 percent of the number of valid ballots cast in a subsequent vote to be declared elected. 13.10 No candidate shall be declared elected unless they receive more than 50 per cent of the number of valid ballots cast. Blank ballots and any ballots declared by the chairperson of the Nominating Committee to be spoiled, pursuant to rule 12.8, shall not be valid ballots. If at the time of balloting for a particular office there is a sole nominee for that office, that person shall be declared elected. 13.11 Candidates defeated in an election for any office shall be deemed to have been nominated for the office next to be filled, provided they meet the equity criteria. If they do not meet the equity criteria for a specific position or they choose not to run for a designated Member-at-Large position, they will be deemed to have been nominated for the next office to be filled for which they meet the criteria. At any time prior to the conducting of a ballot any candidate may, by giving notice to the meeting, withdraw from the election. 13.12 In the elections for Members-at-Large, the first persons elected for the number of two-year vacancies shall be declared to be elected for two-year terms. Persons declared elected after all two-year terms have been filled shall be elected for one- year terms. If on any ballot more persons can be declared to be elected than there are twoyear terms vacant, the one(s) with the highest number of votes shall be declared elected to two-year terms. If on any ballot more persons can be declared elected than there are one-year terms vacant, the one(s) with the highest number of votes shall be declared elected to oneyear term(s). 13.13 When there is a tie vote for a single position, there shall be another ballot held. If the subsequent ballot results in another tie vote, then another ballot shall be held. This process shall continue until one candidate receives more votes than the other.

13.14 Ballots from Annual General Meeting elections will be automatically destroyed unless there is a motion to retain them. 14. Motion to amend standing rules Debatable, amendable; but cannot be referred, postponed or tabled. 14.1 A motion to amend the Standing Rules of Order shall require a two-thirds majority unless notice of amendment has been given in Reports and Resolutions. 15. Matters not covered in standing rules 15.1 When the chair is required to make a ruling not covered by these rules, guidance shall be sought from Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised.

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Statement of Principles on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion That the following Statement of Principles on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion be adopted: The BCTF is a democratic union that recognizes the importance of encouraging and supporting involvement by all members, while recognizing that some members have historically been marginalized. For the Federation to be at its best, all members must see themselves reflected in its goals, structures, and practices. The BCTF will strive to identify and eliminate barriers to participation through programs, procedures, by-laws, and policies supported by specified resources and education. The BCTF supports equity, diversity, and inclusion within the union, the workplace, and in broader society and acknowledges that: 1. Discrimination and harassment must not be ignored and must be challenged and rectified. 2. Not all discrimination is deliberate or visible. Inadvertent, hidden, and systemic discrimination must be identified and addressed. 3. The marginalization of certain groups must be specifically recognized. These groups include, but are not necessarily limited to women; racialized workers; Indigenous people; people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, questioning, or two-spirit; people with disabilities; and those whose participation is impeded because of economic circumstances or family status. 4. Equal opportunity to participate in the Federation does not mean treating all members the same. Within a democratic framework, promoting the engagement of members of equity-seeking groups is a valid and necessary approach to reaching equal outcomes. 5. Federation programs and policies designed to eliminate barriers must not only do so, they must be widely seen to do so.


NOTES


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