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SENIOR FOCUS Should I Stay or Should I Go?

SCHOOL VISITOR’S PASS New Principal at Wheat Ridge High School

WEST METRO FIRE West Metro Crews Deploy to Fires Across Country

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NEIGHBORHOOD

WHEAT RIDGE | APPLEWOOD | MOUNTAIN VIEW | LAKESIDE October 17 – November 13, 2017 • ngazette.com • FREE

Trunk or Treat Turns Seven, Oct. 28, on The Green n By

J. Patrick O’Leary

W

hat started as two parents’ attempt to continue an annual children’s Halloween party after Martensen Elementary School’s closure has grown into a communitywide celebration attracting crowds of more than 3,000 people. Trunk or Treat will mark its seventh year on Saturday, Oct. 28, 4 to 6 p.m., on The Green, 7101 W. 38th Ave. Billed by Localworks as a fun, safe trick or treat for kids and their families with participation from firefighters, the police, businesses and community members, the free event boasts a haunted house, car-trunk-decorating contest, “Thriller” zombie dancers and, of course, candy. Kim Harr served on the local PTA when Martensen closed down, which put an end to the school’s annual Halloween party. She and her husband, Chad, wanted to continue the celebration, which featured candy distributed from the trunks of automobiles decorated for the holiday. “We could try this in the parking lot of the (Wheat Ridge) middle school,” Kim recalls. “That’s when they started revitalization of 38th Avenue, so it was a good idea.” The couple organized the event, and paid for printing Continued on page 2

TRUNK OR TREAT WILL MARK ITS SEVENTH YEAR of fun, safe trick-or-treating for kids, with participation from firefighters, the police, businesses and community members, on Saturday, Oct. 28, 4 to 6 p.m., on The Green, 7101 W. 38th Ave. PHOTO COURTESY LOCALWORKS

Mental Health First Aid Classes Offer CPR for the Mind n By

T

Gwen Clayton

he Jefferson Center for Mental Health is offering free Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) classes to the public through the end of 2017. “One in five people in their lifetime will experience a mental health problem,” said Stephanie Schiemann, Director of Marketing and Public Relations for the Jefferson Center for Mental Health. “If you look around and think about your five neighbors or your family, chances are very good that you know somebody who’s got depression, anxiety, substance use or other mental health conditions.” MHFA teaches people how to recognize, respond to and assist with potential mental health issues and crises using a five-step action plan. The classes are provided free through Dec. 31 to Jefferson County residents, courtesy of the Community First Foundation’s Lutheran Legacy Fund. The Foundation awarded the grant to the Jefferson Center to facilitate the MHFA Jeffco Collaborative – a group of 13 organizations that have a shared vision and commitment to deliver free MHFA training to employees, family, friends and members of the public. “Community First Foundation wanted to take all of our initiatives to the next level and really saturate Jefferson County with mental health first aid, and take it to all corners, with the goal of making it as common as CPR in Jefferson County,” Schiemann said. “Coming together was a really nice way of us creating that shared mission and then the strategic plan for how to move it forward.” Once the group established a strategic plan, the members started talking about specific audiences that hadn’t yet been

reached with mental health first aid. They developed target audiences and through the networks of the collaborative, sought opportunities to offer the class. Members of the Collaborative include Community First Foundation, Jefferson Center for Mental Health, West Pines, Jeffco Public Library, Jeffco Public Schools, Metro Community Providers Network (MCPN), Vietnam Veterans of America, Jeffco

Public Health, Jefferson County Housing Authority, Edgewater Mayor, City of Westminster, Lakewood Police Department, Arvada Police Department and The West Chamber of Commerce. “Mental Health First Aid training has increased knowledge and improved recognition skills of our staff, providing tools for real-world application – both professionally and personally,” said Belinda

T. Smallwood, Manager of Professional Development for Metro Community Provider Network. “Staff who complete the program often comment regarding the value of the training, sharing they feel more prepared to offer support and get appropriate help for those who might be experiencing a mental health crisis. As a Continued on page 14

P E O P L E W E S H O U L D K N O W – W H E AT R I D G E

Britta Fisher, The Force Behind Localworks n By

Elisabeth Monaghan

H

ave you met Britta Fisher? Until Sept. 29, she was the executive director for Wheat Ridge-based nonprofit Localworks, an organization where Fisher spent the last 11 years. The Neighborhood Gazette had an opportunity to meet with Fisher just before she left Localworks to discuss how she came to be the organization’s executive director. Fisher’s path towards Localworks began in 2005, when she and her husband were looking to purchase their first home. Not finding anything in Denver, Fisher and her husband decided to heed their Realtor’s advice and expand their search by “crossing Sheridan Boulevard.” In doing so, the Fishers found a ranch house in Wheat Ridge that was perfect for them. Because Fisher believes in actively participating in her community, she quickly set out to familiarize herself with her new LOCALWORKS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR 11 neighborhood and learn about its people and policy makers. Among the first individuals Fisher spoke with while exploring her YEARS, Britta Fisher is leaving to be the executive di-

rector for Mpowered, a financial health nonprofit. PHOTO COURTESY LOCALWORKS

Continued on page 2


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NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

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Britta Fisher Continued from page 1

new community was then-City Council member Wanda Sang. Their meeting took place just as the City of Wheat Ridge was passing its neighborhood revitalization strategy. That strategy included the creation of a nonprofit whose purpose was to facilitate and encourage appropriate development in Wheat Ridge. Upon discovering Fisher’s enthusiasm for her new neighborhood and interest in being an active member of the community, Sang felt Fisher would be a great fit for the newly formed nonprofit, which at the time was called Wheat Ridge 2020. Fisher happily joined the organization as a volunteer, while working full time for a different nonprofit in downtown Denver. After volunteering for about a year, Fisher was asked by the executive director of Wheat Ridge 2020 and members of its board to join the organization as an employee. It took some convincing, but within months, she took them up on their offer. Two years later, when the organization’s executive director left, Fisher stepped in as interim executive director. After conducting a national search, the hiring committee realized Fisher was the ideal candidate and in 2009, they made her the full-time executive director. In 2015, the organization changed its name to Localworks. Under Fisher’s leadership, the organization earned the 2014 Governor’s Awards for Downtown Excellence winner in Marketing and Branding for its work on Ridge at 38 Brand and Marketing Plan: Ridge at 38 Leadership Committee. This past March, Localworks was named nonprofit of the year by the West Chamber, which serves Jefferson County. Also this year, Fisher was among the Denver Business Journal’s 40 outstanding professionals under the age of 40. While Fisher is pleased with the

Trunk or Treat Continued from page 1

James S. Muniz

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and posters out of their own pocket. Thenchief Kelly Brooks of the Wheat Ridge Fire Department stepped in to help, as did thenboard-member Tom Abbot of Wheat Ridge 2020 and then-city-councilor Joyce Jay. “We ended up with 200 kids” and eight cars, she said. Last year there were 3,500 people, 20 volunteers and 40 cars, according to Localworks. This year crowds could reach 4,000. The middle school is now Stevens Elementary, but the parking lot continues as the venue. Participation has doubled every year, with new attractions added. The second year, Localworks – then called Wheat Ridge 2020 – took on the event to cover insurance costs. In year three, Chad decided the event needed an old-fashioned haunted house, the second-most-popular attraction, run entirely by volunteers. This year the house’s actors will be orchestra and choral students from Wheat Ridge High School. Rise Dance Company will kick off the event by performing a zombie-themed “Thriller” dance, as they have for several years. The Kiwanis Club will once again set up and run games during the event. Kim said a costume parade would be “too big” with the number of participants, but first, second and third prizes – typically gift certificates provided by sponsors – are handed out to winners of the trunk-decorating contest. Founding sponsors – organizations that

recognition she and Localworks have received, she is most proud of the changes she has seen her community undergo. When she started at Localworks, Fisher says Wheat Ridge was mostly a bedroom community. Today, more residents and businesses are very much part of the community, volunteering for or participating in activities like the Ridge at 38 Criterium and Brewfest, RidgeFest, and Trunk or Treat. It is the welcoming spirit of the Wheat Ridge community and the willingness of its residents to get involved that has helped fulfill Localworks’ mission to promote the city and make it a more vibrant and sustainable community. With the numerous festivals and family-friendly activities that Localworks has helped create, there are ample opportunities for those who want to get involved. “One of the things that makes Wheat Ridge special is if you want to make a difference in your neighborhood, in your community, you can,” said Fisher. Fisher is leaving Localworks to be the executive director for Mpowered, a financial health nonprofit that believes in financial security for all Coloradoans who want to learn about money management and participate in coaching to achieve an individual definition of financial success. Fisher says she will miss the Localworks’ staff and its board of directors, but she knows she is leaving the organization in good hands. Carolyn Doran and Ashley Holland will serve as interim co-executive directors while the Localworks’ board of directors searches for Fisher’s replacement. (The board will make an announcement when it has launched its search.) If you did not have the opportunity to meet Fisher while she worked at Localworks, there’s a good chance you’ll run into her at a community function or at the local grocery store. She may be leaving Localworks, but she and her family will continue living in Wheat Ridge and doing their part to ensure it remains a vibrant and caring community. have started and continue to support the event – include the Neighborhood Gazette, Lakota Sky Environments and Compass Mechanical. St. Peter and Paul’s Catholic Church is a supporting sponsor, providing $500. “We are looking for additional candy sponsors,” adds Ashley Holland of Localworks. “Any person or company that donates 10 pounds of candy or more will be recognized at the event.” Costumed revelers need only show up to participate in the free event. People wanting to decorate their vehicles and hand out treats can sign up on the Ridge at 38 web site, at ridgeat38.com/play/trunk-or-treat/. “They don’t have to, but it does help us plan,” said Kim, as there is enough room in the parking lot. Two weeks away from this year’s event, what’s still needed? “The biggest thing we always need is the candy,” Kim said. “We try to supply extra candy if they run out.” Trunk-or-Treat participants are asked to come with 1,500 to 2,000 pieces of candy each. Donations can be dropped off at Brewery Rickoli, Clancy's Irish Pub, Colorado Plus, Infinitus Pie, Personal Achievement Martial Arts, and Right Coast Pizza. As always, the event wraps up by 6 p.m. “It’s always been from four till six for safety, as it gets dark pretty quickly,” Kim explained. “We want to be able to see everyone coming in and out of parking lots.” It also saves the cost of setting up lights. “It’s always been very family friendly, for all ages to enjoy.” For more information, visit ridgeat38. com/play/trunk-or-treat/; or contact Locaworks at 720-259-1030.

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Saturday Oct. 28 • 4-6pm next to the Green at 38 (7101 W. 38th Ave.) Contact Carolyn • 720-259-1030 cdoran@wearelocalworks.org WeAreLocalworks.com


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community has been recognized as having a strong focus on “healthy practices” like walking, biking and rolling on wheelchaireing your mayor has been a joy and accessible routes, and next steps include a privilege. I have been fortunate to establishing safer routes for walking to proudly represent our city at local and school. This past year, environmental regional meetings. A mayor’s job includes awareness found its voice in Wheat Ridge being the official “Face of the City” and when I proudly appointed members to the that means “showing up” whether for a Wheat Ridge Environmental Sustainability ribbon cutting for a small business or at a Committee. These amazing, highly qualified community-wide event like the Carnation volunteers have already Festival. My responsibility established a direction for the for representing the interests city, and I’m hopeful a partand concerns of Wheat Ridge time environmental officer will residents and business owners be included in a future budget. is something I take very With all the progress seriously. It doesn’t matter we have seen in the past few if that representation takes years alone, we are claiming place at City Hall, during city our place as an attractive, council meetings, or at the many forward-looking community. A board meetings/conferences or great deal of that work began trainings where city, county and after I approached the Cultural state elected officials gather, I Joyce Jay Commission and asked them to have been committed to not only create a specific plan to introduce showing up but participating and art in many forms onto our streets and into moving our city forward on your behalf. our parks. You made the need for communication Wheat Ridge has also seen more clear from the very beginning of my term so restaurants and grocery store alternatives in response I established the “Community come onto the scene. We added a Natural Exchange.” This citywide meeting channeled Grocers and a Sprouts Farmers Market into several specific exchange meetings from on Kipling, and a new Lucky’s Market is a which sprang my monthly “Coffee with shovelful of dirt away from breaking ground the Mayor.” Council members also caught at The Corners at 38th and Wadsworth. the buzz and many began holding district King Soopers also committed to its future in meetings on a regular basis in order to keep Wheat Ridge by remodeling and expanding residents/businesses informed and up-toboth of its stores. We have at least six date on issues that matter to you. In public eateries now on West 38th with Bardo’s life, clear, consistent communication is key. coffee shop planned to open this fall, and Looking back on the last four years, a new gathering place offering books and through luck, timing, and with intention, brews planned for next year. Hacienda I have enjoyed being a participant as Colorado is also on board to join the dining our city has embraced new and exciting options at the Applewood Shopping Center, opportunities. I particularly want to thank which has already seen the opening of a our City Manager, department heads and new drive-through Starbuck’s. In addition, our many outstanding employees for their we are seeing work begin at Clear Creek unwavering energy to keep our city running Crossing and at Basecamp, the Transitlike a well-oiled machine. Wheat Ridge Oriented Development near the new Wheat continues to shine brightly as new residents Ridge * Ward Station, which will bring move into the area, commercial areas new employment opportunities, increased expand or are upgraded, varied housing options come online, and new development Continued on page 14 begins in key locations around the city. Our

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LOCALWORKS UPDATE It All Comes Back to Neighbors n By

T

Britta Fisher

he images of communities devastated by recent hurricanes are heart wrenching, and the stories of neighbors helping neighbors in the aftermath are heartwarming. I don’t see anyone asking for a voting record or any other kind of litmus test as they pull waterlogged people into their boats. There are humans in need, and other humans are helping. This pull of humanity, the common bond of community has been important to me my whole life. As a child growing up in Minnesota, I would pray for rain with all my neighbors, churchgoing or not, during the drought. We would join together to pick up debris after tornadoes and get to work doing needed demolition and rebuilding after floods. Despite heavy circumstances, I loved that feeling of being in this together and doing our part to help as we are able. Those moments of community and connection remain important today. I appreciate everyday moments of neighbors helping neighbors with shoveling the walk or sharing an extra zucchini from the garden. I see the greatness of our humanity in such moments and have had the pleasure of working professionally to help build community. After 11 years of professional service to our community nonprofit Localworks, I am moving on. I am proud of the places that have transformed through the hard work of property owners with the help of

our low-interest financing and Wheat Ridge Business District grants. I will miss taking business owners for a ride in my car when looking for possible locations to open shop in Wheat Ridge. Perhaps one of my favorite roles is giving the bus tours of Wheat Ridge and helping people discover hidden gems in our city; October 12 was my last Explore Wheat Ridge Tour. I will also miss helping people build community. It has been a true pleasure meeting with people and helping them get more involved in the community. I am most proud thinking about the people who said that they mostly slept here, but now, due to Localworks, they are involved community members and leaders. Localworks will carry on in connecting neighbors and businesses to create a vibrant, engaged community. There is a fantastic caring staff and a dedicated board of directors to keep up this meaningful work, and they would be happy to have any neighbor join and contribute. I will still live here and hope to continue working with many of you in different ways to help our community. Should the worst happen, please know I would pull any of you into my boat and believe you would do the same. That is what Wheat Ridge neighbors do. Learn more about Localworks and how you can get involved at WeAreLocalworks. org. Britta Fisher is the former Executive Director of Localworks.


ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

n By

C

SENIOR FOCUS

ASK THE EXPERT

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Braces Go Beyond Your Smile

Tawny Clary

olorado has seen quite the spike not only in residents, but specifically in the number of people 65 and over. According to the 2016 U.S. Census Bureau, Jefferson County accounts for 15.6 percent of the population that is 65 and over in the state. Because the population of this generation is so high, it’s been hard not to notice that Jeffco is developing many types of residences to accommodate. This is anything from independent living to retirement homes and assisted living. However, there are still many original homeowners in the area who will have a tough decision to make as they approach their golden years. Can I live out the remainder of my life in my home? Why wouldn’t we try to live in our homes as many years as possible? After all, we spend decades and a countless amount of our hard-earned dollars perfecting our nests just the way we want them. A home really does become our best investment if we are lucky enough to take our last breath in them. So how do we know if we will be that lucky? Sixty-five is a great age to start assessing the situation and the home. As retirement becomes approachable and insurance changes, we naturally tend to take a closer look at our personal health. Reflecting on the strengths and weaknesses of our body can help navigate what our future will look like. For instance, if blood pressure becomes an increasing problem, we adjust our diet and, by extension, the food in our kitchen. When we know we will be more at risk for falling, we install pull bars in the shower and reinforce sturdy railing where it is needed. If we live alone, we consider adding an emergency alert system. It’s just survival.

We protect ourselves from Father Time. When time finally does catch up and it’s time to make the decision of aging in place or moving to an assisted living/senior living home, there are small steps that can be taken to buy a little more time in our homes. Gloria Rose is a Call Center Specialist for Senior Reach at the Senior Resource Center, a facility and program dedicated to support seniors living independently. Rose urges that when seniors begin to question whether they can live independently, they should start by consulting a family member, then a doctor and, finally, a home care manager to assess the home. Rose is part of the a program at the Wheat Ridge Senior Resource Center location (multiple locations exist around the metro area) that provides in-home counseling for independent seniors and can assist when help is needed to making the life-transitioning decision, among other issues. Since the goal of the Senior Resource Center is to help seniors live independently for as long as possible, Rose advises, “if they [seniors] are able to get a network of people around them (family, friends, neighbors, volunteer services, in-home care), they may be able to extend their time in the home.” However, she says that they are still there to help seniors when they need to make that decision. The Wheat Ridge location of the Senior Resource Center is at Chase and 32nd, behind the Wheat Ridge Library. They provide many more services beyond counseling, such as transportation, adult day care, in-home volunteer match and much more. Visit Senior Resource Center’s website at www.srcaging.org.

EAT

WH

EAT

WH

RID G

RID G

n By

Dr. Jamon Jensen

5

Off-Track and Misaligned

You may hear that you or your child ne of the first questions parents asks us have an overbite, under-bite or a crosswhen they bring their children in for a bite, which essentially means the teeth are cleaning and exam is whether or misaligned. How your teeth not they’ll need braces. Generally line-up impacts the pressure by assessing the child’s existing on your jawbone. Too much (baby) teeth, spacing, bite and pressure or force can erode the through X-rays, we can give an bone, while too little pressure, idea if braces are in their future. depending your bite, can lead We always hear a smile is one to lack of bone stimulation. An of the first things we notice about improper bite can also interfere people so it’s natural that both with chewing and speaking, as kids and parents think about well as cause abnormal wear to that when considering braces. tooth enamel and lead to jaw However, there are also health problems. Jamon Jensen implications to consider when deciding to move forward with braces for The Food Breakdown your kids or even yourself. Digestion starts first in your mouth and it can be challenging to chew properly Crooked and Crowded when you have crooked or misaligned teeth. Teeth that are crooked or crowded tend Food isn’t broken down enough, which to create tight spaces, which make it difficult can lead to overall digestion issues and to get to by brushing and flossing. Over malnourishment. time, food gets trapped and plaque starts As you can see, the health benefits of to build, ultimately resulting in tooth decay braces go far beyond the aesthetics of having and possibly tooth loss. You should floss straight teeth and a nice smile. everyday but without the ability to do so and Dr. Jamon Jensen is with Risas Denreach your gum line, you’re also at risk for tal and Braces in Wheat Ridge; visit www. risasdental.com or call 303-731-2587. gum disease.

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NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

SCHOOL CROSSING Enough With the Fluff are challenged, nurtured and prepared for the next level. ow predictable that with upcoming I spent my morning reading elections politicians have been lining Superintendent Glass’s much anticipated up to get involved in the world of education. vision statement. I could tell you that I was Perhaps a select few actually were involved expecting more fluff and a regurgitation before running for public office and have of things we already know. But I was been actively participating on school pleasantly surprised that while it highlights committees in their districts. Maybe I should situations in and out of the classroom, it just be happy that shedding any also challenges us to change kind of light on our classrooms our mindset of how or what a is better than none. It’s a great school should be, encouraging example of the old cup that’s neighborhood schools to take half empty or half full. on an “entrepreneurial attitude” We can harp on the fact that that accommodates what our high school has the highest families are looking for rather dropout rate in Jefferson County the simple belief that location and how we got here … or we can determines the choice. be thankful that we have a new I also love his directive to leader in that building that is the entire education community putting aside all the “that’s how to “keep the student’s learning Guy Nahmiach we’ve always done it” attitudes experience at the center of and is setting a new course with new goals. their work.” As adults, we’ve learned Principal Josh Cooley is actually upset over the years how to manage and isolate that almost half the students enrolling in distractions. We’ve created schedules and his school are arriving with a fifth-grade routines that keep us organized. We ask the reading level, and is ready to work with the same from our young students and yet our schools that are sending him unprepared schools have created schedules for them students. Read Cooley’s plans for WRHS in that are far from consistent. Starting times this edition of the Neighborhood Gazette. for my son this week have been 9:10, 7:40, We can focus on elementary schools 9:40, 8:10 and 9:10. I am sure this up-andthat sit half empty in neighborhoods full down schedule is benefitting someone … but of families that choose to send their kids it sure isn’t the student. Dr. Glass has also asked everyone elsewhere. Or we can focus on the schools “involved in the education of our students, where 70 percent of the enrolled students to keep high expectations.” have parents that have made the education There are drastic differences between of their students a priority and drive to some of our local schools, and many use schools across town just so their students economic conditions to make excuses for poor results and lower their expectations for these students, essentially giving them a “pass” with hopes that “Johnny” will catch up as he moves up in grades until Johnny finally gets to high school and is only reading at a fifth-grade level. Johnny wouldn’t have needed a pass if expectations of him were held to the same as all other students in his class. I urge you to spend some time this weekend and read the full vision document (at www.jeffcopublicschools.org/about/ generations). Note the focus on making an impact on not only “the conditions of learning,” but also the “readiness to learn.” I admire our kids for going to school every day, trying to learn in an environment that is much more convoluted and filled with distractions than when we were in school, adults with political agendas that range from left to right, the Internet which is being relied upon to teach, advise and track progress and an environment that is more concerned with thresholds rather than rigor. I admire their passion for things that aren’t graded and their participation in activities that aren’t rewarded. I admire our kids for finding ways, in this adult world, to be kids. As always, thanks for reading. n By

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ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

SCHOOL VISITOR PASS

Ask the Superintendent

New Principal at WRHS n By

Josh Cooley

S

ince early July, I have felt very fortunate to wake up every morning and say I am on my way to work as the Principal of Wheat Ridge High School. I am humbled by the amount of students, staff, parents and community members who have gone out of their way to make me feel at home. Wheat Ridge, as a school and a city, is built on a tradition of community that I would argue is unmatched in the Denver Metro area. As I spend my first of, hopefully, many years here, my goal is to build relationships and learn about the strengths and areas where growth is needed. I am honored to be a part of and continue that legacy. I also feel fortunate to be following recently retired Principal Griff Wirth. Griff has been very gracious with his time the last few months and has always been available to give me whatever information I may need. I am also grateful for the entrepreneurial spirit that Griff and his team have cultivated in our teachers. I am a firm believer that in order to move education forward, we have to start thinking differently and the best way to achieve that in a school is through distributive leadership, where all stakeholders have a seat at the table. I have been nothing but impressed with how deeply this belief is rooted in what is done at Wheat Ridge High School every day. This commitment to thinking differently to support our students is not only seen in our more high profile initiatives such as STEM/ STEAM, our Gifted and Talented Center and our Career Explorer programs, but also in the innovative ways individual teachers are meeting the needs of our students in our more traditional classrooms. At WRHS, there truly is support for all students. On my first day with the whole WRHS staff and again on Back to School Night with

While you've been “good” at remaining neutral in this election, you’ve shown up to campaign parties. Is it your opinion that instead of remaining neutral, you would instead just cheer on every candidate? After all, you will possibly be working with that new person.

parents, I outlined my four commitments to all stakeholders: 1. Students come first - All decisions we make here at Wheat Ridge HS will be based on what is best for students. 2. Assume positive intentions - I appreciate and respect the passion that comes through when people advocate for their student. When disagreements arise, it is important to remember we are all here for the same reason … the students of our community. 3. Push Wheat Ridge High School to be better - We have amazing teachers and programs here at WRHS. That does not mean we rest on what we have done. With community support, we need to keep pushing ourselves to improve every student’s learning experience to ensure that they have all the knowledge and skills needed to support their long term goals. In a time when families start shopping around for the best high school for their preschoolers, I want Wheat Ridge High School to be the best option. 4. Constantly strive to improve communication - I have heard from several stakeholders that communication from the school to the community should be an area of focus. We have already begun by updating our website and creating a Communication Committee where teachers plan and implement better ways to communicate with the community. In addition, I have been working closely with Wheat Ridge community leaders to better coordinate and spread the word of all the great things our students and staff are doing every day. With all of your support and input, I look forward to continuing to build upon the wonderful legacy of our community high school and making sure all Wheat Ridge families feel proud to send their students to Wheat Ridge High School.

RE-ELECT RE-ELECT

ZACHARY ZACHARY

URBAN URBAN FOR

FOR CITY COUNCIL WHEAT RIDGE

WHEAT RIDGE CITY COUNCIL

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It is well known that Jeffco has a history of contentious board races. The 2015 recall election drew in an estimated million dollars in campaign spending (much of it from sources outside of the community) and garnered national media coverage. Jeffco Public Schools has a five-member board, and three seats are up for re-election this November. District 1 features incumbent Brad Rupert versus challenger Matt Van Gieson. District 2 features incumbent Susan Harmon versus challenger Erica Shields. Board President Ron Mitchell is running unopposed in District 5. I’ve met with all of the candidates and offered to provide them any information or support they needed in terms of factual information in the course of the campaign. I did my homework on Jeffco before taking the job here and knew that these bruising board races would likely be part of the equation going forward. For my part, I’ve asked all the candidates and the community to work on keeping our dignity through this process. We should be tough on the issues, scrutinize election-season claims, and ask the critical questions. But, I think we can also do this while being respectful of different points of view. At the end of this race, we are all still going to be neighbors. As a public servant, I’m prohibited from advocating for or against any candidate or issue on the ballot. My professional responsibility as superintendent is to keep the community informed that we have a board election coming up, urge them to know the candidates, and encourage our citizens to be engaged in the democratic process. When I’ve been asked and my calendar allows, I have attended events to support any candidate running for the board of education. Serving on the board is a tough and time-consuming job, with no compensation or reward other than the opportunity to do good for the community’s kids. I respect and honor anyone willing to run and serve on an elected school board. I am also a private citizen and a Jeffco parent. Sarah (my wife) and I have a current student (Norah is 5 and in Kindergarten) and our son Chase (4 years old) will start in Jeffco Public Schools next year. So, this race matters to me on a number of levels. Collectively, the Board of Education serves as my “boss” in their governance role over the district. They also have a key role in shaping the strategic direction for our schools and have a significant fiduciary responsibility over our budget. Critical questions should be addressed in this board race. We all want student achievement to grow, but exactly how are you going to bring that about? Everyone wants more services for kids, but how will you deliver those within the limitations of our budget, where you have to make trade-offs? And, during campaigns it’s easy to speak in platitudes and generalizations, but how will you work to balance diverging values and interests in the community – where there are no clear answers or easy solutions. Most of the issues boards wrestle with are complex and wicked problems, where you have to make tough choices. A community needs thoughtful people on the board who are willing to wade into the complexity of the work and help our schools navigate toward the best solutions for us. Thank you for your question. Dr. Jason Glass If you have a question for our new superintendent please submit it to Guy@ NostalgicHomes.com or call it in to 303-999-5789.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 SWORN-IN MONDAY, JANUARY 11, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 SWORN-IN MONDAY, JANUARY 11, 2016 PRESENT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 PRESENT WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 PRESENT MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2013 PRESENT MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2013 PRESENT MONDAY,FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, 8,8, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY,JANUARY JANUARY13, 13,2014 2014 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 PRESENT MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 PRESENT MONDAY,MARCH MARCH14, 14, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY,FEBRUARY FEBRUARY10, 10, 2014 2014 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, ONDAY,MARCH MARCH28, 28, 2016 PRESENT MM ONDAY, M 2016 PRESENT ONDAY,FEBRUARY FEBRUARY24, 24, 2014 2014 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,APRIL APRIL11, 11, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, 2016 PRESENT 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26, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY,JANUARY DECEMBER 12, PRESENT 2016 PRESENT MONDAY, 2015 MONDAY, 9, 2017 MONDAY,FEBRUARY FEBRUARY9, 23, 2015PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,JANUARY JANUARY 9,2017 2017PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, 23, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, 23, MONDAY,FEBRUARY MARCH 9, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 23, 2017 2017PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, 2015 M ONDAY, FEBRUARY MONDAY,MARCH MARCH9, 23, 2015PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 2017 PRESENT MMONDAY, ONDAY, MARCH 23,2015 2015PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, 27,13, 2017 PRESENT APRIL 13, MONDAY,MARCH FEBRUARY 27, EXCUSED 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, 13, 2017 MONDAY,APRIL APRIL13, 27,2015 2015 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,MARCH MARCH27, 13, 2017 EXCUSED MONDAY, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, 27,2015 2015PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,APRIL MAY 11, MONDAY, 10, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,APRIL MARCH 27, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,MAY JUNE 8,2015 2015 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, 11, MONDAY, PRESENT MONDAY,APRIL APRIL24, 10,2017 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,JUNE JUNE8,22, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, 8, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,JUNE JULY 22, 13, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY,MAY APRIL 24, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, PRESENT M ONDAY, MAY MONDAY,JULY JULY13, 27,2015 2015 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, MAY22, 8, 2017 2017PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY,JUNE MAY12, 22,2017 2017PRESENT PRESENT MMONDAY, ONDAY, JULY 27, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, PRESENT MONDAY,AUGUST AUGUST10, 24,2015 2015 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,JUNE JUNE26, 12,2017 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, 10,26, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,AUGUST SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY,JULY JUNE 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, 24, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, PRESENT MONDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER14, 28,2015 2015 PRESENT PRESENT MONDAY,JULY JULY24, 10,2017 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, MONDAY, AUGUST 14, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY,SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 12, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, JULY 24, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, 28, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, AUGUST 28, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, AUGUST 14, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, AUGUST 28, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 PRESENT MMONDAY, ONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2017 PRESENT DECEMBER 14, 2015 PRESENT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2015 PRESENT * STUDY SESSIONS OR MEETINGS ATTENDED NOT INCLUDED ABOVE MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2017 PRESENT MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, COMMUNITY 2015 PRESENT

ZACHURBAN.ORG

720-252-5930

* STUDY SESSIONS OR COMMUNITY MEETINGS ATTENDED NOT INCLUDED ABOVE


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NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

Who’s Running For Wheat Ridge City Council Compiled by Gwen Clayton

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heat Ridge City Council candidates running on the November 2017 ballot were required to file paperwork with the city clerk by close of business Aug. 28. The following week, the Neighborhood Gazette emailed questionnaires to the hopefuls, along with a request for a high-resolution headshot photo, to be published with their responses to the questions below: 1. What is your name, position running for, occupation, previous occupations, how long you've lived in the city, and any personal details you want readers to know about you. 2. Have you served in public office before? If so, what position, where and when? 3. Have you volunteered in your community? If so, what position, where and when? 4. What are the three most important issues facing your city, and how will you address them if elected? 5. Please provide basic contact information: Website, phone number, email, social media, as well as name of candidate committee and chairperson. Responses are published verbatim, although they may have been edited for length (character limits were included in the questionnaire), readability, potential libelous content, offensiveness or poor taste. The Neighborhood Gazette does not endorse candidates. Individual staff members may be involved in political campaigns, but they do not speak officially for the newspaper. INDUSTRY MONDAY BOGO 1st drink, 10 am - 2 am Foosball tourney registration 7 pm play 7:30 $5 entry TUESDAY 2fer on Mountain High margaritas 4-10pm THIRSTY THURSDAYS $1 wine well do.m. draft $2 bottles 3-7pm, Video karaoke/DJ FABULOUS FRIDAY $ 5.50 PBR & shot of Fireball 25¢ jukebox

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District I Candidates Janeece Hoppe (incumbent, uncontested) Who: Owner Compass Mechanical Heating & Cooling, Owner All Points Electrical, Owner 7014 -7020 west 38th ave , previous Owner of Compass Construction. I have lived in Wheat Ridge since October 2011, with my Husband & 3 daughters. Public Office: In November 2015, I was appointed to fill City Treasurer Jerry DiTullio’s City Council Seat for District 1, Wheat Ridge CO, where I am currently serving the public. Volunteer: 2011-2015- Localworks; Construction Committee, Treasurer, Vice President, President; 2011- Current- Wheat Ridge Business District; Board Member; 2012-Current- The Family Tree; Development Committee; 2014 – Current- WRHS Poms Treasurer. Most Important Issues: • There are many important issues in our community and to pick just three is difficult, however I believe it starts with having economically viable commercial areas. To be able to address other issues within our community we need to have a strong and diverse sales tax base. We need to support our existing commercial areas; we can do that trough the WRBD grant programs and joint marketing efforts. We also need to pro-actively identify areas for redevelopment both in the current environment and for long term plans. • We need to make Public Safety a priority, by supporting the Police Department with their man power needs for pro active patrolling and code enforcement. Also, by addressing the accessibility needs in our community we can create and maintain an attractive and inviting community for all residents, all generations. • We need to diversify our housing options, we need more “move up” size and priced housing, we also need more quality affordable housing. We can address this by updating our NRS, continuing the ADU conversations, and pro actively looking at our zoning and building codes. We also need to address the storm water and drainage issues many of our neighborhoods have. Contact: jhoppe@ci.wheatridge.co.us or 720-556-9425.

District II Candidates Rachel Hultin

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Who: I’m a mom, 4th generation Colorado native & 5 year Wheat Ridge resident. I worked 18 years in real estate & am now the Bicycle Colorado Strategic Initiatives Director. Public Office: Not yet. Volunteer: Created Wheaties Academy, grassroots leadership Localworks program. Formed WR active transportation community group. 2014 City Council Partnership Award. Started Pints & Policy. Full list on website. Most Important Issues: • Lead with authentic growth. I care about keeping Wheat Ridge wonderful with a plan to preserve our heritage and a vision to create a better tomorrow. I pledge to protect our neighborhoods and create opportunities for small business while pursuing quality national retailers. Working together, we’ll identify policies to address affordability and transportation options to maintain our quality of life. • Build strong neighborhoods. I put people first because people are the heart and the strength of Wheat Ridge. I’m a champion for improving safety on our streets. I’m passionate about strengthening local schools to be Wheat Ridge proud. I’m dedicated expanding programs so seniors can stay in our community and I pledge to reform code enforcement to be more reliable and responsive. And trees. Lots of trees! • Ensure Wheat Ridge is welcoming. I care as much about how we do things as what things we do. From how we welcome businesses and ideas to how we treat neighbors, I value transparency, diversity, inclusion and respectful participation across generations. I promise to preserve Wheat Ridge’s small town character and to build on its history as an exceptional and wonderful place to live, work and play. Contact: www.WheatRidgeTogether.org, 720-464-7446, rachel@wheatridgetogether. org, www.facebook.com/RachelForWheatRidge/, www.instagram.com/rachel_for_wheat_ ridge/, Registered agent: Kristi Davis, Campaign Manager Kristine Disney.

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Who: City Council Member District 2, Running for Re-Election, Married, 2 Children, Self-Employed, Grew up in Arvada, Homeowner in Wheat Ridge for 10+ years, previous renter in Wheat Ridge. Public Office: Elected to 4-year term Wheat Ridge City Council Member 2013; Governor Appointed to the Colorado Board of Real Estate Appraisers 2007; Appointed to Commissioner Jefferson County Housing Authority 2014. Volunteer: Board Member Lutheran Medical Center Foundation; Commissioner Jeffco Housing Authority; Volunteer Girl Scouts of America; Operation Care Package: Colorado; Neighborhood Gazette Columnist (all present). Most Important Issues: • Recently a District Court Judge ruled our Charter provision limiting the use of Tax Increment Financing(TIF) was a matter mixed state concern and as such may not be enforced. If the will of the people can so easily be set aside, which issue will come up next? I appreciate the benefits of Urban Renewal and the use of TIF, I see greater benefits in being a home rule city. I choose to fight for what it means to be a home rule city, rather running rough shot over the will of citizens. • A Better Way is a program deemed successful by City of Albuquerque to clean up their city and help the homeless at the same time, we must adopt this program here. A solid day’s work is where I learned many lessons and continue to learn to be a contributing member of our community. Being stuck in a rut, leaves the homeless fending sunrise to sunset hand to mouth is a cycle that must be broken, so let’s give them a chance to give us a solid day’s work. • As opioid prescription drugs deaths goes down, heroin deaths continue to grow. This isn’t just about drug users; police, first responders, and K-9 units are at risk of exposure. Our goal should be to save the lives of all involved in this crisis. Increasing access to medically assisted treatment, while reducing the stigma for those seeking help in recovery is a good start. We will work with partners across the state to alleviate the pressures and risks placed on our police and first responders to stem this tide. Contact: www.facebook.com/ZachUrbanWR www.zachurban.org zach@ZachUrban. org 720-252-5930 Neighbors to Elect Zach Urban, Zach Urban Chairperson www. zacharyurban.com


ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

District III Candidates Tim Fitzgerald (incumbent, uncontested) Who: Councilor- District 3 / retired / publisher's agent / moved to WR as a 1st grader in 1945. Public Office: I am up for my second term as Councilor for District 3. Volunteer: I served as a volunteer Driver Coordinator for a homeless family program and am currently a driver. I also have been a tutor at a halfway house serving parolees and “direct-placement” prisoners. Most Important Issues: The city has a number of difficult issues that needs to be addressed: • Renewal of blighted areas and empty storefronts. We need to keep doing what we have been doing. The Council along with city staff and management have shepherded renewal of difficult and blighted sites at 38th and Kipling where there is now a Sprouts; at 38th and Wadsworth which will soon have a small shopping village, a Lucky's Market and residences. The former Cabela's site is progressing towards a complete re-birth with "eatertainment", and shopping- all with a connection to the greenbelt. Many other areas are also in progress. • The Gold's Center - all involved have been trying to assist this area with no luck. So far, 2 quality anchor tenants have failed to sign on the dotted line. • Wadsworth redevelopment - as Wadsworth begins it's 2-3 year journey to a new visually attractive major street there is opportunity to encourage upgrading businesses and their physical appearance along the corridor. • The Wheat Ridge income challenge- as a city we receive about 70% of our income from sales and use taxes. As people switch to online shopping, which is mostly untaxed, we must find a way to adapt. • The world is rapidly changing. Resisting change is futile; it will happen without our input in an uncontrolled and unpredictable way. Instead we must prepare for change and guide it to benefit our city and thus ourselves. Contact: Tim Fitzgerald, 720-360-0871, tfitzgerald@ci.wheatridge.co.us, TimL.Fitzg@ gmail.com.

District IV Candidates Virginia Ruth Baranowski Who: Ruth Baranowski, Candidate for City Council District 4 I am an Artist, a social media manager and mother of one. I have lived in District 4 for 7 years. Public Office: No I have not. Volunteer: Chair of the 2016 D.I.R.T task force, Current Board and Committee Member of the Wheat Ridge Carnation Festival. Most Important Issues: • Wheat Ridge is a city with a unique take and great agricultural history but we must admit to that we are a city. As such we must look to improving our infrastructure, working on building up our affordable housing, improving our schools to build stronger neighborhoods and keeping our agricultural history alive by moving to sustainable and green practices. District IV has the ability to leverage the Gold Line as an attractive location for young professionals and families by encouraging developers to build more affordable housing or pay into a land trust to increase the diversity of housing in the area. • We must turn our schools into true community centers, with programs that eliminate the stressors not only our students but also their families, building up our neighbors and encouraging our vulnerable communities to engage in the city they live in. • It is important to keep the character of Wheat Ridge alive, while continuing to move forward. We have made great strides in improving safety of pedestrians and cyclists when building or upgrading street infrastructure but we have neglected the impact our streets have on our natural ecosystems. We can continue to honor history as a rural farming town and our future as a city by strategically designing landscaping and paving that capture and filter rainwater before it becomes contaminated runoff. In urban rights, such green infrastructure of stormwater may include tree planting, rain gardens, wetlands, permeable pavement and more. Contact: You can learn more about me at ruthbaranowski.com, and reach me at my personal cell phone 720-258-6445 or email at ruth@ruthbaranowski.com. You can find me on Facebook at Ruth Baranowski for City Council and I encourage you to reach out with any questions or comments. Neighbors 4 Ruth.

Valerie Nosler Beck Who: Val Nosler, City Council4,Resiliency Outreach Mgr @ CO Dept. of Local Affairs, Resume avail: www.val4wheatridge.com, lived in Wheat Ridge 3 yrs, 2 kids, 1 husband, family settled 45th & Wads in 1890's. Public Office: No I have not served in public office. I have worked as staff for US Rep. Mark Udall (DC) 2004-2007, US Sen. Evan Bayh (DC) 2008, Mayor & Gov. Hickenlooper (CO) 2009 - 15. Volunteer: Activate38 Coalition 2017, Home on 2015 Mid Century Modern Tour, Sts. Peter & Paul Volunteer, Localworks Volunteer, Problem Gambling Coalition of Colorado Board 2017, Colorado Territorial Daughter. Most Important Issues: • I am the 5th generation in my family to raise their kids in Wheat Ridge. I am running for City Council because I bring expertise and a fresh perspective our community needs. I am the only candidate running in District 4 that has the skill set to collaborate with state agencies, special districts, neighboring communities, residents, business and other stakeholders to solve problems and get positive outcomes. I am running for council to advance Wheat Ridge so that it can thrive for generations to come. • We must advance welcoming & safe neighborhoods with creative low cost upgrades to help keep walkers & bikers of all ages safe. These upgrades will inform permanent infrastructure improvements to make our streets safer so we can access parks, public transportation and neighborhood schools. • Now is the time to create a community outreach task force to address needs for residents in our community impacted by or experiencing homelessness. Join me and support thriving business in Wheat Ridge. In District 4 businesses are conveniently located near Clear Creek trail, I-70, great restaurants, shopping and Lightrail. Let’s recruit new business by showcasing all Wheat Ridge has to offer! Wheat Ridge is at a

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pivotal crossroads and must find other sources of revenue. Let’s build on the great work that has been done and grow our sales tax revenue by promoting Wheat Ridge businesses and entice new business to move here. Contact: www.val4wheatridge.com; val@val4wheatridge.com; 303-350-0772; Committee: Val For Wheat Ridge 4; Registered Agent: Dave Petersen; Facebook: Valerie Nosler @ValWheatRidge4; Instagram: @valnozbeck303 #val4wheatridge

Leah Dozeman Who: Leah Dozeman, Wheat Ridge City Council District IV, Program Director at Personal Achievement Martial Arts, Homemaker, Lifelong resident, Colorado native. Public Office: I have not served in public office, but I did run for City Clerk of Wheat Ridge in 2011. Volunteer: Carnation Festival Board: Secretary, 4 years; Parade Chair, 2 years. Participant/mentor: Wheaties Academy. Vice-President of Pennington PTA. Member of Wheat Ridge Historical Society and The Grange. Most Important Issues: • Wheat Ridge is nestled in between the hustle and bustle of downtown Denver and the relaxing Rocky Mountains. It is a “bedroom” community that nostalgically upholds its unique identity of being Wheat Ridge (not to be compared to or likened to any neighboring city) and an independence that we take pride in. We are considered a N.O.R.C (Naturally Occurring Retirement Community) where many people come to live and only leave when they have passed away. The challenges with the aging population or lifetime/longterm residents is that they have a difficulty embracing change, EXCEPT when they are agents of that change. The key to Wheat Ridge is reaching out to the community and those that are seen as the "naysayers" and to listen to them. Hear their thoughts, their concerns, and their hopes. When they feel as if they are a part of the process, they are often more at ease and receptive to the change. • Within District IV, over half of the houses are rentals and thus the neighborhood school, Pennington Elementary has one of the largest mobility rates in Jefferson County. Pennington was recommended for closure by the District last January and I was able to organize parents and community members that fought and were successful in preventing Pennington from being closed. We have few families with young children and thus not enough kids to fill our schools, which is why many school closures have happened or been proposed in our community, which I believe has and will continue to negatively affect our growth. People look for quality schools when determining where to settle down with their families. • We need to support quality schools in our neighborhoods, they are the backbone of our economy and our community. I would like renters to feel invested in our community by loving the community so much that they decide to buy a home in the area when the opportunity arises. I would like to attract young families by developing the areas of WR that are undeveloped or blighted. • The hotels in District IV make up a majority of the crimes reported in our city and I would like to continue the targeted policing of those areas and encourage those within the area to update and maintain properties, in order to reduce crime. We need to address the homelessness concerns, including the illegal camping along the greenbelt. We as a community need to be able to direct those experiencing homelessness to the organizations within Wheat Ridge and the county that can offer them help and resources, whether it be mental health services, housing, or assistance such as those that Pennington offers to its families that have fallen on tough times. It takes working with EVERYONE to get things done and solve the issues we face everyday, that is my promise as a councilor. I plan to be a leader that builds bridges to bring community together. Contact: Leah Dozeman, https://www.facebook.com/Leah4WheatRidge/; 720-3019598; leah4wheatridge@gmail.com; Citizens to Elect Leah Dozeman Candidate Committee: Registered Agent: Korey Stites; Treasurer: Anthony DiTullio; Sara Stites; and Dominick Breton.

Andrew Rasmussen Who: My name is Andy Rasmussen, and I am running for City Council. I am a licensed Electrician for Namaste Solar. I moved to Colorado right after college in 1999 and moved to Wheat Ridge in 2015. Public Office: I have never served in public office before. Volunteer: I currently serve on the Wheat Ridge Environmental Sustainability Committee. Please see the city website for more details about what the committee has been doing. Most Important Issues: • Growth. I support planned growth for the city. I believe that Wheat Ridge is in a unique position due to its physical location and relatively low home prices in the metro area. I would like to see the city develop commercially, but not residentially. What I mean by that is I would like to see the major commercial corridors see changes, but leave the residential neighborhoods mostly unchanged except perhaps for some pedestrian improvements. This is in line with the current Comprehensive Plan and I would like to help continue the good work already completed along these lines. In addition, I believe strongly that future multi-family development should include some portion of affordable housing. • Community Development. Having attended many City Council meetings and other community gatherings in Wheat Ridge, I believe that we could bring in more community members to the process. If elected, I look forward to reaching out to my community and organizing regular neighborhood meetings where I would hope to listen more than anything as I got to know my neighbors and understand how they feel about all of the important issues our great city is facing. • 38th Avenue. I support the 3 lane alignment of 38th Avenue. I have heard from people on both sides of this issue, but believe that in the long run the 3-lane more pedestrian friendly plan would help to create the "downtown" feeling business district that the City wants. I hope to see an area similar to Olde Towne Arvada or downtown Golden in Wheat Ridge, but to do that we must make some changes. I do believe that the final stage of implementation should be sent to the voters in order to approve funding for the new plantings and pedestrian friendly improvements that we would add in order to move in that direction. Plus, I would like to see a little more attention paid to 44th Avenue improvements while we improve 38th Avenue. Contact: Website: andyforwrd4.com Phone: 970-403-2665 Email: andy@andyforwrd4. com Social Media: Facebook.com/Andy.Rasmussen.50 Candidate Committee: Andy Rasmussen for City Council District IV Chairperson: Linda Grantham

REACH UP TO 25,000 READERS MONTHLY! Tim Berland | 303-995-2806 | tim@ngazette.com


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NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

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Town Council Candidates n By

Patricia Lilliston

A

ccording to the Town Charter, the Mountain View town council serves as the governing authority for the town. The council consists of six citizens who are elected at large for a four-year term. Functional tasks addressed by the town council include strategic planning, annual budget preparation, policy and procedural development, and overseeing essential town regulations and codes. By Tuesday, Nov. 7, Election Day, Mountain View voters will elect three council members from among the slate of four candidates. Lisa Maurath, Mladenka V. Boehrer, Leola M. Boone and Kathleen S. Bailey are seeking a council seat on the Mountain View governance board.Recently, all four candidates responded to questions addressing topics specific to the individual rationale for seeking public office, the challenges facing the community, aspirations for the town, and leadership qualities. Lisa Maurath A Mountain View resident for 19 years, and formerly a member of the town council, council candidate Lisa Maurath declares, “I am well versed in the challenges facing the town, and the difficulties in achieving positive results.” Maurath perceives the town’s infrastructure and economic development as the most significant challenges facing the community. She acknowledges that the two areas of concern are intertwined. “With an aging infrastructure and a lack of incentives for economic development, the town is less inviting to developers.” Maurath asserts that the implementation of an achievable five-year project management plan would prompt favorable results. “Being a member of town council is a huge responsibility. My approach to challenges and issues is to address them head on, not to put anything aside for another day or meeting.” Mladenka V. Boehrer “I feel I can make a difference by being a new face on the board, and as a minority woman,” states bilingual council candidate Mladenka Boehrer. Boehrer notes that increased street lighting, sewer and drainage improvements are the priorities for Mountain View. She is an advocate for hosting more community meetings, and social events as a means to open dialogue to ultimately, strengthen communication within the town.

To support this objective, Boehrer aspires to secure a building large enough to provide space for the community meetings and social gatherings. She realizes the challenge for funding infrastructure improvements and community structural renovations. She is committed to maintaining and increasing the town revenues. “I will work to find options, funds and solutions for town projects. I will work tirelessly to make sure every voice in our town is heard.” Leola M. Boone A Colorado native, long-standing Mountain View resident, and current member of town council, council candidate Leola Boone announces, “I am proud to be a council member of Mountain View. It gives me hope that we can all gain from the current serviceable political system to keep our small town stable.” Boone, a Berkeley political science graduate, expresses her commitment to the town through a continued contribution to the community governance structure. She supports economic development, public safety, and public works endeavors. “This will be my last time to serve my town. There is strength and benefit in the unity that the council derives from the governance structure. This type of equanimity helps in the decision process.” Kathleen S. Bailey As a relatively new member in the community, council candidate Kathleen Bailey expresses a love for the town, a joy in meeting, talking, and listening to residents. “Let’s work together to make a better Mountain View,” urges Bailey. Bailey views the size of Mountain View as both a challenge and an asset. She will seek alternative sources of revenue to better diversify the town’s economic base. Bailey aspires to improve the town’s waste management practices by encouraging household composting and recycling standards. “I will work to foster a deeper sense of community, and to adopt sustainability measures to promote economic vitality, community health, and environmental protection.” Currently pursuing a Ph.D in public affairs, Bailey has been employed in nonprofit, public, and private agencies at both the state and federal level. “I want to give back to my community and put my doctoral training and my diverse employment history to practical use to bring positive change to the town.”

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ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

■ By

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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

FITNESS CORNER

Snowshoeing, Fishing and Hiking – Oh, My!

The 3 Components of Getting and Staying Healthy

Meghan Godby

olorado loves to keep us guessing: one day we’re graced with abundant sunshine, while the next morning we’re shoveling snow in our driveways. (Take earlier this month, for instance!) Lucky for us, though, there are a variety of outdoor activities to keep us busy year-round. If you’re new to the Centennial State, or just overwhelmed with the sheer number of options, look no further than the Wheat Ridge Active Adult Center. Their trips program, headed by Dan Brennan II, is not only a great way to explore colorful Colorado, but it’s also the perfect opportunity to socialize and make new friends. Dan, the AAC’s Recreation Coordinator, is excited about the program and eager to spread the word in our community. Outdoor recreation is a broad term, but the AAC has something for everyone and every fitness level: downhill skiing and snowshoeing in the winter months (January through March), along with hiking and fishing May through October. For a small fee (varies per program), you’ll explore everything from state parks to hidden gems in your own backyard. No need to worry about traffic jams or GPS mishaps, either – transportation is included (participants must provide own equipment). Seeking a more leisurely pace? Consider joining the Ramblers – a walking group that meets every Thursday to explore various locations across the Front Range. Each hour-long walk is unguided, but attendees

use the buddy system so they won’t get lost. “[Participants] love the program because it gives them an opportunity to do things they wouldn’t otherwise do by themselves,” Dan explained. “They like the camaraderie […and…] I think they feel safe with the leadership and direction.” In addition to the regularly scheduled outdoor programming, new offerings are served up every season. Earlier this month, for example, a group of seniors took a trip to view elk in Rocky Mountain National Park. Approximately 100 seniors participate each year, but Dan is eager to increase that number. When it comes to outdoor recreation opportunities in Colorado, it can be hard to know where to start. Dan hopes this program can give seniors confidence and inspire them to explore the beautiful scenery that our state has to offer. Interested in learning more? Call Dan directly at 303-205-7510, or visit the city’s website (ci.wheatridge.co.us/aac). You can also stop by the Active Adult Center in person (6363 W. 35th Ave.), where you can pick up a hard copy of the “Possibilities” brochure (a guide to all the classes and programs at the AAC) and get on the mailing list. While the trips are designed for adults 50 and older, other accommodations can be made. Dan encourages seniors in our community to come out and introduce themselves. “We can discuss [your] interests to find a good fit!” Contact the Wheat Ridge Active Adult Center at 303-205-7500 or visit www. ci.wheatridge.co.us/aac.

Have a news tip or story idea? Send it to editor@ngazette.com

you deal with chronic pain, inflammation, low energy, headaches and weight gain. Most fitness programs do not offer assistance with hen it comes to being on the path nutrition. What is it that you need? Meal of health and wellness in our lives, plans, food journals, accountability, ability to it’s important to find something that ask questions? Can you see yourself following encompasses all aspects so that there the gym or studio’s food philosophy? is sustainable success. The three main Accountability: Sometimes it just components for success are fitness, nutrition breaks down to the fact that we know what and accountability. Not all programs include to do, we just don’t do it. Life happens, all three components and your health could distractions happen and excuses arise. What be suffering from it. With the holidays programs can offer you the ability to be held in quick approach, it’s a vital time to get accountable and to be supported yourself on track so you don’t end on a monthly basis? Make sure up gaining weight through them. that you have some forum to ask Fitness: Getting activity questions, get support and to be is clearly an important aspect motivated as well as inspired especially when weight loss is even when you are not physically desired. However, even if weight at the location. If you struggle loss isn’t the main objective, with the mindset aspect of your activity can play a massive role health and wellness journey, in keeping joints healthy, bones you may want to make sure that strong as well as maintaining the program gives coaching on a healthy heart. Finding a mindset practices as well. fitness routine that can include Coming into one of the Brandy Martin resistance training (lifting most challenging times of year, weights), cardiovascular training it is important to have yourself dialed into (cardio) and then some recovery or selfa program that will assist you in every way. care such as yoga will allow you to improve This will help you resist the temptations in all aspects. Make sure that the trainers and unhealthy habits of the holiday season. or coaches are concerned with form and Cold weather and darker days will not affect alignment so that you stay safe and always your health and wellness journey. You won’t speak to someone about your injuries or be sick as often or even at all when you are limitations. Ensure that the program fits eating healthy and working out consistently. your individual needs. For example, if you Come try Feed Your Soul Fitness for are a beginner you will not feel comfortable one of our 6 week challenges that provide in a high-intensity workout environment workouts, meal plans, grocery shopping lists, mixed with a competitive feel. accountability and motivation. Feel the best Nutrition: Let’s face it. It’s the most you ever have this holiday season! important and hardest to do. You may Brandy Martin is owner of Feed Your Soul feel you eat well. However, if you scanned Fitness; contact her at Brandy@FeedYourthrough every single thing that went in your SoulFitness.com or 303-947-5631. mouth, you would better understand why ■ By

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12

NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

What’s Happening in the WRBA

LOCAL BUSINESS NEWS Jeffco Business Education Alliance Names Aimee Skul as Chairman

The assocation booth at the 3rd annual Jefferson County Business Resource Expo, Sept. 18 at the Jeffco Fairgrounds.

Great evening of networking at our July Biz Mix at Infinitus Pie. Gorgeous weather perfect to sit outside on the new patio!

November 2017 Membership Breakfast Date: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 Time: 7:00-9:00 pm Location: Wheat Ridge Recreation Center – 4005 Kipling St. Cost: $15 for WRBA Members, $18 for Non-members SPEAKER: Jess Wiederholt TOPIC: Passion & Purpose = SUCCESS!

Please register for this meeting before 5pm on Thursday, Nov. 9

wheatridgebiz.com/wrba-events/

Don Seyfer • 303-422-5261 4501 Harlan St. • seyferauto.com

Sue Ball • 303-421-7311 sueball.com

Tim Berland • 303-995-2806 ngazette.com

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Susie Fogerson • 720-263-6060 synergyhomecare.com/westdenver

Ron Benson • 720-879-3927 ronbenson777@gmail.com

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Bud Starker • 303-233-3377 29th & Depew • west29th.com

Thomas R. Ripp • Joseph H. Lusk 303-423-7131

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Emily Green • 720-530-3140 cibomeals@gmail.com

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At its next monthly breakfast meeting, Nov. 14, Jess Weiderholt presents “Passion & Purpose = Success!” about stepping outside of comfort zones to reach goals, and her work in East Africa empowering women in business. It takes place 7 to 9 a.m. at the Wheat Ridge Recreation Center, 4005 Kipling St. $15 for members, $18 nonmembers.

Business Classes, Events From Jeffco Business Resource Center The Jefferson County Business Resource Center, located in Denver West, is offering a handful of helpful presentations this month. “Start-Up 101: What You Need to Know BEFORE You Consider Starting a Business!” is held at the JBRC, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Free, but registration requested. “Bookkeeping 101: Making Cents Out of Your Books” is set for Thursday, Oct. 26, 8 to 10 a.m., at the JBRC. This hands-on class shows how to set up basic bookkeeping for a small business. Free, but registration required. “Buying or Selling a Business” with Suzanne M. De Lucia will be offered Thursday, Nov. 2, 8 a.m. to noon, at the JBRC. Early registration recommended; cost is $40. For more information about Jeffco BRC and their business education programs, contact Amira Watters, Executive Director, at 303-996-8976, or visit www.jeffcobrc.org.

Feel The Beat RibbonCutting, Nov. 1 Wheat Ridge Chamber of Commerce will host a ribbon-cutting and networking event for Feel the Beat dance studio, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 5 to 6 p.m., at 5451 W. 32nd Ave. The studio’s grand opening is scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 12, from noon to 4 p.m., and will feature dance, painting, food and a silent auction. For more information, visit www.wheatridgechamber.org.

Billy D. Downs • 720-378-8055 bfbcpa.com • billy@bfbcpa.com

CONSTRUCTION

Pam Goff • 303-969-0763 pg-construction.com

WRBA Breakfast Speaker Steps Out of Comfort Zone Nov. 14

To learn more and to register for the WRBA breakfast buffet, go to www.wheatridgebiz.com. Call 720-588-2317 with questions.

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Challenge includes: • 16 Small Group Sessions • Simple Meal Plan • Yoga Workshop Mark Plummer • 303-422-2018 • Coaching Calls mplummer@lfi ns.com • Party with CASH & PRIZES!

Aimee Skul has been named the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Jefferson County Business Education Alliance (JCBEA). Skul has served on the board since 2010 and replaces Guy Nahmiach of Nostalgic Homes as chairman. Skul is the owner of Skul Insurance Agency and multiple Sport Clips locations. She is also an active member of the Arvada Chamber of Commerce, and a graduate of the University of Northern Colorado. JCBEA connects business and education to create a workforce through the CareerReady course, in which business professionals teach students to become qualified employees who are ready to work. Her favorite class to teach is financial literacy and responsibility, which prepares students to manage expenses and be mindful of credit.

Cheryl Blum Garcia • 720-371-1736 my-idt.com

Vendors Wanted for Taste of Wheat Ridge, Nov. 2 The Wheat Ridge Chamber of Commerce is seeking vendors to showcase their culinary skills, craft beer and wine and compete for the Best Of Wheat Ridge award at Taste of Wheat Ridge, Thursday, Nov. 2, 6 to 8 p.m., at The Grange, 3850 High Court. Vendors who are members of the Chamber offer free samples (4 ounces or less)

to the public in return for a free 10-by-10-foot booth space. Other vendors pay $150 for their space. Tickets for the public are $5. For more information, visit www.wheatridgechamber.org.

Adventurer Speaks at Applewood Lunch, Nov. 9 Dr. Jon Kedrowski, ski mountaineer, professional guide and adventurer, will be the guest speaker at Applewood Business Association’s next monthly luncheon, Thursday, Nov. 9, starting 11 a.m. at Rolling Hills Country Club, 15707 W. 26th Ave., Golden. Kedrowski grew up in the Vail Valley, and climbed every fourteener in the state by age 18, and since then has skied from the top of every one, and climbed each at least five times. He has also climbed Mt. Everest. The Applewood Business Association helps businesses in Applewood start, grow and flourish, is engaged in the community, and encourages businesses from outside Applewood to join. Guests are welcome, with the first lunch free. Newcomers may visit the meetings twice before they must join. Cost is $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers. The deadline to RSVP is 5 p.m. on Friday before the meeting date. The Association cannot guarantee a meal after that time, and members showing up without an RSVP will be charged $25 instead of member pricing. The Association will also host a Business After Hours event at Aspen Mortuary on Oct. 25, 4:30 to 7 p.m., and Breakfast Meeting at The Vista at Applewood Golf Course, Oct. 26, 7:30 to 9 a.m.; sign up on the web site. For more information, visit www.applewoodbusiness.com or call 720-460-1539.

WR Chamber Leads Group, Oct. 19 & Nov. 2 The Wheat Ridge Chamber Leads Group meets the first and third Thursdays (Oct. 19, Nov. 2) of each month, 11:30 a.m. at Pietra’s Pizza, 9045 W. 44th Ave. A Leads Group, or networking group, is a group that meets regularly to create partnerships and build relationships with the members in that group, with a goal of referring business to each other. It’s a great way to build your network, grow your business and help other members grow their business. In order to participate, you must be a member of the Wheat Ridge Chamber of Commerce. If your industry is already represented in this group, the Chamber will put your name on a waiting list and start a second group once we have five or six names on the list. If you are interested in joining, email dot@wheatridgechamber.org. Visit www. WheatRidgeChamber.org for more information.

Events at the West Chamber The West Chamber, serving businesses in Jefferson County, has a variety of events scheduled in the upcoming weeks, including a Women in Business Breakfast on Oct. 24, business after-hours networking event Nov. 2, and ribbon-cuttings. The West Chamber exists for the success of business in Jefferson County, Colorado, with members in Lakewood, Wheat Ridge, Littleton, Edgewater, Arvada, Golden, Evergreen, South Jeffco and around the Denver area. It provides business connections, advocates for local businesses with government, helps make its members’ businesses more visible and educates business owners. For more information and event details, visit www.westchamber.org, call 303-2335555, or email info@westchamber.org.


ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING Governor Graces Opening of Don’t Quit Fitness Center at Everitt Governor John Hickenlooper joined other dignitaries to cut the ribbon for Everitt Middle School’s new Don’t Quit Fitness Center, Thursday morning, Oct. 5. Jefferson County Schools Superintendent Dr. Jason Glass, Everitt Principal Jeff Gomez, National Foundation for Governors’ Fitness Council Chairman Jake Steinfeld and others participated in the event at 3900 Kipling St. The National Foundation for Governors’ Fitness Councils recently selected Everitt Middle School as a National Fitness Champion and gifted the school with a fitness center, according to City of Wheat Ridge spokesperson Sara Spaulding. “The school is being recognized for demonstrating leadership in getting and keeping their students fit,” said Spaulding. “In addition to the grant, the fitness center was financed through public/private partnerships with companies like The CocaCola Company, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation, and Nike, Inc.”

Attic Treasures Yard Sale at Four Seasons Market, Oct. 21 Four Seasons Market will host the Attic Treasures Community Yard Sale, Saturday, Oct. 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at its 7043 W. 38th Ave. venue. For $10, set up a booth at the market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to sell treasures from your attic or garage. Contact info@fourseasonsmarket.com or call 720560-6648 to reserve your space. Four Seasons Farmers and Artisans Market is open year round, Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., with Open Shop Tuesdays through Fridays, noon to 6 p.m. Find more information or RSVP at www.fourseasonsfam.com.

Whale of a Used Book Sale Oct. 26-29 at Fairgrounds Jefferson County Public Library Foundation (JCPLF) will host its annual Fall Whale of a Used Book Sale at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Oct. 26 through 29. The sale, which has more than a 20-year history in the community, offers the book-

buying public more than 80,000 books at prices starting at 50 cents. “The funds generated by the Whale Sale will help support the Library’s STEM/ STEAM initiatives, early childhood literacy and the hugely popular Summer Reading program,” said JCPL Executive Director Pam Nissler. JCPLF is a 501(c)(3) dedicated to supporting the programs of Jefferson County Public Library through advocacy and fundraising. For more information about the JCPLF and the Fall Whale of a Used Book Sale, visit jeffcolibraryfoundation.org.

Free Kids’ Halloween Carnival at St. John Chrysostom, Oct. 31 St. John Chrysostom Episcopal Church will stage its ninth annual Kids’ Halloween Carnival Tuesday, Oct. 31, at 13151 W. 28th Ave., Golden. The free festival features games, crafts, prizes, candy and treats. Nothing too spooky, come for a safe and fun evening open to all! Carnival runs from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The church is in the Applewood area near Manning and Maple Groves schools. For more information, visit www.stjohngolden.org.

New ‘Be Smart, Be Seen, Be Safe’ Video Urges Halloween Safety The Wheat Ridge Police Department and the Arvada Fire Protection District have created a video to help keep kids safe this Halloween. “Be Smart, Be Seen, Be Safe” offers tips for parents and reminds kids to make good costume choices, smart decorating decisions to avoid the risk of a house fire, and about how to avoid the scary stuff that sometimes happens when out trick-or-treating with friends, according to City of Wheat Ridge spokesperson Sara Spaulding. Arvada firefighters, WRPD officers and volunteers, Explorers, and Stevens Elementary School students participated in the video. A Spanish-language version will air on Telemundo, and also can be viewed at https://youtu.be/x3GNGEm7kMU.

Coats For Kids Drive Seeks Winter Gear Till Nov. 2

School Out Day Art Camps Coming in November

Gold Compass Real Estate has partnered with Support JeffCo Kids to host a Coats for Kids donation drive to provide winter gear for students in need throughout the Jefferson County School District in grades K-12. Donations of new and gently used coats, gloves, hats, scarves and boots in all sizes are being collected through Nov. 2 at three locations, the nearest being Earth Treks Climbing Gym, 700 Golden Ridge Road, Golden.

Sweet Ridge Studios is offering half- and full-day School Out Art Day Art Camps for kids during upcoming no-school days in Jeffco and Denver public schools. Students 6 to 12 years of age can sign up in advance to create seasonal projects. Half- and full-day sessions are offered Friday, Nov. 3, 9 to noon or 1 to 4 p.m., $45, or 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., $80 Thanksgiving week, Monday through Wednesday, Nov. 20 through 22, half-day sessions are offered 9 a.m. to noon, $45 per day or $120 for all three. All camps are held at Olde Firehouse Community Center, 3232 Depew St.

For more information please call 303325-5690 or coloradohomeblog.com/ coats-for-kids.

Panel Discusses Homelessness and Hunger Solutions, Nov. 8 People concerned about the impact of homelessness and hunger in Jefferson County are invited to join the League of Women Voters of Jefferson County for a panel discussion on Wednesday, Nov. 8, to learn about who is addressing the problem and what can be done to help. The event will take place at St. Anthony’s Hospital South, 11600 W. 2nd Place, Lakewood, from 7 to 9 p.m. It is open to the public and free of charge. Panelists will include Arvada Chief of Police Don Wick, The Action Center Executive Director Mag Strittmatter, Jeffco Schools Community & Family Connections Coordinator Rebecca Dunn, and Family Tree and Heading Home’s Linda Barringer. In addition, Michelle O’Neill-Clark from the Volunteers of America and Lucas Burrier, a veteran’s advocate with Mountain Resource Center, will be staffing tables at the event to answer questions and distribute printed materials about services for veterans. There will be time for questions as well as information about actions that can be taken by individuals. For more information, visit www.lwvjeffco.org or call 303-238-0032.

For details and to register, visit SweetRidgeStudios.com.

EPA Awards $100,000 to Wheat Ridge Company for Innovative Tech TDA Research, Inc., of Wheat Ridge was awarded $100,000 of funding for an innovative water desalination system for small communities last month, part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s $1.6 million in funding for small businesses to develop technologies that will help protect human health and the environment by detecting chemicals in the air, ensuring cleaner water, and creating greener materials. “Development of brackish groundwater and seawater as alternative water sources can help address concerns about the future availability of potable water,” said Girish Srinivas, TDA Partner and Vice president. The contract was awarded through the EPA’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Companies compete for the annual Phase I awards ($100,000) by submitting research that addresses key environmental issues. After receiving a Phase I award, companies are eligible to compete for a Phase II award of $300,000 to further develop and commercialize the technology. For more information on the EPA’s SBIR program visit www.epa.gov/sbir.

For the English-language version, go to https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=UQJB_PDuIOY&feature=youtu. be.

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NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – ngazette.com

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result, we are even better positioned to serve the needs of our patient population.” Jarred McNeely, Director of Education 44th East of Kipling on the South forside. the Colorado School of Trades, agrees. 9990 44th Ave, Wheat Ridge CO 80033 “MHFA is important to myself and my Come in for “Free Soap Tuesday”* staff in that it gives us tools to better support our students,” he said. “My staff is better prepared to identify possible problems, ask �While supplies last Tuesdays star�ng at 8 a� the tough questions, and direct students to resources that are available within our community. In turn the support we can provide the students allows them to focus on school and be more successful as students. I believe that is the goal of any school, and MHFA helps us attain that goal.” Jefferson Center for Mental Health has been providing Mental Health First Aid since 2009. Other members of the Jeffco Collaborative have been providing the training to their employees for the past two or three years. Schiemann said the most common mental health conditions locally and nationally are anxiety and depression. While mental health issues are present yearround, the holiday blues can be particularly troubling. “Extra stress, unrealistic expectations or even sentimental memories that accompany the season can be a catalyst for the holiday blues,” wrote Laura Greenstein in an article published by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). “Some can be at risk for feelings of loneliness,

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housing options, and I would expect even more restaurants. I’m also thrilled with the momentum along the West 38th corridor between Upham and Teller streets, activity that is having an impact on businesses as well as the community. Not only is the Ridge at 38 a special place where we hold community events, but this area will soon emerge as the center of our downtown with the development of The Corners at 38th and Wadsworth and the addition of the West End at 38, the new apartment and retail space at 38th and Upham Street. For those traveling through Wheat Ridge or stopping

days of work on the fire and then on top of that, the travel time it takes to get there. When you get the call, they need you as fast as you can get there.” Once at the incident, firefighters typically work up to 16-hour days on the fire line, eating in a mess hall and sleeping in tents in fire camp. Crews are required to bring all the personal items they need for two weeks – clothing, protective equipment and their own tent – in one bag, typically called a “red” bag. When crews receive their orders, they know they’re headed to a fire, but that is sometimes all they know. “You have to be up to the challenge to handle the assignment you’re given and the situation your crew might find itself in,” said Captain Todd Heinl, one of the West Metro firefighters who deployed to the West Mims Fire. “On some incidents, you’re not only dealing with the fire, but other things – like the alligators we saw on the West Mims Fire.” The opportunity to deploy gives firefighters a wider range of experience that they can draw on once they get home. “No matter where they go, crews learn lessons about fire behavior, firefighting methods or incident strategy,” said Heinl. “We can use that to fight fires in our district.” Ronda Scholting is West Metro Fire Rescue’s Communications/Media Relations Specialist.

sadness, fatigue, tension and a sense of loss…A lot of seasonal factors can trigger the holiday blues such as less sunlight, changes in your diet or routine, alcohol at parties, over-commercialization or the inability to be with friends or family.” “MHFA gets people talking about mental health and mental health problems,” Schiemann added. “We’re having that conversation and learning more and understanding more about what it really is and what it really looks like and how prevalent it is.” One aspect of MHFA training is battling stigma and the public’s perception of those who struggle with mental health challenges. “It prevents people from accessing care, or telling other people that they’re struggling for fear of being labeled a certain way, or losing a job or a relationship,” Schiemann said. Stigma looks different in different communities. For example, employees worry about being labeled as incompetent, and parents dread the thought of losing their children. Veterans may fear being perceived as being weak or labeled as dangerous. “Actually, the vast majority of folks with mental health challenges are more often the victims of violence rather than the perpetrators,” Schiemann said. Interested parties can sign up for public MHFA classes through the Jefferson Center, or schedule onsite training for organizations that gather a group of 20 to 30 students. To date, the Jeffco Collaborative has trained more than 3,500 people through this program. For more information, visit www.mjfajeffco.org or call 303-432-5155.

by for a beer, a meal or to shop, we are sending a clear message by creating a true “Main Street” for our city. Sales tax revenue has also spiked significantly along West 38th and we expect that trend to continue. When the corridor truly becomes more than just a trafficmoving route through town to one filled with shopping, restaurants and gathering places that are surrounded by walkable space, artwork and beautiful landscaping, we can all take pride in having a main street in Wheat Ridge. As I write about our city and reflect on my term as mayor, I have to say that with the help of a promising marketplace, passionate residents and business owners, a great city staff and dedicated elected officials, I believe it has been a very good run.


ngazette.com – OCTOBER 17 – NOVEMBER 13, 2017 – NEIGHBORHOOD GAZETTE

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Backyard Bats Benefit Just About Everybody n By

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Sally Griffin

ats are blind flying mice that attack you, get tangled in your hair, suck your blood, and give you rabies. So, they must be crazy. Right? Not so fast! There are a number of misconceptions about bats that I want to clear up. First, bats are not related to mice. In fact, they are probably more closely related to us than to rodents. According to the Living Webster Dictionary, bats are one of a group of mammals of the order Chiroptera possessing a pair of leathery wings which extend between the fore and the posterior limbs. The former are specially modified for flying, while the bones of the forefeet are extremely elongated. Chiroptera translates into “hand-wing,” which seems pretty accurate. Bats are the only mammals that can fly. They are also one of the most varied species. Bats are not blind. All bats can see and some, even, have good eyesight. Many types of bats have small eyes and use echolocation to navigate, but this doesn’t mean they are blind. Echolocation or biological sonar is a very refined system, even more so than radar. Bats can detect a single strand of human hair and will usually avoid it. Bats don’t attack people and get tangled in their hair. Bats may fly toward you if they are trying to get away from something or to eat a bug that you may not have noticed above your head. Usually, this is a mosquito. Mosquitos like to dive-bomb people from above. Plus, bats don’t build nests, so your hair would not be of interest to them unless it is harboring a large number of mosquitos or moths. So, then, they would just be helping you with your problem. There is only one species of bat that likes to drink blood: Vampire bats. They live in Mexico, Central and South America and prefer the blood of cows or other livestock to human blood. In fact, most bats are afraid of us and avoid us as much as they can.

Most bats are insect eaters. The more than 1,300 types of bats make up one-fourth of all mammal species. And they can be very different in size. The Bumblebee Bat, the smallest of the species, has a wingspan of six inches. In contrast, the largest bat, the Malayan Flying Fox, has a wingspan of six feet. Thank goodness, these bats don’t have vampire proclivities. Less than one percent of bats have rabies. Like all mammals, bats can get rabies. When they do get rabies, they are very sick and usually die without contact with humans. However, if you see a bat on the ground or during the daytime, it might be sick. You should not try to handle it, keep children and pets away and call for help. If you feel that you must remove the bat before animal control or wildlife technicians get there, only do so while wearing a longsleeved jacket and heavy gloves. Bats are not crazy. They, however, do almost everything upside down, except go to the bathroom (which would be really crazy). They are very sociable and live in large groups called colonies. They have only one baby a year. Bat babies often weigh almost one-fourth as much as their mom when they are born. (Can you imagine a human mom birthing a 30-pound baby?) Bat flight may appear crazy because they often fly in a figure-eight pattern, at up to 50 mph, while they hunt down the 2,000 to 6,000 insects that they eat every night. They do their hunting at night for the simple reason that is when there are the most insects, like mosquitos. Bats’ eating preferences make them very beneficial to have in our backyards. They also help farmers by consuming agricultural pests. A 2009 Journal of Medical Entomology study compared mosquito populations in areas with bats to areas without bats. After two months, the one with bats had a 32 percent reduction in mosquitoes compared to area without bats. In fact, most environmentalists will tell

you that bats are the most environmentally friendly and least risky way to combat mosquitoes. Chemicals and pesticides carry heavy risks for both humans and other wildlife. Yet, the world is a dangerous place for bats. Although they provide important environmental activities, they are declining world-wide, largely due to human activity. That is why many environmentalists and others are recommending people install bat houses. There are several reasons for attracting bats to your backyard. First, of course, is pest control. Bats can also help by providing guano for fertilizer. Guano is the polite name for bat excrement, which, by the way can be used for fertilizing backyard plants and flowers. Guano is packed with nitrogen and phosphorous. Lastly, bats’ nightly display of aerial acrobatics can be an amazing thing to watch from your back deck. According to Bat Conservation International, Inc. ( http://www.batcon.org ), here are some tips to get you started: • Bats prefer to roost on buildings or other large wooden or concrete structures. But they may roost on poles. They don’t particularly like trees, unless they are dead. Bat houses should get at least six hours of sun each day. The south or east side of a house or barn is ideal. Interior temperatures should be as warm and as stable as possible. • Best places for bat houses are 20 to 30 feet from trees and 12 to 20 feet above

ground or the tallest vegetation. Locations near fairly large water sources, preferably within a quarter mile or less, are the most successful in attracting bats. • If you have a cat, keep her inside at night, especially during the summer months when bat mothers are taking care of their young. Cat attacks are one of the most common causes of bat casualties. • To provide them with a varied diet of insects, plant night-blooming plants, flowering annuals and perennials, and fragrant herbs and shrubs. • Tall designs like multi-chambered nurseries and rocket-style houses perform best in attracting bats. But it may take two years for bats to find your bat house. Occupancy may only be 50 percent in urban and suburban areas. • Put a shallow tray under the bat house to collect the guano. Don’t use a bucket or deep container, because baby bats can fall from the bat house and get trapped. • Many Colorado bats hibernate elsewhere during the winter, so you need to make sure that non-bat residents, like wasps, don’t take up residence while they are gone. I don’t know where the slang use of “batty” as “insane” or “odd” came from. Bats are very useful wildlife and there are many benefits to keeping them around. So, the next time someone calls you “batty,” be sure to thank him.

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Saturday Oct. 28 • 4-6pm next to the Green at 38 (7101 W. 38th Ave.) Contact Carolyn • 720-259-1030 cdoran@wearelocalworks.org WeAreLocalworks.com


Questions? Email Joe at jdemott4@gmail.com Paid for by Citizens for Joe DeMott. Richard Matthews, Treasurer

Neighborhood Gazette – October 2017  

The October 17-November 13, 2017 issue of Neighborhood Gazette, serving Wheat Ridge, Applewood, Mountain View & Lakeside Colorado.

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