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The Compass A Publication of Traverse City West High School

2012

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Meet the Editor

Eight days before I walk out of West Senior High for the last time (as a student), I look back on my time here at West, I realize that I have had a lot of experiences in only four years- good and bad (mostly good) The highlights of my high school “career” have been the opportunities that I have had this year being an editor for both the The Occidentalist, our school newspaper, and of course, The Compass. Just a little bit about myself: I have been in the scheool newspaper for two years, starting as a staff writer, and most recently as an editor and business manager. This year, I came into the Compass as the Editor-In-Chief. I have considered it a privilage to hold these positions and cannot think of a better way to finish off my time hear at West. After I graduate, I plan working part time with Grand Traverse Metro Fire Department as a firefighter and medical first responder and attending classes at NMC. In the future, I plan on persuing a career in Law Enforcement. It has always been my goal to have a job that will allow me to help the community and make a difference, which is why I am interested in a career in law enforcement. The Compass magazine is produced by a staff of ten dedicated staff writers, who are led by a student editor and a faculty adviser, David Noller. The student editor is responsible for content and manages all day-to-day operations. The faculty adviser providing necessary support to the editor and training for the staff writers. Our staff works diligently to produce a quality production each trimester for the school, and for the community to enjoy. Each year, students here at West look forward to spring for many reasons. Whether it be spring sports, Prom, the end of the school year or graduation, spring here at West has something in store for everybody. Accordingly, I felt that it was only fitting to have the theme for our last issue of the school year be “Spring.” On behalf of the Compass Magazine staff, thank you for reading this issue. Your continued support is appreciated.

Editor-In-Chief Chase Schelling ‘12 is responsible for all day-to-day operations at The Compass including content, editing, staff management, deadlines, and more.

Chase Schelling Editor-In-Chief 2011-2012

Meet the Staff A former adviser to the Occidentalist for several years, and winner of the Spartan award five times, Mr. Noller was this year’s adviser for The Compass. In addition to the publication, Mr. Noller teaches Advanced Placement Literature & Composition, and is one of two Technology Curriculum Coordinators for the district. His best days are the ones he spends with his kids, adventuring in the beautiful places in Northern Michigan, especially around Empire, Beulah, and the Old Mission Peninsula.

HI im Cody im 15 and I am a freshman, my hobbies include being out side, BMX freestyleing, and hanging out with friends. I BMX every day almost so i can get better at it. my intrest are in BMXing and doing good in school. i chose the compass so later on in high school i can take year book and and learn how to wright the way i need to. This class will help me in the long run by showing me the way to wright articals so if i end up taking newspaper or even year book i will be set.


Meet the Staff I am Alexander James Burch. I like long walks on the beach and romantic comedys. I joined the compass because I thought it would be a great way to express my personality. Once i joined the compass i learned alot of things about writing and editing articles. The compass is a great stepping stone for yearbook or newspaper.

My name is Allie Kessel ‘15. I took this class because I was interested in bein gintroduced to journalism. I enjoy singing and playing the piano. I also write my own songs. In my spare time I enjoy spending time at my cottage at long lake, I also like to play guitar. I also dance at Dance Arts Academy, I go to dance three times a week and take modern, jazz and ballet. I am hoping to go to Interlochem Arts Academy next year for there new singer-songwriter program.

My name is Hannah Gordon. I’m a freshman here at West. My hobbies include, and are pretty much limited to- drawing, reading, talking to myself, listening to music, writing, and video games. My favorite things are manga and anime, and what I want to be when I grow up is a voice actor- preferablly for anime. I joined the Compass because I needed to switch out of gym, and I had been in a Journalism class last year at the middle school, so I thought I would at least know what to do and enjoy the class.

I am Jake Monette ‘13. I was born in Jacksonville, North Carolina. I drive a 2001 Jeep Wrangler and play Lacrosse for the West club team. I have been playing lacrosse since fifth grade, and have been on the Varsity team since my eighth grade year. I have been a captain since my sophomore year, and led the state in goals my sophomore season. I also enjoy hunting and fishing. I have cabin on Crystal Lake in Beulah, which is where I stay by myself during the summers.

I am Katelyn Lane ‘14. I joined the Compass because I thought it would be fun to be part of the school’s online magazine. I enjoy dancing and photography. I dance two nights a week at The Dance Center in Traverse City. There I take ballet, lyrical, and latin classes. Next year I will be attending Charlotte High School in Charlotte MI. I hope to make more friends at my new school and to do good in all of my classes. I’ve really enjoyed all the things I’ve done at West, especially being part of the Compass.

Hi my name is Stephanie Achenbach my hobbies are drawing, music, photography, and computers. My favorites sport is swimming. My interests are The Simpsons, cats, animals, geckos, facebook, anime, and manga. I signed up for this class because I thought it would be fun writing magazine articles.

I like chilling out and doing nothing. My interests are video games and taking naps. My goals for now are to simply graduate high school and go to college. My plans for the future are to become a game designer and build video game worlds and characters. I decided to take this class because I enjoy writing stories. I have recently started drawing again and am trying to get better at it. I have been doing alot of writing lately and have even been putting some of it on the internet for people to view.

Hi, I’m Tyler. I am 15 and I am a freshman. My hobbies are playing video games, playing sports, being outdoors, and hanging out with my friends. The sport I focus on is hockey, but I also longboard in the summer. My interests are in sports and doing well in school. I chose The Compass because I wanted an introductory course to yearbook and the newspaper. I like journalism because it is interesting to me, and journalism classes aren’t slack off classes, like some easy electives.


Table of Contents 6 Acting Out by Allie Kessel 7 Road Trip by Katie Lane 8 One Song at a Time by Hannah Gordon 9 Caught in the Net by Jake Monette 12 Be Yourself by Hannah Gordon 13 All Maxed Out by Alex Burch

10 16 In the Spotlight by Allie Kessel 17 Busted in Tooth by Max Ebach 20 Dancing Queen by Katie Lane 21 Final Score by Cody Gravette

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& Jake Monette


18 22 Racing Reality by Cody Gravette 23 Perfect Way to Go Out by Max Ebach 26 Hockey Hero by Tyler Beaudrie 27 Daddy’s Boy by Alex Burch 30 Getting Back Up by Tyler Beaudrie Compass logo for this issue created by Erica Evans ‘13

28 A Publication of Traverse City West High School 5376 North Long Lake Rd. Traverse City, Michigan 49685 231.933.7500


acting out by Allie Kessel

Above: Hannah Gordron ‘15 asking aunty Em why, while she recites the monologue Dorothy the ungreatful. Hannah learned this monlogue in theater 1 last trimester. Photo Allie Kessel Above left: Hannah holds her head while reciting the monologue Dorothy the Ungreatful. Hannah has been in theater 1 at the highschool to help prepare for voice acting. Photo Allie

Education Options Academy of Art University California Institute of Creative Arts Art Institute of Pittsburgh The Voice acting Academy Cogswell Polytechnical College

Voice Acting.. not a very well known career. It is acting without gesture and facial expression, using voice only, a very difficult craft to master. When you think of voice acting or voice over’s you think of cartoons like Spongebob or Kim Possible. But there are many other Job opportunities for a voice actor. Hannah Gordon ‘15 is interested in voice acting. “I would talk along with Johnny Gilbert imitating his voice while watching Jeopardy,” Hannah said. What also got Hannah interested in voice acting is her mom. Her mom would tell her that she should become a voice actor. “Some of my favorite voice actors are Greg Ayres, Vic Mignona, Jerry Jewell Monica Rial, and Laura Bailey,” Hannah Said. Greg Ayres mainly does voice overs for Anime. Vic Mignona also mainly involved with Anime and Video game voice overs. Monica Rial is also just involved with video games and Anime, Lauren Bailey is also in Anime, Video games and a few other roles as a live actor and other voice roles. Jerry Jewell is mainly in Anime but is also in video games, an actor and also a singer. “These voice actors have recognizable voices and I love it when I can listen to something and say OH! thats so and so,” Hannah said. If she had to pick a favorite type of character to play it would be a villian. Though depending on the characters personality she would also play a hero. “I am mainly interested in doing

Anime roles, because I am addicted to managa which is the book version of anime and I like watching it as well, and I think I would really enjoy doing it,” Hannah said. As a voice actor you are usually paid around $47,000 a year, and if you have a highly recognizable voice then you could get paid more.


Road Trip by Katie Lane

Just one week after school got out last summer, Chase Schelling ’12 left to go on a RV trip around the Western United States with his mom, step dad, and three younger sisters for a fun, family vacation. “My mom traveled a lot as a kid and she wanted us to have the opportunity to see the same stuff she saw,” Chase said. “My mom has been to all fifty states as well as Canada and Mexico.” Chase’s family traveled through many states including, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois. Some of Chase’s favorite stops were at Badlands National Park in South Dakota, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, and Mt. Rushmore in South Dakota. Chase’s favorite part of the entire trip was going whitewater rafting with his family on the Snake River in Jackson Hole Wyoming. “I just thought it was really fun,” Chase said. Chase’s favorite state to visit was Wyoming because he got to go to Yellowstone National Park. At Yellowstone, Chase saw geysers erupt, including Old Faithful. “I don’t think that I had a least favorite part,”

Chase said. There wasn’t much to do while the RV was moving, but for fun, the kids read books, watched movies, and played on phones and iPods. “We all kind of did our own thing while we were driving from place to place, we had ‘our own areas’ in the RV,” Chase said. In the future, Chase wants to go see other places too, but would love to go on another trip around the Western United States again sometime.

Top: Chase Schelling ‘12 stands with his mom, step-dad, and three younger sisters at Yellowstone Nation Park. Chases’ family’s rented RV by a lake at Custer State Park in South Dakota. The family spent the day hiking in the park and spent the night by the lake. Photo: A. Kroupa

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One

Song at a time

by Hannah Gordon Songwriting. Not everybody does it. Not everybody who does it is good at it. But there are those exceptions, like singers, bands, and other people who write songs for people who can’t come up with any by themselves. Allie Kessel ’15 is one of those people. Not one who writes songs for others, but one who writes them for herself. With her recent acceptance into Interlochen’s new Singer-Songwrite prgram, Allie’s star is on the rise. Allie said that she had always been into music and singing. “I would always write lyrics to songs when I was little,” Allie said. Because Allie has been playing piano since first grade she would add lyrics to her piano pieces. Allie also creates her own music. The first real song that she wrote was at about the beginning of 6th grade. “My first song was about my boyfriend breaking up with me,” Allie said. Photos, Right: Allie Kessel ’15 singing and playing piano in TC West Senior High’s Choir room. Allie plays without sheet music, and sings the song “I Think I Love You,” the latest in a series of songs she has written. Allie starts her program in Singer-Songwriting at the Interlochen Fine Arts Academy the fall. This is the first year for the songwriter program at Interlochen. Photos: Hannah Gordon

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She was ten to eleven years old when she wrote that song. Allie said that songwriting has always been a natural thing for her, and getting older gave her better ideas. It was also, she said, a way to express her feelings. “I have been in Cherry Idol twice, the first time I got first place, the second time I made it in the final round, and then I’ve participated in Onstage New York, so that’s a singing and dancing competition and I went to nationals for that, and I got first place solo,” Allie said. She also mentioned that she has been in talent shows, open mike nights, and voice recitals. “I like to perform for bigger audiences, and people I don’t know mainly,” Allie said “It’s easier to get not as nervous, and I like bigger audiences cause’ you get a bigger feedback and

energy from the audience,” Allie said that she was looking into going to Interlochen for her junior and senior year. She mentions that they have a new singer, song writer program. Allie is also was thinking about Berkeley in Boston for when she attends college. She says that they have good sound programs. Most of Allie’s songs fall into one basic genre. “Upbeat, but not exactly pop like Rhianna- more like Sara Bareilles,” Allie said. That genre is more or less alternative. Also Allie mainly does ballads. “The first song I wrote was ‘Just Friends’, then ‘Coming Around’ and ‘I Think I Love You’,” Allie said Allie also added that she has four finished, some without names, and a bunch of unfinished songs.


t h g u In The Net Ca

Kaleb Rodes ’12 has never touched a lacrosse stick in his entire life. Yet he is being thrown in as the most difficult position on his very first day of practice. When Adam Rusinowski ’13, Collin Peters ’13, and Ryan Basel ’13 convinced Kaleb to play lacrosse, he expected to play midfield and ride the bench most of the year. However, Kaleb was thrown in net facing nine ounces of galvanized rubber flying upwards of eighty miles an hour. These shots fly straight at Kaleb’s unprotected arms and legs, and it’s his job to stop them. “I expected to be absolutely terrible because I had never touched a lacrosse stick before.” says Kaleb. “At first I expected to play midfield because I had played hockey and had been a forward. After that first practice however, I was really

excited to play goalie and I felt that was what I wanted to play.” When kaleb realized he was going to be a starter his first season, he felt like an absolute idiot for volunteering. “I was really afraid of the ball. I was extremely scared of getting hit.”

by Jake Monette

said Kaleb. Kaleb Started off his season as the starting goalie during West’s opening bout against Central. The Bucs lost sixteen to four. Kaleb had 14 saves. After the game, Kaleb felt that he had let the whole team down, “My teammates really helped me realize that it’s a team effort and we win and lose as a team.” said Kaleb. “I feel much more comfortable in the net, and I’m less afraid of the ball now.” said Kaleb. The bruises covering his shins stand as proof of that. As a new player to the game, Kaleb said, “Kids interested in playing goalie should definitely go out and practice for next season if they really want to play. I takes hard work and nerve to play goalie at the high school level. And remember to always respect your coaches and support your teammates.”

Background: The bucks break down before a game against Cadillac. Left: Kaleb Rodes ‘12 takes the ball on a clear.


WeAre

West Christina Amalfitano

Brianna Worthington

Kearstan Frusti

Ciera Dean

Amanda Carter


Joe Pendergast, Charlotle Seeley

Layout by Allie Kessel


*BE

YOURSELF*

Written by: Hannah Gordon “Manga is a Japanese style of drawing and cartooning people, and they have really big eyes, and it’s kind of hard to explain the style but it’s just basically an art form,” said Olivia Strang ’15. Manga is ‘a Japanese graphic novel, typically intended for adults, characterized by highly stylized art,’ according to Dictionary.com. Nowadays it’s easy to tell that manga and comics are not just for grown ups anymore, and that a lot artists draw in that style. Many of these artists make a living with theses drawings, and Olivia wants to stand up there with them. Olivia’s favorite things to draw are chibis and random animal things with horns. Chibi in Japanese means ‘little’ or ‘short’, but in this case chibis are a short version of an animated or illustrated character with oversized clothes and completely adorable expressions. “Chibis, because they’re cute and easy for me to do, cause’ I like their stubby little bodies and you can do allot with their really eccentric expressions, and the animals I just kind of do because they’re easy, and I like to put antlers on things. . . and wings,” Olivia said. Drawing is a pastime that Olivia loves to do. “It kinda’ comes naturally and it’s a really good way, or like the only way basically, for me to let out some steam and express myself I guess. It’s a good way to show my feelings and what I think,” Oliva said. Under text; Olivia’s drawing of a And she’s been drawing a long time, almost her entire life. creature named Moroko. “Animals “Basically since I could pick up a pencil, that was like thingthey’re to do I justmy kindfavorite of do because andup I like to put to antlers on as a kid. I used to go and tell my mom, ‘Mom when easy, I grow I want be an things. . . and wings,” artister!’- cause’ I couldn’t say the word, but yeah, so since I was really tiny, I was Top, middle, bottom; Olivia Strang always drawing,” Oliva said. ’15 drawing during second lunch. Olivia says that she thinks about becoming a full time artist all the time. Olivia’s listening to the conversation around here,insane, adding her own I’m “I think that’s probably the only thing I could do without going when here and there as she just sitting there like ‘oh my gosh, I have to quit my comments job, I have to quit my job’, draws. where I could just be like ‘this is the best job in the world’,” Olivia said. She also mentioned that there were a few colleges she was thinking of going to. “I’m looking at The Art Institute of Chicago, because they have a really good, you know drawing and painting classes, but I’m also thinking about Savannah or Kendall. Kendall is in Grand Rapids- it’s another art collage, and Savannah is another art collage down in Georgia,” Olivia said. Olivia started a Manga club at West Middle school last year during eighth grade. She says she got the idea for it from the book Gamer Girl. “I always wanted to meet other artists and be able to draw with them, but I never really thought of a way to do it until I read that book and she (the character) started one, and I thought like ‘I want to do this, I have a cool teacher who would let me do it.’ So I brought up the idea to Mr. Deyo, we came up with a day and Manga club was born,” Olivia said. Mr. Deyo is one of the art teachers at West Middle School Olivia believes strongly in art classes. “I think that the art should always stay in school because they’re very important for people to express themselves.”

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Max’d

all

By: Alexander Burch

Max Ebach ‘13 has passion that is probably a little different than the average person’s dream. He wants to create video games. Max has been playing video games since he was eight years old and now that he is sixteen he still hasn’t sat the controller down. Max is young but that has not stopped him at all from planning about his future. He was trying to think what to do in the future, and he came to a realization “Hey I spend most of my time playing video games so why not get a Career in that field,” Max said. Now that Max is in high school he has started planing for the future. Max is taking classes to help him understand the creation of video games. One of the courses he took at Traverse City West Senior high was Programming. In Programming Max learned how to read and create computer codes. With these codes max learned how to make solitaire. While the game may seem relatively simple by today’s video game standards, it is still very impressive that he can even do that. After all, you don’t start drawing 3-D monsters and designing thirteen levels of dungeons on the first day in class. His goals for the future include working for a video game company like Bungee. Bungee is the creator of one of the most popular multi-media online first person shooter games called Halo. Another video game company he could see himself working for is Bethesda, the creators of the world wide known game Fallout. He is going to go to college to create video games but he does not know what university he will attend. Here is a list of colleges that have a good video game creating programs such as ITT-Tech, Full sail, Champlain College, Ex’pression College for Digital Arts, and Colorado Tech University. “I have heard good things about [ITT],” Max said Since he is too young to get into the video game business, he spends most of his hours on his couch playing on his PS3. The Games that have really Max addicted to gaming are Assassin Creed, Skyrim and Mass Effect 3. Max has a bright future ahead of him as long as he keeps the passion he has now towards gaming.

out

Max Ebach ‘13 working so diligently while he edited a layout for digital media publishing, Photo Alex Burch


e Are West -We Are West -

We Are West - We Are West - W

e Are West - We Are West -


Spring

Sports take the

L E A D Top to bottom, Left to right: Zach McGuire ’15 jumps into the sand pit. He did the long jump in track. Grace Hall ’12 is working on schoolwork. She takes school seriously. Alex Scott ’15 is watching his

golfball fly. He was on the JV golf team. Derrick Diver ’13 jumps over a hurdle. He trys to pass his competition Zac Shafer ’12 and Sam Sikarske ’12 hug it out. They are great friends on the track team. A student participant from another local school walks down the stairs. Other schools also came to our Trashion Fashion show. Mario Cassem ’15 runs in the relay. He participates in the long distance running. Chad Sharnowski ’12 acts in the school play. He played a major role. Taylor Adkins ’12 and Nathan Cunninham ’12 take photos before prom. They had a fun night. Connor Priest ’14 is pole vaulting. This is his favorite track sport.

By: Tyler Beaudrie

We Are West We Are West -

We Are West - We Are West -

We Are West - We Are West -


In the

Spotlight by Allie Kessel

Alyse Carbonell ‘12 has been involved in the musical productions here at west since she has been a freshman. This year she received the role as Amneris i Elton John and Tim Rice’s “Aida” Amneris is one of the leading ladies in “Aida”, it is a very challenging role for people and Alyse had some troubles in the beginning trying to really connect with the character but then understood the fullness to the character. “When I recieved the role of Amneris I underestimated her. I thought ‘Oh she’s just a silly materialistic princess who gets her heart broken!’ but she is so much deeper than that. At the beginning of the show Amneris is a silly materialistic princess, but inside she’s sort of a wreck,” Alyse said. “When she learns her betrothed, who she truly loved but just didn’t relate to, is in love with her one and only true friend, she is just shattered. Her true emotions come out in my favorite scene ‘I Know The Truth’. That’s when you really see her as human. Then her character changes when she is forced to put her fiancee and friend to death. It was hard for me at first to portray the changes in Amneris but with everyone I worked with, especially our amazing director, Erin Peck, I was finally able to capture Amneris for who she truly is,” she said. The growth you get from the musicals here at west and what you learn is truly amazing, although it can get pretty tough along the way the end product is definitely worth it. Alyse’s first show was the Secret Garden she played the lead role as Mary, in the following years she has been in Ruddigore and Phantom of the Opera, in both she was in the chorus. Since Alyse has been a part of the chorus and has also gotten the privilege to be a lead, she has experienced both sides of the spectrum, from being in the spotlight to being in the background. “In chorus you have no script or character you have to portray, so you get to create your own. That is my favorite part! In some of my favorite

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shows, I have seen the extras steal the show. a show is believable when everyone is immersed in their own character, even if they don’t have a name.” Alyse said. Being in the spotlight can also be very rewarding and an amazing experience, but as Alyse said being in the chorus can also be an awesome opportunity, you get to have a little more freedom and get to develop your own character. “Being a lead is also incredible. It’s just a different Above: Alyse Carbonell ‘12 Sings “My Strongest Suit” while performing in type of acting. I Aida. She has just got done walking the run way in her best dress. love learning about my character and I have worked with some “divas” in becoming someone else. It’s also just my past and I have learned from their great fun to act and sing on stage with mistakes. Even if you have the lead in some of your best friends, even if your the musical and you think the whole characters are enemies” Alyse said. show revolves around you, it would be Being in the musicals can help with a the most boring show ever watching lot of things such as college auditions one person no costume, no makeup, or even in your daily life. no set, no band, no nothing. I have “The music program here has really learned that every part of a production, prepared me for college auditions. no matter how small, is just as imporI’m not afraid of talking or singing or tant, if not much more important than just plain making a fool of myself in the lead.” Alyse said front of a lot of people. Being a part of Since there are so many different something like West musicals boosts parts to a musical it’s very to pick your your confidence and gives you amazfavorite part, but Alyse had to pick that ing experiences in teamwork, patience, working up to the performance was her and friendship. It’s really great to see favorite part. a group of people come together for a “All the late night rehearsals, amazing common goal, pulling it off, and being a food, great friends, and the beautiful part of it” Alyse said. piece of art we create together. Once Being apart of the musicals can also we bring the band, leads, chorus, set, have a great learning aspect to it. lights, sound, dancers, makeup, and “I have learned that it’s never about costumes together, magic happens,” just one person. Literally no one could ever do what West does by themselves. Alyse said.


By: Max Ebach

Alex Burch ‘14 loves to play sports and participates in other outdoor activities. It is through these activites that he has busted his teeth three different times. One day before football practice he decided that he wanted a new clear mouth guard rather than his old blue mouth guard. He threw it away telling his mom that he lost it, and then went to practice without one. During practice he went to fake a punt with the ball when someone rushed him. The players helmet hit him in the chest and slid up busting his front teeth. Despite his teeth being destroyed, one certain thought rushed through his head. “I thought that my girlfriend might break up with me,” Alex said. In hindsight “losing” the mouth guard before practice was probably a bad idea. He wasn’t able to eat solid food for a while, and if he did, he couldn’t chew it. The second time he was playing basketball street rules when someone tripped him. His face met the ground and busted his teeth up again. “I freaked out more than last time cause a lot more teeth fell out than last time,” said Alex. The third and most recent time it happened was when he was rollerblading at a skate park. He started to go down but the half pipe was slippery from the rain. He slipped on the metal and went straight down and busted his teeth up for the third and final time. Unlike the

Alex playiing footbal,l one of the sports that resulted in his broken teeth. Photos courtesy of Alex Burch.

first two times, however, he didn’t freak out. Most of the teeth were already fake in the front. “I didn’t really care because the teeth were already dead,” said Alex. Alex quit football the sport that caused his first injury last year. However, he still plays basketball and he still roller blades. Luckily, his dad’s work insurance paid for the broken teeth, as a broken tooth with a cap or crown can go for about a thousand dollars. So, despite breaking his teeth three times it has not stopped him from continuing to play the sports he loves. Alex, instead, is ready to go out there and play even if it costs him a tooth or two.

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we are

West

Top; (from left to right) Rachel Meyer ‘14, Teague Suitor ‘15, Brian Czyzek ‘13, Sydney Baraclough ‘14, Courtney Bailey ‘12, Elana Mosher ‘13, Hannah Ramsbey ‘13, Liam Curtis ‘12 Tyler Labonte ‘14, maaggie Hiller ‘14, Chad Sharnowski ‘12, Chis House ‘12, Alex Burch ‘14.

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Top; ( from left to right.) Britany Kurkowski 14, Leo Hoff Von Sydow ‘12, Nathen Julien ‘12, Max McCrumb ‘15, Connor Seinbauer ‘14, Chris House ‘12, Chad Sharnowski ‘12, Olivia Verellen ‘14, Elana Mosher ‘13, Brian Patenaude ‘13, Chad Sharnowski ‘12, Alex Burch ‘14, Jenn Payne ‘12, Brian czyzk ‘13. By Alex Burch

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Dancing Queen Most high school students already stress about their homework on top of a social life, but Brittney Kurkowski ‘14 not only has hours of homework each night, but she is also constantly at the dance studio training. Brittney has been dancing for ten years and used to dance about sixteen hours a week, but currently only dances six hours. Brittney switched from Dance Arts Academy to The Dance Center this year. At Dance Arts Academy, Brittney danced in Company Dance Traverse which is for excelled dancers. Last year, after a full weekend of dancing, Brittney broke her ankle and had to get two screws in her ankle to help it heal right. “The worst part was having to sit out and watch other people dance,” Brittney said. Between having a broken ankle, and not enough time in the day, Brittney decided it would be best to switch studios for a year and cut down on dance classes. “This year I really cut down on my dance classes, to rehabilitate my broken ankle to full health and to figure out how to balance my courses with the time consuming sport,” Brittney said. “I wasn’t sure if I would be able to dance and take my AP and honors courses, but next year I am looking forward to getting back into

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more dance classes because my courses should be easier to balance, at least according to all of my older friends who are taking them, there shouldn’t be too much homework. I’m really looking forward to going to Dance Arts Academy again,” Brittney said. Dance can be very time consuming, and between dancing sixteen hours a week and homework Brittney had almost no social time. After school, she either went straight to dance, or cheerleading then dance. After that she went home and worked on her homework until one or two in the morning. “Freshman year I was dancing at least fourteen hours a week, and it was really hard to get a lot of social time in. I mainly talked with people in the commons before school and used time after school before dance class to get work done for school. It was nice to hang out with other dancers in Company Dance Traverse because their schedules were practically identical to mine, so I got to be with a lot of my good friends all the time,” Brittney said. Taking less dance classes this year has really reduced Brittney’s stress levels, and it also gave her a lot more time for friends, but she is really excited to go back to Dance Arts Academy next year and be more involved with dance again.

Top: Brittney Kurkowski gets ready to begin rehearsing her pointe piece. Middle: Brittney works on her pointe routine on stage before recitals. Bottom: Brittney works on her pointe technique on stage the week of dance recitals. Center Photo: Brittney practices her chaînés turns on pointe for her recital piece. Brittney has been dancing pointe for five years. Photos by Katie Lane.


Finalscore

By Cody Gravette and Jake Monette

Tyler Beaudrie ‘15 plays hockey for the TC North Stars in the Northern International Hockey League. Tyler plays forward for his team so he is always seeing the puck. It was February 26, 2012 and he and his team were on their way up north to Sault Saint Marie for the playoffs. They came into the playoffs in second place, so they were pretty happy to start that high in the playoffs. Tyler They got to be in second by working hard as a team and and being good at what they do. during the first three games out of the fore they didn’t do so well and ended up in fourth place for the final game. As the time came when they need to start getting ready for the final game. “My stomach went into knots and I was almost puking from nervousness,” Tyler said. When his coach came in to talk to them he told them to play as hard as they could. As he skated onto the ice and saw everyone around he realized that this is real and he lost his nervousness. Once the puck hit the ice and the time started running down he started to wonder if this was gonna go into

his favor. The time was ticking and they still haven’t scored. They were down by one 0-1 going into the second period. About halfway into the period his team finally scored to make it 1-1. As time came to go into the third period the score was still 1-1. Then they scored again. “I was so happy when we scored I thought that we had it Beaudrie in the bag,” Tyler said. There was two minutes left in the game. It was looking like TC was going to win but the the other team scored. “They took a slap shot from the point that rebounded off the goalie and they scored,” Tyler said. “I was so mad that they scored,” Tyler said. The time ran out Tyler and they headed into overtime. At the beginning of overtime Tyler and his team were almost out of steam.

“My stomach went into knots and I was almost puking from nervousness.”

But they were to give it their all to try to win. The game started again and Tyler just didn’t have his head in the game. His coach saw that he wasn’t all there so he had him sit for a while. With two minutes left in the game, he put Tyler back in the game. The score was still tied. With only one minute left in overtime, both of the teams were heated up and ready to get the game over. They would not let it go into double overtime. The opposite team takes the puck and has a clear shot of the goal. With only three seconds left in the game, the other team gets right by Tyler, and scored to win the game. “When we lost, I felt like it was my fault because I should have been there to stop him from making the goal,” Tyler said. Tyler and the rest of his teammates were devastated. “Most of our team was fighting. Our team didn’t really get along, and to Beaudrie get last place, we just kinda snapped,” said Tyler. Tyler’s goal for next year is to play for the Titan Varsity team.

“When we lost, I felt like it was my fault because I should have been there to stop him from making the goal.”

21


G I N C A R y lit a e R Jordan Newsted 15,has been BMX racing for over nine years and is still giving it his all. Jordans bike consists of, white,red, and black redline frame, gold crupi rims, black redline handlebars, black carbon scythe forks, chrome crupi rhythm cranks, and a black redline head stem. As a kid Jordan went to a race with his dad and thought that it looked really cool and fun so he got his dad to let him do it. Thanks to his dad Jordan is now one of the best riders in his age group “I have won too many races to even count,” said Jordan. Jordan wants to get all he can get out of it. “I want to BMX until i can’t BMX any more,” said Jordan. His dream is to get a full sponsorship from redline and become a professional BMX rider. Jordan has traveled to many states around the united states, but the farthest he has traveled is Louisville, Kentucky. Jordan is sponsored by redline, grand Traverse Property Management, and Team Diamond. “The best part of BMXing to me is when you win a really big race with a lot of people there because it makes you feel like you are the king of the world,” said Jordan. “The worst part of BMXing is when you are going in a race and you slam really bad,” said Jordan. One time when he was in Grand Rapids at a race and he was going around the cement turn and got loose because of the dirt on his tires, he slammed and broke three ribs. Usually that would affect some people but not Jordan, he just got back up and rode thru it and ended up taking fourth in the race. In BMX there are plenty of dangers. You could get seriously injured or you could even die. “It scares me on how dangerous it actually is to BMX race, but i’m willing to take the chance,” said Jordan. Jordan also does a lot of fiscal training, so he can keep his body in the shape he needs it to be in the offseason. It also helps him in the racing season. In the last nine years all jordan has done is progressed in his BMXing. Thanks to his supporting parents “Without my parents i wouldn’t be at the level that i’m on, I probably wouldn’t even be BMXIng,” said Jordan. This upcoming season, Jordan hopes to win as many

by Cody Gravette

races that he can and he want to try to win the championship. “If I win the championship i would be so happy,” said Jordan. “I’m hoping that if I try really hard the next few years, I will go pro and get my sponsorship, I want to have the life I want and this is the only way I can do it,” Jordan said. Jordan is hoping that when he gets older and gets married that his children will want to follow in his footsteps.

At the races in Traverse City, Jordan is “wiping the rollers.” Jordan was trying to get more speed to take the lead. Photo: Erin Newsted


Perfect

way to go out By: Max Ebach

Margaret Goeman has been teaching for thirty-two and a half years of her life. The end of this year marks Goeman’s final year of teaching as she moves into retirement. Goeman didn’t become a teacher because of her love of teaching or reading. Rather, she became a teacher through less conventional means. Goeman attended Central Michigan University, as her brother was able to drive her there in his car. She noticed how many of her fellow students there were becoming teachers, so she decided to do the same. “It’s a terrible way to choose a career,” said Goeman. The first school she taught at was Harbor Creek Junior High in Battle Creek. Goeman said her first class was terrible, having driven five teachers away before she showed up. “They were mean. They were obnoxious,” said Goeman. Even so, Geoman said that she has loved teaching for all these years. “I loved it and hate to leave it,” said Goeman. Although she stumbled upon her career by chance, it all worked out. “I enjoy kids so much, any other work would have been too boring,” said Goeman. While unable to decide on a single favorite class during all her years of teaching, Goeman did state that she had three classes she enjoyed teaching very much. They were AP Lang, Humanities, and American Cultural Studies. Goeman said that her last classes of the year have some of her best students. Despite her years of teaching she is very excited about her new life during retirement. David Thoreau wrote in his still-popular book Walden, “I left this life because it appeared I had other lives to live.” Goeman believes this quote sums up her decison to retire. So after all these years, on June 8, 2012, “Mrs. Goeman” will be leaving teaching behind to begin the new life she so eagerly looks forward to.

Top: Margaret Goeman conferences with two students in her language arts class. Below: Goeman adresses entire class from her usual perch.

23


~We~are~west~~we~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE

We are West

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E~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~ By Katie Lane

happenings

5 Photo 1: Lauren Kloosterman ‘15 works outside during class on beatuification day. Photo by Odyssey staff photo 2: Maggie Hiller ‘14 preforms as the Queen in Repunzel for theatre two. Maggie has been involved in theatre since eigth grade. photo by Odyssey staff photo 3: Jordan Stevenson ‘14 runs the in an event during a track meet. Jordan has been running track for two years. Photo by Odyssey Staff photo 4: Miranda Adamick ‘12 Practices pitching during a softball practice. Photo by Odyssey Staff. Photo 5: Morgan Prainito ‘14, Olympia Sanchez ‘14, and Katherine Cole ‘14, eat lunch outside during third lunch. Photo by Katie Lane

E~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~WE~ARE~WEST~~WE~ARE~WEST~


Hockey

Hero

On December 14, 2011 the Traverse City West hockey team played the Bay Reps at Howe Arena. Jake Saxton ’15 was a freshman playing for West. Jake has been skating since he was 2 years old, and his goal when he was younger, was to play for West. He has spent his life dedicated to hockey, busy several days a week and always practicing. He made the team as a freshman, which is rare. In fact, only 18 players are on the team and most are upperclassmen. Jake played well throughout the game, as did his team, but it was a tough, close game. The game ended up tied at 2-2 at the end of regulation, so the game was headed to overtime. Jake hit the ice for his shift as his team was skating down the ice, he trailed behind crashing the net hard. He got the rebound off of a shot from Collin Peters ’13 and shot the puck into the net, winning the game. The rest of the team piled up on top of him to celebrate. It was the highlight of the season for Jake. “ I was very excited and pumped,” Jake said. Jake scored 6 goals last season, but this was his most memorable. Jake was one of three freshmen on the team last year. “ I think it’s a good accomplishment to make the team as a freshman, and my teammates treated me well because I knew them before I made the team,” Jake said Jake plans on playing for the team again next year, and is working towards his goals after high school hockey “ I would like at the Division 1 level college hockey for Boston College,” Jake said. Hockey is just one of the several sports Jake plays, but hockey is the most important to him. He also plays lacrosse and football. “ Lacrosse and football help my physical play and keeps me in good shape,” Jake said. “Overall it was a great fun season,” Jake said. Jeremy Rintala, West’s hockey coach was very happy with his team’s performance. “I was obviously excited to beat a cross town rival in overtime and a good team like the Reps. Jake went hard to the net, he did what he was supposed to do. There was

By: Tyler Beaudrie

a big pile up and I was proud of him for his hard work.” Rintala said. Jake is very dedicated to hockey. Every day after school during the season, he has practice with his team at the Civic Center, and he is always practicing at home, and he skates whenever he can. The reason he practices to much is because it is necessary to reach his goals. “ I stay committed to hockey because I know all the work I do will pay off someday,” Jake said. “ It was a fun season and I will miss the seniors and other teammates that are leaving, but i will have other friends on the team and next year will be another fun season,’ Jake said.

Top; Jake’s jersey and glove. He was ready to hit the ice. Bottom; Jake is celibrating after scoring the game winning goal against the Bay Reps. This was his favorite goal of the season


Daddy’s by Alex Burch

Grant Keith Balino ‘14 lived in the Philippines for five and half years of his life. Grant’s mother met an American man online and moved to America to live with him. Grant has been living in the United States ever since. During Grants seventh grade year he went back to the Philippines to visit his mothers side of the family. While in the philippines, Grant got to swim and fish in the ocean, bathe in the sun, visit his family and see all of his relatives except for one. His father. Grant has never even seen his father. His father ran out as soon as he found out Grant’s mother was pregnant. Since Grant was born into a single-parent family in a third world country, times were tough. He spent a lot of time with his relatives because his mother couldn’t afford to put him in day care while she went to work. Once Grant was five years old, he and his mother moved to America to live with Todd Dean, who is the American man that Grants mother had met online. Shortly after they arrived in the United States, Todd proposed to Grant’s mother. Now Grant lived with his mother and new father for the rest of his life. Grant has always had bad feelings for his father because of the way he left his mother stranded. During Grants’ freshman year, his mother recieved a letter from Grant’s aunt. The letter stated that Grant’s aunt was in the hospital with Grant’s birth father and that he was extremly ill. While Grant’s father was in terrible agony, he managed to get the stregth to ask Grant and his mother for forgiveness. Once Grant’s mother heard this, she quickly said yes and broke out into tears. Grant, on the other hand, said no and laughed. Grant could not forgive his father for the struggles he put his family through. Shortly thereafter, Grant’s dad died. Grant seemed to be upset after he heard that his father passed. Upset perhaps, but Grant still harbors negative thoughts towards his father. However, Grant has continued living his life as if nothing has ever happened. Today Grant lives in a loving family and he is happy the way things turned out.

Boy

Top: Grant Balino ’14 is hanging out with his uncles in the philippines during his vaction there in 7th grade. Bottom: Grant sits on a boat in the Phillipines. Grant was around three years old.

27


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Top Left; (from left to right) Kendra Holz ’12, and Julie Keck discussing how to plant the tree. It’s beautification day , fourth hour ceramics, and Keck’s class is put in charge of planting Willows in the swamp area by the main road. Photo by Hannah Gordon. Top Right; (from left to right) Shawn Wolf ’14, Chad Kendziorski ’14, Eric Chantland ’12 during the play Rapunzel. They’d just come out and intoruced themselves. Shawn plays the character Sir Naseum. Chad plays the character Sir Nort. And Eric plays the character Sir Squashly. They all play in both Friday and Saturday’s cast. Photo by Odyssey Staff. Middle Left; (from left to right) Tylor LaBonte ’14, Max McCrumb ’15, Dani Bennett ’12, Connor Seinbauer ’13, Amanda Sfeir ’12, Kayla Szatkiewicz ’13 during the play Rapunzel. Tylor adressing the audience after pausing the other characters. Tylor plays the character King Zeek Furaday. Max plays Prince Bumpus. Dani plays Parsley. Connor plays Prince Markie. Amanda plays Thyme. And Kayla plays the character Rosemary. They also all play in both Friday and Saturday’s cast.Photo by Odyssey Staff Middle Left; Morgan Harris ’14. Playing tennis in WSH’s tenns court. Morgan’s about to return a sucessful hit from an opponent. Photo by Odyssey Staff.Bottom; (from left to right) Spencer Montcastle ’13, Mario Cassem ’15, and Steve Salset ’15. Spencer runs track, as does Mario and Steve. It’s a home meet for the track team, and Spencer is running the last part of a relay as Mario and Steve look on. Photo by Odyssey Staff. Top; (from left to right) Liam Curtis ’12, Rachel Meyer ’14, Cheyanne Banks ’12, Harley Butler ’14, Kyle McKee ’13, Courtney Ignace ’15, and extras in background during the play Stone Soup. Liam plays the character General Big Bottom. Rachel plays General Moaner. Cheyanne plays General Groaner. Harley plays General Wah Wah on Friday’s cast. Kyle plays Mr. Tizzle. And Courtney plays the character Mrs. Tizzle also on Friday’s cast. The Generals adress the audience along with the other characters in the scene. Kevin and Courtney have their own understandable disscusion in the background beacuse no-one else is supposed to understand them. Photo by Odyssey Staff.

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Getting Back By: Tyler Beaudrie It was warm Saturday afternoon in July, and Cody Gravette ’15 was enjoying his day the the Civic Center Skate Park last summer. Cody is a freestyle bike rider, who participated in competitions at North Coast Feeride, before it was shut down last year. “I am mad that North Coast shut down, because it was a fun place to go to, and it allowed people to ride bikes or scooters during the winter months,” Cody said. Cody has been biking for 2 years, and has become talented at doing tricks. His favorite tricks are barspins and tailwhips. He rides a black and red KHE bike, that he’s had for about a year now. “ I’m getting a new bike soon, because my KHE is pretty worn out,” Cody said. KHE is a brand that makes BMX bikes. He goes to the skatepark almost everyday during summer, which is why he has learned tricks and became skilled so quickly. Cody had been there all day with his friend Zack Rowan ’15 working on new tricks and just hanging out with friends. Cody just got back from eating lunch at Mancino’s. He ate a whole pizza by himself, so he was full when he went back to the skate park. He was attempting tailwhips, a trick he had just recently learned. “I landed it 3-4 times, but didn’t feel like I was getting enough air,”

30

Cody said. He decided to gain more speed into to fly-out, to get more air. Cody was in the air attempting to kick his bike to make it spin, when his foot unfortunately got caught in the bike’s crank. He tried to pull his foot out, but knew he was gonna fall and he couldn’t jump off his bike, so he braced himself. His tires hit the ground first, but he couldn’t get back onto his bike, so he landed directly on top of his hard metal bike. Many of Cody’s friends at the skatepark, such as Zack, Kaaden Bewley ’15, and Cameron Roy ’15, saw him fall and the thought he had sustained major injuries and were going to call an ambulance to bring him to the hospital. “My elbows and knees were bleeding, and I broke my middle and index finger. It hurt for a few minutes, but I got over it,” Cody said. Zack was also concerned and thought Cody was severely injured, so he rushed to his side. Cody talked about what he did after the slam. “I told Zack I was alright then I washed off the blood and continued to ride the rest of the day until I went home,” Cody said. Cody taped himself up later that night, but never gave up riding after his big fall. “ I know I’m gonna fall again, but it’s part of riding and I’m not gonna let that hold me back,” Cody said.

Up

Top: Cody’s shoes on his bike pedals. He was about to start riding his bike. Bottom: Cody attempting a tailwhip. He did land the trick on this attempt.

That shows how passionate Cody is for BMX, and his perseverance to not give up just because he fell hard once. He continues biking, and is excited that it is becoming warmer so he can get back to biking at the outdoor


p

Congratulations Traverse City West Class of 2012

Every June, friends and families gather at Kresge Auditorium, on the campus of the Interlochen Center for the Arts, to celebrate commencement, and to send the year’s graduates on to the next stage of their lives with hugs and best wishes. This year’s celebration to honor the Class of 2012, held on June 3 at 1:00 p.m., was captured on video. A commorative DVD is available from TCAPS for $30. To order, go to http://bit.ly/KHHsjV or call the TCAPS Communications Department at (231) 933-1783. Or, scan the QR code below for access to the order form.


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AL A hard kick t oward the goal take sa player out fo r the rest of the s eason.


On

Encountering an injury playing a sport you love can stir up many emotions inside you. Jessica Kalbfleisch ‘13, had been playing soccer for ten years when she tore her ACL and meniscus in the first round of districts against Central, our greatest rival, in her sophomore year. “I was shooting and when my shooting leg came down my cleats had no traction and my knee buckled,” Jessica said. It had been raining that day, and the field was flooded. “The second after I went down from my injury I knew it was my ACL and I knew I would be out for 8 months.” Jessica knew instantly that her soccer career would be put on hold, and it was a lot to accept. “It was mentally the toughest thing I’ve ever had to wrap my mind around. It was

ry

d to Reco a o R ve e h t

“The second after I went down from my injury I knew it was my ACL and I knew I would be out for 8 months.” a tough recovery,” she said. A year later when school started back up and the soccer season came around, Jessica was more than excited to get back in the game. “Once I was playing again, it was like getting back on an old bike,” she said. “I was rusty at first, but as the season progressed, I started getting closer to where I was pre-injury.” Jessica was lucky to have both a team that helped her get through her injury as well as sympathetic coaches who came to her side, supporting her at those difficult

times. He team let her know that she was not alone during her recovery. The stuck together as a family through it all. “Over all it’s been a very tough year, but it was worth the life lessons,” Jessica said. “I wouldn’t trade it if I could.” Jessica came back in her junior year to help her team make it to the Division I District Finals. While they were defeated by Midland Dow, the team had a good run for their season and Jessica planned to come back and play stronger in her final year as a senior.

33


Race for States


There is always a first time for everything. (Main Photo) Racing towards the finish line, Jordan Stevenson ‘14 said, “My favorite part about track would have to be the friends that I make. I also like seeing how I improve from start to finish.” (Bottom Left) Just moments from planting his feet in the dirt, Nate Castor ‘13 was one of the lucky 28 students to compete at the Team States competition at Jenson High School this year. (Bottom Middle) Breathing heavily as he runs towards the finish, Simon Aagren ‘12 was a foreign exchange student who moved here from Sweden. His event was the one mile and two mile run. (Bottom Right) Preparing himself to launch into the air, Sean Hall ‘13 believes that they could make it to Team States again because of all of the good competitors on the team. Photos: G. Balino

After much dedication and training, the track team earned the opportuity to race alongside other schools, including East Kentwood and Davison schools, to compete for first place at Jenison High School. Individual results in events like running, shot put, vaulting, and hurdles, contributed to an overall team score, and our team ranked high enough to qualify for competition at this prestigous event. “I was excited that we got to go to Team States because we had a big chance to place in the top ten,” Nate Castor ‘13 said. The competition itself was based on skill and dedication to competing. Each athlete had his own scores and placement for how well he did in his event. All of those personal scores added up to a team placement in a ranking from first to tenth. It was a difficult competition, and everyone was feeling the pressure to do well for their school. “It was hard and what made it so difficult for the team was how fast the pace was of the competition,” Paul Sullivan ‘14 said. Pressure can push people to do things that they never thought were possible and that is what brought the track team to a sixth place ranking in the State. Sixth place was no easy feat when competing at this level, but the team had

hopes of making it even further in upcoming years. “We definitely could compete at Team States again next year,” Paul said. “We have a lot of skill in the Sophmores’ and Juniors’ that makes it totally possible.” The team’s dedication to each event was impressive. Making it this far added another notch on our school’s rankings that we could be proud of. M. Milliorn and L. Milliron, Odyssey Yearbook Staff

The Track & Field team races to Team States to experience a new level of competion to test themselves amongst some the State’s greatest competitors.


?Question The BIG There was only one question lingering in the air all spring. It wasn’t the question that caused problems, but rather, how to ask it that made some students a bit uneasy. “I thought of the idea one day while sitting in band class,” James Wheelock said. “I got way more people involved then I had expected.” James put a sign up sheet on the wall in the band room and people would write their names on it if they wanted to help him ask his girlfriend to prom. Most of the people that were willing to help were his friends. “There’s no better way to ask a big question than doing it by public embarressment,” James said. He had 15 members of the drumline play while asking her to attend prom with him. “It was kind of hard to keep it a secret, but we somehow managed. I actually got a couple of her friends to help make sure she was at the table during lunch.” His question-stunt didn’t come easily, though. It took some effort from a lot of people to get things in order. “Since I had to pull some of the people out of class, I was surprised that the teachers were cool with letting them come help me. Almost the entire drumline helped. There were a lot more people then I had expected to help which was good.” James had to bake cookies for his friends to help repay him for their help. One never knows how a potential date will react when publicly asking a big question, so James was prepared for the worst. “I wasn’t surprised she said ‘yes,’ but I was prepared for ‘no’ because it wasn’t a guaranteed ‘yes.’ So the drumline and I came up with a back-up plan just in case she actually did say no.” Some choir students asked their girlfriends to prom during lunch by serenading them. Others posted signs around the school, and some wrote messages outside of homes with neon glow sticks. Regardless of the method, this year’s theme was about going public with popping the big question, and while no two public proposals were the same, each couple made the asking as memorable for the people around them as it was for themselves. By M. Gould and T. Smith, Odyssey Staff

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“We were just finishing up our picnic when I was putting the blanket away in his trunk and on the inside of it there was a big sign that said ‘Prom?” Allison Peters ‘15 “I knew what fish she has been wanting for a while so I decided to get it. I brought him to her work in a big fish bowl with a lot of rocks that said ‘Prom?’ on them. It was cool because the water made the words look bigger.”

?

“It was like a mutual question. I didn’t really ask her, and she didn’t really ask me. We just decided to go. I took her to Subway for the dinner. We didn’t want anything big and fancy.” Jacob Johnson‘13

?


We are West

Photo credits: The Odessy Staff


Bottom left: Payden Myers ‘13 views the course. Top:Payden ‘13 misses putt into the hole. Bottom right: Andrew Hartmen ‘12 checking angle for a shot. Large left: Payden ‘13 takes a swing at the ball.

By: Max Ebach


Beaut

ificatio

n Day

2012

The Compass Magazine, Vol. 3, Issue 3 (2012)  

The last edition of 2012, the student produced magazine from Traverse City West High School.

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