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State of the Arts

Volunteers Have the Magic Touch

Gift from a Dancer

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

December 23, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 102

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20

BY NISHA PATEL

W

ith the holiday season in full swing, communities of all cultures and ethnicities enjoy these months with unique celebrations. Kwanzaa, a non-religious holiday celebrates African-American heritage, pride, family, and culture. The seven-day festival begins December 26 and culminates on January 1 of every year. The name “Kwanzaa” is derived from the phrase “matunda ya kwanzaa” which means “first fruits” in Swahili. Each family celebrates the holiday in its own way, but celebrations often include songs and dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading, and a large traditional meal. An African feast, called a Karamu, is held on the last night of Kwanzaa. In most cases, families gather every night and a child lights one of the candles on the “kinara” (candleholder), after which one of seven principles is discussed. The principles, called “Nguzo Saba,” are values of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcement of community values among African-Americans. continued on page 9 INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Connect with us on Facebook Fremont Economic Development

December 23, 2011


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Saturday, Dec 24

Saturday, Dec 24

"The Man from Beyond" $

Carols and Festive Service

7:30 p.m.

10:30 p.m.

Film, with "Broncho Billy's Christmas Dinner" (1911), "Hearts and Diamonds" (1914)

Singing carols followed by traditional service

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492

Saturday, Dec 24

Trekking for Tracks

1 p.m. Discover and identify tracks of our nocturnal friends; Park Admission fee.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Dec 24

Family Service with Pageant and Communion

4 p.m. Children of all ages participate in a pageant with carols

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew

WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

City of Fremont Board/Commission Vacancies Economic Development Advisory Commission – One vacancy (Commercial/Industrial) Term to expire 12/31/2014

Library Advisory Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014 Planning Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2015

George W. Patterson House Advisory Board – One vacancy (Citizen At Large) Term to expire 12/31/2013

Advisory Body Applications can be obtained at: http://www.fremont.gov/index.aspx?NID=76 or you may obtain an application from the City Clerk’s Office, 3300 Capitol Ave, Bldg A, 510284-4060

Historical Architectural Review Board – Two vacancies Terms to expire 12/31/2015 Human Relations Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014

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Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO

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Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Tobacco program implementation SUBMITTED BY CITY OF UNION CITY

I

n November 2010, Union City City Council adopted an Ordinance to strengthen smoking and tobacco regulations citywide. Passage of this Ordinance earned Union City an “A” grade from the American Lung Association for local tobacco control. The Ordinance strengthened non-smoking standards for outdoor areas and housing complexes and established a Tobacco Retailer’s License Program that requires local sellers of tobacco products to obtain a license locally. Rental Apartment Complexes The Municipal Code (Chapter 7.13) was updated to prohibit smoking in various common areas and in individual rental units. A 14-month grace period was intended to provide landlords with a minimum amount of time to modify leases and notify tenants of the new regulations. Under the new Ordinance, landlords are required to update leases and install signage to restrict smoking in accordance with the Code. If these requirements are satisfied and tenants continue to smoke in violation of local laws and their lease agreements, landlords’ liability will be limited and neighbors can pursue enforcement against the offender through the civil litigation. continued on page 35

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN

December 23, 2011

Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-area-news-groupmedianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website. www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999 We have over 820 signatures on change.org and over 330 have signed a petition at our office. We need more signatures. You can come to our office for a petition and help

us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

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BY PATRICIA DANIELSON, RHIT BOARD MEMBER AND PAST PRESIDENT, WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP HEALTH CARE DISTRICT

W

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ices to the District’s medically indigent who could not pay. This includes care provided for free and also care provided to the Medi-Cal population that Washington subsidizes since the Hospital is

in the Bay Area to have this designation. The Joint Commission, which rates hospitals on key measures of service and patient care, named Washington Hospital as a top performer on key quality and pa-

ashington Hospital Healthcare System is ending 2011 on a high note. We have reached significant milestones that continue to reinforce this institution as a premiere medical facility committed to meeting the health care needs of our community. The close of the year is also the time that the Board of Directors reviews the performance of our Chief Executive Officer, Nancy Farber, and makes any adjustments to her compensation consistent with our compensation philosophy and the Internal Revenue Service Guidelines for establishing reasonable compensation. As President of the Washington Township Health Care District Board of Directors, I am proud to say that her performance has been exceptional given the overall performance of the Healthcare System and Washington Hospital is the only hospital in the East Bay to receive the 2011 HealthGrades award for patient safety excellence, placing it among the top 5% nationally for patient safety. the achievements that have been made, especially when considering the difficult economic climate and the great uncercompensated much less than the cost of tient safety measures. It is a prestigious tainty surrounding healthcare reform. providing care. designation awarded to an elite group of Our achievements are in large part the Just recently, the Board “cut the ribonly 405 hospitals in the entire nation. result of Nancy Farber’s strong leaderbon” on the newly completed Central We also received the 2011 Healthship and commitment to building a Utility Plant, a very complex construction Grades award for patient safety excellence, healthcare system that will serve this project and a critical piece of infrastrucwhich places the hospital among the top community for years to come. ture needed to support the operations of 5% in the nation for patient safety. WashThis high level of success is evident the Hospital in the decades to come. The ington is the only hospital in the East Bay in our financial statements and the nuCentral Utility Plant was completed on and one of only 268 hospitals nationally merous accomplishments. Washington time and on budget. Also recently, Wash- to receive this designation. had a strong financial performance in ington Hospital was granted Magnet StaWashington Hospital’s Center for FY 2010-11 compared to other hospitus recognition by the American Nurses Joint Replacement (CJR) received a fivetals. The total net operating income for Credentialing Center. A Magnet designastar customer service award and the Top our last fiscal year was $36.8M, well tion is the highest level of recognition that Performer Award from Professional Reabove the budget. Again, we were able a hospital can achieve for nursing excelsearch Consultants. The CJR also scored to provide millions of dollars for charity lence. Only 6.7% of hospitals in the in the top 10% nationally based on excare, specifically in 2011 Washington United States have earned this status and cellent patient responses. HealthGrades, provided $44 million in health care serv- Washington is one of only four hospitals the leading national health care rating

December 23, 2011

information and advisory service, ranked it the number one joint replacement program in California. Washington’s stroke program received the 2011 HealthGrades Five-Star Award, ranking among the top 15% in the nation for the treatment of stroke. For the third year in a row we were also awarded the Gold Seal of approval from the Joint Commission for Primary Stroke Centers. In addition to considering the achievements of the Healthcare System in the Board of Directors’ review of the CEO’s compensation, we have retained Integrated Healthcare Strategies to provide independent compensation data to make sure that we are paying the CEO fairly and appropriately. This firm helps us to properly align the CEO’s compensation rate with other similar hospitals in California and across the country that compete for the same executive talent. Integrated Healthcare Strategies uses its own proprietary database and in addition, uses two other commercially available databases in its analysis. The Board has determined that the CEO’s base salary should be administered using ranges built around the 65th percentile of the determined peer group and her overall cash compensation should be administered using ranges targeting the 75th percentile of the peer group. Eric Reehl, a consultant with Integrated Healthcare Strategies, recently presented his findings at our November 9, 2011 Board of Director’s meeting which is available on our website at www.whhs.com. Additionally, I want to remind everyone that the District does not receive any taxpayer dollars to cover its operations including salaries. We are a selfsustaining organization. That means that our revenue comes from sources continued on page 7


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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continued from page 6

other than taxpayer funds. The principal source of our revenue comes from patient generated revenues. We get paid from insurance companies like Blue Cross and Blue Shield as well as from governmental programs like Medicare and Medicaid. The general obligation bond money that was approved through Measure FF in 2004 goes only towards specified new construction projects. That money is kept in separate accounts and is monitored by a citizen bond oversight committee. At the December 14, 2011 meeting of the Washington Township Health Care District, the Board of Directors considered possible adjustments to the

CEO’s cash compensation and extension of her employment agreement. The following three actions were taken: Over 80% of hospitals in Washington’s peer group also have an executive incentive plan. It should be understood that unlike other employees at the Hospital, Ms. Farber has 40% of her base salary placed at risk and paid based on performance. Because of the CEO’s exemplary work this year, the Board voted to award Nancy Farber the maximum At-Risk Performance Compensation Award possible of 40% of base salary which equals $252,867. This award is made in accordance with the Board’s

Killing of bin Laden voted top news story of 2011 BY DAVID CRARY AP NATIONAL WRITER NEW YORK (AP), - The killing of Osama bin Laden

during a raid by Navy SEALs on his hideout in Pakistan was the top news story of 2011, followed by Japan's earthquake/tsunami disaster, ac-

compensation philosophy for the CEO and still places the CEO below the 75th percentile of our peer group in overall cash compensation. This past year the CEO’s salary was 16% below the peer group at the 65th percentile level. The Board acknowledged that they could not just make up the difference in one year and determined that she should receive an increase of 3% to her base salary effective November 1, 2011 which is approximately equal to the average increase for executive compensation as reported by Integrated Healthcare Strategies. Lastly, the Board of Directors voted to extend the CEO’s contract by one year,

cording to The Associated Press' annual poll of U.S. editors and news directors. The death of bin Laden, the al-Qaida leader who masterminded the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, received 128 first-place votes out of 247 ballots cast for the top 10 stories. The Japan disaster was next, with 60 first-place votes. Placing third were the Arab Spring uprisings that rocked North

for a new term beginning November 1, 2011 and ending October 31, 2015. Washington Hospital Healthcare System’s accomplishments have occurred in very challenging economic times and are a direct reflection of the success of the institution and the leadership of Nancy Farber. She has earned the compensation that has been awarded to her and it is fair and appropriate based on the comparative compensation data provided to us by our outside consultants. I am confident that this will help to ensure that we will have the strong leadership that we need to continue to meet the health care needs of our community today and in the future.

Africa and the Middle East, while the European Union's financial turmoil was No. 4. The international flavor of these top stories contrasted with last year's voting - when the Gulf of Mexico oil spill was the top story, President Barack Obama's health care overhaul was No. 2, and the U.S. midterm elections were No. 3. Here are 2011's top 10 stories, in order:

-OSAMA BIN LADEN'S DEATH: He'd been the world's most-wanted terrorist for nearly a decade, ever since a team of his al-Qaida followers carried out the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In May, the long and often-frustrating manhunt ended with a nighttime assault by a helicopter-borne special operations squad on his comcontinued on page 34


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 23, 2011 Tribune Media Services

The Darkest Hour (PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 12:55, 5:40, 10:20

Young Adult (R) Fri. 10:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40, 12:01 Sat. 10:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20 Sun. 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40

War Horse (PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 9:40, 12:35, 1:20, 4:35, 7:00, 8:00

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) The Man From Beyond(NR) Protocol(PG–13)Fri. & Sat. 9:55, Sun. - Thu. 10:05, 3:25, 7:55 Sat. 7:30 P.M.

Broncho Billy's Christmas Dinner (NR) Hearts and Diamonds (NR)

1:15, 4:20, 7:25, 10:45 Fri. 12:15, 1:45, 3:15, 5:35, 6:30, 8:40, 9:45 Sat. 12:15, 1:50, 3:15, 5:35, 6:30, 8:40, 9:45 Sun. - Thu. 9:55, 1:15, 4:20, 7:25, 10:40 Sun. - Thu. 12:15, 1:55, 3:15, 5:35, 6:30, 8:40, 9:50

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 5:00, 7:25, 9:55

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Sherlock Holmes: A Game Chipwrecked (G) Fri. & Sat. Alvin and the Chipmunks: 9:45, 10:25, 11:05, 12:05, 1:20, 2:25, of Shadows (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 3:35, 4:45, 5:50, 7:05, 8:15, 9:25, 10:50 11:45, 3:00, 5:55, 9:00 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. 11:30, Fri. - Thu. 12:35, 3:45, 7:05, 10:00 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30 Sat. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00 Sun. 10:30, 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 4:30, 6:00, 7:00, 9:30

The Adventures of Tintin(PG)

Fri. - Sun. 10:55

Arthur Christmas (PG) Fri. Sun. 11:15

The Muppets (PG) Fri. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:10, 9:55 Sat. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:10

Sun. - Thu. 9:45, 10:25, 11:05, 12:05, 1:20, 2:25, 3:35, 4:45, 5:50, 7:10, 8:15, 9:25, 10:50 The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Fri. - Thu. 9:30 Arthur Christmas (PG) Fri. & Sat. 9:40 Sun. - Thu. 10:00 Hugo (PG) Fri. - Thu. 10:35 The Muppets (PG)Fri. - Thu. 9:35 The Sitter (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:20, 2:35, 5:00, 7:15, 9:40 New Year's Eve (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 1:35, 4:50, 7:35, 10:25

Sat. 11:00, 4:30

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. 11:45, 1:15, 2:45, 4:15, 5:45, 7:15, 8:45, 10:15 Sat. 11:45, 1:15, 2:45, 4:15, 5:45, 7:15 Sun. 10:15, 1:15, 3:00, 4:15, 7:15, 8:45, 10:15

The Girl With the Dragon Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Tattoo (R)Fri. & Sat. 10:00, 11:15, Protocol (PG–13) Fri. & Sun. 12:15, 1:55, 2:55, 4:00, 5:25, 6:40, 12:00, 1:30, 3:00, 4:30, 6:00, 7:30, 7:55, 9:10, 10:35 9:00, 10:30 Sun. - Thu. 10:15, 11:40, 12:50, 1:50, Sat. 12:00, 1:30, 3:00, 4:30, 6:00, 7:30 3:10, 4:15, 5:30, 6:35, 7:50, 9:00, 10:10 The Girl With the Dragon We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. Sat. 10:20, 11:50, 1:25, 2:50, 4:20, Tattoo (R)Fri. & Sun. 12:00, 1:45, & 5:55, 7:20, 8:50, 10:20 3:30, 5:15, 7:00, 8:45, 10:30 Sun. - Thu. 9:30, 10:30, 1:30, 3:50, Sat. 12:00, 1:45, 3:30, 5:15, 7:00 4:40, 7:50, 10:15, 10:45 We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. My Week With Marilyn (R) 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 Fri. - Thu. 10:05, 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, Sat. 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 10:10 Sun. 10:10, 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10

12:45, 4:10, 7:35

Sun. 1:15, 5:45, 10:15

Fri. & Sat. 9:30, 12:00, 2:30, 4:55, 7:30, 10:00 Hugo 3D (PG) Fri. & Sat. 10:10, 1:10, 4:15, 7:10, 10:10

War Horse (PG–13)Sun. 12:35, 3:50, 7:05, 10:20

The Adventures of Tintin 3D (PG) Fri. 11:10, 1:50,

The Darkest Hour (PG–13)

4:25, 7:40, 10:30

The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) Sat. 11:10, 1:45, 4:25, 7:40, 10:30 Sun. 11:00, 3:30, 8:00

Sun. - Thu. 10:40, 1:25, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45

Fri. 10:30, 12:30, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:30, 12:30 Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 10:30, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 Sat. 11:30, 12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30 Sun. 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30

Fri. & Sat. 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10 Sun. 11:30, 8:10 Mon. - Thu. 10:30, 8:10

We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri.

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Sun. 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30

Won't Last a Day Without You (NR)Fri. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15,

9:55, 12:30 The Twilight Saga: Sat. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15 Breaking Dawn Part 1(PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 Fri. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00

Sat. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 Sun. - Thu. 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 Arthur Christmas (PG) Fri. Astronaut (NR)Fri. 11:30, 3:30, 5:30 Thu. 12:20 Sat. 11:30, 3:30 Hugo (PG) Fri. & Sat. 4:20 Mon. Tue. & Thu. 11:30, 2:30 Sun. - Thu. 5:10 Wed. 11:30 A.M. The Muppets (PG) Fri. 11:15, Cosmos 360(NR)Fri. 6:30, 8:30 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35, 12:10 Sat. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00 Wed. 1:30, 3:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 1:50 Secret of the Rocket (NR) The Sitter (R) Fri. 10:00, 12:10, Fri. & Wed. 12:30 P.M. 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 8:50, 11:00 Sat. 12:30, 2:30 Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 12:10, 2:20, Mon. Tue. & Thu. 12:30, 3:30 4:30, 6:40, 8:50 Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Sun. 12:10, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 8:50 Fri. & Sat. 1:30, 4:30 New Year's Eve (PG–13) Fri. Mon. Tue. & Thu. 10:30, 1:30 10:20, 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20, 12:05 Sat. 10:20, 1:05, 3:50, 6:35 Wed. 10:30, 2:30 Sun. 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 Two Small Pieces of Mon. - Thu. 10:20, 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20

Won't Last a Day Without The Adventures of You (NR) Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 5:45 Glass (NR) Fri. 10:30, 7:30 Tintin 3D (PG) Fri. & Sun. 11:20, Arthur Christmas 3D (PG) Mon. - Thu. 4:30 P.M. 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 Sat. 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20

2:40, 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40, 10:50, 12:01 Sat. 10:00, 11:10, 1:30, 2:40, 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30 Sun. 11:10, 1:30, 2:40, 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, Mission: Impossible -- Ghost 7:20, 8:30, 9:40 Protocol(PG–13)Fri. 11:30, 2:30, Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 11:10, 1:30, 2:40, 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40, 12:01 5:30, 8:30, 11:30

10:30, 12:00, 1:25, 2:55, 4:20, 5:50, 7:15, 8:45, 10:10, 11:40 Sat. 10:30, 12:00, 1:25, 2:55, 4:20, 5:50, 7:15, 8:45 12:30, 3:50, 7:10, 10:20 Sun. 12:00, 1:25, 2:55, 4:20, 5:50, 7:15, 8:45, 10:10 The Girl With the Dragon - Thu. 10:30, 12:00, 1:25, 2:55, Tattoo (R)Fri. 12:00, 3:35, 7:00, Alvin and the Chipmunks: Mon. 4:20, 5:50, 7:15, 8:45, 10:10 10:25 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. 10:00, Sat. - Thu. 12:00, 3:35, 7:00 11:10, 12:20, 1:30, 2:40, 3:50, 5:00, The Descendants (R) Fri. We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. - 6:15, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40, 10:50, 12:01 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50, 12:30 Sat. 10:00, 11:10, 12:20, 1:30, 2:40, Sat. 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10 Thu. 1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 10:15 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30 The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Sun. 11:10, 12:20, 1:30, 2:40, 3:50, My Week With Marilyn (R) Fri. - Thu. 1:40 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40 Fri. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Mon. Thu. 10:00, 11:10, 12:20, 1:30, The Adventures of 2:40, 3:50, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40 Sat. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 The Adventures of Tintin(PG) 4:20, 7:15, 9:50

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

The Sitter (R)Fri. - Sun. 1:45, 7:15 Sherlock Holmes: A Game New Year's Eve (PG–13) Fri. of Shadows (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. War Horse (PG–13) Sun. - Thu. 10:40, 12:45, 1:40, 2:40, 3:45, 4:40, & Sun. 11:00, 4:30, 10:00 6:45, 7:45, 8:45, 9:50, 10:40 Sun. - Thu. 10:45, 12:45, 1:40, 2:40, 3:45, 4:40, 6:45, 7:40, 8:45, 9:55, 10:35 Young Adult (R) Fri. & Sat. 9:50, 12:25, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15 Sun. - Thu. 9:50, 12:25, 2:45, 5:20, 7:45, 10:30

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (R)Fri. 10:00, 11:10, 1:30,

Don 2 (NR) Fri. - Thu. 1:10 Happy Feet Two 3D (PG)

Fri. - Thu. 12:00

Hugo 3D (PG) Fri. 10:30, 1:25, 7:15, 10:10 Sat. 10:30, 1:25, 7:15 Sun. - Thu. 2:15

The Adventures of Tintin 3D (PG) Fri. 11:15, 1:50,

4:25, 7:00, 9:35, 12:10 Sat. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35

Don 2 3D (NR) Fri. 10:00, 4:20,

7:30, 10:40 Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 4:20, 7:30 Sun. 4:20, 7:30

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. 10:00, The Darkest Hour (PG–13)

11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:01 Sat. 10:00, 11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 Sun. 11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00

Sun. - Thu. 12:15, 4:45, 9:15

War Horse (PG–13) Sun. - Thu.

11:15, 12:55, 2:30, 4:10, 5:45, 7:25, 9:00

The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) Sun. 2:30, 7:00 Mon. - Thu. 10:00, 2:30, 7:00


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 1

Seven basic symbols represent values of African culture: mazao, or fruit, nuts and vegetable crops, to symbolize work and the basis of this holiday; mkeka, or mat, symbolizes the foundation of African history and culture; kinara, or candleholder, honors the ancestry of the people; muhindi, or ear of corn, represents the fertility and reproduction of children as the future of the culture; mishuma saba, or seven candles, representing the minimum set of values by which all Africans are urged to live; kikombe cha umoja, or unity cup, to perform the libation on the sixth day to practice unity; and finally, zawadi, or gifts, to reward accomplishments, achievements and commitments that have been kept.

Inspired by the first harvests and civil rights struggles of the 1960s, Kwanzaa, is based on ancient African celebrations, and has become increasingly popular within the last decade. First developed in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga, Kwanzaa stresses the need to preserve, continually revitalize, and promote African culture. More than 20 million people celebrate Kwanzaa in the United States, Canada, England, the Caribbean, and Africa. Kwanzaa 2011, hosted by Rev. and Mrs. Tommy Smith and sponsored by The Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society will be celebrated at Palma Cela Baptist Church, Friday, December 30 beginning at 6 p.m. All are welcome; there is no charge for admission. Kwanzaa Celebration Friday, Dec 30 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Palma Cela Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Rd., Hayward (510) 489-0689

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

December 23, 2011

Obituaries

Boris Kirillov Eugene H. Arthur

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 29, 1937 - December 7, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 25, 1923 - December 7, 2011

Dr. Edward L. Buchanan, III

Leonora V. Fajardo

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 8, 1948 - December 13, 2011

January 6, 1947 - December 15, 2011

Roberto D. Devera

Joan I. O’Neil

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY May 26, 1931 - December 14, 2011

Obituary RESIDENT OF FREMONT

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 30, 1933 - December 15, 2011

Carmelita T. Facunla RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 27, 1946 - December 16, 2011

John A. Lanto

Hortensia E. Gomez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 18, 1927 - December 15, 2011

Kulsoom Bawani RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON June 20, 1940 - December 16, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 15, 1930 - December 17, 2011

Mohammed “Moin” Ghatala

Maolin Zhao

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY March 1, 1945 - December 19, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 7, 1941 - December 17, 2011

Lance “Chan” Hunter, Jr. RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA June 6, 1955 - December 18, 2011

Seraphim “Ray” F. Faria, Jr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 23, 1923 - December 19, 2011

Jack M. Wilken RESIDENT OF HAYWARD May 27, 1929 - December 19, 2011

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

L

William C. Smith RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 10, 1943 - December 18, 2011

Gisele J. Renson RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 14, 1934 - December 20, 2011

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

Celia Ramirez RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Saokram Bouth RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

Ruperto Vasquez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Lupe Arriola RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

Chieko K. Dixon RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 25, 1929 - December 19, 2011

Berge • Pappas • Smith

FD1007

Sharon Chandler-Tindall

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Obituary

William Carver

William Carver Smith entered peacefully into rest December 18, 2011 in Fremont, CA. Born March 10, 1943 in French Camp, CA he was 68 years old. He was a US Air Force veteran of the Vietnam War and worked at PG&E Gas Department for 38 years. He enjoyed RVing and was a long time member of

Palma Ceia Baptist Church in Hayward and current member of the Resurrection Baptist Church in San Leandro where he was a Sunday School and Bible Study teacher. He was a Mason, West Gate Lodge #43 and belonged to the California Sight Seers RV Club. Devoted husband of 43 years to Susie Smith of

Fremont, CA. Loving father of Julie Esma Smith and William Alexander Smith. Dearest brother of one sister and two brothers. Also survived by many nieces, nephews and cousins. Family and friends are invited to attend a visitation Wednesday, December 28th from 2:00-8:00 p.m. at BergePappas-Smith Chapel of the Angels, 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA. Funeral services will take place 11:00 a.m., Thursday, December 29th at Palma Ceia Baptist Church, 28605 Ruus Rd, Hayward, CA. Burial will be 11:00 a.m. Friday, December 30th at Sacramento Valley National Cemetery, Gustine, CA. Donations may be made to Allensworth State Historical Park, Dept. of Parks and Recreation 1416 9th Street Sacramento, CA 95814. For further information call William C. Smith Resident of Fremont (510) 656-1226 www.bergepappassmith.com

Page 11 11 Page


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 23, 2011

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Fremont Cribbage Club Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 www.sshsa.org

A.M.A.C. The new Conservative AARP.Now over 200,000 Jazzinators members. ATTENTION-Lions, East Bay Youth Jazz Band Rotary, TEA, VFW, American Le- Tues 11/1 & 15 & 12/13 & 27 gion, SIRS. Speakers available. Bronco Billy’s, Irvington Call to schd., Jan-April 7-8pm - No Cover chg. 510-938-1118 https://eastbaytradjazz.org amacwest@aol.com 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Association of Mature American Mission Gold Jazz Band Citizens’ Go to our Website at Swiss Park 1st & 3rd www.amac.us Wed. 7-9pm

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS

Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Starts on Thurs, Oct 27th Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 PM. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

New Fremont Chess Club

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

www.newfremontchessclub.org

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-623-9935

Serious Mental Illness FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Sat., Jan 7, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email: joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Master Sudoku

1

Sudoku

8 6 5 4 9 2

Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

2 5

4 letter words Cent Espy Iris Jest Knot Next Quiz Rime

4 9 2 7 4 9 3

In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

18 12 22

19

8

9

2

12

15

8

24

9

14

6

26

25

16

19

24

11 14

25

20

19 14

20

6

8

18

19

6

10

13

23 2

24

9

11

17

13

11

26

12

23

22

24 6

22

22 17

23

10

7

11

9 23

19

26

19

22 3

20

11

26 23

7 9

21

23 11

22

26

10 6

4

22

23

1

8

22

1

23

11

15

23

23

12

19

23

18

14 7

20 1

26

13 17

19

8

11 23

14

23

11

7

19

8

19

18

24

6

7

7

20

19 8

19

26

21

1

11

23

26

18 7

4

23

11

7

13

11

11

9

8 10

26

23

14

7 21

23

23

F

8 1

D 6

Sudoku

7 3 5 4 2 1 6 9

2

23 5

7 4

5

22

7 18

14

18

7

8

22

19

7

1

2

3

4

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7

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6 letter words Cygnet Dampen Effigy Enjoin Jejune Public Quench Rejoin Seethe Strait Swathe Thieve Throve Turnip Twenty Uganda 7 letter words Air-drop Apparel Belated Chignon Company Excerpt Eyewash Inflict Inshore Majesty Poleaxe Riot act Unkempt Workbox

Solutions on page 4

2 7 5 E A C 3

8 1 4 6

C 6 F 8 3 7 5 1 3 D B C 0 A

Word Search Christmas

Advent Angel Baby Camel Candy Cards Cedar Christ Crib Cupid December Dolls

Donkey Donner Elves Fir Gold Gravy Ham Holly Holy Icicle Inn

D E C E M B E R H G G O L D J

O C A R D S S O C R S A U C E

Ivy Jerusalem Joy Lights Lord Magi Mass Merry Myrrh Noel Pie

L M A G I H R L W A D N F I R

L D X G A E I M I V Y G W C U

C A E 7 B 0 5 C 9 B 0 4 D 3 9 2 E 4 9 1 8 9 F 0 3 7 1 8 2 F 0 B 1 5 A C 4 A B 5 7 9 6 E 5 E B 7

S C M M D G P I E Y C E I I S

S T A R H O C N L R H L N C A

Port Potato Prancer Red Roast Sales Sauce Shopping Sing Sled Stable

S J S T T C T T V O R N T L L

U O S A L E S D E A I Y E E E

R Y T S C D M A S S S S R L M

P O A I C A M E L T T L U O X

Star Surprise Toys Winter Xmas

R P B N H R N P R A N C E R T

I O L G O O I D O N N E R D B

S R E J L E L M Y R R H O I A

0 5 6 B C 0 1 1 6 C 9 3

E T T O Y S L L Z C U P I D B

S H O P P I N G Y D O N K E Y


Page 14

Maine soda-andcandy powered car travels 239 feet

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 660,000 Median $: 430,000 Lowest $: 197,500 Average $: 400,667 ADDRESS

Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz created a single-seat rocket car powered by 54 bottles of Coke Zero and 324 Mentos. They say the Mark II traveled 239 feet, improving upon last year's 220 feet with only half the fuel. They posted video of a 209-foot attempt online. Voltz said Thursday they incorporated a simple pistonand-cylinder mechanism to get the vehicle moving. He says it's powerful enough that people shouldn't try the experiment at home. The Buckfield-based entertainers shot to fame five years ago when they wore lab coats and goggles during their online videos demonstrating elaborate geysers set to music. --Online: Mark II rocket car: http://bit.ly/vxtzS0

ZIP

20904 Baker Road 18398 Center Street 21245 Hobert Street 18859 Lenross Court 4219 Omega Avenue 17962 Petersen Way 19710 Spruce Street 17686 Trenton Drive 20450 Crow Creek Road

AP WIRE SERVICE BUCKFIELD, Maine (AP), - The Maine guys known for creating colorful geysers from Diet Coke and Mentos candies say they've set a distance record for a vehicle with soda-and-candy-powered propulsion.

December 23, 2011

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

210,000 525,000 197,500 450,000 383,500 520,000 330,000 430,000 560,000

2 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

836 1572 1016 1683 1664 1357 1314 1674 2655

1956 1956 1947 1956 1947 1953 1959 1963 1995

11-15-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-17-11

24645 Broadmore Avenue 24175 Clarendale Street 26583 Eldridge Avenue 181 Goodwin Street 26812 Lakewood Way 27635 Pompano Avenue 25949 Regal Avenue 28418 Rochelle Avenue 921 Snowberry Court 27469 Orlando Avenue

ADDRESS

ZIP

3574 Altamira Terrace 35423 Ardo Court 3501 Birchwood Terrace #314 38746 Huntington Circle 37975 Lavender Common 37471 Parish Circle #15A 840 Uinta Court 5533 Butano Park Drive 2546 Clymer Lane 4167 Converse Street 39380 Monterey Way 42622 Newport Drive 4727 Stevenson Boulevard 39338 Sutter Drive 42024 Benbow Drive 41090 Rosewalk Court 48665 Sedum Road 40920 Valero Drive 32445 Lake Barlee Lane 33051 Lake Huron Street

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

425,000 425,000 139,000 265,000 361,000 201,000 407,500 335,000 492,000 400,000 445,000 310,000 306,000 400,000 830,000 820,000 530,000 740,000 495,000 263,000

3 3 1 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 4 4 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1864 1232 712 724 1717 942 1120 1204 2184 1485 2144 1000 1148 1358 1603 2047 1243 1583 1936 1148

2005 1966 1984 1989 1979 1989 1957 1961 1977 1956 1961 1958 1959 1959 1958 2004 1978 1971 1973 1971

11-17-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-16-11

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 26 Highest $: 392,000 Median $: Lowest $: 139,500 Average $: ADDRESS

25201 2nd Street 435 B Street 1040 Clubhouse Drive 24085 Dover Lane 1748 Dover Place 1784 Germaine Court 22925 Kingsford Way 22725 Lorand Way 845 Marin Avenue 22263 Prospect Street 285 Sullivan Way 22286 Thelma Street 22739 Watkins Street 25859 Bel Aire Drive 680 Banbury Street 695 Bristol Drive #282

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94544 94544

SOLD FOR BDS

392,000 321,000 200,000 175,000 144,000 247,000 240,000 190,000 270,000 290,000 386,500 210,000 206,000 250,000 258,000 139,500

4 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 3

400,000 429,475

251,000 252,000 176,000 245,000 245,000 167,500 190,000 229,000 141,000 180,000

3 4 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3

1360 1618 1034 1107 1774 1000 1059 1115 1185 1469

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 650,000 Median $: Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: ADDRESS

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 20 Highest $: 830,000 Median $: Lowest $: 139,000 Average $:

94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545

ZIP

340 Boyd Street 210 Butler Street 1197 Clear Lake Court 2185 Cuesta Drive 902 Dempsey Road 1650 Diel Drive 1268 Elkwood Drive 161 Evening Star Court 311 Falcato Drive 178 Junipero Drive #1 164 Marylinn Drive 328 South Temple Drive 136 Surrey Court

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

385,000 465,000 650,000 510,000 390,000 430,000 540,000 300,000 480,000 219,000 305,000 390,000 180,000

3 3 4 2 2 5 3 3 4 3 2 3 2

ZIP

36439 Buckeye Street 39931 Cedar Boulevard #214 7807 Inverness Drive 38481 Jacaranda Drive 36529 Olive Street 4972 Stafford Place

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

330,500 177,000 435,000 450,000 454,000 485,000

4 2 3 3 3 4

ADDRESS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2356 1934 1332 1208 1208 1044 1345 1534 1562 1776 1040 1159 1248 1161 1045

1920 1942 1973 1978 1978 1955 2004 1948 1952 1924 1950 2005 1951 1958 1988

11-15-11 11-15-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-15-11

694 Billings Boulevard 800 Dolores Avenue 701 Donovan Drive 34 Georgia Way 962 Joaquin Avenue #2 1309 Leonard Drive 2429 Longview Drive 1513 Orchard Avenue 492 Sybil Avenue 3867 Anza Way 16868 Clinton Avenue 14617 Craft Avenue 3726 Lamoureux Street 16243 Miramar Place 1555 Beechwood Avenue 1356 Trojan Avenue

ZIP

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

200,000 415,000 221,000 215,000 188,000 341,000 470,000 160,000 211,500 270,000 400,000 313,500 282,000 200,000 327,000 295,000

2 3 2 2 3 5 3 2 2 3 6 2 3 3 3 3

390,000 403,385 BUILT

CLOSED

1064 1431 1848 1528 1187 1634 1615 1240 1675 1050 1378 1102 980

1954 1956 1977 1993 1981 1965 1991 1969 1977 1971 1983 1960 1971

11-30-11 11-23-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-28-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-28-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-23-11 11-29-11

435,000 388,583

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2053 1071 1482 1426 2328 1707

1974 1985 1968 1975 1968

11-17-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-17-11

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 16 Highest $: 470,000 Median $: Lowest $: 160,000 Average $:

229,000 230,596

11-17-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-16-11

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 485,000 Median $: Lowest $: 177,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1956 1960 1952 1952 1953 1954 1952 1954 1972 1955

270,000 281,813

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

779 1781 885 1044 1390 1758 1695 923 1470 1096 4446 1783 1356 1519 1396 1114

1943 1951 1942 1941 1980 1953 1963 1908 1976 1954 1945 1945 1979 1985 1953 1950

11-15-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11 11-16-11 11-17-11 11-17-11 11-17-11 11-17-11 11-15-11


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 384,000 Median $: Lowest $: 215,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

16750 Daryl Avenue 422 Hacienda Avenue 16023 Paseo Largavista 16163 Silverleaf Drive 540 Tulsa Street 17640 Via Arriba 267 Via Elevado

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

220,000 229,000 220,000 384,000 235,000 262,000 215,000

2 3 3 3 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

905 1156 986 1819 1014 1134 1374

1948 1951 1944 1996 1950 1948 1944

11-15-11 11-17-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-15-11 11-17-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 675,000 Median $: Lowest $: 135,000 Average $: ADDRESS

33747 15th Street 33555 2nd Street 33240 Arizona Street 4709 Finn Cove Court 1063 Stone Street 34348 Torrey Pine Lane 32154 Trefry Court

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

225,000 135,000 390,000 675,000 500,000 630,000 425,000

2 2 4 4 3 5 3

229,000 252,143

425,000 425,714

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

890 600 1544 2797 2442 2671 1593

1916 1900 1976 1997 2004 2000 1973

11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-15-11 11-17-11 11-16-11

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

The Wall Just thought I'd share my frustration about our city's "progress." Photos I took this past weekend of the new Central Park Terrace (CPT) perimeter wall and several existing walls close by indicate that graffiti is inevitable. Who will take responsibility for its removal? City of Fremont won't because it doesn't face any widely used public area and is not on city-owned property. Union Pacific won't because it's not their property. The CPT development won't because they will not see it. Central Park Terrace wall panels have square openings at the base. The plan is to plant a creeping vine on the interior side and let it grow out and up the exterior side, preventing graffiti. The back wall at the senior deaf housing apartments has the same thing. The vines have partially grown up the walls, but either because of lack of maintenance or the wrong kind of vine was used, it has not stopped the graffiti. These walls will eventually look like every property wall you see when riding BART between Oakland and Fremont. It seems a darker color might have been chosen. The interior of the wall facing the development will be finished as faux stone in various colors. Doug Tinney Fremont

Page 15


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Bookworm

Every year, you’re faced with a quandary.

The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

Take, for instance, your annoying cubemate. What do you do if hygiene is, well, a little lacking? Or can you ask

sual, too-cool co-worker who insists on giving everybody too-ridiculous nicknames? And speaking of casual,

Missing the office holiday party is not an option. You have to go, no question. But attending is filled with potential trouble. Will you, in the holiday spirit, say the wrong thing to the boss? What if your beloved makes a fool out of you? If the champagne flows, will regretful behavior follow?

In this book, you’ll learn how to deal with office bragging and office groping. You’ll find out how to say “goodbye” to a partner, both businesswise and personally. You’ll learn what to do about after-office-party regrets and how to apologize for things you wish you could remember you did. And you’ll see how a keyboard or keypad can get you into more trouble than you can possibly imagine. Finding a few frustrating faux pas at the fax machine? Tired of tiresome coworkers? Or is the etiquette issue more with friends and family this season? No matter what oops you own, “Social Q’s” can make things easier to handle.

Every year, it’s a difficult decision: Go to the office party or plead death and dismemberment? Or just grab the new book “Social Q’s” by Philip Galanes and be better prepared, yearround?

With a good sense of humorous outrage and an even larger amount of gracious aplomb, author and New York Times columnist Philip Galanes helps his readers safely through the obstacle course of getting along in the twenty-first century. Galanes is Emily Post, only hipper; Dear Ann, only funnier; and your mother, only gentler.

Long before you even started school, you learned social skills at your parents’ table. They taught you “please” and “thank you,” when to say you were sorry, how to play nice with others, and how to say “no” gracefully. But are the old rules outdated in this new century? No, says Galanes, but the first thing you need to know is to “forget everything you know!” People are not the same as they were decades ago, and some issues take further finesse to fix than they might have, way back then. Your personality and that of the etiquettely egregious are both new considerations. It all “requires a mountain of self-control.”

December 23, 2011

him to ditch the cologne bath every morning? What can you say to a boss who insists on telling you details about his personal life that you’d rather not know? How do you stop the too-ca-

there are Casual Fridays. What is totally verboten and what will allow you to keep the boss’s respect while you keep your Zen state of almost-weekend?

I liked this book because it’s light reading in a serious vein, and I think you’ll appreciate its usefulness. If you need to tackle the kind of sticky worksocial issues of which your grandparents never dreamed, “Social Q” is the book you want. Read it, please. Thank you. c.2011, Simon & Schuster $23.00 / $27.00 Canada 259 pages


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Doing real science with NASA

BY DR. MARC RAYMAN Why can't an airplane just fly into space? Why do we need rockets?

M

ost of the time air may not seem like a very real substance. But when the wind blows so hard it nearly knocks you down, air seems very real indeed. Airplanes can fly because air moving under their wings is strong enough to hold them up. If you could slice across an airplane wing, you would see it is curved over the top and flat on the bottom. As the plane's engines push the wing forward, air moves over and under the wing. Because the top of the wing is curved and the bottom is flat, the air going above has a little farther to travel than the air going below. The air molecules on top are thus a little farther apart, making the air there a little thinner and the pressure on the top of the wing a little less than the pressure on the bottom. So what happens? The wing is pushed up by the air underneath it. Large passenger planes can't fly much higher than about 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). The air is too thin above that altitude to hold the plane up. Some kinds of planes can

fly much higher. But no plane can fly as high as even the lowest Earth-orbiting satellite at around 200 kilometers (125 miles) above Earth's surface. So, to boost a spacecraft to even the lowest Earth orbit requires a rocket. But how is a rocket different from an airplane? Rockets do not depend on air, even for burning their fuel. Rockets work because of an important law of nature called Newton's Third Law.

vacuum of space. Unlike planes, they don't need air to lift them up. But like everything else that burns, rocket fuel needs oxygen to burn. A rocket carries its own oxygen in tanks and mixes it with the fuel just before it is burned. One kind of rocket hitches a ride on an airplane for the first part of its journey through air then fires its rocket engine for the rest of the trip to orbit. Read about it at The Space Place, http://space-

This law says that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. For example, when you blow up a balloon and let it go, the air rushes out of the hole and the balloon takes off in the opposite direction. Most rockets use high-speed exhaust gases from burning rocket fuel to propel themselves up and away from Earth's surface to the

place.nasa.gov/galex-pegasus/. This article was provided through the courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and support from the U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

December 23, 2011

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD December 20 Officers were dispatched to a called-in bomb threat at 41400 Boyce Road. Employees were evacuated before the PD arrived and a search of the exterior and interior of the building was conducted. No device was located. Sergeant Quimson supervised the incident. California Highway Patrol requested assistance after an Hispanic Male Adult tried to escape on foot from a vehicle crash. The passenger was apprehended, but the driver, later identified as a 31 year-old male, escaped. He is last seen hopping fences near Briarwood and Stonewood. Officer Baca setup a perimeter and Sergeant Gott supervised the incident. A K9 search of the residences met with negative results. The suspect is also wanted for a parole violation. December 21 A residential burglary occurred in the area of Sanderling Drive. The reporting party called to report a suspicion person that rang the doorbell and when they did not answer the door, saw the subject make a phone call. The subject saw the R/P and told him he was at the wrong house. While officers were checking the area, a victim of a burglary called to report their home was burglarized 30 minutes prior. In that burglary, the victim’s 12 year-old son answered the door and the suspect told him he was at the wrong house. The suspect left and returned with a second suspect. The 12 year-old answered the door a second time and this time the suspects forced their way in and stole electronics and a small safe after ransacking the residence. The 12 year-old was unharmed and he called his parents before calling the police. The suspects are described as: #1 Black male 20’s, red t-shirt and black saggy jeans. #2 Black male, 20’s, bark blue shirt and black baggy jeans. These appear to be the same suspects in the suspicious person call. An area check failed to locate the sus-

pects. The case is being investigated by Officers Newton and Nevin. Officer Manrique located an occupied stolen vehicle out of Union City in the area of the Irvington Jack in the Box. The two occupants are arrested without incident. CHP drives up on a single vehicle vs center median collision at Alvarado/Fremont. The driver fled and hid in the bushes and the female passenger was transported as a precaution. Sergeant Crandall finds the driver as he emerged from the shrubs. He is arrested for DUI and hit and run. December 22 A transient from Texas arrived in our city last night. While walking on Mission Blvd this morning, he discovered a dead skunk on the side of the road and felt the need to give this creature a proper burial, and so creates his own funeral pyre by gathering pine needles under the skunk and lighting it ablaze. This attracts some attention from the commuters who call FFD. The deceased skunk is ultimately extinguished, and the transient taken in for a psychiatric evaluation. Residential burglaries occurred at 600 block of Praderia (front door POE 'point of entry') and 45600 block of Parkmeadow (back door pry POE). Officers were dispatched to an in-progress residential burglary at 4945 Central Avenue (Regency Square Apartments). The victim was awakened by two suspects entering a bathroom window. When he confronted them, they fled the apartment with Christmas gifts. One suspect was an Asian male and the other was a Hispanic male, both 1620 years old. Case investigated by Officer Newton and Officer Nevin. 3700 Foxswallow Terrace: The victim arrived home, probably interrupting the suspect(s) who left several items stacked on couch. Entry was made by drilling a lock box. Investigated by SCO Ernst. A victim returned from a 1-hour walk to find his home on the 700 block of Bedford Street burglarized; investigated by Officer Perry.

Hayward Police Chief Diane Urban reads to kids at Kaiser Permanente Hayward Medical Center during a recent visit. PHOTO KAISER PERMANENTE

Checkpoint to target drunk drivers and educate public SUBMITTED BY SGT. DEAN SATO, UNION CITY PD The Union City Police Department plans to conduct a sobriety and drivers license checkpoint on Friday, December 23rd from approximately 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. The checkpoint will be clearly marked and placed on a Union City roadway with a high rate of DUI arrests. The checkpoint will be staffed by Union City officers in full uniform. The checkpoint provides an opportunity to locate drivers who are under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs and remove them from your roadways. Each year, drivers under the influence cause a disproportionately high number of collisions, many of which result in injury or death. The checkpoint will help educate the public by distributing an informational pamphlet and by letting people know that the Union City Police Department is committed to deterring people from driving while under the influence and arresting those who do. A conviction for driving while under the influence could result in suspension of driving privileges, fines and jail time. The Union City Police Department reminds everyone to have a designated driver or take a cab if you have been drinking and to always wear your seatbelts. The checkpoint was funded through a grant from the Avoid the 21 Campaign.


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Lima”

serves to have a happy life. Please come visit her today.

Lima is a female, brown brindle Pit Bull. We believe she is about seven years old. Lima was dropped off at the shelter by her owners through not fault of her own. She is a very gentle soul and has a lot of spunk. She loves to roll in the grass and play with other dogs. Lima is looking for a second chance at life. Even with all she has been through, she still has a happy spirit that shines. She is the sweetest girl and de-

“Steve”

Page 19

Total in Kennel: Dogs – 36 Cats – 89 Other – 8

Steve is a black, neutered male rabbit. He is very social and loves

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley

to show off for people. Steve has been at the shelter since September and is looking for his forever home. He would probably do best in a home with kids that will give him a lot of attention. Come see him today.

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd. Fremont (510) 790-6640 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 pm Saturdays: 11 am - 4 pm Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 23, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11604985 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: MohamedNajeeb Muslimveetil Abdulrahiman for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: MohamedNajeeb Muslimveetil Abdulrahiman to Najeeb Abdulrahiman The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: January 6, 2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: D514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: November 18, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 11/25, 12/2, 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2212377#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458557 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DSPTEL, 3204 Hancock Place, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Yuan Cheng Zheng, 3204 Hancock Place, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on November 28, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yuan Cheng Zheng This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13/12 CNS-2229930# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459379 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: KINDER ESTATES, 1879 NELSON STREET,

SAN LEANDRO, CA 94579, County of ALAMEDA SUSAN ANN KINDER, 1879 NELSON STREET, SAN LEANDRO, CA 94579 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ SUSAN ANN KINDER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on DECEMBER 19, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13/12 CNS-2229681# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459185 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Grillaz Gone Wild, 1681 Delta Ct., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda 3321 Howard Common, Fremont, CA 94536 Trevor Jay Thompson, 3321 Howard Common, Fremont, CA 94536 James Demattei, 255 El Camino Real #204, Burlingame, CA 94010 This business is conducted by a Joint Venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Trevor Thompson, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 12, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 1/6/12 CNS-2226249# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459159 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wood Bone, 39867 Fremont Blvd. #906, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Luis Humberto Perez, 39867 Fremont Blvd. #906, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Luis Humberto Perez Gonzalez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 12, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 1/6/12 CNS-2226244# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459167 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: H&S Glass, 4432 Enterprise St., Suite 5, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda John Paul Hollis, 5280 Desiree Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ John Hollis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 12, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 1/6/12 CNS-2225531# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458737 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: C.P. Construction, 6662 Mayhews Landing Road, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda C.P. Enterprises, Inc., California, 6662 Mayhews Landing Road, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on July 25, 1994 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Leslie Hellewell, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 28, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 1/6/12 CNS-2224615# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458379 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wheels 4 Less, 38665 Fremont Blvd. #6, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Nanik Advani, 3400 Stevenson Blvd., Apt. K-27, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Nanik Advani This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 15, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 1/6/12 CNS-2223900# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458965 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Perfect Electric Service, 5467 Truman Pl., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Razvan Panescu, 5467 Truman Pl., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Razvan Panescu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 05, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2221868# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458923 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sadko Appliances, 33025 Korbel Street, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Alexander Trofimov, 33025 Korbel Street, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Alexander Trofimov This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 02, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).

12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2221862# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458178 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heeniverse, 40351 Robin St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Timothy Odell, 40351 Robin St., Fremont, CA 94538 Jeff Glucker, 208 Nashville Ave., Apt. A, Huntington Beach, CA 92648 Kamil Kaluski, 8 Whittier Place, Apt. 6C, Boston, MA 02114 This business is conducted by general partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/10/2009 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Timothy Odell, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 09, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2221698# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458915 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: All About Auto Lock Out, 1069 12th St., Oakland, CA 94612, County of Alameda. POB 32246, Oakland, CA 94604. Jonathan Crayton, 1069 12th St., Oakland, CA 94612. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jonathan Crayton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 2, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2220352# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457995 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Black Jack Pomade, 4797 Wadsworth Ct., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Brandon James Brooks, 4797 Wadsworth Ct., Fremont, CA 94538. Michael Lysle Brooks, 5217 Dry Creek Ct., Antioch, CA 94531. This business is conducted by Co-Partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A.


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PUBLIC NOTICES I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Brandon Brooks, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 3, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2219916# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458650-51 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Far East Business Accounting Solutions, 2. Paulin Home Care, 3051 Darwin Dr., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Douglas Paulin, Jr., 3051 Darwin Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Douglas C. Paulin, Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 22, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2219628# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458869 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ensustain, 2000 Walnut Ave., Unit C302, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Prajesh Bhattacharya, 2000 Walnut Ave., Unit C302, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Prajesh Bhattacharya This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 30, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a

Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/9, 12/16, 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2219627# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458747 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Truckin Sweet, 6354A Buena Vista Dr., Newark, Alameda, CA 94560, County of Alameda Jacquelyne Renee Parrish, 6354A Buena Vista Dr., Newark, Alameda, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jacquelyne Parrish This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 28, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/2, 12/9, 12/16, 12/23/11 CNS-2216476# CORRECTED FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457643 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kumon Math & Reading Center of Union City - East, 34712 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda 34383 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Incredible Learners, Inc., CA, 34383 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jayanthi Subramanian, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 26, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 12/23/11 CNS-2199258#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications:

CNS-2230402# NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Alameda County Social Services Agency Contracts Office, 2000 San Pablo Avenue, 4th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #SASYEP 2012 Summer & After-School Youth Employment Program, January 12, 2012, 1:00 PM – Alameda County Social Services Agency, 2000 San Pablo Ave., 3rd Floor, Berkeley Room (#331), Oakland, CA NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #SASYEP 2012 Summer & After-School Youth Employment Program, January 13, 2012, 9:30 AM – Alameda County Social Services Agency, 24100 Amador Street, 2nd Floor, California Poppy (#225/226), Hayward, CA Response Due by 2:00 pm on February 15, 2012 County Contact: Sandra Oubre at (510) 267-9457 or via email: SOubre@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 12/23/11 CNS-2230128#

Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan Update The City of Union City is updating the Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan. The plan provides for a citywide system of pedestrian and bicycle facilities and a variety of programs to allow for safe, efficient, and convenient walking and bicycling within the City. The City is updating the plan to reflect current background information as well as pedestrian and bicycle facilities that have been constructed since 2006. In addition, the update reflects the incorporation of previous analysis, which was completed since adoption of the plan in 2006, including additional Safe Routes to School projects. The update also reflects changes in response to the public comments that has been received to date. NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that the City had adopted a Negative Declaration for the adoption of the original Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan in 2006. The Negative Declaration determined the project would not have a significant effect on the environment. The proposed update to the plan does not include any significant changes that would impact this determination. PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING Thursday, January 5, 2012 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. For further information, contact Carmela Campbell, Planning Manager, at (510) 675-5316. Written comments regarding this project should be received by the Planning Division on or prior to Thursday, January 5, 2012. The plan is available for review at City Hall and the Union City Library located at 34007 Alvarado Niles Road. The plan is also available for review on-line at www.unioncity.org City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. JOAN MALLOY Economic & Director 12/23/11

Community

Development

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 11, 2011 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461 (510) 659-6993 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): C409 Karr, Marla Kay C385 Romandia, Margaret C294 Karr, Marla Kay C184 Cardoza, Scott C162 Zamora, Antonio C086 IMERBTHAMA, JARROD C056 Rensel, Edgar B086 MEGAN, CLARLA A218 Brooks, Lamonica A159 Ramirez, Ricardo All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 23rd day of December 2011 and 30th day of December 2011, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2229603# NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 10, 2011 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time: 9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): B017 ROMANIK JR, CARL B020 WHITAKER, KEN

C013 Moreno, Dawn C065 SCHROEDER, RANDALL C111 Rivera, Denise D066 Afukei, Elizabeth P040 Gregory, Robert Public Storage 08026 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2148 Secoquian, Corazon 2174 SAMFOHERUS, WENDY 7007 Simpson, Edward 8002 taylor, tyrone 9055 Coria, Antonio Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s): B018 Angeles, Alvin C020 BERNARDO,CELEDONIO C097 Hawkins, Keith C138 Brown, Dennis D183 MacMullen, Ruth F009 White, Jermaine Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A106 QUERIDA, MARILYN A109 MCDOWELL, CYNTHIA A137 Ho, Kevin C325 Mitchell, Wanda D733 Mitchell, Steve E505 PETTY, GERALD E579 Clark, Joseph E610 Scully, Richard E654 Hill, Aritha F428 Kerlegan, Francis G818 Hoos, Lisa Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123 (510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A008 Maly, Izy A041 CASE, PAMELA A085 ZAKRZEWSKI, JASON A094 Oneill, Sara A117 Dawson, Kristi A261 COLEMAN, RONNESHA A348 Thach, Theresa A350 Taylor, Lorrie C033 Wouters, Jim C061 PALMONES, JAMES D046 DeRush, Angela Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A084 DELVAL, RENGELL B056 ANDERSON, JAMES E043 Santoni, Rhonda E044 W.D. Campbell Construction, Inc. E065 Roesler-Barrett, Jamie All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 23rd day of December 2011 and 30th day of December 2011, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 12/23, 12/30/11 CNS-2229599#

Flying squirrel invades New Jersey emergency room AP WIRE SERVICE RAHWAY, N.J. (AP)Firefighters were needed stat after a flying squirrel went nuts in a New Jersey hospital's emergency room. The squirrel kept launching itself from an 8-foot-

high wall-mounted lamp into a glass wall after becoming trapped in a trauma room at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in Rahway Tuesday night. Fire Department spokesman Capt. Ted Padavano told The Star-Ledger of Newark (http://bit.ly/vxBiL0) it would climb up on a light and would jump off and glide.

A pair of firefighters threw a blanket over the squirrel and released it into a wooded area outside the hospital. Padavano believes there may be a nest in the building because it's the second time in two weeks that a flying squirrel got in the ER. Information from: The Star-Ledger, http://www.nj.com/starledge


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House, Senate show no give in payroll tax fight BY ANDREW TAYLOR ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Dec 21 House and Senate leaders traded demands Wednesday but remained mired in a bitter holiday-season stalemate that is threatening 160 million workers with Jan. 1 tax increases and millions of the long-term unemployed with an end to their benefits. In a letter, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid urged Speaker John Boehner to bring House lawmakers back to Washington and approve a bipartisan measure the Senate approved overwhelmingly last weekend. That bill would extend the payroll tax cut and jobless benefits for two months, giving bargainers time to agree to a more expensive, yearlong measure. “Because we have a responsibility to assure middle-class families that their taxes will not go up while we work out our differences, we must pass this immediate extension first,” wrote Reid, D-Nev. Minutes later, Boehner, R-Ohio, and other top House Republicans invited reporters into a meeting where they urged Reid to bring senators back to town so

they can negotiate over a yearlong extension of the tax cut and jobless benefits. The bill would also postpone a scheduled Jan. 1 cut of 27 percent in payments to doctors who treat Medicare patients. “All we're asking for is to get Senate members over here to work with us to resolve our differences so we can do what everybody wants to,” Boehner said. President Barack Obama and leaders of both parties want to extend the tax cuts and jobless benefits and prevent the cut in doctors' reimbursements for an entire year. Most lawmakers have left Washington for the Christmas and New Year's holiday, but could quickly return to vote on any agreement. The back and forth underscored a pressure-packed partisan fight, being waged on the eve of a presidential and congressional election year, in which neither side is showing any indication of give. In a moment of political theater, Democrats tried to get the House to consider the two-month extension of the payroll tax cut as the chamber convened for a ceremonial session at which no formal business was scheduled. But acting speaker Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., adjourned the chamber and walked out.

“Mr. Speaker, you're walking out. You're walking away just as so many Republicans have walked away from middle-class taxpayers” and others, Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the No. 2 House Democrat, shouted to an empty chair where the House presiding officer sits. Republicans also came under pressure from their own usual allies when an opinion article on the Wall Street Journal's conservative editorial page accused the GOP of botching the fight over the payroll tax cut. “Republicans would do best to cut their losses and find a way to extend the payroll holiday quickly,” the editors wrote. On Tuesday, the House voted 229193 to kill the Senate measure. Afterward, Obama signaled he'll use his presidential megaphone to try to force Republicans controlling the House into submission. “Now let's be clear,” Obama said at the White House. “The bipartisan compromise that was reached on Saturday is the only viable way to prevent a tax hike on Jan. 1. The only one.” The Obama campaign promptly took to Twitter and Facebook to fight it out. With their candidate's poll numbers ris-

ing, Democratic operatives seemed almost giddy at the prospect of a prolonged battle. Republican lawmakers relished the battle as well, though some of them are too inexperienced to know that presidents - regardless of party - usually win such high-profile fights, like Bill Clinton did over a 1995-96 government shutdown or George W. Bush did in skirmishes on anti-terror policies. House Republicans instead rallied around a plan passed last week that would have extended the payroll tax cut for one year. But that version also contained spending cuts opposed by Democrats and tighter rules for jobless benefits. If legislation isn't passed by New Year's Day, payroll taxes will go up by almost $20 a week for a worker making a $50,000 salary. Almost 2 million people could lose unemployment benefits as well, and doctors would bear big cuts in Medicare payments. Given Obama's remarks and Reid's refusal to negotiate, it was unclear what leverage Republicans had in the year-end standoff. It appeared likely the partisan disagreement could easily persist past Christmas and into the final week of the year.


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Consumers may owe tax on online purchases SUBMITTED BY CASEY WELLS The California State Board of Equalization (BOE) reminds Californians to be aware of their tax obligations that may arise during the holiday season. Sales of many seasonal items, such as Christmas trees and firewood, are taxable. Additionally, purchases of many holiday items, such as holiday cards and books, are taxable even when purchased from an out-of-state retailer. Consumers are reminded that use tax is due on online purchases they make from out-of-state retailers. Firewood sales, as well as labor or service charges related to firewood sales (cutting, splitting, delivery, etc.) are taxable. Christmas trees, wreaths, ornaments and other similar holiday items are also subject to sales tax. Sellers of these items should register with the BOE and obtain a seller’s permit. Generally, there is no sales tax exemption for charities, non-profits, or civic organizations. Individuals or organizations that make three or more sales in any 12-month period

should contact the BOE to apply for a seller’s permit. Those planning to sell only during the holiday season should apply for a temporary seller’s permit. BOE representatives perform inspections statewide at flea-markets, Christmas tree lots and street-vending locations to ensure businesses are properly registered. For more information about obtaining a California seller’s permit, see publication 73, “Your California Seller’s Permit,” at www.boe.ca.gov/pdf/pub73.pdf. For more information about nonprofit organizations, see publication 18, “Nonprofit Organizations,” available at www.boe.ca.gov/pdf/pub18.pdf. The BOE advises consumers to keep receipts from online purchases. Most consumers are familiar with sales tax that is applied when a purchase is made from a California retailer. When a purchase is made from an outof-state retailer that does not collect California use tax, California consumers are responsible for payment of use tax on their purchases.

If you are not required to be registered with the BOE to have a seller’s permit or a use tax account, the easiest way to report and pay the use tax is on your California state income tax return, due for most filers on April 15 of each year. You may also register with the BOE as a use tax payer and make the payment directly to the BOE. If the purchaser is a retailer with a seller’s permit, the use tax should be reported on their regular sales and use tax return. Included in the California income tax return instructions for calendar year 2011 is a new Use Tax Look-Up Table, which allows individuals to estimate use tax owed on non-business purchases of less than $1,000. The LookUp Table makes it more convenient for taxpayers by providing an option to report estimated use tax owed on qualifying purchases, rather than calculating and reporting their actual unpaid use tax liabilities. For more information, visit www.boe.ca.gov and www.taxes.ca.gov

Green Chemistry regulations SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA New regulations creating a robust process to identify, prioritize and evaluate chemicals of concern used in consumer products could possibly be adopted by next fall, the director of the state Department of Toxic Substances Control told the Assembly Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials Committee December 8. Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) chaired the ESTM hearing to review new informal draft regulations of the Safer Consumer Products program, also known as Green Chemistry. The

DTSC released the latest draft on October 31. The Green Chemistry regulations are designed to reduce the use of harmful chemicals in products in order to protect consumers. “The Green Chemistry regulations have enormous implications for the future of California,” Wieckowski said. “They have the potential to steadily reduce the commercial use of toxic substances and better protect the public’s health.” Green Chemistry regulations are required under legislation approved by the state in 2008. Earlier proposed regulations released at the end of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s administration were never finalized.

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SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE POWELL For most of us, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Days are a getaway from the everyday world – stores and businesses are shuttered as people pause to enjoy the season with friends and loved ones. But there are some companies that never close, and Union Sanitary District is one of them! USD’s wastewater treatment plant operates 24/7/365 to serve the Tri-Cities, and that means some of its plant operators are spending their holidays on-site making sure that things are running smoothly. They also stand ready to send assistance for customers who call in with sewer emergencies. “We do all of the normal daily checks to make sure that our processes are running efficiently,” says Dave Drake of his holiday work routine. “The plant is our first priority.” The operators monitor flows on computers as wastewater comes in from throughout USD’s service area and makes its way through the plant, test wastewater samples, and make rounds to check on equipment during their twelve-hour shifts. “We also re-

December 23, 2011

while during the day, then leave parties early to get to work,” says Tim Hughes. “Often, my family takes two cars to a gathering so my wife and kids can stay when I leave for my shift. Sometimes even though I’m not scheduled to work, I’m on-call in case of an absence, so I follow the same routine, just in case.” Whether on-shift or on-call, USD’s employees are always ready to give exceptional service to the community. “Working the holidays can be a difficult sacrifice at times, because we’re not with our loved ones,” adds Perry Borbeck, “but we all get satisfaction from providing an important service to the public. I Tim Hughes readies a pump for maintenance inside USD’s Alvarado Pump Station at the treatment plant in Union City.The District has seven pump station located throughout its Tri-City service area.

spond to customer emergencies,” says Tony Lullo. “If a USD customer calls in with a sewer problem, we dispatch Collection Services workers to respond, whether it’s Christmas Day or any other day. A mechanic and electrician are al-

Perry Borbeck makes sure a process sampler is drawing the correct amount of wastewater and preserving it properly. The sample will then be analyzed in USD’s laboratory.

Dave Drake and Tony Lullo in USD’s Control Room, where plant processes are continuously monitored.

ways on-call as well to assist at the plant or pump stations if necessary.” Operators and their families make adjustments for holiday celebrations. “Sometimes I make up for being absent by joining the party in the evening when I get home, and sometimes we celebrate on a different day,” says Dave. “Your relatives get used to you not being home for the usual family times – we all make accommodations.” The night shift operators have their own ways of adapting holidays. “We tend to mingle with our families for a

never feel like I have to go work, but that I get to go to work.” Union Sanitary District operates a 30 million gallon per day wastewater treatment facility in Union City and provides wastewater collection, treatment and disposal services to the cities of Fremont, Newark and Union City. The District serves a population of 328,000 and maintains over 779 miles of sewers. For more information about USD, visit www.unionsanitary.com


December 23, 2011

SUBMITTED BY ANNA JACOBY

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large part of my design business involves selecting wall colors for my clients. Most of the time, my clients are attracted to color, but are very afraid of making a mistake. It is rare when I get a client who wholly embraces the idea of bold, rich colors in his or her home. I absolutely love it when I suggest a mediumtoned color and they say, “How about this darker one?” I always smile and say, “Yes—great! Let’s go darker!” In this article, I will touch on the most common fears people have about color in their homes and offer some encouraging words for overcoming those fears. Fear # 1: This color will make my room too dark. Well, guess what? Whatever size your room is now, it will still be that size after we paint it. Dark colors by themselves don’t make a room look smaller; in fact, dark cool colors like charcoal gray, midnight blue, emerald green and eggplant purple actually have the opposite effect—those rich hues tend to recede into the distance, giving the effect of walls that move away from you. What makes a room feel smaller is the amount of contrast in the room (such as

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

very light floors or furniture with very dark walls) or bulky, overscaled furniture, or too much clutter. I encourage you to try a shade or two darker than what you would normally select and see how much you like the results. Your room will feel rich and cozy, not too small. Fear #2: I can’t choose colors I like because I have to think of resale value. Stop this thinking right now! Are you selling in less than one year? If not, pick colors you love! Not to mention that plenty of people love color on the walls, so just because you choose red or green or lavender doesn’t mean future buyers won’t like them. Do model homes have white walls? No! The designers know that people actually love the way color makes them feel. The trick is to choose colors that really complement your furnishings, flooring, woodwork, granite, etc. If you give the house some “design flair” and choose colors carefully and with intention, you’ll get years of enjoyment out of your house— and future buyers will, too. Fear #3: I want to be able to change my décor frequently, so I have to keep the walls neutral.

Anna Jacoby of Anna Jacoby Interiors is a local interior designer. Send your design questions to her at info@annajacobyinteriors.com Call or fax her at 510-490-0379 or visit www.annajacobyinteriors.com

Hmmm, whenever I hear this, I become a little bit skeptical. It seems that so many times when people tell me this, I see sofas from the 80’s and pillows and bedding that have definitely seen better days. So, I ask you to really be honest with yourself: do you really change your décor often? If you really do, then that’s great—painting the walls a rich, luscious caramel color, or sleek modern silvery gray will keep the background neutral so you can change the décor to your heart’s content. If you are the type of person who keeps her furnishings for many years, then that’s definitely okay, too. That same caramel or silver wall colors will still work for you, but you can also consider being bolder. Consider colors like Paprika, Dijon, Burgundy, or Ocean Blue. Color adds so much life and personality to your home. Go for it! What are you afraid of?

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SUBMITTED BY LILA BRINGHURST

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esidents of every city in the San Francisco Bay Area have neighbors who emigrated from countries around the world. We mix and mingle in business, in schools and in social settings. But rarely do we appreciate the struggles that immigrants have experienced in their quest to come to America and seldom do we know their achievements… or their gratitude. Rachel Kuo Tan of Fremont is a case in point. If you saw her in the grocery store you would see a typical mother of two filling her cart, impatiently waiting in line and hurrying off to complete her list of tasks. But you would not know her story. Tan’s family emigrated in 1978 from Taiwan to Seattle, thanks to her uncle, Wu Shin Kuo, who sponsored and financed them. Her parents, Pao Tung Kuo and Huang Chuan Kuo, felt deeply indebted to him. They worked long hours in a relative’s dry cleaning business and every penny they earned went to pay the debt. They and their five children, ages five to thirteen, lived in poverty in the top floor of a three-story house. Rachel’s mother was sad and terribly homesick, but wonderful things began to happen to the children as loving friends and strangers entered

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their lives. The first was their bus driver, Burness. “She was a happy lady with curly blond hair. We didn’t speak much English, but we felt the love of this lady,” remembers Tan. “She always greeted us with a smile and taught us English words by pointing to objects

and saying their names. She sang songs and taught them to us.” On the last day of school before winter break the loving bus driver dropped all the other students off first. When she arrived at the Kuo home she presented a gift to each child. “Grandma, who was waiting for us, did not want us to accept the gifts,” Tan recollects with a smile, “but Burness shouted Merry Christmas, gave a happy wave, and quickly drove away.” Christmas Eve brought a wonderful surprise. The doorbell rang and when they opened the door they found beautiful packages on the stairway filled with clothing, food and presents for every member of the family, including money. “A note said ‘Merry Christmas from Santa Claus.’ We never found out who the giver was,” said Tan, who was eleven years old at the time, “but we felt warm feelings that someone had brightened

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our lives that bleak Christmas. I have always been grateful that someone did something special for us on our first Christmas in America.” Their bilingual teacher, Lucy Ou, took the children to many fun outings. She became a mentor for the multitalented Rachel and encouraged her to continue in ballet. As the next Christmas approached, Rachel wanted to see the famous “Nutcracker.” “My desire to see the ‘Nutcracker’ was so strong that my family made a tremendous financial sacrifice to set aside money for bus transfers and a theater ticket for one, allowing me to fulfill my fondest wish,” said Tan recently. “When I presented my fifteen dollars for the ticket, the counterman asked me if I was by myself. With a big smile I replied, ‘Yes.’ With a big smile of his own he presented the precious ticket to me. Soon I discovered that he had given me a front row seat! Though I have witnessed the ‘Nutcracker’ many times since that day, the memory of my first ‘Nutcracker’ will always be the most beautiful and magical of all. This performance became my inspiration and ultimately directed my career path.” After graduating in 1990 from the University of Washington with a major in communications and a minor in dance and education, Tan traveled and performed in Asia. She studied in Malaysia with an examiner from the Royal Academy of Dance of London. After five years, dancing six days a week, she became a certified dance instructor. Then she married Cheoh Tan, whom she had met when they both attended the University of Washington. Shortly after the birth of their daughter, Miranda, his work brought him to the Bay Area. They bought a two-bedroom condo in Fremont, and Rachel opened a dance studio in their garage. She now has two studios in Fremont and one in Dublin (rachelsballet.com). Her daughters, Miranda, 13, and Elisha, 4, both dance. continued on 27


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continued from page 26

“I often thought about the wonderful people who helped our family,” said Rachel. “After I joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons), I realized that the gifts I witnessed were from my loving Heavenly Father, who had prompted the hearts of others to help us. Being a receiver of these gifts I felt and saw the light of Jesus Christ for the first time. I remember thinking that someday I hope to follow their good example.” In 2009 the Tans began making arrangements for a wonderful gift of gratitude, two free performances of the “Nutcracker.” In 2010 Rachel’s Ballet first performed the “Nutcracker” ballet, free of charge, at The Church of JesusChrist of Latter-day Saints Interstake Center on Temple Hill in Oakland, California. She repeated the gift this year. Free tickets for the two performances in the 2000-seat auditorium became available at 6 p.m. on November 26. They were all gone in 30 minutes. Appreciative residents from all over the Bay Area packed the house on December 16 and 17. The ballet performances were a gift from a little girl who was given a front row seat by a kindly ticket seller, where she was caught up in the magical dance of childhood dreams. Now she creates the enchanting scenes and dances and shares them with friends and strangers – as a loving gift.

Cougar Girls are tops in Homestead Tourney SUBMITTED BY COACH DARRYL REINA The Newark Memorial girls varsity basketball team captured the Homestead Holiday Basketball Tournament title December 20, defeating host Homestead 56-48 in the championship game. Cougars’ sophomore Ni’Yesha Brown led all scorers with 22 points. Junior point guard Taylor Norman scored 18 points and junior center Tarryn Clark chipped in with 12 points. The Cougars, now 6-4 overall, had a 52-44 opening round win against Mt. Pleasant, and a 58-50 win over Santa Clara High in the semifinals. The Cougars will host their annual Newark Optimist Club – Newark Memorial Holiday Classic on December 28-30 at Newark Memorial High School, 39375 Cedar Boulevard, Newark. They will open with Evergreen Valley from San Jose beginning at 7:45 pm on Wednesday, December 28.

Walmart Foundation grants SUBMITTED BY ASHLEY ROBINSON The Walmart Foundation’s California State Giving Program announced it has provided $76,000 to East Bay Area community organizations: Hope 4 the Heart, YMCA of the East Bay, and Girls Inc. of Alameda County. These grants will support hunger relief efforts and nutrition education for thousands of children and their families in the region. “As part of Walmart’s commitment to hunger relief, we also want to help ensure that young people have the information they need to help make decisions that will impact their long-term quality of life,” said Debbie Rood, Regional General Manager for Walmart. “We are pleased to be supporting organicontinued on page 34


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City Council seeks applicants to fill vacancy SUBMITTED BY NEWARK CITY CLERK SHEILA HARRINGTON The Newark City Council is seeking qualified applicants to fill a vacancy caused by the election of Council Member Nagy to the position of Mayor. The appointee will fill the unexpired City Council Member term which will end in November 2013. Official application forms are available on the City's website at www.newark.org or by contacting the City Clerk's office at 37101 Newark Boulevard, 5th floor, (510) 5784266, sheila.harrington@newark.org. Obtaining the application from the city website is highly encouraged since City Hall offices will be closed from December 23, 2011 through January 2, 2012. Applicants must provide a typewritten statement of no more than 200 words per numbered category addressing the following: (1) why you want to be appointed to the Newark City Council; (2) your familiarity with City of Newark's organization and projects; (3) prior governmental, political, occupational, community service, or volunteer experience; (4) applicable education; and (5) your view of the City's budgetary priorities. Applicants must be a Newark resident and a registered voter at the time the application is filed. Original applications must be signed by the applicant and received in the City Clerk's Office before 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 5, 2012. A special meeting to interview City Council candidates will be held Monday, January 30, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of Newark City Hall.

December 23, 2011

René G. Santiago appointed new Deputy County Executive SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/LAUREL ANDERSON County of Santa Clara County Executive Jeffrey V. Smith has announced the appointment of René G. Santiago as a new Deputy County Executive. Santiago, who will step into the new role on February 6, will be chiefly responsible for serving as the liaison and providing general direction to the Santa Clara Valley Health and Hospital System, including SCVMC, Public Health, Mental Health, the Department of Alcohol and Drug Services, Custody Health Services, Ambulatory Care and Community Health Services, Valley Health Plan and Community Outreach Services, and Finance. The position reports to the County Executive. Santiago currently serves as deputy director/general manager for the County of San Diego’s Health and Human Service Agency where he has led local efforts to expand healthcare coverage, improve access to care, and integrate services across the physical health, mental health, and social services continuum. He is the executive lead for health care reform initiatives and directly manages over $200 million in health and human services programs that employ nearly 1,000 staff members. “My family and I are very excited to join the Santa Clara County community,” said San-

tiago. “I’m looking forward to working with the excellent team at the Santa Clara Valley Health and Hospital System, Dr. Smith and the Board of Supervisors to

improve the health status of residents in collaboration with our community partners.” Raised in East Los Angeles where his family relocated from Mexico, Mr. Santiago attended the University of California at Berkeley, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Welfare Policy and Planning in 1984. He also attained dual Masters’ degrees in City & Regional Planning and Health Policy and Administration from UC Berkeley in 1987. Years later, he attended the University of California Los Angeles for graduate doctoral work in Public Health. Santiago will be relocating with his wife of nine years Yolanda and seven year old son Adrian. His starting salary will be $210,231.84.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY RENA DEIN Each November, the City of Fremont Recreation Services Division holds its Fall Fremont's Got Talent Youth Showcase at the Fre-

mont Teen Center. The Spring competition and performer's showcase is held in Central Park during the Kids n Kites Festival.

3rd Place – Ciara Lunger Aditi Bagepalli; Sakshi Prablu; Irvington High School Hip Hop Club Ventriloquist: James Scott

Audience Awards: Junior Division (12 & under) 1st Place – James Scott 2nd Place - Sakshi Prablu 3rd Place – Braxton Carlson

Solo Vocals: Christina Ewing; Mar Robinson; Nina Nelson; Sandhya Chari; Soukhya Inamdar; Cathryn Flores; Kelsey Findlay; Braxton Carlson; Ciara Lunger.

Dance: Solo Indian Dancers:

Junior Division (12 & under) 1st Place - Braxton Carlson 2nd Place - Aditi Bagepalli 3rd Place - Andrew Wilson Senior Division (13 & older) 1st Place – Ciara Lunger 2nd Place – Nina Nelson 3rd Place – The Icebreakers band Best Overall Performance (NonVocal) - James Scott Best Overall Performance (Vocal) – Kelsey Findlay

Teen Bands: Miss Communication; The Icebreakers. Musicians: Bryceton Au, Cello; Katherine Lin,Violin; Anirban Datta, Keyboards; Andrew Wilson, Drums.

Judges Awards Performers chosen to receive Special Recognition include: Bryceton Au, Cello; Katherine Lin, Violin; Sakshi Prablu

Senior Division (13 & older) 1st Place – Irvington High School Hip Hop Club 2nd Place – Nina Nelson

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December 23, 2011

SUBMITTED BY RACHAEL VANDER MARTIN LIFE ElderCare’s Annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon drew an enthusiastic crowd of 275 people to the Newark Hilton on December 7 for an elegant meal and entertainment by local magician, Ryan Adler. This year’s theme, “Volunteers Have the Magic Touch,” celebrated the efforts of 574 volunteers who, along with 318 nursing students from Unitek College and Cal State East Bay, donated close to 42,000 hours last year towards helping frail, at-risk seniors in the Tri-City area stay healthy and maintain their independence. Mary M. Anderson, Executive Director of LIFE ElderCare, welcomed the guests by saying, “Within each of us is a powerful design for living. Every day that you volunteer, your own special magic makes life better on behalf of our community’s seniors." Janice Futch-Claridge, event sponsor, added, “This is a special time of the year but you are special all year long.” This year’s recipient of the organization’s Friend for LIFE Award was outgoing Newark mayor, David Smith. Smith accepted the award on behalf of the volunteers by saying, “Through your dedicated service to the community, all of you are MY friends for life. On my last official day of being Mayor, I couldn’t be spending it with a finer group of people.” Smith moved some people in the room to tears with a heartfelt story about how sharing a candy bar with a classmate when he was in the third grade was remembered more than 30 years later at a high school reunion. “You never know how much you are impacting someone’s life,” he said, “with a just a simple act of kindness.” One of the guests, Paul Ray Andrus, has been giving rides to homebound seniors through the VIP Rides program for the past two years. “I like the flexibility of being able to volunteer when I have a break or some free time during the week,” he said. Dori Alexander started delivering meals through the Meals On Wheels program three months ago. After she retired, she knew this was what she wanted to do. “When I see people on my route I feel so happy,” she said, “and if they have time to talk, I enjoy visiting with them.” According to a recent article in the AARP Bulletin, the value of one volunteer hour in California is $23.42.When you add it up, this represents a $900,000 in-kind investment by LIFE ElderCare volunteers. If you would like to join them in building an aging-friendly community, and make some heart-friendly connections along the way, please visit the LIFE ElderCare website atlifeeldercare.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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fter an exhaustive statewide search, veteran public law attorney Vincent C. Ewing was named General Counsel for AC Transit by the agency’s Board of Directors. As a former Deputy City Attorney for Los Angeles, Assistant City Attorney for Santa Rosa, City Attorney for East Palo Alto, and a prosecutor of violent crimes for the City of Los Angeles, Mr. Ewing brings vast experience in a variety of legal arenas, especially public law. A graduate of Howard University School of Law, Mr. Ewing has advised city councils, city administrators, city managers, and elected boards and commissions on issues ranging from government and fiduciary responsibilities to matters of general law concerning land use, due process, the Brown Act, labor, risk management, city charters and other public policies. “In a general counsel, professional competence is most critical,” Board President Elsa Ortiz said. Mr. Ewing has 12 years of California municipal law experience. He has a highly successful litigation record and has provided impartial legal analysis and administrative guidance on a variety of ballot measures. Mr. Ewing holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from Howard University School of Law. He now lives in Alameda with his wife and three daughters.

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BY MARGARET TALT AND MARGARET THORNBERRY FREMONT CULTURAL ARTS COUNCIL “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” Pablo Picasso

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hat is it with cultural arts people? One sometimes hears this plaintive cry. Well, cultural arts people care. They care about creativity, originality, and beauty, about a better world, about people having access to art, music, literature, and theatre, even if some can’t afford the cost. In addition to the volunteer organizations that work to provide art, music, literature, and theatre to children and adults in Fremont, is there any other entity that helps? Do Fremont’s council and administration care whether the fine arts prosper here? Yes, Fremont does care. The Recreation Division of the Community Services Department offers a broad variety of classes for ages two and up in drawing, cartooning, color, ceramics, glass etching, mural design, dance, music, voice, writing, and much, much more. Approximately 106 arts classes and 32 dance classes are available each summer and even more during the fall/winter/spring sessions. For those who are unable to pay the moderate cost of these classes, scholarships of up to $75 per person are available. The Fremont Cultural Arts Council donates $1,500 to $2,000 yearly specifically for art scholarships. The city usually receives donations amounting to about $20,000 for general scholarships for all classes. In addition, public school teachers may request onceweekly programs integrating art, history, and drama with the classroom curriculum for which the specific school pays the city.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The classes offered are taught either by state-credentialed teachers or people with experience in the subject. Background checks, tuberculosis tests, and fingerprinting are done for all of the teachers. Regarding the art courses, Recreation Supervisor II Irene Jordahl said, “The City offers a wide variety of arts programming for all different ages; we are

always looking for new programs and we want to hear from the public about what the public wants.” Rena Dein, Teens and Community Programs Supervisor, offers a Young Apprentice-Movie Magic summer camp for ages seven to twelve. This program uses a hands-on integrated approach that blends practical knowledge, arts and crafts, role-playing, guest speakers, the origin of filmmaking, and a weekly field trip. Participants will create a story, script, set, and produce a short film. The campers also find out why Charlie

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Chaplin is still funny and how Broncho Billy became the first cowboy movie star. For information and registration for Recreation classes, go to www.RegeRec.com or the Community Services Dept., 3300 Capitol Avenue, Bldg. B, weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or call (510) 494-4300. On top of all this, the City of Fremont has partnered with the Fremont

Cultural Arts Council, using the Council’s pictures and research, to put information about art in public places in the city on the city’s website. To view, go to http:///www.fremont.gov/artmap. What about the other side of the street? How does all of the above fit with cultural arts courses taught locally by private individuals conducting business enterprises? There are about twenty listings in the yellow pages of the phone book for art, dance, and music instruction in Fremont. These businesses draw from the same population as the city.

Donna Dellaria, Artistic Director of Mission Dance, 42068 Osgood Road, has not noticed any impact. Mission Dance has been in business for thirty-four years teaching tap, jazz, and ballet. Dellaria says word of mouth, drive-bys, and the Internet bring in students; in addition, students do benefit performances for charitable organization fundraisers, which provide further exposure. Abrakadoodle, 2856 Washington Boulevard, teaches a variety of art forms to children two through twelve years of age. According to its website, Abrakadoodle’s instruction exceeds National Standards for Visual Arts Education requirements. Asked if the City’s recreational arts programs affect private cultural arts instructors, Director Ruth Yong thought that, yes, the City does have some impact. Between the many volunteer organizations augmenting the Fremont Unified School District curriculum, the courses available from the Community Services Department and through private enterprises, Fremont is a city filled with children and adults interested and active in the cultural arts. So what is it with cultural arts people? The diverse people of Fremont know that the cultural arts are satisfying, fun, and make their lives better, fuller, and happier.


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Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY OFFICER MARK DOYLE, MILPITAS PD SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD December 16 Officers responded to calls of shots being fired in the 37200 block of Olive Street at 11:11 p.m. Upon arrival it was learned that several rounds had been fired into an occupied residence. An adult male, age 25 who was inside the home suffered a minor, nonlife threatening bullet wound. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment and later released. There was at least one other adult inside the home that was not injured. During the initial investigation, the Department’s SWAT team was used to secure a residence where it was believed suspects in the crime were concealed. The initial investigation was handled by members of the Department’s Special Enforcement Team, Detectives and Patrol Officers. The Southern Alameda County Major Crimes Task Force has taken over the investigation as this incident is associated with gang activity. Any person with information to the incident is encouraged to contact the Southern Alameda County Major Crimes Task Force at (510) 477-1700, or information can be left anonymously on the Newark Police Department’s “Silent Witness” hotline at (510) 578-4000, extension 500. December 19 At 8:53 p.m., NPD units responded to the Del Taco (Jarvis Avenue) on a report of an intoxicated male who stopped in his vehicle in the drive thru. Officers arrested 51 year-old Newark resident Bradley Wharton for DUI. Wharton was cited and released. Officers arrested 26 year-old San Francisco resident Agustina Herrera at 9:46 p.m. for shoplifting at JC Penney’s. Herrera was cited and released. Newark resident David Lucas was arrested at Sycamore and the railroad tracks at 10:47 p.m. for being under the influence of a central nervous system stimulant. Lucas was booked at Fremont Jail.

December 21 Officers had a busy night at the NewPark Mall dealing with several arrests of shoplifters including Dereck Fenk, age 18 (Fremont) for petty theft at the JC Penney store. While Shanani Powell, age 28, Laurie Bardell, age 22 & Altina Dotson, age 22 (all of Richmond) were arrested for petty theft at the Burlington Coat Factory. At 10:27 p.m., officers investigated a residential burglary investigation on Bayonne Drive that occurred on December 19. Residents reviewed their home surveillance system and discovered their 17-year-old neighbor stealing a bicycle out of their garage. The juvenile suspect admitted to stealing the bicycle, promptly returned it and promised to repair some damage he had done to it. The juvenile suspect was arrested, reprimanded and released to his parents. Officers responded to the Hilton Hotel lobby at 2:55 a.m. where Jesse Katches, age 23 (Auburn) was creating a disturbance. Katches was arrested for being under the influence of a controlled substance and booked at Santa Rita Jail. Officers investigated a residential burglary that occurred at a residence on Cypress Point Drive at 7:35 p.m. – northwest area of the city. A witness reported seeing a suspect described as a “slender black male adult” running from the victim’s backyard prior to the police being called. Another witness reported a suspicious 25 year-old black female, 5’07” tall, 145 lbs. selling cleaning products door-to-door about 30 minutes prior to the burglary. Please be on the lookout, keep your windows and doors locked and notify the Police Department if you see any suspicious activity in your neighborhood. Call 911 for immediate response or any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

The Milpitas Police Department would like to remind members and guests of our community to review the following tips to reduce the likelihood that you become a victim of crime as we prepare for and enter the holiday celebrations. Cars: Do not leave gifts or other valuables in plain view inside the passenger compartment of your vehicle. Glass breaks easily. Gifts left unattended and in plain view are frequently stolen. Secure valuables in the trunk or in covered cargo areas of your vehicle prior to your final parking maneuver. If you bring gifts back to your car and wish to continue shopping, move your car to another parking space. This way thieves won’t see you hiding valuables in your car and walking away. If possible, park in well-traveled and well-lit areas. Activate your car alarm. Driving: Use increased caution while driving, especially with fog, wet roadways, and around shopping centers. Be sure to use a sober driver if celebrations include adult beverages. Do not engage or challenge reckless drivers. Do not further provoke any acts of road rage, vandalism, or assault. The safety of you and your family is far more important than defending your pride against a total stranger. Call 9-1-1, report the reckless driver to police, and provide a description and license plate if possible. Homes: Lock your doors. Lock your windows. Set your burglar alarm. Communicate with a trusted neighbor when you will be away from home and look out for each other. Milpitas residents may call MPD and sign up for a Vacation House Check during extended trips. Immediately call 9-1-1 or 586-2400 if you see or hear anything suspicious. If there is any possibility that a crime is in progress, you are witnessing suspicious behavior, or uncertain whether your incident is an emergency, you should call 9-1-1. Otherwise, any other concern should immediately be reported to on-duty personnel for proper response at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp The members of Milpitas Police Department bid everyone peace and joy during this holiday season. We encourage you all to enjoy your time with friends, family and neighbors during this special time of year.


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Killing of bin Laden voted top news story of 2011 continued from page 7

pound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Bin Laden was shot dead by one of the raiders, and within hours his body was buried at sea. -JAPAN'S TRIPLE DISASTER: A 9.0-magnitude earthquake off Japan's northeast coast in March unleashed a tsunami that devastated scores of communities, leaving nearly 20,000 people dead or missing and wreaking an estimated $218 billion in damage. The tsunami triggered the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl after waves knocked out the cooling system at a nuclear power plant, causing it to spew radiation that turned up in local produce. About 100,000 people evacuated from the area have not returned to their homes. -ARAB SPRING: It began with demonstrations in Tunisia that rapidly toppled the longtime strongman. Spreading like a wildfire, the Arab Spring protests sparked a revolution in Egypt that ousted Hosni Mubarak, fueled a civil war in Libya that climaxed with Moammar Gadhafi's death, and fomented a bloody uprising in Syria against the Assad regime. Bahrain and Yemen also experienced major protests and unrest. -EU FISCAL CRISIS: The European Union was hit with relentless fiscal turmoil. In Greece, austerity measures triggered strikes, protests and riots, while Italy's economic woes toppled Premier Silvio Berlusconi. France and Germany led urgent efforts to ease the debt

crisis; Britain balked at proposed changes. -US ECONOMY: By some measures, the U.S. economy gained strength as the year progressed. Hiring picked up a bit, consumers were spending more, and the unemployment rate finally dipped below 9 percent. But millions of Americans remained buffeted by foreclosures, joblessness and benefit cutbacks, and investors were on edge monitoring the chain of fiscal crises in Europe. -PENN STATE SEX ABUSE SCANDAL: One of America's most storied college football programs was tarnished in a scandal that prompted the firing of Hall of Fame football coach Joe Paterno. One of his former assistants, Jerry Sandusky, was accused of sexually molesting 10 boys; two senior Penn State officials were charged with perjury; and the longtime president was ousted. Paterno wasn't charged, but expressed regret he didn't do more after being told there was a problem. -GADHAFI TOPPLED IN LIBYA: After nearly 42 years of mercurial and often brutal rule, Moammar Gadhafi was toppled by his own people. Anti-government protests escalated into an eight-month rebellion, backed by NATO bombing, that shattered his regime, and Gadhafi finally was tracked down and killed in the fishing village where he was born. -FISCAL SHOWDOWNS IN CONGRESS: Partisan divisions in Congress led to several showdowns on fiscal issues. A fight over the debt ceiling

prompted Standard & Poor's to strip the U.S. of its AAA credit rating. Later, the so-called ``supercommittee'' failed to agree on a deficit-reduction package of at least $1.2 trillion - potentially triggering automatic spending cuts of that amount starting in 2013. -OCCUPY WALL STREET PROTESTS: It began Sept. 17 with a protest at a New York City park near Wall Street, and within weeks spread to scores of communities across the U.S. and abroad. The movement depicted itself as leaderless and shied away from specific demands, but succeeded in airing its complaint that the richest 1 percent of Americans benefit at the expense of the rest. As winter approached, local police dismantled several of the protest encampments. -GABRIELLE GIFFORDS SHOT: The popular third-term congresswoman from Arizona suffered a severe brain injury when she and 18 other people were shot by a gunman as she met with constituents outside a Tucson supermarket in January. Six people died, and Giffords' painstaking recovery is still in progress. Among the news events falling just short of the Top 10 were the death of Apple Inc. cofounder Steve Jobs, Hurricane Irene, the devastating series of tornados across Midwest and Southeastern U.S., and the repeal of the ``don't ask, don't tell'' policy that barred gays from serving openly in U.S. military.

December 23, 2011 continued from page 27

Walmart Foundation grants zations that have created solutions aimed at addressing the hunger and health epidemics here in the Bay Area.” Hope 4 the Heart, a food bank located in Cherryland, an unincorporated area of Alameda County, will use its grant of $26,338 to purchase a new forklift. The new equipment will help move the thousands of pallets of perishable and non-perishable donations the organization provides to soup kitchens, schools, and nonprofit agencies that feed the hungry. “The new forklift will allow us to handle the products more efficiently and get them to the thousands of families in the Bay Area who face the greatest need,” said Victoria Popejoy of Hope 4 the Heart. “We are grateful to the Walmart Foundation for helping us accomplish our mission of alleviating hunger and improving nutrition.” The Downtown Oakland YMCA, a branch of the YMCA of the East Bay was granted $25,000 in order to establish the Y Camp Food Revolution, which will provide 500 healthy meals and 500 healthy snacks to every camper and camp counselor all summer long. This is in an overall effort to combat the spread of obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease through proper nutrition and increased physical activity. "We are so appreciative that the Walmart Foundation has joined in our efforts to turn the tide against the obesity epidemic. This grant will help solidify our partnership with Revolution Foods to ensure that every child's camp experience will be enriched with nutritious food and a space to learn about healthy living," said Kathleen Gushoney, Executive Director of the Downtown Oakland YMCA. Girls Inc. of Alameda County also received $25,000 to start a new program called the "Healthy Girls, Healthy Families Initiative" where girls are taught the importance of healthy eating, activity,

and the need for nutrient-rich fuel. By helping girls who are at risk for serious health problems due to weight or a primarily sedentary lifestyle, this program takes a stand against obesity and encourages a positive body image, confidence, and strong self-esteem. "We are excited to offer a program that will change the lives of young girls by fostering healthy habits that will continue for years to come. With the help of Walmart and the Walmart Foundation, girls and families in Alameda County will gain increased knowledge of healthy behaviors, have greater access to and will be more likely to choose fresh fruits/vegetables, and will build interest in and engage in more physical activity," stated Linda Boessenecker, CEO of Girls Incorporated of Alameda County. The contributions to these organizations were made possible through the Walmart Foundation’s California State Giving Program. Through this program, the Walmart Foundation supports organizations that create opportunities so people can live better. The Walmart Foundation State Giving Program strives to award grants that have a long-lasting, positive impact on communities across the U.S. In 2010, Walmart gave more than $21.6 million to California organizations, supporting nonprofits like Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley, GRID Alternatives, Alameda County Community Food Bank, Westcoast Children's Clinic, and JobTrain, Inc. To be considered for support, perspective grantee organizations must submit applications through the Walmart Foundation State Giving Program’s online grant application. Applicants must have a current 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status in order to meet the program’s minimum eligibility criteria. Additional information about the program’s funding guidelines and application process are available online at www.walmartfoundation.org/stategiving.


December 23, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tobacco program implementation

Page 35

Rotary supports Family Giving Tree

continued from page 4

In December 2010, Union City staff gave written notice of key dates and requirements of the new Ordinance along with a complete copy of Chapter 7.13 to more than 250 rental property owners and managers. Additional reminders were sent to approximately 30 property owners and managers responsible for more than 3,000 apartment units in April 2011 and again in December 2011.

Councilmember and Rotarian Debbie Giordano (l) with Milpitas Rotary President Doris Roth (r).

On February 23, 2012 smoking in a rental complex unit will be prohibited. Tobacco Retailer’s License Program Municipal Code (Chapter 5.42) was established to require a local Tobacco Retailer’s License. The local license enables business owners to be penalized for selling tobacco products to minors in addition to the sales clerk. The Tobacco Retailer’s License Program requires completion of an application and payment of $665 annually by any person / business that sells tobacco in Union City. This is in addition to any applicable Business License Taxes owed. Complete program information is at www.UnionCity.org/TRL.html. There are currently 49 tobacco retailers in Union City; this number is not expected to increase substantially as new restrictions on location make it more difficult to open a business selling tobacco. New tobacco retailers are required to be located 1,000 feet from any “sensitive uses,” which include parks, playgrounds, public libraries, recreation centers, religious institutions, schools or youth-oriented establishments. All current tobacco retailers are “grandfathered” with regard to location. On December 8, 2011, staff sent billing and program information to all 49 tobacco retailers informing them of the program requirements and asking for the return of a completed application and payment by January 13, 2012. Staff expects most to respond accordingly but those who do not, or fail to submit materials and payment in a timely manner, will lose their “grandfathered” status and may be required to cease tobacco retailing operations. Some retailers have complied already. Tobacco Retail Licenses will be issued by staff after payment and internal review. The Police Department expects to begin full enforcement of this program in February / March 2012.

(l-r): Rotarians John Jay, Deanna Melen and Darshan Shah sorting and stocking plush pillow animals in the Family Giving Tree Store area.

Family Giving Tree’s "Queen Elf" Jennifer Cullenbine in one of the rooms full of unsorted, unwrapped gifts.

SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT Milpitas Rotarians and student Interacters from Milpitas High and Cal Hills High volunteered on December 19, 2011 at Family Giving Tree located in the former Milpitas Mervyn's building.

Residents Academy Program SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL The County of Santa Clara Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to approve the creation of a new informational program based on the model of Citizens Academies across the country. The purpose of the program is to raise public awareness of County government roles and services, promote civic engagement and residents’ participation in County governance, and provide answers to basic questions that residents need to know. County of Santa Clara Government 101 is designed as a ten-week course with a range of topics, including: Know Your County which describes how the County is organized, what is its mission and key mandates; All About Taxes where the comes from and where it goes; Keeping the Community Safe which will include a tour of a correctional facility; Justice at Work covering the District Attorney and Public Defender roles and tour of the state of the art Crime Lab; Supporting Community which focuses on County’s roles in caring for children, seniors and families in need; Protecting Environment and Consumers; 24/7 Community Service such as Fire, Roads, and 911 center; Healthy Communities features award winning medical and health care programs; Get Involved will cover opportunities to volunteer or serve in advisory roles; and finally The End of the Road and Graduation. “SCCGov 101 is a great opportunity for residents who want to know more about what we do at the County,” said Supervisor Liz Kniss, District 5, who championed the program. “I suspect that there will be more demand than seats available.” The 10-week program will take place on Tuesday evenings, for 2.5 hours. One half-day session will be held on a Saturday. The Board also conceptually approved a nominal fee to cover materials cost, with a waiver for hardship and asked staff to explore creating a telecast of the sessions, so that more people will be able to participate. Details for the application process will be posted on the County website www.sccgov.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187

December 23, 2011

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


December 23, 2011 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

December 23, 2011

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


December 23, 2011

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

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RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV2011-12-23  

Tri City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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